Single Letter

HAM/1/15/2/31

Volume of copies of letters from Mary Hamilton to Charlotte Margaret Gunning

Diplomatic Text


37.[1]
                                                         (1
Novbr. 5th. 1784 Bulstrode Park -- I am going on prosperously
wth. Coxe in being 355 Page of ye. 2d Vol.[2] -- sometimes he
amuses me, sometimes informs me, & sometimes
makes me yawn, he is I believe to be depended upon,
as there appears an air of veracity in every thing he
relates, what court he pays to the Empress of
Russia
?[3] The Man was in the right for I suppose
he had in view returning to that Country, where
he is now gone with Mr. Whitebread (the great
Brewer
s Son) -- They are to travel Through the
Northern Courts & Mr. W: allows Mr. Coxe £800
per An: besides paying all travelling & other expences
Dear Mr. Bryant was here the other day &
told us a curious characteristic anecdote of
Lord Pembroke. -- we all know He left Lady Pembroke
when their daughter was dying & ran away
with a Dancer to Italy,[4] -- As soon as he
heard poor Lady Charlotte was dead -- of whom he
always affected to be very fond -- he wrote to Lady
Pembroke
& said that as she had had the misfor-
tune
of losing her Daughter he desired she would
receive a natural Daughter of his, -- that she was
very handsome, & a charming Girl & would console
her
that her company would console her for the
loʃs she had sustained. It is said Lady P:
has consented to receive this young Woman under
her her protection & that she is expected in
England this Month



30.
July 27th. 1784 There are few People remaining in Town
I care Much abt. The Dʃs. of Ancaster gives Balls, as
does Lady North at Bushey Park -- others too I have
                                                         heard of



2)
of & been invited too, but as I was not interested, I
neither went nor made inquiries abt. them. I live
entirely with Lord & Lady Stormont, she is not yet
brought to bed, the first 10 days of her confinement,
I shall go to Mrs: Walshingham's at Thames Ditton.
I shall remain in London both as Lady Stormont's ------
& my Uncle Sir Wm. Hamilton's. x I have just finished
the second Vol: of Madame Genlis's[5] Veillées du Chateau,[6]


How do you like her Adêle et Theodore &c ?[7]
I allow she has genius & imagination but I do not
approve her method of instructing Children -- ye.
oldest of wch. is 7 10 -- ye. youngest 7 years old; --
More of this another time. Consistency, Consistency,
my dear! even if I must be as odious to you
as a croaking Raven, -- I must repeat, as long
as I continue to love you as I now do, &
cannot help doing. Alas! poor human Nature, how
easily led astray, by even what we in the sober
sadneʃs of reflecting moments most heartily
despise, -- why will you, -- how can you aʃsociate
with Ladies D——[8] &c &c &c. you must know it
is wrong, else why I am I desired to conceal it from others --
and why do you praise my resolution for keep-
ing
steadily to my purpose in refusing invitations
to such Houses of ------diʃsipation,, pardon me if I also say
of profligate infamy & vice -- With The Poet Young
I say to you my Dear
      Vice seen to is a Monster of such frightful mien
      as to be hated, needs but to be seen,
      yet seen too oft, familiar with her face,
                             we first endure, then pity, then embrace.
[9]



                                                         3
Queen's Lodge Windsor 8th. Janry 1782
22 x I have just heard that their Majesties go to ye. Play tomorrow, I
will therefore put off dining at your House tomorrow as I
know that the night you go to ye. Play, in attendance, you
dine with your Sisters The Maids of Honor at yourtheir
Table. I leave it to you to make a polite & proper
excuse to Sir Robert Gunning -- I shall merely get
a glimpse of you This time for we return to Windsor
on Friday, but the next excursion we make, will be
the last for some time -- most probably till Easter --
The Queen had ------------ me the honor of coming to
my apartment (when I was writing I was interrupted
writing to you by hearing the Queens voice, she did
me the honor & pleasure to bring her work & sat
with me a long time in friendly converse -- I find
by her, The Princeʃs Royal does not go to The Play
Therefore I shall not, as I expected, gain an Evg. -- x
I have got through Lucian, have you? --


8.
East Bourne
July 23d. 1780 I went to Beachey head, would I could con-
vey
to you the sensations of my mind on ye. sight of ye
Stupendous scene mademore awful than any idea I could
have formed -- I believe I mentioned before, having
seen these Cliffs -- but then I had not seen them to
advantage ye. same advantage, as the tide had prevented
our going far enough -- x You tell me you love me
more than ever -- I feel gratefully sensible -- You
warn me to guard against the Queen -- Ah my Dr-
why so? I know she is good & amiable, I have
always loved her since I knew her, & if she has true
friendship for me, wch. I think, & hope she has, -- it
surely must be - perfectly disinterested. I well
know mine for her is & ever shall be so.
If you do not believe this -- You know me not
                                                         Adieu my Dr. frd- x



4/
24x The fatigue of standing upwards of 3 hours last night, as
we did not play at Cards, has made me paʃs a very bad
sleepleʃs night, I am not yet up but I roused myself to
send you the earliest intelligence that her Majesty ordered
me to advise you to use Leeches to your gums, she
said they would prove a certain remedy -- Mrs: C: did so yesterday
& it removed the pain she had suffered for 10 days. x
St. James's Palace 1782


9. East Bourne August the 14th 1780
I took a pleasant ride of 12 Miles yesterday afternoon
Mr. Farhill was my Esquire, we attended my kind
Friends who came here on purpose to visit me in
their way to Tunbridge -- viz: Miʃs W: King -- Mrs- Genl-
Tryon
, her Daughter, & Mrs: Leland -- I was not the
least tired wch: I should have been had I walked only
two miles -- Mrr. F: has been so obliging to get me
some franks for you from his Brother in Law Coll.
Tuffnel
-- he appears an amiable young Man --
indeed I think both Mr: Fisher & himself are equally
deserving -- they are great friends wch: is a happy cir-
cumstance
-- for they have an insolent overbearing
Man to deal with in the Governor, who is better
calculated for a negro driver[10] than the situation he
is in -- The Man however is not unpleasant in
his manners to Ladies, or his superiors -- he has
seen much of the world & lived in good society, -- & he
enlivens conversation by anecdotes. He told me he was
wth. Lord Townsend when Ld. Lieutenant in Ireland -- I
believe Aid de Camp. He also went to Italy &c. with the
                             rich Young Pelham.



                                                         5
x
5.4.
8th. June 1780 Friday Eveg I expect you early tomorrow Morng. --
what times what dreadful times, what horrid Riots[11] --
The Dear King! how does he shine like a constellation, but I
should say like a true Christian -- I am firmly persuaded
Lord George Gordon is insane -- my heart has ached too
much for me to put pen to paper -- twenty times
have I begun writing to you -- I hope you have been
happier than myself -- we go to Eastbourne at 5
o Clock on Monday Morng. Her Majesty kindly wished
(this a secre-t) to detain me with her, but as
she had told Lady Charlotte Finch she should chuse
either to have Miʃs Goldsworthy or myself, & Lady
Charlotte
chusing me, I am to go -- yet the Queen
was affectionately pleased, as she told me she thought
Sea air & Bathing would do me good & she should
have great pleasure in corresponding with me
I wish I could convince you that the Queen has real
sensibility -- x


      x
15.
23d S.                Eastbourne
23d. Sepbr. 1780         An expreʃs arrived this Morng. that
her Majesty was safely delivered of a Son -- the
Princeʃs Royal
wrote me a kind letter also of infor-
mation
-- I hear we are to leave this place in
11 days -- do not my lovely friend let your
family
jarring take such hold of your spirits
Pardon me, but I think you all seem to
contrive to torment each other -- wch. is most
strange as you are so extremely, & I may
say, so uncommonly attached. x





6)
St. James's Palace 1st. Janry 1782 -- It is not in my power to go to
21. you this Morng -- let me know how you do, & if ye. pain in yr-
face is gone. It will afford me great happineʃs to know
the new Year smiles upon you, & that you enter upon it
in Health & spirits -- May you, from henceforth, enjoy
every happineʃs Virtue & goodneʃs merit, & which
I think you deserve -- I hope our friendship will
continue in this world, & when we quit it may we
hope to meet in the next, & may we merit that
Heaven wch. is the reward of the righteous.
                             tenderly Yours
                                Mary Hamilton


5.
East Bourne Suʃsex
8th June 1780

I told you I had seen Herts Herstmonceu-x
it is about 10 Miles from hence, we did not
rail at the ravages of time, but at the mean wretch
who destroyed this noble Pile of Building, far from the
time of Henry the 6th- till within these 4 Years it was
in habitable repair, nothing but the outside walls
are left standing wch: while they last will be a Mon-
ument
of shame to Mr: Hare[12] -- it is situated in a fine
Park well wooded, the Ground is finely disposed, &
a view of the great Ocean crowns the prospect, the
Present owner
has just finished a Modern House[13]
near this once Noble Castellated Masion with its
Materials -- the Architect they told me was Mr-
Samuel Wyatt
-- a Man in Vogue:
Herstmonceux was built by Sir Roger Fiennes
in 1423. The dimensions of a most noble lofty spacious Room
is still to be traced. Addison wrote his comedy of the



                                                         7
Drummer or Haunted House[14] when on a Visit ------to this
Mansion -- a suitable place to create such ideas --
The ancient Furniture & curious carved wood-
work
of this room is in the new House.


11.
East Bourne
August 31st. 1780 I feel so much for you my Dr. friend
that I sincerely regret I cannot be
with you & aʃsist you in attendance on your worthy
Father
-- I hope your Sister is very attentive, but
I ought not to doubt it, as I believe she has a good,
& an affectionate heart -- & it is at such a time
when one feels -- how much we love -- how much
we owe -- how much we should lose -- endeavour
Dear friend to keep up your spirits, I know you
will from every right & good motive.x I told you
in my last of our having been a little excursion --
it was to Ashburnham, the Seat of Lord Ashburn-
ham
's abt. 14 Miles from hence -- a very fine situ-
ation
-- the Park is 7 Miles in circumference --
the Ground finely disposed by Nature, and highly
improved by 15 years labour & skill of Mr-
Browne
-- I dare not presume to say that If
I was the employer of Brown I should suggest
some alterations wch. would be more accordant to my ideas of
picturesque beauty -- but I may say to you
that I think my great Uncle Charles Hamiltons
taste would have made this place more renowned
for true simplicityx &c &c &c -- The views from
many parts the views are extensive -- they told
us one might see to the distance of 60 miles --
                                                         there are



8.
there are charming rides through the Park, --
Water -- &c &c, & a Noble view of the Sea on
wch. are easily distinguished Veʃsels sailing, with-
out
the aʃsistance of Glaʃses, & to crown the scene
the Downs rising to the CloudsSky, we had a distinct
view of the Grand ruins of Battle-Abbey, wch-
appeared but two miles distant -- I believe it is
four -- I regretted we could not go to it -- It is
memorable for being raised upon the Spot where
Harolds Body was found, by William stiled ye-
Conqueror, as a pretended attonement for the
horrid quantity of human Blood shed in that encounter.
I am informed Battle Abbey Called the Conquerors Abbey[15] (Built by William.) is charmingly
situated, it belongs to Sir George Webster,[16] &
it is now partly inhabited by a LWidow Lady
Webster
. It was pointed to our observation,
at no great distance, an eminence called
Standard Hill, the place where William the
invader, or Conqueror
, erected his Standard
on landing. The Abbey was one of the most magni-
ficent
edifices of that kind in England -- It was
reduced to a wreck by the furious zeal of the Reformers
The Gates I am told remain, which are very grand.
xIn Ashburnham Church is kept the Shirt the
unfortunate Charles ye first wore the day he was
beheaded, & the Sheet wch: covered his body. An
Ancestor of Lord Ashburnham
was Groom of the Bed-
chamber
to the King, & out of attachment contrived to
get & preserve them. The shirt is what we should
                                                         think



                                                         9.
think very coarse Linnen -- it has a Vandyke falling
down collar similar to what we see in the Portraits
of this Monarch -- & of the costume of that time --
it is curiously ornamented with variety of stiches in
needlework by some skillful sempstreʃs, or perhaps
Sailor -- N:B: not in colors but white Thread. I like-
wise
saw the Kings watch wch he gave his faithful
Friend & Servant, Mr. Ashburnham, the morning of
his execution -- it is finely enameled in colors
withing (on Gold) withing & without. -- has no glaʃs
but shuts up like a Box.         I saw the Dairy
wch. I admired -- it is well furnished with fine
Old Delf, China &c -- in it is a Milk Pail, called
Queen Elizabeths, it was brought from Greenwich --
it is a pretty round small pail of white wood,
with a round plain silver handle, & broad rims
of Silver, encircle the top & bottom of the pail,
These rims are engraved, & there are arms -- but
not those of Elizabeth -- but like those belonging
to the Shirley's.x -- The House suits the situation,
The Rooms are Large, Light, & handsome; -- the
furniture neither old, nor very modern, nor elegant.
Lord Ashburnham had intentions of new furnish-
ing
it, but poor Ly: A's miserable state of
health preventing her being so distant from medical
advice in London makes him defer it; -- I
was obliged to leave Ashburnham without seeing
the Gardens wch. I regret -- I hear they are in ye.
stile of his Majesties at Richmond -- but wth. greater
natural advantages.



10)
1. x
March 24th- 1780 -- To what my friend am I to attri-
bute
your extroadinary change of manner & cold-
neʃs
towards me, it was your Father & yourself
who courted my acquaintance -- I by no means
sought yours -- you may remember you both engaged
Miʃs Tryon to bring you to my apartments at St-
James's -- Your Father almost with tears intreated
I would let you be rank'd among the number of
my friends & I recollect paid me many fine
compts. on ye. character he had heard of me &c &c --
You have ever since (till your return from Bath) --
expreʃsed in the warmest terms that I was,
(excepting Sr: Rt: your Brother, & Sister) the dearest
to your heart of any other human being, & from
the extroadinary proofs, of yourby the confidence, you
placed in me I really thought I was.
You are become a votary to diʃsipation & I
lament to observe you now aʃsociate with per-
sons
I shun, & whose conduct you have condem̅ed,
It is not the first time I have been disappoint-
ed
-- but I am not yet grown calous, & I own I am
wounded; -- In you I expected to find steadineʃs
of character superiour to those Moths whom
it is easy to predict will soon or late fall victims
to dangers they seem to court.

2.
24th: March 1780 I am very sorry to receive so bad an
account of your Health & spirits, one should im-
agine
the diʃsipation you are so constantly
                                                         engaged in



                                                         (11
in would rouse the latter, however prejudicial it may & must be it may be to the
former. Mrs: Vesey desired me to ask you to go to
her on Saturday Eveg -- she is removed to their new
House in Clarges Street -- if you have no objection
to meet any thing so stupid & sober as myself,
I will make a point of being there for otherwise
I despair of seeing you as our time draws near
for my quitting Town -- with Their Majesties -- the 3
elder Princes
Pʃs: Royal & Augusta -- we go on
Sunday and are to Windsor & shall not return till
Wednesday sennight -- The rest of ye. Royal Children
remain in Town wth. Ly C—— Miʃs G—— &c &c as
usual -- Adieu you will ever find me the same.

My excellent friends Mr. Smelt, Mrs: Carter,
&c Breakfast with me tomorrow.
x
3.
24th. March 1780
You think my note cruel & unkind, & I felt
even more than I expreʃsed -- I require nothing
more of you my Dr. friend than that you will be
consistent -- let your own mind be the guide
of your own actions -- I did not doubt but that
you had an affection for me, but I am too
honest not to say, that it appeared to me, in
proportion as you seemed to court the notice
& acquaintance of ye. Great the Daʃshers of the
haut-ton you shrank from me -- I have had such
painful proofs of ye. mutability of ye. human heart
that I did not condemn you, but regretted my loʃs,
-- hence I justify my expreʃsion, & make it



12)
it agreeable to my feelings ie. “That I should
always be the same” Come to me at ½ past ten
o'clock tomorrow Morng -- Adieu I have only time
to add that I embrace you with tenderneʃs and
      sincerity
                             Mary Hamilton

      I am delighted with your Hungarian, 'tis from the
conversation of such persons one gains what Books
cannot teach. -- I wish you would keep away from
such crowded dinner parties -- I do not wonder, with
your very delicate health, that they make you ill!
The variety also of smells, & particularly at the
German Tables you mention -- A Dish of smoking
Sour Crout will at any time affect one sufficiently
to overcome all desire of eating for that day, though
it was often at my Father's Table, I never could
endure it -- The worthy Genl Freytag has tried to
bribe me various ways to relish it but without
suc̅eʃs we are great friends, but I think I shoud
be still a greater favorite wth him could I conquer
my dislike to Sour Crout.x



                                                         (13
x
12.
Lady Betty Comptons Gardens, Eastbourne
Sea Seat Septr. 4th. 1780
You will my Dear perceive from whence this is
dated that I was detirmined this post should
not depart without a few lines to you -- Lady
Charlotte Finch
remained at her own Lodgings
to write letters, -- Princeʃs Elizabeth & my sweet
engaging Child Princeʃs Sophia are playing about
like innocent Butterflies in the Sun, & culling the
wild flowers on the Graʃs, whilst I am watching
them, & yet scribbling to you, to prevent your
thinking any occupation either of duty, or pleasure,
or diʃsipation could render me unmindful that
you was not well, I earnestly wish you would
see our attentive, kind & skilful Doct. Turton
oftener, it may be extremely improper for you
to continue, for any length of time, medicines, or
even the Bath water -- change of prescription
may be requisite, & you, by continuing to take
what might behave been beneficial a month ago, you are,
perhaps doing yourself great injury. -- I am like-
wise
very much concerned for Sir Robt. Gunning --
& sincerely glad Dr Jebb attends him, though the
Physician from R.
might be a skilful man, he
hads not ye. same chance of being of service to him,
Dr Jebb, on the contrary, by knowing his consti-
tution
can prescribe with greater certainty. I
hope my Dear to have a few lines from you
without fail, by return of post -- Mrs. Fielding, to
                                                         the



14)
great happineʃs of the proud Parent, was safely
brought to bed of a Son on the 31st.. Lady Charlotte
had an expreʃs with this most welcome intelligence,
Mrs. Fielding never was so well before, my most
dear & amiable friend Lady Dartrey, & herMrs Fieldings worthy
Aunt Lady Louisa Clayton were with her at the
time, & the latter is to be with her till she is
recovered. Lady Charlotte Finch has been very
anxious about her favorite Daughter &, entre
nous, thought it no small hardship that she
was not excused by her Majesty attending the
Princeʃs Elizabeth, &c to Eastbourne, &
though I so very highly respect & love Lady
Charlotte Finch
, I must say I think as
she enjoys such great pecuniary advantages
& ------ for herself, & family, from the
King
& Queen, & has been so greatly considered,
it is to be regretted she does not exert
herself more for the advantage of the Royal
children
, &c &c. You will rejoice for me when
I inform you my friends Lord & Lady Dartrey
are arrived at East-bourne, as there will not
be any impropriety in their visiting their
Royal Highneʃs's
, & joining our parties, I
shall have the heart felt comfort of seeing
them often -- I hope I shall be able to per-
suade
them to remain as long as we shall --
They have their sweet Girl with them



                                                         (15
I had a most gracious & affectionate little letter
from the Queen on Saturday, she tells me it is the
last before we shall meet, -- that she wrote it in
my room, & reminds me of sitting with me there
last year -- The Princeʃs Royal & Miʃs Goldsworthy
have had an open rupture (this must be sacred)
I think them both to blame -- Miʃs Goldsworthy is
most praiseworthy and indefatigable in the duties
of her station, but she wants softneʃs of
temper & manner -- nor do I think her either
qualified by education or Birth to be Sub-
Governeʃs
to the Daughter of a Monarch. --
I have a most sincere affection for her, notwithstanding --
& flatter myself she regards me equally.
Mr. Edwin Stanhope -- my perpetual torment,
has taken it into his strange pate to send
me such a Volume of incomprehensible jargon
-- five pages of Verse, & as much in prose,
we will laugh over it when we meet -- I never
answer his letters, & very often do not read
them havg many packets by me unsealed.
      Adieu the wind blows my paper about --
& my Dear Children wish me to play wth-
them -- I have scribbled so rapidly I fear
you can can hardly decypher what I have
written.
      Ever the same towards you
                             Mary Hamilton
Remember me kindly to Sr. Robert -- Your
Br.
& Sister.
+




16)
x 18th. Septr. 1780 Eastbourne
14. I am grateful for the scrap you sent me my friend,
God grant you may soon be enabled to write longer
letters -- I hear Miʃs Tryon is ill, & suffers much --
I trust your resentment is softened, for though
you might be offended, your superiour sense &
the uncommon advantages of education for a female wch your Father gave
you, ought to raise your ideas above such
miserable trifles. I think her Majesty will
never be brought to Bed[17] -- no account from
Windsor to day. A shocking & most awful
event happened yesterday -- My nerves are still
too much agitated for me to give you any
regular acct. -- A Thunder storm, 2 persons were
killed by Lighttning Lightning, & a 3d. much wounded,[18]
It was miraculous from the situation of our
House that we escaped -- those also that Prince
Edward
, & Lady Charlotte Finch occupied
waswere in the direct line    Adieu the Post waits --
                                                         Your true Friend
                                                            Mary Hamilton

13.
7th. Septr.. 1780 -- —— writes to me that the Ducheʃs
of Argyle
& her Daughter Lady Augusta are constant
in their attendance on Windsor Terrace, which
I much wonder at, as her Majesty does not invite
them them to her Evening parties -- surely this
must be particulary mortifying to the Ducheʃs --
I must own, in confidence to you, I do not think
the Queen to blame, as the Dʃs.'s manners towards
her



                                                         (17
her -- (I grieve to say it, for she has invariably been
attentive & kind -- & I may say, affectionate, to me
wch. she said she owed, whenever I expreʃsed my
acknowledgments, for my Father's amiable
interference in persuading his Cousin The
Duke of Hamilton
to marry her -- of wch. she
has repeatedly told me the whole history)
this is a long par[enthesis] I repeat I grieve to
say the Dʃs. of A: manners towards the Queen
wch. I have been too often witneʃs to, has been
provokingly haughty, not to acknowledge, most
improperly & unprovokedly insolent.
      Adieu, my Dear, I have many other
letters to write -- Yours in true confidence,
                             & Sincerity
                                                         Mary Hamilton
x






18[19]
6.
East Bourne 15th June 1780
Our journey was very pleasant, the weather fine, the
Roads good, & the views beautiful, particularly from
East Grinstead to Ukfield, from whence the prospect
was more confined but the Fields were covered with
charming Verdure bounded by luxuriant Hedge-rows --
abt. 10 Miles from East-bourne it is barren flat, &
dreary. Nothing could exceed the loyalty of the people,
This circumstance after the recent melancholy confusion
& uproar in the Capital[20] was particularly pleasing, &
of course, highly gratifying to their Royal Highneʃs's.
every Town & Village through wch. we paʃsed shewed
testimony of respect & attention -- Bells ringing --
firing &c &c & the roads lined with people, who
strewed flowers & rushes, & flung Nosegays into the
Carriages, when we alighted at an Inn we were covered
with the flowers which the poor Women showerd over
us -- Prince Edwards Governor Mr Bruyeres re-
warded
them by throwing Silver -- & he gave money
at the Towns & Villages for the Bell ringers -- &c
abt 7 Miles from this place a large party of Men
on Horseback, some with their Wives & Daughters
behind them met the Royal Children & after giving
them 3 Chears turned their Horses & escorted
them to this Habitation, wch. was surrounded by
all the people of the neighbouring Villages -- The
Sailors on ye. Beach fired Cannon at intervals the
whole Eveg.. A large Cask of strong Beer was placed
there by Mr. Bruyeres orders & was emptied to the



                                                         (19
the Healths of the King & Royal Family --
all this was very cheering to ones spirits after
the horrid transactions in London. The reconciliation
of the King to the Dukes of Gloucester & Cumberland
is now made public, they were introduced on
Tuesday to the Princes & Princeʃs's with the restric
tion
that their Royal Highneʃs's were not to enquire
after the Ducheʃs's of Gloucester or Cumberland --
They are to be at the Drawing room to day, &
the Elder Princes are to meet them. I think
their is every appearance that we shall be very
comfortable here & spend our time agreeably.
I love Lady Charlotte Finch as if she were my
Mother & she is always most kind & affectionate
towards me
      Adieu. My best Compts. to Sr. R——
& love to Bell.
7.
June 1780
The Birth day[21] was celebrated here in the most
Loyal Manner -- Lady Mary, Miʃs Hume[22] & her
Brother
drank tea & played at Commerce with
their R: Highneʃs -- and Lady C Finch kept them
to sup with us
I have recd. the honor & gratification of another
Letter from the Queen -- she informed me she hdad
not seen any one I was interested about, except
yourself at the Drawing Room -- that you was
near Richmond & that your Father did not go
to Northamptonshire this Summer. Mrs: Fielding
writes word Lord E. has been laughed out of his intention, of



20/
marrying L MW.[23] by his gay companions reminding
him of his former declarions declarations never to
marry -- Lady Egermont will be hurt, for she told the
Queen
how happy & pleased she was wth. the intended
match & that her Son would marry.[24]
                             Adieu my Dr.
                                                         MH
East Bourne
17th. August 1780
10. Mr. B. has written you a Note which I inclose --
he read it to me -- he is not amiable but he imagines
I am the dupe to his external appearance --
Mr: Fisher & Mr: Farhill are very ill treated by
him, so are all Prince Edwards Domestic's, he is
quite hated by them & I fear deservedly so.
I want you to apply to your Father in my name
for the relief of a poor Widow Gentlewoman, I am
raising a subscription -- your F.ather desired I would
never would scruple applying to him for objects of real
distreʃs -- when we meet, if he wished it, I will tell
him her name. It is sufficient for the present to
inform him her Husband was a Clergyman, he died
abt. a Month ago, & left an amiable beautiful Wife
with 6 Children -- from a variety of circumstances,
chiefly I am told illneʃs they had been sometime
deeply involved in debt. The Creditors are now
in poʃseʃsion of all she has, this stroke added to
the loʃs of an affectionate Husband has overwhelmd
her. I leave it to you my Dr. friend to plead for
my poor Widow.      I hear there were 500 people
                                                         at



                                                         (21
at the Duke of Leeds's Ball at Tunbridge on
the 12th- Tunbridge is quite full -- I have not heard
any thing respecting the Drawing room on the 12th --
your not having written last post makes me fear
you are worse than you represented yourself to be.

16.
Windsor -- Queens
Upper Lodge
Octbr. 23d. 1780 I have not my Dr. had a quarter of
hour to myself since we parted --
I am now sitting with my door locked
to prevent intrusion, & the post I fear will go out
again, without a letter from me if I do not make
haste I thank God you are so well & that we shall
have the comfort of meeting in a few days, I have
not seen Mrs. Walsingham since you left Windsor,
but have just recd a Note from her, she will be in
Town tomorrow & will tell you its contents.
Miʃs Goldsworthy has a bad Cold, I have therefore
been obliged to walk to & from the Lower Lodge --
to the Younger Princeʃs's -- &c I am not yet
the worse for it, but I never can nor never could
bear the fatigue of much walking -- this is
not to be wondered at, as my Mother never
hardly let me walk -- the only excercise I took
was in Carriages & sometimes on Horseback --
Prince Frederick will soon go to Hanover -- Coll.
Granville
, aid de Camp to his Majesty, came here
yesterday to receive his orders -- he is to attend the
Prince
also Coll. Malortie, who has been in England
about a week -- Coll. Granvilles manners are
very engaging & Gentleman like. The Prince of
Wales
will lose his Governors at the same time.
                                                         & have



22/
have an establishment, but will remain at the
Queens House in Town till he is 21. The Duke of
Cumberland
was here on Sunday Eveg, he was remark-
ably
polite & attentive to me -- but far otherwise
to ——, wch: she was foolish enough to be piqued
at -- The reason I suppose why he honored me
with his prate was his acquaintance with so
many of my relations &c Tuesday the 31st. is
fixed for the Christening -- Monday we go to Town --
In the Morng we are all to go to the Cathedral, as
His Majesty and his Sons are to make their
offering before they quit Windsor therefore we shall
not be very early in Town -- I am obliged to say
Farewell -- M: H:
17.
20 August 1781
Queens Upper Lodge
Windsor

                             (To ye. Honble. Miʃs G: Horton)
      I saw Mrs. Walsingham on Friday Eveg.
      my Dr: frd. she desired me to tell you
      she expects you to visit her on your
return delay not then to write to her & fix the time.
take care to be with her the week there is no Drawing
Room that I may not be absent -- I hope Miʃs Goldsworthy will be recovered
by that time & then we can meet -- for then I have
from 7 till 11 three Evegs. in the week -- that is if
I do not go with her M: & Pʃs: R: & A: to Kew &
when things go on in a regurlar train. The Féte
in the Castle was charming -- The Supper was in
St. Georges Hall & put one in mind of descriptions in
The Tales of the Genie, the illuminations & decorations
of the Tables was so brilliant -- I have not time
                                                         to describe



                                                         (23
my dear loved friend Lady Dartrey is now under
this Roof & will remain till the King returns -- he
is expected on Wednesday. I believe I once before
told you it was my doing that her Majesty became
acquainted with Lady Dartrey I was certain
she would like her & admire her character & manners
                             In great haste ever Yours
                                                         Mary Hamilton
How poor Dr: Lady Wake has been disappointed!
she went to see her friend at Chelsea & arrivedgot
there just as the Queens invitation arrived --
She came here on Friday -- I have not yet been able
to have 5 Minutes conversation with her alone.
19.
31 Octbr 1781
Queens Lodge Windsor
      Wednesday night ¼ before 12 -- the busineʃs
      of the day is over, Princeʃs Royal is in
      bed & I must also hasten to mine as I sleep
in the same room -- but I will steal a few minutes
to fulfil my promise to you my Dear friend --
My Head aches -- my spirits are worn, my body is
greatly fatigued -- Miʃs Goldsworthy has been con-
fined
some days by illneʃs, so I must go to the
Lower Lodge &c & in the Eveg. to take Pʃs. Elizabeth
&c home -- though I was three or 4 hours at
St. James's Palace -- I could not see you, as Pʃs-
Augusta
was with me -- the Queen giving her leave
to be there during the Drawing room instead of
remaining at the Queens House. I went to Town
on Wednesday with Princeʃs Royal & Augusta who
went with their Majesties to ye. Play -- the next day from
7 in the Morng till 12 at night I was taken up with
                                                         dreʃsing -- running



24/
up & down those high flights of stairs & so on --
& to finish the day I stood in one place, without
moving any thing but my fan three hours & a half.
to add as the Pʃ's. did not play at Cards. To add to
this, my Maid was taken ill & as I could not get
my House maid was obliged to do every thing for
myself -- nor have I yet had any aʃsistance from
poor Goodyear -- all this will convince you I could
not write to you -- I must lay down my pen --
Saty 3d Novr -- Yesterday was the Prince Edwards Birthday
?Today is that of my little favorite Princeʃs
Sophia
-- I have finished painting the Satin Border
& even I myself I am very well satisfied with it
& think it looks elegant it has been put on a
very pretty color'd Sattin Sliper -- the little Lady
will make her appearance with it this Eveg-
Madame de la Fite is arrived from Holland
to settle in England, she will belong solely to the
Queen
to be in quality of Lectrice,[25] as Mon̅ de
Luc
is in that of Lecture[26] -- she will I suppose
only read French & German -- I have generally
ye. honor of reading english to ye. Queen -- Madame
de la Fite
's Husband
has been dead abt. a Year,
he was a Clergyman, & I believe, was a Preceptor
to the Prince of Orange's Children. (Madme. has brought
a Child with her a Daughter with her -- ) Se is extremely
plain in face & person, but she has a sensible
countenance -- her voice not pleasant in reading --
& indeed I think she has undertaken a situation
she appearsseems to



                                                         (25
to me not in the least calculated for, she is in
bad health & appears to have a tender ------constitution and she has
very weak lungs & Eyes -- I feel concerned for this
Stranger & think my good friend De Luc has
judged ill to transplant her from her native
Land & friends -- particularly too, as she is not
young -- she looks 60 -- though perhaps not near so
old -- as her complexion, grief for ye. loʃs of her
Husband
, -- delicate health, & other causes may
make her appear much older than she really is.
I am pre-resolved to shew this poor Dutch Woman
every attention -- for though I am very certain the
Queen
will be most kind, gracious & generous
towards her, I well know others will slight
her, or, at least, shew her moon shine civility.
                             Adieu my Dr. frd.
                                                         Mary Hamilton
20.
Queens Lodge Windsor
25th Novbr. 1781
      My Dear -- we go to Town tomorrow
The family to settle for the Winter -- Her Majesty &
the Princeʃs Royal & myself return on Friday to
this place to attend his Majesties hunting party
These excursions for some time, are to be from
Friday till Monday. I have great delight in looking
forward to your return, if you keep your word, &
arrive the 6th. I shall then see you before I go the 2d-
time to Windsor, as that will be on Thursday &
we may spend that Evg together -- Adieu
                             My Dr. frd.
                                                         Mary Hamilton



26/
23. Queens Lodge Windsor 14th Jan 1782 -- I suffered many hours of anxiety
on your acct. my Dr. frd. wch. I certainly might have
been spared had your letter been given to the post
the night it was written, for though you did not
date your letter I imagine it was written on Friday
night, for you had so seriously promised I should
hear from you, & I did not till yesterday --
I cannot tell you what uneasineʃs I suffered
on Saturday, particularly too as no post
went form hence that day & I could not con-
trive
, even to send a meʃsenger, to enquire after
you, I hope & trust you have seen my
friend Doctr. Turton.    I cannot place any
faith in ye. skill of the person you told me of --
You aʃsure me you feel “rather better upon the whole” --
I will hope you neither deceive me nay yourself. --
The King has had a Cold & her Majesty is not
free from one, therefore I do not imagine
they will venture either to the Play or Opera
before the Great Drawing Room. The Queen
enquired after your health. We have had a
most melancholy gloom cast over our whole
party, indeed my spirits have been so much
affected that I do not expect to get the better of
it for some time -- I have not leisure to enter
into any detail -- Doctr. Arnold who this day week was
under this Roof in perfect health & good spirits
is now in the most deplorable of all situations, --
confined as a lunatic & raving Mad![27]
Adieu My Dr. Ever most Affy. Your frd. Mary Hamilton



                                                         (27
From Sr. Wm. Wakes Upshire Farm Eʃsex
26th. Sepbr. 1783
My Dr. frd.

26.
      I do not imagine I shall have the happineʃs
of seeing you for some time, unleʃs you could go to
Courteenhall -- this requires explanation -- Sir Wm-
Wake
has proposed that Lady Wake should pay a
visit to her Father & Mother in Yorkshire, & my
amiable friend
has entreated me to go with her,
& Mr & Mrs. Fenton have kindly invited me to their
house -- if we go we shall stop one day night at
Courteenhall & I will take care to inform you
when I am to be there -- Sir Wm. has busineʃs wch
will detain him in Eʃsex, therefore our party will
consist of Lady Wake, her eldest Son, his Tutor &
myself -- we shall stay a Month, I believe at Mr-
Fenton
's -- Sr. Wm. left us on Sunday to attend
Northampton Races &c he is expected back to day.
I hope he will bring good accts. of Sr. Robert, & that
his Domestics & Neighbours are recovered from ye-
late epidemic disorder. -- I am writing to you in
ye. Garden -- not seated in a “Proud Alcove” or Gothic
Temple but in a little humble shed -- how I
wish you were with me -- but yet I rejoice that
you are at this time gratifying the wish of your
heart in hastening on to a beloved Father -- I
am delighted you have so fine a day for your
Journey -- ------------------------Yesterday the weather was agreeably plea-
sant
& Dr. Ly. Wake endulged me in a scheme I proposed
that we should all dine in the Forest -- we spent a most
agreeable day. -- pray say many civil things for me to your
Brother
& aʃsure him I am very sorry he is so angry wth. me -- had
it been in my power I certainly would have spent some time
      at Horton -- Adieu I shall write again in a day or two
                             my love to Bell, Compts. to Sr. Robert.



28) Bullstrode
Decbr. 9th. 1783

27.      I told you my Dear I would acquaint
      you why I prolonged my stay with the
      Dr. Ducheʃs of Portland tho' I earnestly
wishd to see you. The Ducheʃs and Mrs. Delany so
warmly & affectionately preʃsed me to continue with
them till they went to Town that it was hardly impoʃsible
to refuse, but Mrs. Delany being for three days ex-
treamely
ill made me no longer hesitate -- These two
Dear friends
wanted the attention & friendly aʃsistance
of a third person to keep up their spirits, & I flatter
myself my endeavours had that effect -- it was very
touching to observe their tender solicitude for each
other -- Mrs. Delany exerting herself to appear better
than she was, not to alarm the Ducheʃs, & the Dʃs-
using every effort of her reason to conceal from Mrs-
Delany
her anxiety; she is now pretty well again,
& indeed in surprising health as in leʃs than a
Month she will be 84 -- her birth dates wth. ye year --
Her faculties are not the least impaired -- her sight
only excepted wch. has been failing sometime, yet
she reads, & writes as well as ever, & employs herself
in various works -- The vigor of her mind -- the activity of
her limbs, & the sensibility of her heart are the
same as when she was young. I have so great an
veneration & love for this most excellent of women
that I could talk of her without ceasing -- I am
every day more charmed with her, & I think my-
self
very fortunate in having had opportunities
of benifiting by the contemplation of such rare
human perfection, & receiving instruction by
listening to precepts which I trust will ever be
engraven on my mind.
I am sorry my Dear to hear that Dowgr Lady
Carslisle
is returned to England as I imagine
                                                         it



                                                         (29
it will make you lose many pleasant hours
at Carlisle House -- for you certainly will endeavour
to avoid the society of a Woman who has been so in-
famous
, &, as Lord Carslisle, it is said, has shewn her
great kindneʃs, it is probable she will be much
at his house.
10 Decbr. I had intended sendg. you a long letter
as I have a thousand things to say to you, but Dr-
Mrs. Delany has taken up my time & she has not
been so well to day, she had an indifferent night
& has had a bad head ach, I have just attended her
to her apartment -- it is ten o'Clock, supper just
ready & my Dear Ducheʃs will wait for me --
If you have no franks send your letters to WhiteHall.
      Lady Weymouth left us yesterday, she had been here three
days -- My Uncle Sir Wm: Hamilton was to have
come here ------again next Saturday -- but he has
written to inform me that his Majesty has
done him the honor to invite him to Windsor
for two or 3 days -- I believe I shall be in
Town the 18 -- tell me all your plans
                             Adieu my Dr. ever Yours
                                                         Mary Hamilton
This date cannot be correct for
it would make Mrs Delaney 103 years old
                             she died 15 April 1788
[28]
25. 19th. Janry 18031783? -- Mrs. G. under ye. most unpromising
exterior poʃseʃses every good quality of the heart, her
principles are founded on rectitude and she is the
warmest & most steady friend I ever met with --
to esteem her as she deserves one must have more
opportunities of knowing her than that of a mere
acquaintance, & her manners & language are
destitute of that polish wch. are requisite in that
society to which her Husband belongs, & wch. she,
from her Birth, tho' not from her education, has a right
                                                         to be in



30) to be in. Mr: Farhill called on me this Morng --
& brought me a poem wch. he has written, & had printed
a Dozen Copies printed of for the gratification of his friends,
who requested him to do so -- it is an imitation of
one of Juvenals Satires -- the title of it is Nobility
we will read it together. I sat an Hour with Mrs-
Delany
this morng -- she was very well & in charming
spirits -- Mr. Bryant came in & we had a pleasant
chat -- Mrs. D enquired after you & expreʃsed much
concern that you had been so ill. I dined at
Mr. Jackson's & was much entertained by the
prattle of Beau Tutteridge who was one of the
Guests -- had I my dr. little Burney's talents
I could amuse you by a description of this
good natured coxcombical being. He boasted to
me that he was the Original from whom his
Royal Highneʃs the Prince of Wales, & heir
apparent of the Crown of England copied, viz
his Buckles, snuff boxes & so forth -- but the
Prince
unfortunately does not have his hair
dreʃsed in the same stile as Tutteridge's, there-
fore
he condemns it as very outre & unbecoming.
I return'd to my old Friend Leonidas imme-
diately
after dinner as I had promised, & read
aloud to him the whole Eveg.. I read a Manuscript
Comedy wch. he wrote 30 years ago -- the only comedy he ever
wrote -- The Story is taken from ye. Arabian nights
Entertainments[29] & ye. Persian Tales[30] -- it is very enter-
taining
& very moral -- interesting also, but not a
single dash of ye. sentimental -- he wrote it in 16
days & though -- it has never been corrected it might go to the Preʃs.



                                                         (31
1st- July 1784
Clarges Street
28.
      My Dear friend
                             I do not wish to pry into any
      secret you do not think proper to com-
municate
, all I require is the continuance of the
affection you say you have for me -- I have the highest
opinion of your understanding & well know how infer-
iour
I am in judgment to you. -- I am extremely
apprehensive that I shall not be able to visit
you at your Fathers this Summer -- my Uncle
Sir Wm. Hamilton has engaged me to execute so
many commiʃsions for him that I see no end to ym-
if you was but 10 or 12 Miles from Town I could
easily go to you, because I could return when it
was neceʃsary -- one of the commiʃsion is to super-
intend
the progreʃs of an Drawg & engraving by Cipriani
of the fine Antique Vase.[31]
2d. July Friday -- Lady Clavering has just left
me, she told me you had invited her to spend a
day at Horton on her way to the North, she is
waiting for Mrs. Peachels being brought to bed[32]
wch. she hourly expects, & after ye: 3d. or 4th. day
after that event she intends to set out -- now
if there is any posʃibility of getting my Uncles
busineʃs in a certain train, for I know it
cannot be finished, I shall certainly accompa
ny
her & stay with you as long as I can --
I have settled this with Lady Clavering &
you must inform me where you intend to
meet us in your Fathers carriage, & when &
where the Coach sets out that your Servants
always go in -- I shall send her maid by that
                                                         conveyance



32/
conveyance -- (I shall not take one as yours or
Bells can dreʃs my Hair) as I am to take her place
in Lady C. Chaise -- a Miʃs Goring is to accompa
ny
Lady C. -- we shall travel with post horses.
My mind is quite set in this scheme -- yet I own
I have my fears I shall not be able to manage it
If I did not love my Uncle Wm so well -- I could al-
most
be out of humor with him, he might have
thought it could not be agreeable to me to be
forced to stay in Town & set aside all my Summer
engagements & disappoint so many of my friends
      If he was in London & I had the pleasure of his
society I should be made amends, but he is
rambling over the Hills & far away
I was my dear quite affected with your narrative
of the little Boy Sir Robert has so benevolently
taken under his protection. I am astonished to
hear that Mr. Thursby has acted so inconsiderately
as to leave his eldest Daughter to her own Guidance
at Freestone. -- Lady Wake informs me she dined
lately at Abington[33], there was a large party &
Miʃs Thursby acquitted herself very well; I am
sorry you will not have an opportunity of seeing
her this Summer as I am much interested abt.
her both for her own & her late mothers sake, &
I had hoped she would reap great advantage by
forming an acquaintance with you & Isabella.
I suppose you have heard of the death of that
vile Woman the Dowg. Lady Harrington[34], what a
dreadful end to an infamous life! perhaps you



                                                         (33
you have not heard the following particulars 33
concerning her wch. I will relate as I can depend
on ye. person who informed me -- Lady Harrington
was perfectly well & in high spirits the whole
day, was out all Morning & dined with her friend
Mrs. Abington, the Actreʃs, when she returned home
in the Eveg she found some cause of displeasure
against her Porter and fell into a dreadful
paʃsion -- the man saw her stagger & thought
she was going to fall -- he caught her in his
arms, the miserable wretch was struck wth-
death, all she said after the Porter had placed
her in his Chair, was, “dont leave me,” she
remained there two hours -- The Apothecary
found her a melancholy object, her tongue
hanging quite out of her mouth & black, she
lay insensible till 4 in the morning and
then died -- what is very surprising no one
has yet taken upon them to give any order
respecting the Body -- her Servants sent
for a Shell in wch- they have placed the Corpse
wch. is dreʃsed in White Sattin & a lace
Mob cap, & every one who chuses is admitted
to see her -- I have heard of several Young
Men of the Haut-Ton who have been to
look on this awful spectacle -- God Grant
it may excite some profitable and
lasting impreʃsions on their minds --
Genl. Craggs was with her when she breathed
her last & he is too deeply afflicted
                                                        



34/
to give any orders, & they say that is also
the reason why her Executor Sir Alexander
Crawford
has not yet acted -- What a striking leʃson
might this event be to the vicious, & to those
who do not strive to check their paʃsions --
how dreadful the thought that a human
creature should thus unprepared, & unrepenting
rush into an awful eternity! I have been
told that whenever this unhappy creature was
ill, she used, in transports of despair to say --
I cannot die” -- “I wont die” -- enough & too
much on this melancholy subject -- x
The Prince of Wales is ill again, he went
yesterday to the Queen to make an apology
for not attending the Drawing room as he was
indisposed, & he had so great an oppreʃsion on
his breath that he could not speak, this
my worthy friend Mr. Digby told me.
      The Ducheʃs of Hamilton is so ill that
Sir Peter Burrel & her Mother are gone expreʃs
to Scotland -- the Duke is drinking himself
to death as fast as poʃsible[35] x
I am now much taken up with my Cousin
Ly. Stormont who is come to Town to lay in
Lord Stormonts always joins us in the Eveg.
& I find this this very pleasant,
      Adieu ton chere Amie!
                                                         Mry Hamilton



29.
                                                         (35)
Monday 12th. July 1804
Clarges Street 1784?[36]
      You will my dearest very
      easily comprehend how much I am
mortified & disappointed, & you too, to my great concern will
I know be equally so! -- for I am obliged to tell you that I
cannot accompany Lady Clavering tomorrow & I also
greatly fear I shall not be able to Visit you at
Horton this Summer -- I will however still hope when
you go there between the fortnight Drawing Rooms
that I can then go with you -- Mrs. Walsingham
has sent me a most preʃsing invitation to go to her
next Sunday. -- I went to her on Saturday at her Villa at Thames
Ditton with Mr: Pepys, we got there to dinner & I
returned by 11 this Morng. -- , she inquired kindly after
you; -- Yesterday, Mrs. Garrick, the Ducheʃs of
Bolton
, Lady Catherine Pawlet, & Mss. Boyle dined
with us -- Mrs. Walsingham's Son staid all night --
I like him -- (notwithstanding some reports I have
certainly heard to his disadvantage) -- he appears
good humour'd, sensible, & polite -- I was really
very much pleased to observe that Mrs: W: &
her Son seemed to be on affectionate terms, he
is uncommonly attentive to her -- Miʃs Boyle
quite adores her Brother, &, he is, I think, fond
of her -- it was really a pleasure to see how happy
she was to enjoy his society. I have promised
Mrs. Walsingham to spend a few days with her very
soon again -- as I can run down to her in the inter-
of vals
of the great affairs I am concerned in
for my Uncle William. People may say what
they please, & you, even you, but I have ever
found Mrs: Walsingham steady, sincere, & consistent,
towards myself -- & I should be very un-



36/ ungrateful indeed if I did not acknowlegdge it to every
one who chuses to abuse her -- I will, some other time
give you what, I think, her true character, there
may be, & I fear is, some austerity, but how few
are her equals in strength of mind, & mental ac-
quirements
. &c, & I can with truth maintain she
is truly religious, & not devoid of benevolence,
wch. many aʃsert, for she has insisted upon my
acquainting her with any object deserving of
relief wch. I might feel interested for, -- & was
seriously displeased I had not applied to her
for a poor Woman & her Daughter whom she
heard I was anxious about -- & without my
asking, gave me something very handsome for
the poor distreʃsed creatures.
x The Ducheʃs of Argyle has resigned her place
as Lady of ye. Bedchamber to her Majesty wch-
was I am told, accepted without any expreʃsions
of regret -- Lady Harcourt succeeds her, and
is delighted with the distinguished honor
she has received by the appointment.
I shall spend the whole day tomorrow with
Lord & Lady Stormont, if I am not obliged
to stay at home, -- on Wednesday Morning I
am to have Sir Wm. Hamilton's people with
me -- then go to Lord Dartrey's at Chelsea
to dine, & return on Thursday Morng -- x
I have written in the greatest haste
having a thousand things to do at once.
& a quantity of letters to answer
      Heaven give you health &
      protect you my dr. frd. Mary Hamilton



31.
                                                         (37
23d. August 1784
Clarges Street[37]
My dear -- If I had not been
disappointed in seeing my, delight,
of a Cousin Charles Cathcart I should have written to you
on Saturday Evening -- X I got a bad cold by walking
home instead of having my Chair, by wch. my feet
got wet -- O how I lament my poor dear Parents
brought me up to be a fine Lady. X -- I saw Coll.
Cathcart
last night, he desired me to tell you
aʃsure you that his friend & yours was well, as
he had lately heard from him; he would not
advise you to write, as it was so uncertain if any
letters would reach him. Coll. Cathcart has promised
to give me further information before he goes to
Scotland, wch. will be in a few days; he spoke very
highly of Mr. Young, & said he had often heard him
speak of your family in terms of of gratitude
& sincere affection. Mr. Young is now at Madrás[38]
& my Cousin told me that he believed his
deteremination respecting his continuance in
the regiment would be by what he did. I hope
my Dear I may be able in a day or two to give you
a more satisfactory account
      I must conclude, Ever tenderly Yours
                             Mry Hamilton
Enclose to Viscount Stormont Portland
place.

32.
      1784?
20th- Sepbr- 1804
Harwood Sunbury
Middlesex[39]
My Dearest I came here last Sunday
& am engaged to remain till next
Monday, when I go to Lord Stormont's
at Wandsworth Hill for a week, after that I go to my two
Dear Old friends
at Bullstrode where I shall make a long
Stay, -- I recd a letter from my amiable friend Lady Wake
who is at Sir Wm-s Riddlesworth Hall Norfolk[40] she desires
me to look out for a Governeʃs for her Daughters, I



38) I thought my Dear that you had got one for them --
pray write to me immediately -- I have recd. a letter from
Madame Busche she makes me many apologies and
entreats the continuance of my friendship &c &c --
The worthy Genl. Freytag whom I made my confidant
ifn this strange & unexpected conduct of hers, has cleared
up the mystery, but under promise of my not repeating
what he told me so I shall not, even to you --
Let me hear very particulary how you do & if you have
lost the pain in your Hip -- I wish you wd. inform me of
what you are doing, & sometimes of what you think -- if
you should be so graciously inclined enclose your Packets
to Viscount Stormont Wandsworth Hill, & he will for-
ward
them in case I am gone frm. thence to the Dʃs- -- Dog
of Portland
s -- This is a quiet comfortable place, & I
receive great satisfaction in observing that my friend
Mrs. Jackson is very happy as a Wife & Mother she
has 3 sweet little Girls, & has the means to live in
an hospitable & agreeable stile -- Adieu I will my
                             Dearest
, write longer letters when
I have got rid of ye: cold & inflammation in my Eyes

33.
Wandsworth
Hill Octbr. 5th-
1804 1784?[41]
You will have been surprised my Dr. frd-
not to have heard from me before now, but
my Eyes were so bad all the time I was at
Harwood that I really had not spirits to write to you
& indeed it was not prudent for me to use them more
than I could help -- The day I arrived -- wch. was on Tuesday
the 28th- I met Doctr. Ford & he kindly advised me to
leave off the eye waters I had been recommended to use,
as they were all too strong, & did more harm than good --
he ordered me to put 1 Grain (or 2 at most) of White
Vitriol[42] in an ounce of Elder flower water, & to Bathe
my eyes with this mixture several times a day -- I
have done so & refrained much from reading & writing & my



                                                         (39
my eyes are now well -- now you have the recipe, you
can prescribe it, to any one who has inflamed Eye lids, for
that was my complaint. I recd. your little note at Harwood
& your letter after I came here. Mrs. Walsingham has sent
me a most kind & friendly invitation to meet you next
Saturday at her Villa -- I am very sorry it is not in my
power to accept it, but that is the Day I have pro-
mised
the Ducheʃs to be at Bullstrode & as I have
already disappointed her by not going 6 weeks ago I
cannot venture to put off going, tho' had I not fixt the
day I should not have been able to resist spending a
few days happily with & Mrs. Walsingham at Thames
Ditton. My Uncle William informed me that the
Ducheʃs of Argyle
is ordered by her Physician to spend
the Winter at Nice; when he was with her in Scotland
this Summer he thought her looking very ill, & grown
extremely weak -- I am truly concerned she in so de-
clining
a state -- Lord Stormont will take me to Town
on Thursday, & I will call on you before your dinner, for
I had rather not dine with you at the Maids of Honor's
table -- & If I dine there I shall offend my
Uncle Frederick -- & two or three others -- & I wish to be
alone at home a few hours -- I am very sorry I
cannot receive you in the Eveg. as Mr. Hamilton has
sent word he intends coming to sit with me, provided
I shall be alone. Mr: Dickensons X father has been
dangerously ill & he has not been able to go to London.
I hope my Dear that I shall find you free from com-
plaint
-- what a general state of suffering as Yours!
Lord Stormont intends taking me & his Daughter to-
morrow
to see the Duke of Northumberlands fine Villa
at Sion -- Adieu ma Belle & chere Amie
      Dure á jamais notre Amitie!
                             Mary Hamilton
X This mention of Mr Dickenson proves that this letter
should be dated 1784 & not 1804 see page 42




40
34.
Bullstrode Park
19th: Octbr. 1784[43]
I sent you a few lines yesterday my
Dear
in a frank of Lord Stormonts -- how
unfortunate I was not to be able to spend two or three
comfortable hours with you as I had depended on doing the
day I was in Town. -- surely my Dear aʃsurances of friend-
ship
from me must be wholly unneceʃsary for you will
know that my heart is sincerely attached to you -- yet the
conclusion of your letter was gratifying to my feelings.
I wish you was here with me -- you would be charmed in
contemplating the virtues of the two friends -- you would
delight on their conversation -- their manners -- & you wld-
be much pleased with the stile of living & every thing
around you -- here you would find a constant fund of
rational & instructive amusements -- &, notwith-
standing
the advanced age of the Ducheʃs & Mrs. Delany
you would find constant good humour & chearfulneʃs
made their society as desirable as their Virtues,
good sense, cultivated minds, & knowledge of the
world make it equally instructive & entertaining --
I hope your parties took place, I know how agreeable
they would be & how much Mr. Walpole & Mrs. Garrick
would be pleased to meet you as you are very much
admired by both. I have this moment recd. a letter from
Lady Wake with the most comfortable acts. of herself &
Marianne -- she aʃsures me that she has not suffered in
health by the anxiety she was under on her Dr. Girls
account who is recovering fast. Sir Wm. also was getting
better -- this last fit of the Gout having been leʃs
violent -- Ly. W. does not mention when they shall
leave Riddlesworth Hall -- but this illneʃs of Miʃs Wakes
has put a stop to their going into Yorkshire.
35
20th Wednesday -- you ask me how long I shall
remain at Bullstrode -- I have promised the Ducheʃs
to stay with her till Christmas when she settles in Town



(41
Town for the Winter & she has in ye most friendly man-
ner
insisted most that Mr. Dickenson shall make his intend
ed
visit to me here -- as to your question when our affairs
will draw to a conclusion, I can only tell you I believe
our union will not take place for some time, perhaps
some Months -- we mutually wish to shew every mark
of deference to Mr. D: Senior -- who wishes to arrange &
settle every thing between himself Son & Daughters before
we are united.[44]
36.
21st. Thursday -- Miʃs Hannah More writes me word she
has lately made an acquaintance with a poor Creature
whose whole life has been devoted to the lowest affairs,
such as Milking Cows, selling the Milk abt. ye. streets
of Bristol, & feeding Swine, to support a miserable
existence, & procure food for 6 small Children -- &
yet who writes most excellent verses, she has a
fine imagination, stored with abundance of images, a
great variety of poetical expreʃsion, & an ear so finely
tuned, that in 500 lines Hannah More was not able
to detect an unmusical one -- she has very noble
sentiments, & what is infinitely better good principles.
She is select in choosing words though she has never
seen a Dictionary -- in short this poor Creature is a
prodigy -- Miʃs H. More has promised to send me
some of her Verses, & as I imagine you will have as
great a curiosity to see them as myself I will copy
them for you. I want to know if you have read Coxes
Tour -- through Poland Ruʃsia &c,[45] & how you like it, I
am reading it to ye. Dear friends in an Eveg, & have al-
most
got through the first Volume, I like it very
well on the whole & He appears an impartial writer.
I aʃsure you that my time is very well occupied -- I have
no room left on this sheet to acquaint you how & in what
manner -- The Dʃs & Mrs. Delany desire their compts. to you --
Mrs. Delany is charming well. Could you not contrive to pay
me a Morng visit from St. Leonards Hill. Did you see the
Dʃs. of Argyle
when she was in London? I fear frm. what I have
heard that she cannot live long -- how did she appear to you? for
I hope you did see her      Ever yor. friend Mry: Hamilton


[46]
42.
Some of these letters, which are evidently copies
of the originals, & apparently in the handwriting
of Mrs John Dickenson (née Mary Hamilton) are
dated 1803 and 1804.
But as they are signed Mary Hamilton, & she
married Mr Dickenson (to whom she became
engaged on 18th June 1784) on 13th June 1785
This must be incorrect & the proper dates
are probably 1783 and 1784 and these date 183 or 1804 may
be the date on which the letters were copied[47]
Besides, in one of the letters, dated 1804, reference
is made to Mrs Delany who was born in
1700 & died on 15th April 1788.
Some of these letters appear among the original
letters in No- 15.
                                                         A E H Anson
      “Southfield”[48]
      St Leonards on sea
      7 March 1906



                                                         43
No of Letter Year Month Page
1            1780    mar 24th     10
2            “         “ “                 10
3            “         “ “                 11
4            “         June 8th     5
5            “         “ “                 6
6            “         “ 15th          18
7            “         “ “                 19
8            “         July 23rd     3
9            “         Augt 14th     4
10            “         “ 17th          20
11            “         “ 31st          7
12            “         Septr 4th     13
13            “         “ 7th          16
14            “         “ 18th          16
15            “         “ 23rd          5
16            “         Octr 23rd     21
17            1781    Augt 20th     22
18            “         Octr 31st     23
19            “         Novr 3rd     24
20            “         “ 25th     25
21            1782    Janr 1st     6
22            “         “ 8th     3
23            “         “ 14th     26
24            “         “                   4
25            1783    Janr 19th    29 misdated 1803
26            “         Septr 26th    27
27            “         Decr 9th    28
28            1784    July 1st    31
29            “         “ 12th     35
30            “         “ 27th     1
31            “         Augt 23    37
32            “         Septr 20    37 misdated 1804
33            “         Octr 5     38
34            “         “ 19     40
35            “         “ 20     40
36            “         “ 21     41
37            “         Novr 5     1



44.

These letters were written to Miss Charlotte
Margaret Gunning
, maid of Honour to Queen
Charlotte
between 24th March 1780 and 5th November
1784 -- she was the daughter of Sir Robert Gunning
who was minister plenipotentiary at Berlin[49]
He was born in 1734 and died in 1816.
Miss Charlotte Gunning married Colonel
the Honble- Stephen Digby
in 1790 & her Sister
Barbara Emily Isabella (referred to as Bella in
these letters) Married General Ross.
Mrs Delany was the widow of Patrick Delany
Dean of Down who was born in 1686 & died in 1768
Miss Burney was born in 1752, married General
Darblay
[50] in 1793 & died in 1840 --
she was the daughter of Dr Burney a music
master & french refugee.[51]
The letters have not been copied in the
order of their dates but in page 43 they have
been arranged and numbered in that
order.




Found this parcel among my Papers
after I thought I had return'd
them all as requested
to be given to -- ye. first opportunity
of my going to London

(hover over blue text or annotations for clarification;
red text is normalised and/or unformatted in other panel)


Notes


 1. These numbers, presumably written by a member of the Anson family, indicate the chronological order in which to read the different items in this volume.
 2. Mary is here talking about the second volume of William Coxe's Travels Into Poland, Russia, Sweden, and Denmark: Interspersed with Historical Relations and Political Inquiries, which was (like vol.1) published in 1784.
 3. Catherine II (née Sophie of Anhalt-Zerbst) (2 May 1729 – 17 November 1796), also known as Catherine the Great, was the Empress of Russia from 1762 until 1796.
 4. Likely to be the Italian dancer Giovanna Francesca Antonio Guiseppe Zanerini (also known as 'La Baccelli'), who danced as a principal ballerina in London at the King's Theatre (Haymarket) from 1774 onwards and became a close friend of Henry Herbert (Lord Pembroke). Around 1783-1784 she was dancing in Venice. After her separation from John Frederick Sackville (the Third Duke of Dorset) in 1789, Giovanna Francesca Antonio Guiseppe Zanerini travelled back to England and became involved with Henry Herbert until his death in 1794 (see Karen Eliot (2007) “A Little Business for the Eye”: Insights into the London Career of an Eighteenth-Century Ballerina, in Dance Chronicle 30:1, pp.1-27).
 5. Caroline-Stéphanie-Félicité, also known as Madame de Genlis (25 January 1746 – 31 December 1830) was a French writer known for her novels and theories of children's education.
 6. Les Veillées du château, ou Cours de morale à l'usage des enfants (1784, 2 Vols).
 7. Adèle et Théodore, ou, Lettres sur l'éducation; Contenant tous les principes relatifs aux trois différents plans d'Education, des Princes, des jeunes Personnes, & des Hommes, Maestricht: Dufour et Roux, Imprimeurs-Libraires associés (1782, 3 Vols).
 8. Probably Elizabeth Smith-Stanley (née Hamilton), Lady Derby, who was a cousin several times removed (the daughter of Elizabeth Hamilton, Duchess of Argyll). Following her separation from her husband in 1778, she mainly lived abroad until 1783, but following Derby's public affair with Elizabeth Farren, she begun to be re-integrated into polite society. It makes sense then that Lady Derby would be the person about associating with whom Hamilton chides her friend in 1784.
 9. Mary Hamilton misattributes lines from Pope's Essay on Man to his contemporary Edward Young.
 10. According to Dundes (1973), in ‘Mother wit from the laughing barrel: readings in the interpretation of Afro-American folklore’, negro-drivers were ‘individuals who speculated in the purchase and sale of slaves were called ‘Negro-drivers’ or ‘soul-drivers’’ (OED s.v. negro n. and adj. C1. (b). Accessed 09-10-2020).
 11. The 1780 Gordon Riots in London, which reached their height on 7 June.
 12. Fifteenth-century Herstmonceux Castle was part-demolished in 1776-1777 by its owner Robert Hare, when much of its interior was pulled down.
 13. Herstmonceux Place.
 14. Joseph Addison's play, The Drummer, or The Haunted House (1716).
 15. This addition by Mary Hamilton appears at the bottom of the page and is linked to this point in the text via paired asterisks.
 16. Mary is likely referring to Sir Godfrey Webster, 4th Baronet (1749-1800), who owned the abbey from May 1780 until his death (before him it briefly belonged to his father, also named Godfrey Webster (d. 1780), and before him it belonged to Sir Whistler Webster, 2nd Baronet). After him his son Sir Godfrey Vassall Webster, 5th Baronet (6 October 1789 – 17 July 1836) inhereted the abbey. There is no known record of a Sir George Webster around this time.
 17. Prince Alfred was born on 22 September 1780, a few days after this letter was originally written.
 18. See here: Owen Salusbury Brereton (1781) ‘Account of the Violent Storm of Lightning at East-Bourn, in Sussex, Sept. 17, 1780’, Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London Vol. 71, 42-45. Accessed 14-10-2020).
 19. This number, which appears to have been added by a member of the Anson family, is to indicate the page number of the volume (which Mary Hamilton normally added to the top of each page), rather than the order in which to read the various items chronologically (which is what the added number 6 below this number does).
 20. The Gordon Riots of 2-9 June 1780, in which protests against the Papists Act of 1778 devolved into widespread rioting and looting.
 21. Probably King George's birthday on 4 June.
 22. Probably Maria Anne Hume (cf. Stephen Hyde Cassa, Lives and Memoirs of the Bishops of Sherborne and Salisbury from the Years 705 to 1824 (1824), p. 324-325).
 23. Lady Charlotte Maria Waldgrave, not to be confused with her mother, the former Lady Maria Waldgrave née Walpole. Some sources suggest Egremont was engaged to Lady Maria Walpole, granddaughter of Prime Minister Robert, but this is not possible as by 1780 she was already married, for the second time, to the Duke of Gloucester. Her daughter was presumably known by her middle name, or Hamilton has confused the two.
 24. Lady Egremont's eagerness for her son to marry is unsurprising under the circumstances: he is reputed to have kept 15 mistresses in his lifetime, and fathered more than 40 illegitimate children. He did eventually marry one of his mistresses, Elizabeth Ilive, after fathering seven children with her. Their eighth and only legitimate child died in infancy, leaving him without legitimate issue to inherit his title.
 25. This appearance of Lectrice, ‘a woman engaged as an attendant or companion to read aloud’ antedates the earliest attestation of the term in the OED by 108 years (OED s.v. lectrice. Accessed 04-11-2020).
 26. Possibly a misspelling for Lecteur.
 27. William Arnold's obituary in 1802 in The Gentleman's Magazine observes that 'the unhappy situation of his mind, for 20 years, has been the cause of real grief to a numerous circle of friends' (1802, p.859).
 28. As the letter mentions Richard Glover as still being alive, we can narrow the date of the original further, to some time before 25 November 1785.
 29. The Arabian Nights Entertainment was the earliest English-language translation of the collection of Middle-Eastern folk tales also known as 'One Thousand and One Nights'. This was an anonymous translation not of the original Arabic, but Antoine Galland's French translation, Les mille et une nuits. Galland's translation also augmented the collection with other tales not part of earlier versions.
 30. This probably refers to Ambrose Phillips's The Thousand and One Days: Persian Tales (1714), although a new translation the Persian Tales by Edward Button was published in 1754. See Ros Ballaster, Fabulous Orients (2008), pp.114-126.
 31. The vase which would later become known as the Portland Vase (after Hamilton sold it to the Dowager Duchess of Portland). Bartolozzi's engraving of Cipriani's drawing of the Portland Vase can be seen in The British Museum (accessed 14-10-2020).
 32. Charlotte Pechell gave birth to a son on 9 July 1784 (see also HAM/2/11, in which Mary Hamilton receives a note from Lady Clavering informing her of the birth of a son by Charlotte Pechell, Lady Clavering's step-daugter).
 33. Abington Hall in Northamptonshire was the home of the Thursby family.
 34. The Dowager Lady Harrington, Caroline Stanhope, died on 26 June 1784. She was notorious for adultery and rumoured to be bisexual. She was the founder of a group of British upper class women shunned by society due to their reputations, particularly for adultery, known as 'The New Female Coterie'.
 35. Despite his best efforts, Douglas Hamilton, the 8th Duke of Hamilton, did not die until 2 August 1799.
 36. The dateline and annotation appear to the left of the opening of the letter.
 37. The dateline appears to the left of the opening of the letter.
 38. Present-day Chennai in India.
 39. The dateline and annotation appear to the left of the opening of the letter.
 40. Riddlesworth Hall was a country seat of Sir William Wake. He sold it to Sylvanus Bevan at some point in the 1780s.
 41. The dateline and annotation appear to the left of the opening of the letter.
 42. Zinc Sulfate.
 43. The dateline appears to the left of the opening of the letter.
 44. The last six lines are excerpted in Anson & Anson (1925: 258).
 45. William Coxe published his Travels Into Poland, Russia, Sweden, and Denmark: Interspersed with Historical Relations and Political Inquiries, vol. 1 in 1784 (another four volumes would be published in the following years).
 46. The following 3 pages are written by Archibald Edward Harbord Anson, with some additions by Florence and/or Elizabeth Anson.
 47. The original note was written by Archibald Edward Harbord Anson, and the additions in the margins and in between the lines are likely by either Elizabeth or Florence Anson.
 48. Possibly the name of a house on Old Roar Road in St. Leonards (St. Leonards-on-sea), Hastings.
 49. Sir Robert Gunning was appointed envoy extraordinary and minister plenipotentiary to the court of Prussia on 13 April 1771. He settled in Berlin in July 1771.
 50. Alexandre D'Arblay.
 51. This is inaccurate: Anson appears to confuse Frances Burney's husband General D'Arblay (a French Emigré who arrived in England in the 1790s) with her father, who was born in Norfolk. Frances Burney did, however, possess some Huguenot heritage via her maternal grandmother.

Normalised Text



                                                        
November 5th. 1784 Bulstrode Park -- I am going on prosperously
with Coxe in being 355 Page of the 2d Volume -- sometimes he
amuses me, sometimes informs me, & sometimes
makes me yawn, he is I believe to be depended upon,
as there appears an air of veracity in every thing he
relates, what court he pays to the Empress of
Russia? The Man was in the right for I suppose
he had in view returning to that Country, where
he is now gone with Mr. Whitebread (the great
Brewers Son) -- They are to travel Through the
Northern Courts & Mr. Whitebread allows Mr. Coxe £800
per Annum besides paying all travelling & other expenses
Dear Mr. Bryant was here the other day &
told us a curious characteristic anecdote of
Lord Pembroke. -- we all know He left Lady Pembroke
when their daughter was dying & ran away
with a Dancer to Italy, -- As soon as he
heard poor Lady Charlotte was dead -- of whom he
always affected to be very fond -- he wrote to Lady
Pembroke & said that as she had had the misfortune
of losing her Daughter he desired she would
receive a natural Daughter of his, -- that she was
very handsome, & a charming Girl & that her company would console her for the
loss she had sustained. It is said Lady Pembroke
has consented to receive this young Woman under
her protection & that she is expected in
England this Month




July 27th. 1784 There are few People remaining in Town
I care Much about The Duchess of Ancaster gives Balls, as
does Lady North at Bushey Park -- others too I have
                                                         heard




of & been invited to, but as I was not interested, I
neither went nor made inquiries about them. I live
entirely with Lord & Lady Stormont, she is not yet
brought to bed, the first 10 days of her confinement,
I shall go to Mrs: Walsingham's at Thames Ditton.
I shall remain in London both as Lady Stormont's ------
& my Uncle Sir William Hamilton's. I have just finished
the second Volume of Madame Genlis's Veillées du Chateau,


How do you like her Adêle et Theodore &c ?
I allow she has genius & imagination but I do not
approve her method of instructing Children -- the
oldest of which is 10 -- the youngest 7 years old; --
More of this another time. Consistency, Consistency,
my dear! even if I must be as odious to you
as a croaking Raven, -- I must repeat, as long
as I continue to love you as I now do, &
cannot help doing. Alas! poor human Nature, how
easily led astray, by even what we in the sober
sadness of reflecting moments most heartily
despise, -- why will you, -- how can you associate
with Ladies D—— &c &c &c. you must know it
is wrong, else why am I desired to conceal it from others --
and why do you praise my resolution for keeping
steadily to my purpose in refusing invitations
to such Houses of dissipation,, pardon me if I also say
of profligate infamy & vice -- With The Poet Young
I say to you my Dear
      Vice is a Monster of such frightful mien
      as to be hated, needs but to be seen,
      yet seen too oft, familiar with her face,
                             we first endure, then pity, then embrace.




                                                        
Queen's Lodge Windsor 8th. January 1782
I have just heard that their Majesties go to the Play tomorrow, I
will therefore put off dining at your House as I
know that the night you go to the Play, in attendance, you
dine with your Sisters The Maids of Honour at their
Table. I leave it to you to make a polite & proper
excuse to Sir Robert Gunning -- I shall merely get
a glimpse of you This time for we return to Windsor
on Friday, but the next excursion we make, will be
the last for some time -- most probably till Easter --

I was interrupted
writing to you by hearing the Queens voice, she did
me the honour & pleasure to bring her work & sat
with me a long time in friendly converse -- I find
by her, The Princess Royal does not go to The Play
Therefore I shall not, as I expected, gain an Evening --
I have got through Lucan, have you? --



East Bourne
July 23d. 1780 I went to Beachey head, would I could convey
to you the sensations of my mind on the sight of the
Stupendous scene more awful than any idea I could
have formed -- I believe I mentioned before, having
seen these Cliffs -- but then I had not seen them to
the same advantage, as the tide had prevented
our going far enough -- You tell me you love me
more than ever -- I feel gratefully sensible -- You
warn me to guard against the Queen -- Ah my Dear
why so? I know she is good & amiable, I have
always loved her since I knew her, & if she has true
friendship for me, which I think, & hope she has, -- it
surely must be perfectly disinterested. I well
know mine for her is & ever shall be so.
If you do not believe this -- You know me not
                                                         Adieu my Dear friend




The fatigue of standing upwards of 3 hours last night, as
we did not play at Cards, has made me pass a very bad
sleepless night, I am not yet up but I roused myself to
send you the earliest intelligence that her Majesty ordered
me to advise you to use Leeches to your gums, she
said they would prove a certain remedy -- Mrs: C: did so yesterday
& it removed the pain she had suffered for 10 days.
St. James's Palace 1782


East Bourne August the 14th 1780
I took a pleasant ride of 12 Miles yesterday afternoon
Mr. Farhill was my Esquire, we attended my kind
Friends who came here on purpose to visit me in
their way to Tunbridge -- viz: Miss Wilhelmina King -- Mrs- General
Tryon, her Daughter, & Mrs: Leland -- I was not the
least tired which I should have been had I walked only
two miles -- Mrr. Farhill has been so obliging to get me
some franks for you from his Brother in Law Colonel
Tuffnel -- he appears an amiable young Man --
indeed I think both Mr: Fisher & himself are equally
deserving -- they are great friends which is a happy circumstance
-- for they have an insolent overbearing
Man to deal with in the Governor, who is better
calculated for a negro driver than the situation he
is in -- The Man however is not unpleasant in
his manners to Ladies, or his superiors -- he has
seen much of the world & lived in good society, -- & he
enlivens conversation by anecdotes. He told me he was
with Lord Townsend when Lord Lieutenant in Ireland -- I
believe Aide de Camp. He also went to Italy &c. with the
                             rich Young Pelham.



                                                        


8th. June 1780 Friday Evening I expect you early tomorrow Morning --
what times what dreadful times, what horrid Riots --
The Dear King! how does he shine like a constellation, but I
should say like a true Christian -- I am firmly persuaded
Lord George Gordon is insane -- my heart has ached too
much for me to put pen to paper -- twenty times
have I begun writing to you -- I hope you have been
happier than myself -- we go to Eastbourne at 5
o'Clock on Monday Morning Her Majesty kindly wished
(this a secret) to detain me with her, but as
she had told Lady Charlotte Finch she should choose
either to have Miss Goldsworthy or myself, & Lady
Charlotte choosing me, I am to go -- yet the Queen
was affectionately pleased, as she told me she thought
Sea air & Bathing would do me good & she should
have great pleasure in corresponding with me
I wish I could convince you that the Queen has real
sensibility --




23d September                Eastbourne
23d. September 1780         An express arrived this Morning that
her Majesty was safely delivered of a Son -- the
Princess Royal wrote me a kind letter also of information
-- I hear we are to leave this place in
11 days -- do not my lovely friend let your
family jarring take such hold of your spirits
Pardon me, but I think you all seem to
contrive to torment each other -- which is most
strange as you are so extremely, & I may
say, so uncommonly attached.






St. James's Palace 1st. January 1782 -- It is not in my power to go to
you this Morning -- let me know how you do, & if the pain in your
face is gone. It will afford me great happiness to know
the new Year smiles upon you, & that you enter upon it
in Health & spirits -- May you, from henceforth, enjoy
every happiness Virtue & goodness merit, & which
I think you deserve -- I hope our friendship will
continue in this world, & when we quit it may we
hope to meet in the next, & may we merit that
Heaven which is the reward of the righteous.
                             tenderly Yours
                                Mary Hamilton



East Bourne Sussex
8th June 1780

I told you I had seen Herstmonceux
it is about 10 Miles from hence, we did not
rail at the ravages of time, but at the mean wretch
who destroyed this noble Pile of Building, far from the
time of Henry the 6th- till within these 4 Years it was
in habitable repair, nothing but the outside walls
are left standing which while they last will be a Monument
of shame to Mr: Hare -- it is situated in a fine
Park well wooded, the Ground is finely disposed, &
a view of the great Ocean crowns the prospect, the
Present owner has just finished a Modern House
near this once Noble Castellated Mansion with its
Materials -- the Architect they told me was Mr-
Samuel Wyatt -- a Man in Vogue:
Herstmonceux was built by Sir Roger Fiennes
in 1423. The dimensions of a most noble lofty spacious Room
is still to be traced. Addison wrote his comedy of the



                                                        
Drummer or Haunted House when on a Visit to this
Mansion -- a suitable place to create such ideas --
The ancient Furniture & curious carved woodwork
of this room is in the new House.



East Bourne
August 31st. 1780 I feel so much for you my Dear friend
that I sincerely regret I cannot be
with you & assist you in attendance on your worthy
Father -- I hope your Sister is very attentive, but
I ought not to doubt it, as I believe she has a good,
& an affectionate heart -- & it is at such a time
when one feels -- how much we love -- how much
we owe -- how much we should lose -- endeavour
Dear friend to keep up your spirits, I know you
will from every right & good motive. I told you
in my last of our having been a little excursion --
it was to Ashburnham, the Seat of Lord Ashburnham
's about 14 Miles from hence -- a very fine situation
-- the Park is 7 Miles in circumference --
the Ground finely disposed by Nature, and highly
improved by 15 years labour & skill of Mr-
Browne -- I dare not presume to say that If
I was the employer of Brown I should suggest
some alterations which would be more accordant to my ideas of
picturesque beauty -- but I may say to you
that I think my great Uncle Charles Hamiltons
taste would have made this place more renowned
for true simplicity &c &c &c -- from
many parts the views are extensive -- they told
us one might see to the distance of 60 miles --
                                                        




there are charming rides through the Park, --
Water -- &c &c, & a Noble view of the Sea on
which are easily distinguished Vessels sailing, without
the assistance of Glasses, & to crown the scene
the Downs rising to the Sky, we had a distinct
view of the Grand ruins of Battle-Abbey, which
appeared but two miles distant -- I believe it is
four -- I regretted we could not go to it -- It is
memorable for being raised upon the Spot where
Harolds Body was found, by William styled the
Conqueror, as a pretended atonement for the
horrid quantity of human Blood shed in that encounter.
I am informed Battle Abbey Called the Conquerors Abbey (Built by William.) is charmingly
situated, it belongs to Sir George Webster, &
it is now partly inhabited by a Widow Lady
Webster. It was pointed to our observation,
at no great distance, an eminence called
Standard Hill, the place where William the
invader, or Conqueror, erected his Standard
on landing. The Abbey was one of the most magnificent
edifices of that kind in England -- It was
reduced to a wreck by the furious zeal of the Reformers
The Gates I am told remain, which are very grand.
In Ashburnham Church is kept the Shirt the
unfortunate Charles the first wore the day he was
beheaded, & the Sheet which covered his body. An
Ancestor of Lord Ashburnham was Groom of the Bedchamber
to the King, & out of attachment contrived to
get & preserve them. The shirt is what we should
                                                        



                                                        
think very coarse Linen -- it has a Vandyke falling
down collar similar to what we see in the Portraits
of this Monarch -- & of the costume of that time --
it is curiously ornamented with variety of stitches in
needlework by some skillful seamstress, or perhaps
Sailor -- N:B: not in colours but white Thread. I likewise
saw the Kings watch which he gave his faithful
Friend & Servant, Mr. Ashburnham, the morning of
his execution -- it is finely enamelled in colours
(on Gold) within & without. -- has no glass
but shuts up like a Box.         I saw the Dairy
which I admired -- it is well furnished with fine
Old Delft, China &c -- in it is a Milk Pail, called
Queen Elizabeths, it was brought from Greenwich --
it is a pretty round small pail of white wood,
with a round plain silver handle, & broad rims
of Silver, encircle the top & bottom of the pail,
These rims are engraved, & there are arms -- but
not those of Elizabeth -- but like those belonging
to the Shirley's. -- The House suits the situation,
The Rooms are Large, Light, & handsome; -- the
furniture neither old, nor very modern, nor elegant.
Lord Ashburnham had intentions of new furnishing
it, but poor Lady Ashburnham's miserable state of
health preventing her being so distant from medical
advice in London makes him defer it; -- I
was obliged to leave Ashburnham without seeing
the Gardens which I regret -- I hear they are in the
style of his Majesties at Richmond -- but with greater
natural advantages.





March 24th- 1780 -- To what my friend am I to attribute
your extraordinary change of manner & coldness
towards me, it was your Father & yourself
who courted my acquaintance -- I by no means
sought yours -- you may remember you both engaged
Miss Tryon to bring you to my apartments at St-
James's -- Your Father almost with tears entreated
I would let you be ranked among the number of
my friends & I recollect paid me many fine
compliments on the character he had heard of me &c &c --
You have ever since (till your return from Bath) --
expressed in the warmest terms that I was,
(excepting Sir Robert your Brother, & Sister) the dearest
to your heart of any other human being, & from
the extraordinary proofs, by the confidence, you
placed in me I really thought I was.
You are become a votary to dissipation & I
lament to observe you now associate with persons
I shun, & whose conduct you have condemned,
It is not the first time I have been disappointed
-- but I am not yet grown callous, & I own I am
wounded; -- In you I expected to find steadiness
of character superior to those Moths whom
it is easy to predict will soon or late fall victims
to dangers they seem to court.


24th: March 1780 I am very sorry to receive so bad an
account of your Health & spirits, one should imagine
the dissipation you are so constantly
                                                         engaged



                                                        
in would rouse the latter, however prejudicial it may & must be to the
former. Mrs: Vesey desired me to ask you to go to
her on Saturday Evening -- she is removed to their new
House in Clarges Street -- if you have no objection
to meet any thing so stupid & sober as myself,
I will make a point of being there for otherwise
I despair of seeing you as our time draws near
for my quitting Town -- with Their Majesties -- the 3
elder Princes Princess Royal & Augusta -- we go on
Sunday to Windsor & shall not return till
Wednesday sennight -- The rest of the Royal Children
remain in Town with Lady Charlotte Miss Goldsworthy &c &c as
usual -- Adieu you will ever find me the same.

My excellent friends Mr. Smelt, Mrs: Carter,
&c Breakfast with me tomorrow.


24th. March 1780
You think my note cruel & unkind, & I felt
even more than I expressed -- I require nothing
more of you my Dear friend than that you will be
consistent -- let your own mind be the guide
of your own actions -- I did not doubt but that
you had an affection for me, but I am too
honest not to say, that it appeared to me, in
proportion as you seemed to court the notice
& acquaintance of the Great Dashers of the
haut-ton you shrank from me -- I have had such
painful proofs of the mutability of the human heart
that I did not condemn you, but regretted my loss,
-- hence I justify my expression, & make




it agreeable to my feelings ie. “That I should
always be the same” Come to me at ½ past ten
o'clock tomorrow Morning -- Adieu I have only time
to add that I embrace you with tenderness and
      sincerity
                             Mary Hamilton

      I am delighted with your Hungarian, 'tis from the
conversation of such persons one gains what Books
cannot teach. -- I wish you would keep away from
such crowded dinner parties -- I do not wonder, with
your very delicate health, that they make you ill!
The variety also of smells, & particularly at the
German Tables you mention -- A Dish of smoking
Sour Crout will at any time affect one sufficiently
to overcome all desire of eating for that day, though
it was often at my Father's Table, I never could
endure it -- The worthy General Freytag has tried to
bribe me various ways to relish it but without
success we are great friends, but I think I should
be still a greater favourite with him could I conquer
my dislike to Sour Crout.



                                                        


Lady Betty Comptons Gardens, Eastbourne
Sea Seat September 4th. 1780
You will my Dear perceive from whence this is
dated that I was determined this post should
not depart without a few lines to you -- Lady
Charlotte Finch remained at her own Lodgings
to write letters, -- Princess Elizabeth & my sweet
engaging Child Princess Sophia are playing about
like innocent Butterflies in the Sun, & culling the
wild flowers on the Grass, whilst I am watching
them, & yet scribbling to you, to prevent your
thinking any occupation either of duty, or pleasure,
or dissipation could render me unmindful that
you was not well, I earnestly wish you would
see our attentive, kind & skilful Doctor Turton
oftener, it may be extremely improper for you
to continue, for any length of time, medicines, or
even the Bath water -- change of prescription
may be requisite, & you, by continuing to take
what might have been beneficial a month ago, you are,
perhaps doing yourself great injury. -- I am likewise
very much concerned for Sir Robert Gunning --
& sincerely glad Dr Jebb attends him, though the
Physician from R. might be a skilful man, he
has not the same chance of being of service to him,
Dr Jebb, on the contrary, by knowing his constitution
can prescribe with greater certainty. I
hope my Dear to have a few lines from you
without fail, by return of post -- Mrs. Fielding, to
                                                         the




great happiness of the proud Parent, was safely
brought to bed of a Son on the 31st.. Lady Charlotte
had an express with this most welcome intelligence,
Mrs. Fielding never was so well before, my most
dear & amiable friend Lady Dartrey, & Mrs Fieldings worthy
Aunt Lady Louisa Clayton were with her at the
time, & the latter is to be with her till she is
recovered. Lady Charlotte Finch has been very
anxious about her favourite Daughter &, entre
nous, thought it no small hardship that she
was not excused by her Majesty attending the
Princess Elizabeth, &c to Eastbourne, &
though I so very highly respect & love Lady
Charlotte Finch, I must say I think as
she enjoys such great pecuniary advantages
for herself, & family, from the
King & Queen, & has been so greatly considered,
it is to be regretted she does not exert
herself more for the advantage of the Royal
children, &c &c. You will rejoice for me when
I inform you my friends Lord & Lady Dartrey
are arrived at East-bourne, as there will not
be any impropriety in their visiting their
Royal Highness's, & joining our parties, I
shall have the heart felt comfort of seeing
them often -- I hope I shall be able to persuade
them to remain as long as we shall --
They have their sweet Girl with them



                                                        
I had a most gracious & affectionate little letter
from the Queen on Saturday, she tells me it is the
last before we shall meet, -- that she wrote it in
my room, & reminds me of sitting with me there
last year -- The Princess Royal & Miss Goldsworthy
have had an open rupture (this must be sacred)
I think them both to blame -- Miss Goldsworthy is
most praiseworthy and indefatigable in the duties
of her station, but she wants softness of
temper & manner -- nor do I think her either
qualified by education or Birth to be Subgoverness
to the Daughter of a Monarch. --
I have a most sincere affection for her, notwithstanding --
& flatter myself she regards me equally.
Mr. Edwin Stanhope -- my perpetual torment,
has taken it into his strange pate to send
me such a Volume of incomprehensible jargon
-- five pages of Verse, & as much in prose,
we will laugh over it when we meet -- I never
answer his letters, & very often do not read
them having many packets by me unsealed.
      Adieu the wind blows my paper about --
& my Dear Children wish me to play with
them -- I have scribbled so rapidly I fear
you can hardly decipher what I have
written.
      Ever the same towards you
                             Mary Hamilton
Remember me kindly to Sir Robert -- Your
Brother & Sister.




18th. September 1780 Eastbourne
I am grateful for the scrap you sent me my friend,
God grant you may soon be enabled to write longer
letters -- I hear Miss Tryon is ill, & suffers much --
I trust your resentment is softened, for though
you might be offended, your superior sense &
the uncommon advantages of education for a female which your Father gave
you, ought to raise your ideas above such
miserable trifles. I think her Majesty will
never be brought to Bed -- no account from
Windsor to day. A shocking & most awful
event happened yesterday -- My nerves are still
too much agitated for me to give you any
regular account -- A Thunder storm, 2 persons were
killed by Lightning, & a 3d. much wounded,
It was miraculous from the situation of our
House that we escaped -- those also that Prince
Edward, & Lady Charlotte Finch occupied
were in the direct line    Adieu the Post waits --
                                                         Your true Friend
                                                            Mary Hamilton


7th. September 1780 -- —— writes to me that the Duchess
of Argyle & her Daughter Lady Augusta are constant
in their attendance on Windsor Terrace, which
I much wonder at, as her Majesty does not invite
them to her Evening parties -- surely this
must be particularly mortifying to the Duchess --
I must own, in confidence to you, I do not think
the Queen to blame, as the Duchess's manners towards




                                                        
her -- (I grieve to say it, for she has invariably been
attentive & kind -- & I may say, affectionate, to me
which she said she owed, whenever I expressed my
acknowledgements, for my Father's amiable
interference in persuading his Cousin The
Duke of Hamilton to marry her -- of which she
has repeatedly told me the whole history)
this is a long parenthesis I repeat I grieve to
say the Duchess of Argyll manners towards the Queen
which I have been too often witness to, has been
provokingly haughty, not to acknowledge, most
improperly & unprovokedly insolent.
      Adieu, my Dear, I have many other
letters to write -- Yours in true confidence,
                             & Sincerity
                                                         Mary Hamilton








East Bourne 15th June 1780
Our journey was very pleasant, the weather fine, the
Roads good, & the views beautiful, particularly from
East Grinstead to Ukfield, from whence the prospect
was more confined but the Fields were covered with
charming Verdure bounded by luxuriant Hedge-rows --
about 10 Miles from East-bourne it is barren flat, &
dreary. Nothing could exceed the loyalty of the people,
This circumstance after the recent melancholy confusion
& uproar in the Capital was particularly pleasing, &
of course, highly gratifying to their Royal Highness's.
every Town & Village through which we passed showed
testimony of respect & attention -- Bells ringing --
firing &c &c & the roads lined with people, who
strewed flowers & rushes, & flung Nosegays into the
Carriages, when we alighted at an Inn we were covered
with the flowers which the poor Women showered over
us -- Prince Edwards Governor Mr Bruyeres rewarded
them by throwing Silver -- & he gave money
at the Towns & Villages for the Bell ringers -- &c
about 7 Miles from this place a large party of Men
on Horseback, some with their Wives & Daughters
behind them met the Royal Children & after giving
them 3 Cheers turned their Horses & escorted
them to this Habitation, which was surrounded by
all the people of the neighbouring Villages -- The
Sailors on the Beach fired Cannon at intervals the
whole Evening. A large Cask of strong Beer was placed
there by Mr. Bruyeres orders & was emptied to



                                                        
the Healths of the King & Royal Family --
all this was very cheering to ones spirits after
the horrid transactions in London. The reconciliation
of the King to the Dukes of Gloucester & Cumberland
is now made public, they were introduced on
Tuesday to the Princes & Princess's with the restriction
that their Royal Highness's were not to enquire
after the Duchess's of Gloucester or Cumberland --
They are to be at the Drawing room to day, &
the Elder Princes are to meet them. I think
there is every appearance that we shall be very
comfortable here & spend our time agreeably.
I love Lady Charlotte Finch as if she were my
Mother & she is always most kind & affectionate
towards me
      Adieu. My best Compliments to Sir Robert
& love to Bell.

June 1780
The Birth day was celebrated here in the most
Loyal Manner -- Lady Mary, Miss Hume & her
Brother drank tea & played at Commerce with
their Royal Highness -- and Lady Charlotte Finch kept them
to sup with us
I have received the honour & gratification of another
Letter from the Queen -- she informed me she had
not seen any one I was interested about, except
yourself at the Drawing Room -- that you was
near Richmond & that your Father did not go
to Northamptonshire this Summer. Mrs: Fielding
writes word Lord Egremont has been laughed out of his intention, of




marrying Lady Maria Waldgrave by his gay companions reminding
him of his former declarations never to
marry -- Lady Egermont will be hurt, for she told the
Queen how happy & pleased she was with the intended
match & that her Son would marry.
                             Adieu my Dear
                                                         Mary Hamilton
East Bourne
17th. August 1780
Mr. Budé has written you a Note which I enclose --
he read it to me -- he is not amiable but he imagines
I am the dupe to his external appearance --
Mr: Fisher & Mr: Farhill are very ill treated by
him, so are all Prince Edwards Domestic's, he is
quite hated by them & I fear deservedly so.
I want you to apply to your Father in my name
for the relief of a poor Widow Gentlewoman, I am
raising a subscription -- your Father desired I would
never scruple applying to him for objects of real
distress -- when we meet, if he wished it, I will tell
him her name. It is sufficient for the present to
inform him her Husband was a Clergyman, he died
about a Month ago, & left an amiable beautiful Wife
with 6 Children -- from a variety of circumstances,
chiefly I am told illness they had been sometime
deeply involved in debt. The Creditors are now
in possession of all she has, this stroke added to
the loss of an affectionate Husband has overwhelmed
her. I leave it to you my Dear friend to plead for
my poor Widow.      I hear there were 500 people
                                                        



                                                        
at the Duke of Leeds's Ball at Tunbridge on
the 12th- Tunbridge is quite full -- I have not heard
any thing respecting the Drawing room on the 12th --
your not having written last post makes me fear
you are worse than you represented yourself to be.


Windsor -- Queens
Upper Lodge
October 23d. 1780 I have not my Dear had a quarter of
hour to myself since we parted --
I am now sitting with my door locked
to prevent intrusion, & the post I fear will go out
again, without a letter from me if I do not make
haste I thank God you are so well & that we shall
have the comfort of meeting in a few days, I have
not seen Mrs. Walsingham since you left Windsor,
but have just received a Note from her, she will be in
Town tomorrow & will tell you its contents.
Miss Goldsworthy has a bad Cold, I have therefore
been obliged to walk to & from the Lower Lodge --
to the Younger Princess's -- &c I am not yet
the worse for it, but I never can nor never could
bear the fatigue of much walking -- this is
not to be wondered at, as my Mother never
hardly let me walk -- the only excercise I took
was in Carriages & sometimes on Horseback --
Prince Frederick will soon go to Hanover -- Colonel
Granville, aide de Camp to his Majesty, came here
yesterday to receive his orders -- he is to attend the
Prince also Colonel Malortie, who has been in England
about a week -- Coll. Granvilles manners are
very engaging & Gentleman like. The Prince of
Wales will lose his Governors at the same time.
                                                         &




have an establishment, but will remain at the
Queens House in Town till he is 21. The Duke of
Cumberland was here on Sunday Evening, he was remarkably
polite & attentive to me -- but far otherwise
to ——, which she was foolish enough to be piqued
at -- The reason I suppose why he honoured me
with his prate was his acquaintance with so
many of my relations &c Tuesday the 31st. is
fixed for the Christening -- Monday we go to Town --
In the Morning we are all to go to the Cathedral, as
His Majesty and his Sons are to make their
offering before they quit Windsor therefore we shall
not be very early in Town -- I am obliged to say
Farewell -- Mary Hamilton

20 August 1781
Queens Upper Lodge
Windsor

                             (To the Honourable Miss Gunning Horton)
      I saw Mrs. Walsingham on Friday Evening
      my Dear friend she desired me to tell you
      she expects you to visit her on your
return delay not then to write to her & fix the time.
take care to be with her the week there is no Drawing
Room that I may not be absent -- I hope Miss Goldsworthy will be recovered
by that time & then we can meet -- for then I have
from 7 till 11 three Evenings in the week -- that is if
I do not go with her Majesty & Princess Royal & Augusta to Kew &
when things go on in a regular train. The Féte
in the Castle was charming -- The Supper was
St. Georges Hall & put one in mind of descriptions in
The Tales of the Genie, the illuminations & decorations
of the Tables was so brilliant -- I have not time
                                                         to describe



                                                        
my dear loved friend Lady Dartrey is now under
this Roof & will remain till the King returns -- he
is expected on Wednesday. I believe I once before
told you it was my doing that her Majesty became
acquainted with Lady Dartrey I was certain
she would like her & admire her character & manners
                             In great haste ever Yours
                                                         Mary Hamilton
How poor Dear Lady Wake has been disappointed!
she went to see her friend at Chelsea & got
there just as the Queens invitation arrived --
She came here on Friday -- I have not yet been able
to have 5 Minutes conversation with her alone.

31 October 1781
Queens Lodge Windsor
      Wednesday night ¼ before 12 -- the business
      of the day is over, Princess Royal is in
      bed & I must also hasten to mine as I sleep
in the same room -- but I will steal a few minutes
to fulfil my promise to you my Dear friend --
My Head aches -- my spirits are worn, my body is
greatly fatigued -- Miss Goldsworthy has been confined
some days by illness, so I must go to the
Lower Lodge &c & in the Evening to take Princess Elizabeth
&c home -- though I was three or 4 hours at
St. James's Palace -- I could not see you, as Pss-
Augusta was with me -- the Queen giving her leave
to be there during the Drawing room instead of
remaining at the Queens House. I went to Town
on Wednesday with Princess Royal & Augusta who
went with their Majesties to the Play -- the next day from
7 in the Morning till 12 at night I was taken up with
                                                         dressing -- running




up & down those high flights of stairs & so on --
& to finish the day I stood in one place, without
moving any thing but my fan three hours & a half.
as the Princesses did not play at Cards. To add to
this, my Maid was taken ill & as I could not get
my House maid was obliged to do every thing for
myself -- nor have I yet had any assistance from
poor Goodyear -- all this will convince you I could
not write to you -- I must lay down my pen --
Saturday 3d -- Yesterday was Prince Edwards Birthday
Today is that of my little favourite Princess
Sophia -- I have finished painting the Satin Border
& even I myself I am very well satisfied with it
& think it looks elegant it has been put on a
very pretty coloured Satin Slipper -- the little Lady
will make her appearance with it this Evening
Madame de la Fite is arrived from Holland
to settle in England, she will belong solely to the
Queen to be in quality of Lectrice, as Monsieur de
Luc is in that of Lecture -- she will I suppose
only read French & German -- I have generally
the honour of reading english to the Queen -- Madame
de la Fite's Husband has been dead about a Year,
he was a Clergyman, & I believe, was a Preceptor
to the Prince of Orange's Children. (Madame has brought
a Daughter with her -- ) Se is extremely
plain in face & person, but she has a sensible
countenance -- her voice not pleasant in reading --
& indeed I think she has undertaken a situation
she seems



                                                        
to me not in the least calculated for, she is in
bad health & appears to have a tender constitution and she has
very weak lungs & Eyes -- I feel concerned for this
Stranger & think my good friend De Luc has
judged ill to transplant her from her native
Land & friends -- particularly too, as she is not
young -- she looks 60 -- though perhaps not near so
old -- as her complexion, grief for the loss of her
Husband, -- delicate health, & other causes may
make her appear much older than she really is.
I am pre-resolved to show this poor Dutch Woman
every attention -- for though I am very certain the
Queen will be most kind, gracious & generous
towards her, I well know others will slight
her, or, at least, show her moon shine civility.
                             Adieu my Dear friend
                                                         Mary Hamilton

Queens Lodge Windsor
25th November 1781
      My Dear -- we go to Town tomorrow
The family to settle for the Winter -- Her Majesty &
the Princess Royal & myself return on Friday to
this place to attend his Majesties hunting party
These excursions for some time, are to be from
Friday till Monday. I have great delight in looking
forward to your return, if you keep your word, &
arrive the 6th. I shall then see you before I go the 2d-
time to Windsor, as that will be on Thursday &
we may spend that Evening together -- Adieu
                             My Dear friend
                                                         Mary Hamilton




Queens Lodge Windsor 14th January 1782 -- I suffered many hours of anxiety
on your account my Dear friend which I certainly might have
been spared had your letter been given to the post
the night it was written, for though you did not
date your letter I imagine it was written on Friday
night, for you had so seriously promised I should
hear from you, & I did not till yesterday --
I cannot tell you what uneasiness I suffered
on Saturday, particularly too as no post
went form hence that day & I could not contrive
, even to send a messenger, to enquire after
you, I hope & trust you have seen my
friend Doctor Turton.    I cannot place any
faith in the skill of the person you told me of --
You assure me you feel “rather better upon the whole” --
I will hope you neither deceive me nay yourself. --
The King has had a Cold & her Majesty is not
free from one, therefore I do not imagine
they will venture either to the Play or Opera
before the Great Drawing Room. The Queen
enquired after your health. We have had a
most melancholy gloom cast over our whole
party, indeed my spirits have been so much
affected that I do not expect to get the better of
it for some time -- I have not leisure to enter
into any detail -- Doctor Arnold who this day week was
under this Roof in perfect health & good spirits
is now in the most deplorable of all situations, --
confined as a lunatic & raving Mad!
Adieu My Dear Ever most Affectionately Your friend Mary Hamilton



                                                        
From Sir William Wakes Upshire Farm Essex
26th. September 1783
My Dear friend


      I do not imagine I shall have the happiness
of seeing you for some time, unless you could go to
Courteenhall -- this requires explanation -- Sir William
Wake has proposed that Lady Wake should pay a
visit to her Father & Mother in Yorkshire, & my
amiable friend has entreated me to go with her,
& Mr & Mrs. Fenton have kindly invited me to their
house -- if we go we shall stop one day at
Courteenhall & I will take care to inform you
when I am to be there -- Sir William has business which
will detain him in Essex, therefore our party will
consist of Lady Wake, her eldest Son, his Tutor &
myself -- we shall stay a Month, I believe at Mr-
Fenton's -- Sir William left us on Sunday to attend
Northampton Races &c he is expected back to day.
I hope he will bring good accounts of Sir Robert, & that
his Domestics & Neighbours are recovered from the
late epidemic disorder. -- I am writing to you in
the Garden -- not seated in a “Proud Alcove” or Gothic
Temple but in a little humble shed -- how I
wish you were with me -- but yet I rejoice that
you are at this time gratifying the wish of your
heart in hastening on to a beloved Father -- I
am delighted you have so fine a day for your
Journey -- Yesterday the weather was agreeably pleasant
& Dear Lady Wake indulged me in a scheme I proposed
that we should all dine in the Forest -- we spent a most
agreeable day. -- pray say many civil things for me to your
Brother & assure him I am very sorry he is so angry with me -- had
it been in my power I certainly would have spent some time
      at Horton -- Adieu I shall write again in a day or two
                             my love to Bell, Compliments to Sir Robert.



Bullstrode
December 9th. 1783

     I told you my Dear I would acquaint
      you why I prolonged my stay with the
      Dowager Duchess of Portland though I earnestly
wished to see you. The Duchess and Mrs. Delany so
warmly & affectionately pressed me to continue with
them till they went to Town that it was hardly possible
to refuse, but Mrs. Delany being for three days extremely
ill made me no longer hesitate -- These two
Dear friends wanted the attention & friendly assistance
of a third person to keep up their spirits, & I flatter
myself my endeavours had that effect -- it was very
touching to observe their tender solicitude for each
other -- Mrs. Delany exerting herself to appear better
than she was, not to alarm the Duchess, & the Duchess
using every effort of her reason to conceal from Mrs-
Delany her anxiety; she is now pretty well again,
& indeed in surprising health as in less than a
Month she will be 84 -- her birth dates with the year --
Her faculties are not the least impaired -- her sight
only excepted which has been failing sometime, yet
she reads, & writes as well as ever, & employs herself
in various works -- The vigour of her mind -- the activity of
her limbs, & the sensibility of her heart are the
same as when she was young. I have so great a
veneration & love for this most excellent of women
that I could talk of her without ceasing -- I am
every day more charmed with her, & I think myself
very fortunate in having had opportunities
of benefitting by the contemplation of such rare
human perfection, & receiving instruction by
listening to precepts which I trust will ever be
engraved on my mind.
I am sorry my Dear to hear that Dowager Lady
Carslisle is returned to England as I imagine
                                                        



                                                        
it will make you lose many pleasant hours
at Carlisle House -- for you certainly will endeavour
to avoid the society of a Woman who has been so infamous
, &, as Lord Carslisle, it is said, has shown her
great kindness, it is probable she will be much
at his house.
10 December I had intended sending you a long letter
as I have a thousand things to say to you, but Dear
Mrs. Delany has taken up my time & she has not
been so well to day, she had an indifferent night
& has had a bad head ache, I have just attended her
to her apartment -- it is ten o'Clock, supper just
ready & my Dear Duchess will wait for me --
If you have no franks send your letters to WhiteHall.
      Lady Weymouth left us yesterday, she had been here three
days -- My Uncle Sir William Hamilton was to have
come here again next Saturday -- but he has
written to inform me that his Majesty has
done him the honour to invite him to Windsor
for two or 3 days -- I believe I shall be in
Town the 18 -- tell me all your plans
                             Adieu my Dear ever Yours
                                                         Mary Hamilton

19th. January 1803 -- Mrs. Glover under the most unpromising
exterior possesses every good quality of the heart, her
principles are founded on rectitude and she is the
warmest & most steady friend I ever met with --
to esteem her as she deserves one must have more
opportunities of knowing her than that of a mere
acquaintance, & her manners & language are
destitute of that polish which are requisite in that
society to which her Husband belongs, & which she,
from her Birth, though not from her education, has a right
                                                        



to be in. Mr: Farhill called on me this Morning --
& brought me a poem which he has written, & had
a Dozen Copies printed for the gratification of his friends,
who requested him to do so -- it is an imitation of
one of Juvenals Satires -- the title of it is Nobility
we will read it together. I sat an Hour with Mrs-
Delany this morning -- she was very well & in charming
spirits -- Mr. Bryant came in & we had a pleasant
chat -- Mrs. Delany enquired after you & expressed much
concern that you had been so ill. I dined at
Mr. Jackson's & was much entertained by the
prattle of Beau Tutteridge who was one of the
Guests -- had I my dear little Burney's talents
I could amuse you by a description of this
good natured coxcombical being. He boasted to
me that he was the Original from whom his
Royal Highness the Prince of Wales, & heir
apparent of the Crown of England copied, viz
his Buckles, snuff boxes & so forth -- but the
Prince unfortunately does not have his hair
dressed in the same style as Tutteridge's, therefore
he condemns it as very outre & unbecoming.
I returned to my old Friend Leonidas immediately
after dinner as I had promised, & read
aloud to him the whole Evening. I read a Manuscript
Comedy which he wrote 30 years ago -- the only comedy he ever
wrote -- The Story is taken from the Arabian nights
Entertainments & the Persian Tales -- it is very entertaining
& very moral -- interesting also, but not a
single dash of the sentimental -- he wrote it in 16
days & though -- it has never been corrected it might go to the Press.



                                                        
1st- July 1784
Clarges Street

      My Dear friend
                             I do not wish to pry into any
      secret you do not think proper to communicate
, all I require is the continuance of the
affection you say you have for me -- I have the highest
opinion of your understanding & well know how inferior
I am in judgement to you. -- I am extremely
apprehensive that I shall not be able to visit
you at your Fathers this Summer -- my Uncle
Sir William Hamilton has engaged me to execute so
many commissions for him that I see no end to them
if you was but 10 or 12 Miles from Town I could
easily go to you, because I could return when it
was necessary -- one of the commission is to superintend
the progress of a Drawing & engraving by Cipriani
of the fine Antique Vase.
2d. July Friday -- Lady Clavering has just left
me, she told me you had invited her to spend a
day at Horton on her way to the North, she is
waiting for Mrs. Peachels being brought to bed
which she hourly expects, & after the 3d. or 4th. day
after that event she intends to set out -- now
if there is any possibility of getting my Uncles
business in a certain train, for I know it
cannot be finished, I shall certainly accompany
her & stay with you as long as I can --
I have settled this with Lady Clavering &
you must inform me where you intend to
meet us in your Fathers carriage, & when &
where the Coach sets out that your Servants
always go in -- I shall send her maid by that
                                                        




conveyance -- (I shall not take one as yours or
Bells can dress my Hair) as I am to take her place
in Lady Clavering Chaise -- a Miss Goring is to accompany
Lady Clavering -- we shall travel with post horses.
My mind is quite set in this scheme -- yet I own
I have my fears I shall not be able to manage it
If I did not love my Uncle William so well -- I could almost
be out of humour with him, he might have
thought it could not be agreeable to me to be
forced to stay in Town & set aside all my Summer
engagements & disappoint so many of my friends
      If he was in London & I had the pleasure of his
society I should be made amends, but he is
rambling over the Hills & far away
I was my dear quite affected with your narrative
of the little Boy Sir Robert has so benevolently
taken under his protection. I am astonished to
hear that Mr. Thursby has acted so inconsiderately
as to leave his eldest Daughter to her own Guidance
at Freestone. -- Lady Wake informs me she dined
lately at Abington, there was a large party &
Miss Thursby acquitted herself very well; I am
sorry you will not have an opportunity of seeing
her this Summer as I am much interested about
her both for her own & her late mothers sake, &
I had hoped she would reap great advantage by
forming an acquaintance with you & Isabella.
I suppose you have heard of the death of that
vile Woman the Dowager Lady Harrington, what a
dreadful end to an infamous life! perhaps



                                                        
you have not heard the following particulars
concerning her which I will relate as I can depend
on the person who informed me -- Lady Harrington
was perfectly well & in high spirits the whole
day, was out all Morning & dined with her friend
Mrs. Abington, the Actress, when she returned home
in the Evening she found some cause of displeasure
against her Porter and fell into a dreadful
passion -- the man saw her stagger & thought
she was going to fall -- he caught her in his
arms, the miserable wretch was struck with
death, all she said after the Porter had placed
her in his Chair, was, “dont leave me,” she
remained there two hours -- The Apothecary
found her a melancholy object, her tongue
hanging quite out of her mouth & black, she
lay insensible till 4 in the morning and
then died -- what is very surprising no one
has yet taken upon them to give any order
respecting the Body -- her Servants sent
for a Shell in which they have placed the Corpse
which is dressed in White Satin & a lace
Mob cap, & every one who chooses is admitted
to see her -- I have heard of several Young
Men of the Haut-Ton who have been to
look on this awful spectacle -- God Grant
it may excite some profitable and
lasting impressions on their minds --
General Craggs was with her when she breathed
her last & he is too deeply afflicted
                                                        




to give any orders, & they say that is also
the reason why her Executor Sir Alexander
Crawford has not yet acted -- What a striking lesson
might this event be to the vicious, & to those
who do not strive to check their passions --
how dreadful the thought that a human
creature should thus unprepared, & unrepenting
rush into an awful eternity! I have been
told that whenever this unhappy creature was
ill, she used, in transports of despair to say --
I cannot die” -- “I won't die” -- enough & too
much on this melancholy subject --
The Prince of Wales is ill again, he went
yesterday to the Queen to make an apology
for not attending the Drawing room as he was
indisposed, & he had so great an oppression on
his breath that he could not speak, this
my worthy friend Mr. Digby told me.
      The Duchess of Hamilton is so ill that
Sir Peter Burrel & her Mother are gone express
to Scotland -- the Duke is drinking himself
to death as fast as possible
I am now much taken up with my Cousin
Lady Stormont who is come to Town to lay in
Lord Stormonts always joins us in the Evening
& I find this very pleasant,
      Adieu ton chere Amie!
                                                         Mary Hamilton




                                                        
Monday 12th. July 1804
Clarges Street
      You will my dearest very
      easily comprehend how much I am
mortified & disappointed, & you too, to my great concern will
I know be equally so! -- for I am obliged to tell you that I
cannot accompany Lady Clavering tomorrow & I also
greatly fear I shall not be able to Visit you at
Horton this Summer -- I will however still hope when
you go there between the fortnight Drawing Rooms
that I can then go with you -- Mrs. Walsingham
has sent me a most pressing invitation to go to her
next Sunday. -- I went to her on Saturday at her Villa at Thames
Ditton with Mr: Pepys, we got there to dinner & I
returned by 11 this Morning -- , she inquired kindly after
you; -- Yesterday, Mrs. Garrick, the Duchess of
Bolton, Lady Catherine Pawlet, & Mss. Boyle dined
with us -- Mrs. Walsingham's Son stayed all night --
I like him -- (notwithstanding some reports I have
certainly heard to his disadvantage) -- he appears
good humoured, sensible, & polite -- I was really
very much pleased to observe that Mrs: Walsingham &
her Son seemed to be on affectionate terms, he
is uncommonly attentive to her -- Miss Boyle
quite adores her Brother, &, he is, I think, fond
of her -- it was really a pleasure to see how happy
she was to enjoy his society. I have promised
Mrs. Walsingham to spend a few days with her very
soon again -- as I can run down to her in the intervals
of the great affairs I am concerned in
for my Uncle William. People may say what
they please, & you, even you, but I have ever
found Mrs: Walsingham steady, sincere, & consistent,
towards myself -- & I should be very



ungrateful indeed if I did not acknowledge it to every
one who chooses to abuse her -- I will, some other time
give you what, I think, her true character, there
may be, & I fear is, some austerity, but how few
are her equals in strength of mind, & mental acquirements
. &c, & I can with truth maintain she
is truly religious, & not devoid of benevolence,
which many assert, for she has insisted upon my
acquainting her with any object deserving of
relief which I might feel interested for, -- & was
seriously displeased I had not applied to her
for a poor Woman & her Daughter whom she
heard I was anxious about -- & without my
asking, gave me something very handsome for
the poor distressed creatures.
The Duchess of Argyle has resigned her place
as Lady of the Bedchamber to her Majesty which
was I am told, accepted without any expressions
of regret -- Lady Harcourt succeeds her, and
is delighted with the distinguished honour
she has received by the appointment.
I shall spend the whole day tomorrow with
Lord & Lady Stormont, if I am not obliged
to stay at home, -- on Wednesday Morning I
am to have Sir William Hamilton's people with
me -- then go to Lord Dartrey's at Chelsea
to dine, & return on Thursday Morning --
I have written in the greatest haste
having a thousand things to do at once.
& a quantity of letters to answer
      Heaven give you health &
      protect you my dear friend Mary Hamilton




                                                        
23d. August 1784
Clarges Street
My dear -- If I had not been
disappointed in seeing my, delight,
of a Cousin Charles Cathcart I should have written to you
on Saturday Evening -- I got a bad cold by walking
home instead of having my Chair, by which my feet
got wet -- O how I lament my poor dear Parents
brought me up to be a fine Lady. -- I saw Colonel
Cathcart last night, he desired me to
assure you that his friend & yours was well, as
he had lately heard from him; he would not
advise you to write, as it was so uncertain if any
letters would reach him. Colonel Cathcart has promised
to give me further information before he goes to
Scotland, which will be in a few days; he spoke very
highly of Mr. Young, & said he had often heard him
speak of your family in terms of gratitude
& sincere affection. Mr. Young is now at Madrás
& my Cousin told me that he believed his
determination respecting his continuance in
the regiment would be by what he did. I hope
my Dear I may be able in a day or two to give you
a more satisfactory account
      I must conclude, Ever tenderly Yours
                             Mary Hamilton
Enclose to Viscount Stormont Portland
place.



20th- September 1804
Harwood Sunbury
Middlesex
My Dearest I came here last Sunday
& am engaged to remain till next
Monday, when I go to Lord Stormont's
at Wandsworth Hill for a week, after that I go to my two
Dear Old friends at Bullstrode where I shall make a long
Stay, -- I received a letter from my amiable friend Lady Wake
who is at Sir Willams Riddlesworth Hall Norfolk she desires
me to look out for a Governess for her Daughters,



I thought my Dear that you had got one for them --
pray write to me immediately -- I have received a letter from
Madame Busche she makes me many apologies and
entreats the continuance of my friendship &c &c --
The worthy General Freytag whom I made my confidant
in this strange & unexpected conduct of hers, has cleared
up the mystery, but under promise of my not repeating
what he told me so I shall not, even to you --
Let me hear very particularly how you do & if you have
lost the pain in your Hip -- I wish you would inform me of
what you are doing, & sometimes of what you think -- if
you should be so graciously inclined enclose your Packets
to Viscount Stormont Wandsworth Hill, & he will forward
them in case I am gone from thence to the Duchess -- Dowager
of Portlands -- This is a quiet comfortable place, & I
receive great satisfaction in observing that my friend
Mrs. Jackson is very happy as a Wife & Mother she
has 3 sweet little Girls, & has the means to live in
an hospitable & agreeable style -- Adieu I will my
                             Dearest, write longer letters when
I have got rid of the cold & inflammation in my Eyes


Wandsworth
Hill October 5th-
1804
You will have been surprised my Dear friend
not to have heard from me before now, but
my Eyes were so bad all the time I was at
Harwood that I really had not spirits to write to you
& indeed it was not prudent for me to use them more
than I could help -- The day I arrived -- which was on Tuesday
the 28th- I met Doctor Ford & he kindly advised me to
leave off the eye waters I had been recommended to use,
as they were all too strong, & did more harm than good --
he ordered me to put 1 Grain (or 2 at most) of White
Vitriol in an ounce of Elder flower water, & to Bathe
my eyes with this mixture several times a day -- I
have done so & refrained much from reading & writing &



                                                        
my eyes are now well -- now you have the recipe, you
can prescribe it, to any one who has inflamed Eye lids, for
that was my complaint. I received your little note at Harwood
& your letter after I came here. Mrs. Walsingham has sent
me a most kind & friendly invitation to meet you next
Saturday at her Villa -- I am very sorry it is not in my
power to accept it, but that is the Day I have promised
the Duchess to be at Bullstrode & as I have
already disappointed her by not going 6 weeks ago I
cannot venture to put off going, though had I not fixed the
day I should not have been able to resist spending a
few days happily with & Mrs. Walsingham at Thames
Ditton. My Uncle William informed me that the
Duchess of Argyle is ordered by her Physician to spend
the Winter at Nice; when he was with her in Scotland
this Summer he thought her looking very ill, & grown
extremely weak -- I am truly concerned she in so declining
a state -- Lord Stormont will take me to Town
on Thursday, & I will call on you before your dinner, for
I had rather not dine with you at the Maids of Honour's
table -- & If I dine there I shall offend my
Uncle Frederick -- & two or three others -- & I wish to be
alone at home a few hours -- I am very sorry I
cannot receive you in the Evening as Mr. Hamilton has
sent word he intends coming to sit with me, provided
I shall be alone. Mr: Dickensons father has been
dangerously ill & he has not been able to go to London.
I hope my Dear that I shall find you free from complaint
-- what a general state of suffering as Yours!
Lord Stormont intends taking me & his Daughter tomorrow
to see the Duke of Northumberlands fine Villa
at Sion -- Adieu ma Belle & chere Amie
      Dure á jamais notre Amitie!
                             Mary Hamilton






Bullstrode Park
19th: October 1784
I sent you a few lines yesterday my
Dear in a frank of Lord Stormonts -- how
unfortunate I was not to be able to spend two or three
comfortable hours with you as I had depended on doing the
day I was in Town. -- surely my Dear assurances of friendship
from me must be wholly unnecessary for you will
know that my heart is sincerely attached to you -- yet the
conclusion of your letter was gratifying to my feelings.
I wish you was here with me -- you would be charmed in
contemplating the virtues of the two friends -- you would
delight on their conversation -- their manners -- & you would
be much pleased with the style of living & every thing
around you -- here you would find a constant fund of
rational & instructive amusements -- &, notwithstanding
the advanced age of the Duchess & Mrs. Delany
you would find constant good humour & cheerfulness
made their society as desirable as their Virtues,
good sense, cultivated minds, & knowledge of the
world make it equally instructive & entertaining --
I hope your parties took place, I know how agreeable
they would be & how much Mr. Walpole & Mrs. Garrick
would be pleased to meet you as you are very much
admired by both. I have this moment received a letter from
Lady Wake with the most comfortable accounts of herself &
Marianne -- she assures me that she has not suffered in
health by the anxiety she was under on her Dear Girls
account who is recovering fast. Sir William also was getting
better -- this last fit of the Gout having been less
violent -- Lady Wake does not mention when they shall
leave Riddlesworth Hall -- but this illness of Miss Wakes
has put a stop to their going into Yorkshire.

20th Wednesday -- you ask me how long I shall
remain at Bullstrode -- I have promised the Duchess
to stay with her till Christmas when she settles in




Town for the Winter & she has in the most friendly manner
insisted that Mr. Dickenson shall make his intended
visit to me here -- as to your question when our affairs
will draw to a conclusion, I can only tell you I believe
our union will not take place for some time, perhaps
some Months -- we mutually wish to show every mark
of deference to Mr. Dickenson Senior -- who wishes to arrange &
settle every thing between himself Son & Daughters before
we are united.

21st. Thursday -- Miss Hannah More writes me word she
has lately made an acquaintance with a poor Creature
whose whole life has been devoted to the lowest affairs,
such as Milking Cows, selling the Milk about the streets
of Bristol, & feeding Swine, to support a miserable
existence, & procure food for 6 small Children -- &
yet who writes most excellent verses, she has a
fine imagination, stored with abundance of images, a
great variety of poetical expression, & an ear so finely
tuned, that in 500 lines Hannah More was not able
to detect an unmusical one -- she has very noble
sentiments, & what is infinitely better good principles.
She is select in choosing words though she has never
seen a Dictionary -- in short this poor Creature is a
prodigy -- Miss Hannah More has promised to send me
some of her Verses, & as I imagine you will have as
great a curiosity to see them as myself I will copy
them for you. I want to know if you have read Coxes
Tour -- through Poland Russia &c, & how you like it, I
am reading it to the Dear friends in an Evening, & have almost
got through the first Volume, I like it very
well on the whole & He appears an impartial writer.
I assure you that my time is very well occupied -- I have
no room left on this sheet to acquaint you how & in what
manner -- The Duchess & Mrs. Delany desire their Compliments to you --
Mrs. Delany is charming well. Could you not contrive to pay
me a Morning visit from St. Leonards Hill. Did you see the
Duchess of Argyle when she was in London? I fear from what I have
heard that she cannot live long -- how did she appear to you? for
I hope you did see her      Ever your friend Mary Hamilton



42.
Some of these letters, which are evidently copies
of the originals, & apparently in the handwriting
of Mrs John Dickenson (née Mary Hamilton) are
dated 1803 and 1804.
But as they are signed Mary Hamilton, & she
married Mr Dickenson (to whom she became
engaged on 18th June 1784) on 13th June 1785
This must be incorrect & the proper dates
are probably 1783 and 1784 and these date 183 or 1804 may
be the date on which the letters were copied
Besides, in one of the letters, dated 1804, reference
is made to Mrs Delany who was born in
1700 & died on 15th April 1788.
Some of these letters appear among the original
letters in Number 15.
                                                         Archibald Edward Harbord Anson
      “Southfield”
      St Leonards on sea
      7 March 1906



                                                         43
No of Letter Year Month Page
1            1780    mar 24th     10
2            “         “ “                 10
3            “         “ “                 11
4            “         June 8th     5
5            “         “ “                 6
6            “         “ 15th          18
7            “         “ “                 19
8            “         July 23rd     3
9            “         August 14th     4
10            “         “ 17th          20
11            “         “ 31st          7
12            “         September 4th     13
13            “         “ 7th          16
14            “         “ 18th          16
15            “         “ 23rd          5
16            “         October 23rd     21
17            1781    August 20th     22
18            “         October 31st     23
19            “         November 3rd     24
20            “         “ 25th     25
21            1782    January 1st     6
22            “         “ 8th     3
23            “         “ 14th     26
24            “         “                   4
25            1783    January 19th    29 misdated 1803
26            “         September 26th    27
27            “         December 9th    28
28            1784    July 1st    31
29            “         “ 12th     35
30            “         “ 27th     1
31            “         August 23    37
32            “         September 20    37 misdated 1804
33            “         October 5     38
34            “         “ 19     40
35            “         “ 20     40
36            “         “ 21     41
37            “         November 5     1



44.

These letters were written to Miss Charlotte
Margaret Gunning, maid of Honour to Queen
Charlotte between 24th March 1780 and 5th November
1784 -- she was the daughter of Sir Robert Gunning
who was minister plenipotentiary at Berlin
He was born in 1734 and died in 1816.
Miss Charlotte Gunning married Colonel
the Honourable Stephen Digby in 1790 & her Sister
Barbara Emily Isabella (referred to as Bella in
these letters) Married General Ross.
Mrs Delany was the widow of Patrick Delany
Dean of Down who was born in 1686 & died in 1768
Miss Burney was born in 1752, married General
Darblay in 1793 & died in 1840 --
she was the daughter of Dr Burney a music
master & french refugee.
The letters have not been copied in the
order of their dates but in page 43 they have
been arranged and numbered in that
order.




Found this parcel among my Papers
after I thought I had returned
them all as requested
to be given to -- the first opportunity
of my going to London

(consult diplomatic text or XML for annotations, deletions, clarifications, persons,
quotations,
spellings, uncorrected forms, split words, abbreviations, formatting)



 1. These numbers, presumably written by a member of the Anson family, indicate the chronological order in which to read the different items in this volume.
 2. Mary is here talking about the second volume of William Coxe's Travels Into Poland, Russia, Sweden, and Denmark: Interspersed with Historical Relations and Political Inquiries, which was (like vol.1) published in 1784.
 3. Catherine II (née Sophie of Anhalt-Zerbst) (2 May 1729 – 17 November 1796), also known as Catherine the Great, was the Empress of Russia from 1762 until 1796.
 4. Likely to be the Italian dancer Giovanna Francesca Antonio Guiseppe Zanerini (also known as 'La Baccelli'), who danced as a principal ballerina in London at the King's Theatre (Haymarket) from 1774 onwards and became a close friend of Henry Herbert (Lord Pembroke). Around 1783-1784 she was dancing in Venice. After her separation from John Frederick Sackville (the Third Duke of Dorset) in 1789, Giovanna Francesca Antonio Guiseppe Zanerini travelled back to England and became involved with Henry Herbert until his death in 1794 (see Karen Eliot (2007) “A Little Business for the Eye”: Insights into the London Career of an Eighteenth-Century Ballerina, in Dance Chronicle 30:1, pp.1-27).
 5. Caroline-Stéphanie-Félicité, also known as Madame de Genlis (25 January 1746 – 31 December 1830) was a French writer known for her novels and theories of children's education.
 6. Les Veillées du château, ou Cours de morale à l'usage des enfants (1784, 2 Vols).
 7. Adèle et Théodore, ou, Lettres sur l'éducation; Contenant tous les principes relatifs aux trois différents plans d'Education, des Princes, des jeunes Personnes, & des Hommes, Maestricht: Dufour et Roux, Imprimeurs-Libraires associés (1782, 3 Vols).
 8. Probably Elizabeth Smith-Stanley (née Hamilton), Lady Derby, who was a cousin several times removed (the daughter of Elizabeth Hamilton, Duchess of Argyll). Following her separation from her husband in 1778, she mainly lived abroad until 1783, but following Derby's public affair with Elizabeth Farren, she begun to be re-integrated into polite society. It makes sense then that Lady Derby would be the person about associating with whom Hamilton chides her friend in 1784.
 9. Mary Hamilton misattributes lines from Pope's Essay on Man to his contemporary Edward Young.
 10. According to Dundes (1973), in ‘Mother wit from the laughing barrel: readings in the interpretation of Afro-American folklore’, negro-drivers were ‘individuals who speculated in the purchase and sale of slaves were called ‘Negro-drivers’ or ‘soul-drivers’’ (OED s.v. negro n. and adj. C1. (b). Accessed 09-10-2020).
 11. The 1780 Gordon Riots in London, which reached their height on 7 June.
 12. Fifteenth-century Herstmonceux Castle was part-demolished in 1776-1777 by its owner Robert Hare, when much of its interior was pulled down.
 13. Herstmonceux Place.
 14. Joseph Addison's play, The Drummer, or The Haunted House (1716).
 15. This addition by Mary Hamilton appears at the bottom of the page and is linked to this point in the text via paired asterisks.
 16. Mary is likely referring to Sir Godfrey Webster, 4th Baronet (1749-1800), who owned the abbey from May 1780 until his death (before him it briefly belonged to his father, also named Godfrey Webster (d. 1780), and before him it belonged to Sir Whistler Webster, 2nd Baronet). After him his son Sir Godfrey Vassall Webster, 5th Baronet (6 October 1789 – 17 July 1836) inhereted the abbey. There is no known record of a Sir George Webster around this time.
 17. Prince Alfred was born on 22 September 1780, a few days after this letter was originally written.
 18. See here: Owen Salusbury Brereton (1781) ‘Account of the Violent Storm of Lightning at East-Bourn, in Sussex, Sept. 17, 1780’, Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London Vol. 71, 42-45. Accessed 14-10-2020).
 19. This number, which appears to have been added by a member of the Anson family, is to indicate the page number of the volume (which Mary Hamilton normally added to the top of each page), rather than the order in which to read the various items chronologically (which is what the added number 6 below this number does).
 20. The Gordon Riots of 2-9 June 1780, in which protests against the Papists Act of 1778 devolved into widespread rioting and looting.
 21. Probably King George's birthday on 4 June.
 22. Probably Maria Anne Hume (cf. Stephen Hyde Cassa, Lives and Memoirs of the Bishops of Sherborne and Salisbury from the Years 705 to 1824 (1824), p. 324-325).
 23. Lady Charlotte Maria Waldgrave, not to be confused with her mother, the former Lady Maria Waldgrave née Walpole. Some sources suggest Egremont was engaged to Lady Maria Walpole, granddaughter of Prime Minister Robert, but this is not possible as by 1780 she was already married, for the second time, to the Duke of Gloucester. Her daughter was presumably known by her middle name, or Hamilton has confused the two.
 24. Lady Egremont's eagerness for her son to marry is unsurprising under the circumstances: he is reputed to have kept 15 mistresses in his lifetime, and fathered more than 40 illegitimate children. He did eventually marry one of his mistresses, Elizabeth Ilive, after fathering seven children with her. Their eighth and only legitimate child died in infancy, leaving him without legitimate issue to inherit his title.
 25. This appearance of Lectrice, ‘a woman engaged as an attendant or companion to read aloud’ antedates the earliest attestation of the term in the OED by 108 years (OED s.v. lectrice. Accessed 04-11-2020).
 26. Possibly a misspelling for Lecteur.
 27. William Arnold's obituary in 1802 in The Gentleman's Magazine observes that 'the unhappy situation of his mind, for 20 years, has been the cause of real grief to a numerous circle of friends' (1802, p.859).
 28. As the letter mentions Richard Glover as still being alive, we can narrow the date of the original further, to some time before 25 November 1785.
 29. The Arabian Nights Entertainment was the earliest English-language translation of the collection of Middle-Eastern folk tales also known as 'One Thousand and One Nights'. This was an anonymous translation not of the original Arabic, but Antoine Galland's French translation, Les mille et une nuits. Galland's translation also augmented the collection with other tales not part of earlier versions.
 30. This probably refers to Ambrose Phillips's The Thousand and One Days: Persian Tales (1714), although a new translation the Persian Tales by Edward Button was published in 1754. See Ros Ballaster, Fabulous Orients (2008), pp.114-126.
 31. The vase which would later become known as the Portland Vase (after Hamilton sold it to the Dowager Duchess of Portland). Bartolozzi's engraving of Cipriani's drawing of the Portland Vase can be seen in The British Museum (accessed 14-10-2020).
 32. Charlotte Pechell gave birth to a son on 9 July 1784 (see also HAM/2/11, in which Mary Hamilton receives a note from Lady Clavering informing her of the birth of a son by Charlotte Pechell, Lady Clavering's step-daugter).
 33. Abington Hall in Northamptonshire was the home of the Thursby family.
 34. The Dowager Lady Harrington, Caroline Stanhope, died on 26 June 1784. She was notorious for adultery and rumoured to be bisexual. She was the founder of a group of British upper class women shunned by society due to their reputations, particularly for adultery, known as 'The New Female Coterie'.
 35. Despite his best efforts, Douglas Hamilton, the 8th Duke of Hamilton, did not die until 2 August 1799.
 36. The dateline and annotation appear to the left of the opening of the letter.
 37. The dateline appears to the left of the opening of the letter.
 38. Present-day Chennai in India.
 39. The dateline and annotation appear to the left of the opening of the letter.
 40. Riddlesworth Hall was a country seat of Sir William Wake. He sold it to Sylvanus Bevan at some point in the 1780s.
 41. The dateline and annotation appear to the left of the opening of the letter.
 42. Zinc Sulfate.
 43. The dateline appears to the left of the opening of the letter.
 44. The last six lines are excerpted in Anson & Anson (1925: 258).
 45. William Coxe published his Travels Into Poland, Russia, Sweden, and Denmark: Interspersed with Historical Relations and Political Inquiries, vol. 1 in 1784 (another four volumes would be published in the following years).
 46. The following 3 pages are written by Archibald Edward Harbord Anson, with some additions by Florence and/or Elizabeth Anson.
 47. The original note was written by Archibald Edward Harbord Anson, and the additions in the margins and in between the lines are likely by either Elizabeth or Florence Anson.
 48. Possibly the name of a house on Old Roar Road in St. Leonards (St. Leonards-on-sea), Hastings.
 49. Sir Robert Gunning was appointed envoy extraordinary and minister plenipotentiary to the court of Prussia on 13 April 1771. He settled in Berlin in July 1771.
 50. Alexandre D'Arblay.
 51. This is inaccurate: Anson appears to confuse Frances Burney's husband General D'Arblay (a French Emigré who arrived in England in the 1790s) with her father, who was born in Norfolk. Frances Burney did, however, possess some Huguenot heritage via her maternal grandmother.

Metadata

Library References

Repository: John Rylands Research Institute and Library, University of Manchester

Archive: Mary Hamilton Papers

Item title: Volume of copies of letters from Mary Hamilton to Charlotte Margaret Gunning

Shelfmark: HAM/1/15/2/31

Correspondence Details

Sender: Mary Hamilton

Place sent: unknown

Addressee: Charlotte Margaret Digby (née Gunning)

Place received: unknown

Date sent: between 24 March 1780 and 5 November 1784
notBefore 24 March 1780 (precision: high)
notAfter 5 November 1784 (precision: high)

Letter Description

Summary: A note inserted in the volume written in Mary Hamilton's hand states that this 'parcel' was found 'among my Papers' after she thought she has returned them as requested. Hamilton writes that the parcel is to be 'given to [blank] at first opportunity of my going to London'.
    The volume consists of numerous copies of letters written by Hamilton dating from 1780 until 1784 and concerning court life and Hamilton's friends and society.
   

Length: 24 sheets, 11581 words

Transliteration Information

Editorial declaration: First edited in the project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers' (Hannah Barker, Sophie Coulombeau, David Denison, Tino Oudesluijs, Cassandra Ulph, Christine Wallis & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2019-2023).

All quotation marks are retained in the text and are represented by appropriate Unicode characters. Words split across two lines may have a hyphen on the first, the second or both fragments (reco-|ver, imperfect|-ly, satisfacti-|-on); or a double hyphen (pur=|port, dan|=ger, qua=|=litys); or none (respect|ing). Any point in abbreviations with superscripted letter(s) is placed last, regardless of relative left-right orientation in the original. Thus, Mrs. or Mrs may occur, but M.rs or Mr.s do not.

Acknowledgements: Transcription and XML version created as part of project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers', funded by the Arts & Humanities Research Council under grant AH/S007121/1.

Transliterator: Christine Wallis, editorial team (completed 15 October 2020)

Transliterator: Cassandra Ulph, editorial team (completed 15 October 2020)

Transliterator: Tino Oudesluijs, editorial team (completed 15 October 2020)

Cataloguer: Lisa Crawley, Archivist, The John Rylands Library

Cataloguer: John Hodgson, Head of Special Collections, John Rylands Research Institute and Library

Copyright: Transcriptions, notes and TEI/XML © the editors

Revision date: 23 December 2021

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