Single Letter

HAM/2/1

Journal-letters of a tour to Spa (Belgium) from Mary Hamilton to Mrs Mary Catherine Hamilton (née Dufresne) (1 August 1776 - October 1776)

Diplomatic Text

[1]




[2]
[3] Tuesday morning 30th. July 1776 -- between 7 & 8 -- left my Drst-
mama
to accompany Lord & Ly. Dartrey to Spa -- &c In ye
coach. Ld & Ly D. Mr Dawson Lord D's son ( -- abt 17/ by his
first wife
-- in the Coach -- Dined at Rochester were joind
by Master Penns & their x Tutor -- oldest age 16 youngest
14. -- Slept at Canterbury

x a young Clergyman of ye. name of Foster

Sunday 4th. August -- Mr. Foster



                                                         1        1[4]
Dover. Thursday night 1st. August 1776

My dearest Mama -- I write these few lines
to you from Dover where we are waiting for a fair
wind -- I wrote to Catherine from Canterbury where
we got safe on Tuesday eveg.. We did not forget to
take an observation of the Moon in its Eclipse
its appearance I thought very extroadinary[5]
& singular; not remembering ever to have seen
that redneʃs or blood color. We breakfasted this
Morng..[6] at Canterbury & as I was ye. only person in
company who had not seen the Cathedral, Lord &
& Ldy Dartrey, who are all goodneʃs & attention,
wld- not suffer me to go from Canterbury with-
out
doing so, I was much pleased with this
Noble structure (very different from those I
had seen at Salisbury &St. Albans -- plain --
-- elegant -- vast in size, but I have not time
for particular discreptions -- we got to Dover
abt. 1 o'clock -- The corn fields were not
the least agreeable objects we paʃs'd, the
stalks loaded with golden grain, but yet
no appearance of Harvest -- the fields were
quite luxuriant -- the Hops also in their
most beautiful state.      At our arrival at
Dover met the celebrated & amiable Mrs:
Carter
translator of Epictetus who came from Deal, where she resides
in Summer, (abt. 9 miles frm. hence) and Miʃs
*Cooper
[7] an Irish lady I believe you have heard me
mention was with her -- they remained wth. us till
                                                         the
*married after to Monr. de Luc[8]



2
2
Evening. The carriages were put on Board ye Packet
but the Wind & Tide were against us. In the after-
noon
went up the steep Hill to Dover Castle. 30
Acres of Land are inclosed within its walls; The
walls of the Square Tower of Julius Cæsar are stand-remain-
ing
-- they told us itstheir preservation was of consequence
to the Curate of the Church for he is entitled to 30£
pr. An. as long as they stand; there is a Round
Tower close to these walls wch. in the times of Julius
Cæsar
had a set of Bells therefore they call it the
Belfrey. In the reign of Queen Anne, Admiral
Rooke
, after obtaining a victory, desired permiʃsion
to remove the Bells to Portsmouth, where they
now are. There are 400 men on Garrison at Dover --
Castle -- the Barracks are neat and comfortable.
The Well which was sunk by order of Julius Cæsar
is 360 feet deep, it is enclosed within a building.
The Water is drawn up by a large Wheel turned by
6 men -- there is always 20 feet water in it --
there is a remarkable echo, I threw a pin in wch.
I distinctly heard, -- a stone thrown in when
it reaches the Water sounds like the report of a
Pistol -- the noise encreasing according to the weight
of what is thrown down -- it is bricked but a few
feet, the rest of the Well isis formed by a fine chalk
Cliff: They also shewed us an immense Cannon
                                                         wch.



                                                         3        3
they call Queen Elizabeth's pocket pistol. I for-
got
to mention. that men have gone to the bottom
of the well without proving any inconvenience
from damp air. It was too late for us to see
the Governors apartments, we returned to the Inn
& spent the Eveg most sociably and cheerfully --
the youths of our party are equally agreeable as
sensible.
ThursdayFriday[9] Morg. Wind still contrary -- the Captain
says that is of no consequence but Lady Dartrey's
apprehensions and dread of Sickneʃs, from wch. she
suffers so severely, makes us young folk patient
notwithstanding our eagerneʃs to see what is to be
seen acroʃs the water. (Lord Pomfret with his
two Sons
and Daughter, and a Tutor are here in their
way to Calais, they called on Lord & Ly. Dartrey this
Morng -- Lord P. is a fine handsome looking Man,
&, when he pleases, a fine Gentleman in manners.
We walk'd before dinner on the Pier head, saw several
Ships go out & come in, we drank tea in a large
Room built for the Pilots from whence there is
a grand view of the Sea. Mr. Dawson, Mr. Penn,
Mr. Granville Penn & their Tutor walked wth. me to
Shakespeares Cliff we ascended to the top & spouted that
immortals bards fine description in King Lear: -- the pros-
pect
of the Sea from hence is unbounded -- to look
down is tremendous.[10]       It is now late& I must
conclude -- I am very impatient & anxiousmy dear
Mama
to hear how you are. I embrace you tenderly
                             my beloved parent -- your
      dutiful child
                                                         Mary Hamilton



4
4        Lady Dartreys insertion
      [11] “I have the pleasure of aʃsuring you my Dearest
Mrs: Hamilton that your amiable Daughter is perfectly
well and in charming spirits -- except when a little
cloud comes over them at being absent from you;
we are here waiting for a fair wind & hope to be
able to Sail tomorrow. Lord Dartrey begs to presents his
Respects & joins me in repeating our many thanks to
you for entrusting us wth. your Treasure, I will
take the greatest care of her and am My Dr. Madam
                             your faithful & most
                             Obliged Humble. Servant
                                                         P: Dartrey
Dover
1st. August 1776

2d. August 1776 Sunday abt. 9 in the Morng. left Dover
went on board the Packet (called the Mary -- belonging to
Captn. Cosley) we were 5 hours getting to Calais the day very
fine, went to Deʃsiens celebrated Hotel[12] -- he makes 111 beds --
it seemed strange that in the space of 5 hours every object should
appear so different -- the Buildings, language, dreʃs &c &c
before Dinner we went to ye Convent of English nuns -- Mrs Grey
an English lady is the Abbeʃs -- she is stiled Reverend Mother --
wch it seems is not a title given to all Abbeʃs's of Convents -- we were
only admitted into the Parlour.[13]

My Dearest Mama -- Since we left Calais it
has not been poʃsible for me to write to you -- I
hope you have recd the account of our little Voyage
I had no fears but was sick -- 'tis my Dear Mama wth --
truth that I can aʃsure you I never was in better health
& the only thing that could add to my present enjoments would
be receiving a letter from you with good accounts.
2d. August
Friday
      at Calais we went to the Convent of the
      Dominicaines -- an English Lady is the
Abbeʃs her name is Grey, she is lively and polite.
She shewed us some different works of the Nuns --
Lady Dartrey bought a purse wch. she gave me, from
the Dominicaines we went to the Chapel belonging
to the Capuchins -- there were only 6 men in it --
slept at Monr. Defseins -- L'Hotel D'Angleterre, it is
a spacious mansion & contains 111 beds, the floors
                                                         are


[14]




                                                         5        5
are dirty but the linnen is white & clean, and the
waiters are clever & attentive. The Town is not remark-
able
for cleanlineʃs.
      Saturday the 3d -- we left Calais[15] changed Horses at
Ardres -- 12 miles -- (6 miles is called a post to Recourse[16] 1 post to St. Omer's 2 posts) dined
at St.Omer's at the Hotel de Ville, the room we dined
in was 62 feet long & had 13 windows -- the wainscote
painted blue, ornamented with gilding, -- 5 noble cut glaʃs
Lustres -- a Portrait of Lewis the 15th over one chimney
& that of the Dauphin over the other -- the side board
was large and consisted of dirty boards laid acroʃs
a frame. We went to the Cathedral and was charmed
bywith. a Picture painted by Rubens, the subject was the
descent from the Croʃs; -- there is a large Silver Tomb
in this Cathedral ornamented with Filagree work,
wch. contains the bones of St. Omer -- on one side
of this Tomb is a large silver Coffin in wch. are deposited
the remains of an Abbeʃs, on the other side another
Silver Coffin containing those of a Monk. The City of St-
Omer is one of the strongest fortified in french Flan-
ders
-- the fortifications are of modern structure, it
is 19 miles from Calais, is a large trading place &
appears very populous -- it is the second City of
Artois -- there is a large plain building wch is an
English College.
August 1776 Sunday 4th. After Breakfast we had prayers; &
then walked, we saw 3 shows in honor of ye. Virgin
Mary in the Market place near wch. a Woman sang
Cantiques for above an hour, surrounded by a great con-
course
of people.* We dined early & went on to Aire[17] --
                                                         a la Poste, wch. isplaced



6 6
is two posts, or 12 miles, from St. Omer, Aire is also
a fortified town in the French Netherlands, the Country
is richly cultivated, and abundant in grain of all
kinds -- we saw in one Field, Wheat, Barley, Rye,
Flax, French-wheat, Carrots, Beet-root, Rape Seed,
French-beans and Tobacco -- the people are uncommonly
neat and clean & appear extremely industrious. We
went to L'Eglise de St Piere & heard Maʃs, then went
to the Convent of St. Clara -- the Nuns had not the same
air of happineʃs as the Seours Grises -- there are 25 English
Nuns, at first they conversed with us, without our seeing
them but on our expreʃsing a desire to do so 3 came
out to the gate, they informed us that they had the
privilege of appearing at the gate but not that of going
out of it, -- they are never allowed to eat anything but
Eggs & Milk, seldom Cheese, nor even at the door of
Death might they have animal food, they exist by
begging alms, and there are two Holy Fathers (as they
call them) who go about collecting for their support;
whilst they were talking to us -- one of these Fathers -- a Monk appeared to[18]
watch them -- when we took leave he reminded us of ye duty of his office -- viz
begging for their support.[19]
from St. Clara went to the Convent of the Penitents, but
could only see their Chapel it being too late. The per-
son
who shewed us the Chapel told us the sad history
of a Young Lady who was placed in this Convent of
Penitents contrary to her inclinations by her Parents
on account of an attachment she had to a young Man
her inferior / in fortune, after she had been confined
3 Months she found means to escape, but was dis-
covered
before she had got far, she ran to the Chapel be-
longing
to the Convent, wch. has a part priviledged, so
that in case any can get hold of the Rail, wch. surrounds ye Altar, who has attempted to
                             escape, & is pursued, she is


[20]




                                                         7 7
is secure, & can never again be placed in the Convent, un-
leʃs
she particularly desires it, this unfortunate Young
Woman -- (who our guide told us, was Jeune et belle à manger) ran
into the Chapel, and was within a few yards of ye soldiers[21]
when the Soldiers -- who are always there on guard -- caught
her & delivered her to the Abbeʃs -- who ordered her imme-
diately
to be confined between 4 brick walls, she was
allowed a small portion of bread & a little water daily
in this state she existed 8 Months, continually pray-
ing
to God for release from her sufferings: When her
lover heard she was dead he ran to the River and
drowned himʃself -- this happened only two years
ago -- the man could not inform us what became of
the young Ladys Parents. We sup't and slept at Aire
the beds good and every thing very clean; here we
have Hares, Partridges and all sorts of game as plenty as Fowls
Rabbits &c in England -- the Poultry is also good, plenty, and
cheap: Besides two courses well dreʃsed by excellent Cooks there
is always 7 or ten dishes at Desert consisting of various
fruits and Cakes -- the wines, the gentlemen say, are very
good -- Claret, Burgundy, Vin de Greve, &. No Port wine nor
Beer. The magnificence of the Churches strike me ex-
tremely
. We shall reach not Aix la Chapelle so soon as was
at first intended as Lord Dartrey wishes me to see every
picture worth looking at. I should my dearest Mama
write more particularly & accquaint you wth. every occur-
ence
, but Lord Dartrey has made some gentle remonstran
ces
against Lady Dartrey & I spending too much time
in scribbling letters, & when we settle for the Eveg. he likes
to play at Domino or some round game, likewise, as the
post goes out at uncertain times at ye. places we stop at, it
      is impoʃsible for me to send letters as regularly as I
                             wish -- Adieu Adieu My Dearest Mama
                                                         Mary Hamilton



8
My Dr. Mama -- I was sorry to hear of the Death of
Lord Cathcart -- I had just before been told he was going
to marry again which I should have wondered at, as he
was so terribly afflicted on losing my Aunt, who had
proved herself an exemplary wife and careful Mother,
& that he was arrived at an age when the paʃsion of
Love one should imagine could not master the sober
dictates of prudence, &c.       I mentioned to you that
Lord Bute's Mr. Jenkinson was here, he tells me that
he lately met my Uncle Sir Wm- & Lady Hamilton at
Geneva & that they were going to Paris on the very
preʃsing invitation of Lord Stormont -- it seems that
my young Cousin is rather difficult to please &
manage, & does not conduct herself quite so
amiably as Lord Stormont wishes; -- it is a great
pity Lord Cathcart required his Daughter to marry
a Man so much older and whom the world, in Paris,
say she evidently dislikes. Mr J. says Ly. S: will
not comply properly with ye. Etiquettes required as
Lady to the English Ambaʃsador -- it is to be hoped
that Lady Hamilton will prevail on her to alter
her conduct. Mr. Jenkinson also says it is my Uncle Wil-
liam
's intention to be in London the first week in
September -- this will afford you great pleasure as
Lady Hamilton has so sincere an affection for you,
as well as my Uncle -- I hope you will go to them as
soon as poʃsible, & pray aʃsure them of my unalterable
affection & that I shall feel impatient to embrace
                                                         them. -- I think[22]



                                                         1 8 9
Dearest Mama
      I was made extremely happy by the letter I recd.
from you. Not to lose time I will continue my journal
[23] Monday 5th.
august 1776
      Went to Lilliers where we breakfasted --
      changed Horses at Bethune -- Lord Dartrey said
the woman of the Inn was very imposing & every thing very
dear. -- post -- changed Horses at la Waquet a single house
The people were particularly civil -- the House looked like an
good clean English Farm house, and we had farmers
fare Bacon & Eggs wch. we enjoyed much and were very
Merry, over broiling & cooking ourselves -- I do not
think the Domestics were quite so well satisfied
as we were, though there was plenty of good Bacon
fresh eggs, & sweet bread, to eat. The weather was
very hot -- but not so for Lord Dartrey -- we were all
gasping -- We changed Horses again at Lisle wch. is
a large city strongly fortified -- though there is much
worth seeing our curiosity must lie dormant, till
we are on our return to England when Lord Dartrey
intends stopping for a day or two. We were struck
with the number of windmills near Lisle Lady
Dartrey
& I counted 200 at least -- changed Horses
at Menin -- post -- Lord Dartrey was here obliged
for every set of 4 horses to pay for 6 -- the profit
they say goes partly to the King. -- one Postilion drives
4 horses (they never use more) with long traces, faster, than two pos-
tilions
with 6 horses, at least so I was told.
In paʃsing through a Village we saw almost at --
every door women spinning Cotton, they were very
neatly dreʃsed & all wore wooden shoes. We got
                                                         to



10
9
to Courtray at 8 o'clock -- half an hour before the gates
are shut -- we went to the Hotel Damier every thing
perfectly clean, the Supper was served on Pewter as
bright as silver -- Lord Dartrey paid only 5 escalins
(2s: 11d English) per head) we had 2 fine Fowls,
a larded Hare, 6 Quails, a dish of sweet-
breads
-- Veal à la Mode, hot, Stewed Peas --
French beans Do. and 7 dishes at desert --
Tarts -- and 7 dishes of fruit &c. for desert. --
The Beds were excellent and the people
extremely civil. The dreʃs continues the same as at
Calais, I do not recollect that I described it. The
Maid Servant and the common people of the Town is
a short Casaquin,[24] or jacket, made of very coarse stuff, ye-
color not material -- the peticoats remarkable short
the Stockings white & clean and Slippers, wch. only cover
the toes, without hind quarters & a heel rather high &
stout. The caps are all of the same form, made of
white linnen, Cambric, Lawn or Muslin, with a
double border of the same plaited uncommonly
small & neat, this cap is close to the face, all the
hair is concealed except on the forehead, wch. is combed
flat to the head and powdered -- these do not wear any
Ribbon, but white bobbin drawn round ye. head fastens the cap, no woman
is without gold earings, they have single drops, and a
Croʃs of gold hangs on their bosoms, these that can
afford it have 3 drops to their earings and a large gold
Croʃs embelished with rose diamonds; the poorest creature
who has scarcely clothes to shelterprotect her from the weather
has gold earings and a Croʃs: Stays are not worn -- the
                                                         jacket is made high
                                                         &



                                                         3 10
conceals the bosom &neck, yet they wear a small white
Neck-kerchief -- the White Caps, &c; give an air of clean-
lineʃs
to ---which I am sorry to say the same rank of peo-
ple
in England have not, -- Women of all conditions
(particularly when they go to maʃs) wear long Hoods, they
are of various colours -- chiefly light brown, the Hood
shades the face and the cloke entirely disguises the
figure -- the poorest rank wear a long square piece of black
stuff; silk, serge, &c &c which they throw over their
Heads & serves to cover the head &, body. I have
not seen a Hat. The Linnen here is remarka
bly
white, not very fine, and so stifly starched
as to scratch ones legs in bed.
Tuesday the 6th.
August 1776
Courtray
      We saw L'Eglise Collegiate, over ye.
      Great Altar is a capital picture of ye.
      declaration of the Croʃs by Vandyke, it is
placed between the Windows therefore has not a good
light. There is another picture by Crayer, of the Virgin
Mary & the Trinity: from L Eglise we went to the
Chanoineʃses, saw a fine picture, painted by Jourdains,
of the Nativity, the Channoineʃse was polite and
shewed me a private Chapel. Lord Dartrey could
not procure a sufficient number of Horses so early as
he wished, and proposed by way of amusement that
we should dine at a Table D'Hote at our Hotel, wch.
we did -- our company consisted of two Priests, a
Dutchman, who talked as much as he eat, & was
equally impertinent as vulgar, a well bred genteel
looking Man who spoke good french, and 6 ill
dreʃsed strange looking people -- for 2 Escalins,
(14d. English) a head we had as good a dinner as
                                                         what Ld: D: beal-



4 11
always pays 5 Escalins a head for; -- the rooms are
floored with Bricks. Soon after we got onto Cour-
tray
there was an awful storm of Thunder, light
ning
& torrents of rain. We left Courtray soon
after Dinner, changed horses at Vive St Cloy, also
at Betghent, and arrived at Gand or Ghent at
5 o'Clock, we went to L'Hotel St. Sebastian on
the Place de Parade -- the Landlords name Buʃso, ye-
Hotel is very large -- excellent beds, good Waiters,
and Mr. Buʃso himself remarkably attentive -- Brick floors
in the bed-rooms wch. were covered with Old fine
Tapestry in a sad ragged state -- large glaʃs Lustres
hanging from the Ceiling, & miserable shabby fire
places -- like those in a poor house in England. --
There was a most elegant dinner for us at 6 escalins
a head -- 2 courses, -- the Desert very handsome with Ices
&c &c.       The Supper was 5 Escalins a head -- fine
Wines, good bread, -- only, the Butter indifferent --
In this Country you have always Napkins and
Silver forks & spoons, but they dont change the Knives.
      Lord Pomfret and children were here, he was ill &
not able to quit his room -- Lady Dartrey took Lady
Charlotte Fermor
& her Governeʃs (Mrs: Southern,)
with us to the abbey of St. Piere. The Salle a man-
ger
is a magnificent Room -- 300 feet long -- the Ceiling
painted by Simon (on linnen) who is living at
Bruʃsels -- they told us it was painted in 47 days --
the sides of the Room are covered with beautiful
Landscapes -- painted by an artist named Artois --
It was near the time for the Abbe's dinner, and
                                                         the



      Ghent                                              5 12
Tables were ready. Over the doors in the Library were
exquisite paintings by Girard in Clair Obscur -- he
resides at Antwerp -- this room is 97 feet long. The
Abbe de St. Piere is Comte de Flanders; there are
32 Abbies -- The Chapel or Church annexed to it is very
elegant and very rich -- and kept in the nicest order --
the Altar is solid silver as are the Candlestick wch.
are above 6 feet high. The Stalls for the Singers are
of Oak carved curiously each of wch. cost 1000 Florins
(or       English) We saw the fine Vestments and
ornaments worn by the Priests, The Point and Bruʃs-
els
lace was most superb and beautiful -- The whole
amazingly rich & costly -- we saw very fine Tapestry, and
many relicks made precious by ornaments of jewels &c
there are many pictures -- we were only particularly struck
by 2 near ye. Altar[25] -- Tobit by G Crayer[26], and our Saviour crucified by Janʃsins.
We then went to the Cathedral of St. Bavon where is a
fine picture by Reubens the subject of wch. is disputed --
some affirm it is St. Bavon giving up his treasures to
the Church -- others that it is the Emperor Charles ye-
5th.
giving up the Crown to his Son[27] : the Altar Candle-
sticks
, an immense size, of Copper richly ornamented,
they were brought from York, the arms of England, are finely
engraved on them -- they were purchased by a Bishop
of Ghent
: here is a fine Monument by Jerome
du Qucesnoy
. From the Cathedral went to the Church
of the Recollects -- Three fine Pictures by Reubens --
Over the great Altar is represented Christ going to
punish the World -- the Virgin at his feet, as interceding --
and St. Francis below her in an humble affecting
attitude of supplication. Over another Altar St. Francis;
                                                         & on a third a



6 13
a dying Magdalen
August 7th- 1776
Ghent
      Lady Charlotte Fermor &c went with
      us to see a private cabinet of pictures
      belonging to an Abbé and were gratified
by the sight of a large collection of flemish pictures
highly finished -- two Lord Dartrey admired much by
Meijers one Bachus and Nymphs, the other a family, &c
From the Abbés we went to see a Collection wch. is to be
sold -- many fine pictures -- by Reubens, Vandyck --
Carlo Maratti &c &c.       After Tea a Savoyard played
/before the Windows/ extremely well.
Thursday
8th-
      Left Ghent early changed Horses at Quatrect[28] --
      dined at Alost[29] at Les Trois Rois. Saw the
Church of St. Martin saw another capital picture, by
Reubens, of St. Rock[30] interceading during a Plague.
and in the Church of the Carmelites a picture over ye-
altar by G. Crayer -- the Virgin with the degrees of the
altar from the Pope to the Monk.
      We got to Bruʃsels in the Eveg. we had a good deal of
Rain wch_ was quite refreshing after the almost intoler-
able
dust and heat. Lodged at the Hotel D'Angleterre
at our entrance into Bruʃsels the Carriages were
surrounded by men called Valet de Place, they are only
Servants during a strangers residence, to conduct them
to the Churches &c. &c. Lord Dartrey hired one, his
Name Sr. Philip -- he is very attentive & civil -- he says
he has a Wife & ten Children who are extremely in-
dustrious
. The Room we sit in is 45 feet long. --
Friday 9th. Augst.
Bruʃsels
      We went to see Mr. Varrulst's Cabinet
      of pictures -- This gentleman has not been
out of his house 25 years but he has great pleasure
                                                         in



                                                         7 14
in sharing his pictures, particularly to strangers, he recd. us
in his study, he is well bred, the dreʃs we saw him in, (& wch.
I believe he always wears,) was a fine India Chintz Robe
de Chambre, -- a Cambric night cap bound round with a
striped border of chintz -- Slippers, & fine Bruʃsels point
Ruffles, & upon one of his little fingers a large brilliant
Diamond ring of great value -- he has a large fortune, and
we saw a number of man Servants in superb liveries wch.
denoted it -- as far as appearance goes. Mr. Varrulst shewd
us 4 rooms & a closét cram̄ed with highly finished
Flemish & Dutch pictures -- there was one by R---ubens
which Mr. V values as the best he ever painted; From
Mr- Varrulst's we proceeded to Charles Prince of
Lorraine's Court, which is magnificient & in good taste,
(as far as I have experience to judge) the first room
we entered was hung with Tapestry wrought in a
superiour stile from designs by Rubens -- between
each window were looking Glaʃses from ye Ceiling to
to the Ground; the Cornice & Ceiling beautiful; ano-
ther
Room was wainscoated with the wood of Nut-
Tree
brought from Turkey, ornamented in a light
yet rich manner with Copper gilt. We were shewn
many curious pieces of mechanism, Clocks &c. &c. &c.
there was a long narrow Gallery filled with very mean
pictures -- a Salle á Manger (a large Room) also full
of pictures, some good. Prince Charles has two
Millions of Florins per annum; he has also a
Noble Summer Palace. We saw him drive past us
in an open Carriage -- he is a large, bloated, plain
looking Man -- he drinks two bottles of Burgundy every
day at dinner -- each bottle twice the size of English
quart ones. -- besides liquers &c. From the Court we went
                                                         to



8 15
to see the Arsenaly Arsenal where there is a quantity of curious Armour
amongst that of others we particularly noticed, was that of
Charles the 5th- and Mountezuma's -- the workmanship of
the first was admirable -- that of poor Montezuma's was
made of Indian Reeds and other similar materials. --
From the Arsenal we went to the Capuchins -- over the
great Altar a Picture by Rubens', of Christ dead on the knees
of the Virgin Mary a very affecting and beautiful picture,
the Magdalaine's figure and countenance is very lovely.
Almost (The works of Rubens, Vandyck, G. de Crayer, &c.
are chiefly monopolized by the Churches in Flanders &
in them you will find their find their best productions)
The Capuchin who shewed us the Church took us to the
Sacristi & shewed us a picture of Christ & Mary his
Mother by Atto Verrius; and a fine Ivory Crucifix
by Quernoy -- and two pictures by Vandyck, the one
St. Anthony, the other St. Francis. It is not
poʃsible for me, My dearest Mama, to mention
all the pictures, Sculptures, Relicks, Architecture
&c. &c. &c. wch. are worthy notice in the Churches &
other places -- for besides my want of judgment, we
see things too rapidly for perfect recollection. Lord
Pomfret
& suite came here (in his way to Antwerp)
quite recovered. The weather is fine -- we looked
at Lace and Silk Stockings wch. are dear & to be purchased
as cheap in London. The best society here is elegant.
My Hair was well dreʃsed by the Princeʃs's Hair dreʃser, not so
extravagantly large as in London -- the fashions very here in
the same manner, Some of the Ladies have their heads well
loaded. We saw elegant small hats composed of Blond's --
foils flowers &c. so small that but a small portion of hair
is covered -- they do not wear any other to walk abroad in,
                                                         they



                                                         9 16
they leave the face exposed, & are made wth. open wires behind to
turn up to the crown of the head, or let down to appear round,
some of these hats have extravagantly high feathers waving
on the top. These Hats we saw at one of the first milleners
they were for Ladies of quality.
Saturday
10th. August
      Left Bruʃsels at 8 oClock, dined at Maline or
      Mechlin -- saw some Churches -- arrived in
Antwerp in the Afternoon. L'Hotel d'Angleterre;
went to the Church of the Recollects -- from thence to that of
the Augustines -- from there to Notre Dame called the
Cathedral[31] -- the Tower beautiful Gothic 466 feet high.
The great Altar entirely of Marble very superb, The Statue
of St. Paul finely executed on the top, all his at the
expence of Capello y[e] Bishop of Antwerp -- I shall make
a list of pictures &c ------ the memorandum of our
party & my own and what we markd in in the book --

Then to the Dominicaines &c. I had a bad Sick headach
                             wch- kept me at home part of ye way &c

Sunday 11th
August
Antwerp
      Mr. Foster read prayers -- after which some of
      our party went again to the Cathedral -- then to
      Mr. Lonty an Historical Painter, & 2 others --
after dinner went to St. Andre -- opposite to ye Chapel
of the Saint Sacrament there is an Epitaph to the
Memory of Mary Queen of Scots with her Portrait
over it, the head is beautiful -- on the North Side a
picture by Vandyck of our Saviour & the Virgin Mary --
The Valet de Place Lord Dartrey hired here is a very
intelligent Man & could give an acct. of every Picture
&c in a clear manner -- his name, de Bois. The City
of Antwerp is the Capital of the Marquisate of the same
name in the Netherlands, wth. a Citadel reckon'd ye. strongest
in the Low Countrys -- the City is built in form of a Crescent
on the River -- it was esteemed 200 years ago ye. greatest
Trading port in Europe -- but the traffic is removed to
Amsterdam & other Towns in Holland -- In the after-
noon
we saw the private collection of the Chanoine



10 17
Chanoine Knyffe, -- & the Abbé de Saint Michel
where we saw some capital Pictures by Rubens, Vandycke,
& other eminent painters -- the apartments weare very
spacious & commanded an extensive view of the River --
Here the Royal family are lodged, & we were shewn
some boards burnt, on wch. it is said, the King of
France
& Charles the 1st. of England burnt some pa-
pers
of consequence. Antwerp is subject to ye. house
of Austria
Monday
12th August
1776
      Left Antwerp at 11 -- din'd at Mecklin -- (or Malines)
      at a pretty good Inn called la Grue -- saw ye-
      Cathedral saw no Pictures to rival those at
Antwerp -- went to L'Eglise of St. Jean where is a fine
Picture of the Adoration of the Maji by Rubens --
We drank tea & slept at Bruʃsels to wch place we re-
turn'd
from Antwerp in our way to Aix la Chapelle
Tuesday
13th August
      Saw the Jesuists Church, College &c. &c. it
      was melancholy to see a place so deserted --
all the Vestments of the Priests & abt. 2000 pictures to
be sold -- they told us the pictures were chiefly copies &
a few good originals -- many were sad daubs -- We then
went to the Abbé de Colbert -- St. Jacques de Couden-
berg
-- he recd. us wth. great politeneʃs, shewed us his
private apartments & his Chapel -- saw two beautiful
sketches by Vandycke, -- he also shewed us a drawing of
the Abbey & Church & apartments wch. are going to be
built upon a noble & extensive scale; to be enabled
to complete this, they intend selling some valuable
Pictures -- we saw a Madona & Child by Vandyck -- and
3 Pictures by Rubens for -- wch. said 3 Pictures they ask
four thousand Guineas -- The Abbé de Coudenberg is
a jolly well looking Man, appears abt. 60 -- There was
an Old Abbé with him who very politely invited us
to go to his House in the Country, on our return from
Spa to see some curious paintings -- flowers &c.
Bruʃsels is Capital of Brabant & all the Austrian --
Netherlands on the Senne -- & Residence of ye. Vice Roy.
Prince Charles of Lorraine, & subject to Austria --
                                                         The



                                                         11 18
The Road for some Miles from Antwerp near Bruʃsels
is charming -- one side thickly planted wth. Trees, on the
other a fine clear River & a broad good road on each side
the Pavé
Tuesday
13th. August
1776
      Left Bruʃsels at 12, the road beautiful be-
      tween
B: & Louvain, 3 & sometimes 4 rows of
      Trees on each side of the Road -- no hedge rows --
we saw 3 wheels on wch. some malefactors had been executed
these were in a field near ye. public road -- the land is cul-
tivated
close to the trees planted on the sides of ye. Road --
The Harvest is begun, they cut the corn wth a short Scythe &
hold it down with a Stick in the left hand, women la-
bour
as well as Men. We saw them reap Poppies in ye-
same manner as the Corn -- they have long narrow --
Carriages drawn sometimes by 4 sometimes 5 horses
3 of them abreast -- on there Vehicles they load a vast
quantity. Women & children wear wooden Shoes, few
have stockings -- Beggars are numerous on The Road &
the Doors of Inns -- we dined at Louvaine (at the
Ville de Cologne) -- every thing good & well dreʃsed --
excellent Beds, very clean, & the people very attentive.
The State House at Louvaine is esteemed a most
beautiful Gothic Building -- tis in good preservation,
we all admired it much. At the Chapel of the Con-
vent
of Les Dames Blanches we saw a fine Picture
by Rubens -- the adoration of the Maji -- at the large
Church of St. Piere we saw some exquisite carving
in Oak, -- walked to the Eglise Dominicaines,
belonging to Women & Convent, heard Vespers -- was not
charmed either by the voices of playing of the Nuns
& their Organ was a bad one. Saw St. Augustins
Church -- a fine picture by Crayer -- a Monk gave
a book of Miracles -- Louvaine is not a clean nor
agreeable Town.
Wednesday
14th. August
      At 7 in the Morning left Louvaine, changed
      Horses at Tirlemont -- a large Town, with
3 old Churches -- wch. Lord Dartrey did not think, worth --
                                                         while stopping
                                                         to



12 19
to look at; changed Horses again at St. Trond, and of
Tongres where we dined at La Poste -- they made Lord
Dartrey
pay extravagantly for a very bad dinner --
The weather was exceʃsively hot wch. did not agree wth-
dear Lady Dartrey & we got to Maistretch in ye. afternoon
a very large Inn, every thing clean, good Beds, well attended,
the Landlord remarkably civil, The Inn called the Moulinn.
Lord Dartrey found the charge reasonable for an elegant
Supper & Desert. At the entrance of the Town there is a
strict search -- we were stop'd by the Burreau[32] (or Custom-
house
officer) & asked more questions than usual, for
at every great Town travellers are stop'd at the Gates, asked
who they are & whether they have any thing sujet au
droit de sa Majesté, & where they are going, but as we
were going to Aix la Chappelle as travellers & not
Merchants were permitted to paʃs without the Trunks
being opened -- The officer who examined us appeared
to be an Ensign about 13 or 14 & short of that age, the
Burreaus at some other Towns did not appear of equal
Dignity as they always asked Lord Dartrey for some --
money for Drink. Maestritch is a well built Town,
large & clean, it is situated on the River Maes, it
is garrison'd by the Dutch who have ye. civil govern-
ment
of that part called the Town wch. is 4 miles in
circuit, & strongly & curiously fortified -- there are
3 Dutch Churches -- none for Roman Catholics, -- Lord
Dartrey
did not stay to see any thing here. This City
(by ye. acct.. published,) was taken by the Dutch from ye-
Spaniadrds in 1632, & retaken by the French by Louis
the 14th.
, in person, in 1673, who restored it again to
the Dutch by the Peace of Nemigen in 1679,[33] & has
since continued in their poʃseʃsion.
                                                         this far
Thursday
15 August
1776
      Left Maestritch after breakfast, a tolerable
      road but no Pavé or rows of Trees -- N.B. the
Road from Calais to near M: is paved ye. same as ye.
Streets in London, & on each side of ye. pavement, wch. is
broad, is a Road equal to our best turnpike roads in
England -- (In Winter or rainy Weather they drive on the
pavement. The Postilions wear enormous boots, they
                                                         are



                                                         20
are made of Iron covered with leather -- when I first saw
a number of these Boots standing upright in the Inn-
yard
at Calais & the Postilions just before they were to
mount their Horses, thrusting their legs in wth. shoes on
their feet, I could hardly refrain laughing -- & we were
all amused at ye. Novel sight of Postilions with long
grises dangling down their backs & Cocked 3 Cornered
Hats -- they use short hadndle whips with long lashes,
wch. are thick near the handle wch. they dexterously crack
several times wth. considerable noise when they set off or arrive at
an Inn; but to return to the Boots wch. are more useful
than laughable as they are calculated to save a limb
from being fractured in case of a fall on the paved road.)
Lord Dartrey stop'd at a small Village, wth. his usual
humanity, to rest the horses -- I can't recollect the
name of the Village -- we had Cold meat & good Boullie[34]
on wch. made an excellent meal -- The Road from this
place to Aix la Chapelle is hilly & ye. country on are wooded -- (The
roads in Flanders being flat it appeared ridicoulous to
us to observe the slow snail-like pace of ye. Postilions
if they met with ye. least, almost imperceptible, rise
of ground.) The road near Aix is bad -- the surrounding
country beautiful. About 5 we arrived at the
Aix la Chapelle Great Hotel kept by De Bigh where Lord & Ly Dartrey
found a very handsome suit of apartments ready
to receive them & their party, viz: a very large dining
Room wth. painted hangings, but I have not time to
stop to describe ye. rest, only I must say that I
am lodged in a room I feel ashamed to occupy as
it is ye. best & largest, but Dr. Ld. & Ly. D—— would
have it so -- it is next to ye. dining room, very large & hung wth. painted
hangings. We found Mrs. XBoughton & two of her
Daughters
were lodged in this Hotel -- they have been
abt. 10 days at Aix la Chapelle -- they drank tea wth-
us -- after wch. Lady Dartrey felt herself stout enough to
walk with all our party & Mrs. & Miʃs Boughton's to see
the Baths wch. are oposite to this Hotel, & to the Emperor's
                                                         Baths
X Bed chamber woman to the Queen. Ld. Lyttleton's Delia, see his sonnets



21
      Baths which are at a greater distance -- we lodge near
the Pump, Ball room, & walks -- I did not go out as I
wished my Dearest Mama to continue my journal
to you -- The weather very Sultry.
      Aix la Chapelle is soveregign State of Germany & an
Imperial City -- large not handsome. The Emperor
Charlemagne
was the discoverer of the hot spring --
The Baths are large, handsome & convenient, they
say they are particularly beneficial to those who
are afflicted by Palsey or Scurvy, the water is so
strongly impregnated with Sulphur, that I smell it
when I open my bed-Room Windows, tho' the Baths
are in a Back Court on the opposite side of the way
or street. -- The water at the Emperors Baths are so
hot as require sipping -- they are not so much
drunk as the water from the Pump near ye Hotel
wch. are cooler.
Friday 16th
August 1776
Aix la Chapelle
      During some hours in the Night there
      was an awful Storm of Thunder, Rain
      Lightning & Hail, you know I am not
particularly affected by Thunder but the lightning
flash'd so terribly on me in Bed that I got up, &
thought over those lines of Mrs. Carter's, wch. Lord Napier
sent me, wch. you will see in her little Book of poems,
she wrote them during a storm (I think) to a friend --
they begin,------------------Let coward guilt wth pallid fear” -- &c.[35]
      I went wth: Lord Dartrey to ye. Pump, this Morng, and
drank two glaʃses of water -- the rest of ye. day was
chiefly filled up by walking about the Town -- Mrs. &
Miʃs Boughton's drank tea with us. Mr. Jenkinson
the friend (& formerly Secretary) of Lord Bute, paid Lord
Dartrey
a visit in the Eveg. I have heard he wais a
Man of superior political abilities -- but his man-
ner
, voice and countenance are by no means prepoʃ
sing
-- he is tall, thin, & most ungainly & awkward.
there is however great shrewdneʃs in his eyes when
                                                         they are



                                                         22
not squeezed up by laughing, wch. he does often, & in no very
harmonious tones.
Saturday
17th. August
Aix la Chapelle
1776
      We got up early, went to ye. Pump -- people
      take Magnesia & Sulphur at night when they
      intend drinking the water in ye. next Morng. --
Walked on the Parade made acquaintance wth-
Sir John & Lady Webb -- (she has an elegant figure & is
very handsome -- Fine dark brown hair wch. grows well
on her forehead -- face oval -- Nose rather Acquiline, eyes
well cut, dark hazelle -- fine eye-brows -- good teeth &c &c)
-- also with a polite old French Gentleman who we hear is a
Man of consequence & very rich -- his Daughter just gone
to Spa -- [36]After Dinner we walked to a Convent in a
Village or little Town called Bourchet[37] -- about a Mile
from Aix la C—— it is calld an Abbaye founded by ye.
Emperor's Otho 2d. & 3d & Henrys 2 & 3d -- The Ladies
are Noble -- Madame Platenburgh who, obligingly,
shewed us the Chapel, has the air of a person of
high fashion and appears amiable -- there is an
Abbeʃs
and, only, ten Ladies -- they have leave of
absence once a year to visit their distant Relations, &
they have liberty to pay visits in the Town & receive com-
pany
: each have 4 Rooms. wch appeared but shabbily
furnished, & each a Garden with paltry pictures &
Prints, & the walls white wash'd, they live on their
own fortunes, each have a Maid Servant -- or, what we
stile, a Ladys Maid -- A Table & every thing requisite
for their Board is provided for them free cost --
They have lately built a large handsome Chapel -- wch. is
just completed. There is a hot spring in this Town
wch. boils an Egg in 3 Minutes -- it smells strong of
Sulphur.



23






Aix Aug 15th to 29th p.20-41
Spa Aug 29th Oct 11th 42-62
Liege Oct 11th 13th        65
Louvain 15
Brussels 16 17 70
Ghent
Lille
S Omers
------               25




                                                         24
                                                         Aix la Chapelle
I left off my journal on the 16th. of August[38] -- on Saturday
the 17th- walked in the Morning on the Esplanade met
Sir John & Lady Webb -- they are English and Roman
Catholics -- he looks likes a little french Hair Dreʃser,
he can tell the history of every one here if you chose
to ask him, they say he has a very large Estate in
England and is shabby & pernicious, chiefly residing on
the Continent -- Lady Webb is his 3d. Wife, he married
her when she was little more than 13 -- she was a Miʃs
Salvin
of York -- she is handsome, has delicate
health, and looks very unhappy. Met also Monr.
Bartin
a pleasant old Frenchman, a very rich --
Finnancier -- he is Uncle to Madame Monboisier, he
intends to visit England next year Winter. Mrs.
Boughton
-- (a Bed chamber woman to the Queen) and
her Eldest, and youngest daughter (Jane) went with us
after dinner to Bourchet, a Village about a Mile from
Aix la Chapelle to see an Abbaye founded by the
Emperors Otto &c. there are only ten Ladies inclu-
ding
the Abbeʃs -- they are all Noble; Madame Platen-
burg
who shewed us the Chapel &c. is remarkably
well bred & polite, each of the Ladies have 4
Rooms a Garden & Maid Servant, they are allowed
to visit their Relations & friends, they have also
a very ample table kept for them. Madame Platen-
burgh
enquired much after Lady Effingham: She
made us promise to pay her another visit; in one
                                                         of the rooms
                                                         She



25
she shewed us there were two Gentlemen drinking
tea, they joined us, & one of them attended us to the
boiling Well -- The water is of that degree of heat as to
boil an Egg in 3 minutes; We return'd home to tea,
and then went to the Aʃsembly, wch, is next door to
this Hotel, there were but few people, & as Lady
Dartrey
and myself were to Bathe at 8 o'Clock we
came away so early that Cards were not begun --
We made acquaintance with a Marquise de la
Bedoyere
a handsome interesting woman, and
a Mrs Nugent, & another Lady of this place, they
were very civil. I found the Bathing very agree-
ablye
, and the attendants and accomodations excel-
lent
.
Sunday the 18th- I drank the proper quantity of
water, 3 glaʃses, before breakfast, one is not al-
lowed
to breakfast till an hour after ye. last Glaʃs,
Lord Dartrey calls me up every Morning at 6 o'Clock, walked
to the Emperor's Bathes met Mr. Jenkinson, (who
honors me by much notice) he is certainly a very
clever man but not an agreeable one to suit my taste).
The Boughton's, Monr. Butin &c -- After breakfast
Mr. Foster (the young Gentleman's Tutor) read pray-
ers
, very well, and gave me a good Sermon. In
the afternoon Mrs. & the Miʃs Boughton's drank tea wth-
us. Mrs. B left us early & was so gracious as to let her
Daughters
remain wth. us, we spent the Eveg very
cheerfully. 19th: Monday Spent the Morng most comfortably
with Dr. Ld. & Lady Dartrey -- the Young men & their
                                                         Tutor




                                                         26
otherwise engaged -- I bathed at 1 o'Clock afterwards had my
hair dreʃsed by a celebrated performer on heads of this
Town. After dinner some good humoured acquaintance Monr
Butin
came to laugh & Goʃsip till 7 when we all went to
the Ball, I danced with Mr. Dawson -- a French Count
& two other gentlemen asked me to dance wth: them but
I did not change my partner -- One of the gentlemen was
a queer looking mortal -- I did not enquire who he
was -- we danced English Country Dances, and were 8
couple -- Monr. Butin gave tea to all our party, he
lamented that his lameneʃs prevented his opening
the Ball with me -- These little parties are in my op-
inion
a thousand time more cheerful than a fine
Ball or great aʃsembly. The Marquise De La Bedoyer
danced with Lord Dartrey. Le Marquis her Husband was there, a
genteel handsome young Man. We got home at 10 o'Clock,
Small Blond Hats, & quantities of Feathers, worn
on one side of the head is the general fashion here, it
is both smart & elegant. Tuesday 20th. The wea-
ther
too bad to walk much -- In the Eveg. Lord D——
amused us by teaching us Taro -- he held the Bank,
& we wasere as interested about our fourth part of farthings
as if they were Guineas. Wednesday 21 walk'd wth-
Lord & Lady Dartrey to pay visits, see shops, and
the Needle Manufacturing wch. is very curious -- we
dined early, after which, I went wth. Mr Dawson the
2 Penn's
& Mr.. Foster to the Summit of a Mountain
it was difficult for me to climb, but I was rewarded for
my labour by seeing a beautiful & extensive view
of the country. -- on the top of the Mountain saw many
foʃsil shells -- and great variety of aromatic herbs
                                                         which



27
perfumed the air. In the Eveg we all went tot he
aʃsembly for an hour. Thursday 22 Went with Lord
& Lady D—— to pay a visit to the amiable Marquise
de la Bedoyere
-- hired some French Books at the Book
Sellers. -- saw the Market place and la Grand Place where
their is a Noble State House or Maison de Ville; in
the Middle of la Grand place is a large beautiful fountain[39]
-- we have seen in every (I think) Town we have gone
through remarkable Pumps and Fountains. We
dined early & went afterwards with the Boughton's &
La Marquise to the Cathedral, the most ancient
building of the kind we have yet seen, there are not
any paintings, but there are great store of Relics, --
L'Archi Pretre Davis showed us every thing worthy
observation -- bquantities of celebrated Relics, Bones
of Charlemangne, &c. &c. &c. inclosed in gold cases &
studdied with diamonds, pearls, onyx, &c. &c. a
very fine Onyx of an uncommon size, a Cameo of
the Emperor Otho & his wives heads; The Em-
peror
Charlemagne
is buried in this Cathedral
he has no Monument -- a large square pavement
marks where he was buried: In one of ye Chapels
there is a Pulpit of Maʃsy gold enriched with pre-
cious
stones & gems -- one Onyx measures more
than half a foot: L'Archi Pretre shewed us the
Crowns that the Infanta Isabella presented to ye-
Virgin Mary & the young Saviour for them to wear
on high days -- they are of gold, ornamented with
fine diamond & pearls & their form is beautiful,
                                                         she



                                                         28
she likewise presented the Vestments wch. are Sattin
finely embroidered with color'd flowers, and quantities
of White Lillies in small pearls -- the border is almost
grounded with small pearls, diamonds and large
pearls. There are hangings for the whole Chair &c, &c,
the gift of some Bishop (I 'dont just now recollect
his name) they are of Crimson Velvet embroidered
with pearls & gold. We noticed the Stone Chair of
Charlemagne on wch. all the Emperors are seated when
they are crowned, near it are two fine Verd antique
pillars and two of beautiful Granite. Over the great
Altar is the Escutcheon of Lewis the 13 & 14th- of France, as
soon as Lewis the 15th was burried they sent his to
be placed under L: the 14th. -- In this Choir is the
Tomb of the German Emperor Otho. & at the end a small Organ.
The Marquise de la B: returned with us to tea, we then
went to the AgreeablyRooms, as there was not any Music, the
Marquis de la Bedoyere
very good naturedly offer'd to
send for his Violin that we might dance, but this
was stop'd by his being aʃsured there would be a
Procés commenced against him next day, for in-
fringing
the rights of the Band of Musicians, who
were paid by the gentlemen, what made this appear
ridiculous was that the Musicians were not in
the Aʃsembly rooms was because they thought there
would not be Gentlemen enough to pay them; as
there was no dancing we went into one of the Card
Rooms wch. had no party in it -- but our own & were
amused by the agreeable Marquise teaching us some
french recreations -- similar to Blind Man's Buff &c &c



29
      [40]My Dear Madam
                             I have beg'd Miʃs Hamilton to a---
me to add a Postcript to her Letter, & now she has done so, I almost
scruple making use of her Permiʃsion, because it takes up ye:
Paper She would otherwise fill. & I know what it must be to
you to receive her Letters. I shall therefore in as few words as
poʃsible beg you to be aʃsured how sensibly I feel my obligations
to you for ye: Treasure you intrust me with = She is the most
delightful Companion I ever travelled with, & I really hope, she
will return to you not the worse for this little Excursion -- She is
I thank God quite well, both the Waters & Bathing seem to agree
with her -- Lord D & I are charmed with her, & I aʃsure you She is much
admired, but I am a very careful Chaperone. Adieu ma trés chere Madme:
nous parlons Francais du matin jusqua'u Soir, mi Lord vous
presente ses baisemains -- & permettez que Je vous offre mes
dRespects & toute la reconnaisance, qui vous est dit, de la part
                             de votre Servante Obbeeist & tres humble
                                                         P Dartrey
a thousand Thanks for ye goodneʃs to my Child.)

There is a Taro-table in the rooms and 3 desperate
Gamesters hold the Bank -- it is very painful to
observe the agitation of those who play, both men
& women.

Aix la Chapelle
Friday 23d. August
1776
      After Breakfast I walkd with Lord
      & Lady Dartrey to a Church upon
      a Hill near the Town, from whence
there is a charming prospect, a poor Woman who re-
sides
in a Cottage near the Church brought us chairs
and without our asking her went & milked her
Cow, whilst we were sitting & waiting for the milk, we saw a
poor young woman with a sick infant in her arms, two
children followed her, one held a Rosary and a bottle
of holy water, and the other two Candles, they went
into the Cottage & came out again with the Candles
lighted -- they then went to the Church door, the young
                                                         woman wth-



                                                         30
an expreʃsive countenance of deep affliction mad a sign
to us to follow her, which we did and to our great sur-
prise
found a place filled with Straw & Wheat like
a granaryBarn, wch. we got through with some difficulty
at the end of this Barn without any partition was
a Chapel filled with Crucifixes and wretched daubs
of pictures -- on one side lay an image of Christ, as
dead -- dreʃsed in mourning, & the Virgin & Two Saints
stood behind him, also in Mourning, -- there was
an Altar, a Pulpit, Confeʃsional chair &c. decorated
in as miserable a manner as the Images; the
Ceiling was a Hay loft, filled. The poor young
Woman placed her Candles on each side of ye. figure
of Christ, & then knelt down with the Sick Child
in her arms -- her two other children knelt on each
side of her -- they were silent but appeared to offer
up prayers with a devotion that was truly affecting,
Such a scene is not easily described, but I feel that it will
not, easily, be effaced from my memory. We went
through the Chapel and discovered the ruins of
Some Gothic architecture -- & an open arched Vault
with a large Stone Tomb. We gave the young Woman
something and left her with very fervant wishes
that her prayers might be granted.      I bathed at
one,. We dined early and walked to Bourchet where
we drank tea at a small House called L'Ceriviʃse
here there are Baths & Vapeur Baths hotter than
those at Aix. We went to see a Garden belonging
to a Mr: Kounan, a Needle Merchant, there are in
this Garden upwards of 30 figures some as large
                                                         as



31
as life, of Men & Women, they are composed of
Shell work, finished in a stile you could hardly ima
gine
-- notwithstanding Dear Mama your own skill
and taste in Shell work -- we went into a large Grotto where
some Officers were regaling with Mr. Kounan, the
inside was entirely covered with beautiful Shell-work
of fruits, flowers and other ornaments, in shells,
there were figures likewise, the drapery of these
were so well executed as to appear at a short dis-
tance
like painting -- it is said £30,00 has been expended
in this place -- Mr. K must be a rich Man for
Aix la Chapelle. NB. I do not admire the needle --
Merchants taste -- I dare say he is a Dutch Man. --
Saturday 24th.
Lady Dartrey & I had a comfortable tete à tète
all Morng, she did not wish to go out. We drank
tea drank tea in great form at Mrs. Boughtons wch. gave
me the fidgets most terribly. -- Miʃs Boughton's came
to us in the Eveg. they all sat down to Commerce
& I went to my room to scribble till supper time
Sunday 25th. We had prayers early and Mr- Foster
read an excellent Sermon: afterwards I went with
Lord & Lady Dartrey in a Coach through the prin-
ciplal
streets of the Town to see the preparations
wch. are making for a great Spectacle, viz: the
Reception of one of the Students of a College of
Louvain. There is one chosen every year out
                                                         of



                                                         32
of 4 Colledges and 6000 Students who has ye. greatest
Merit -- the young man who is going to receive these
marks of honor is 18, and has distinguished him-
self
worthy of the prize in several branches of
learning particularly philosophy -- he is to enter
Aix this day in triumph, & will be received wth-
every demonstration of joy as it is his native
place -- there has not been one in this City who
has been worthy of this prize honor 140 years,
and then it was adjudged to one of his family.
The Streets through wch. he is to paʃs are decorated with young trees stuck
in the ground 4 feet aʃsunder, -- fine Shrubs are
put out at most of the WindowsDoors, in pots, tubs &c
We drove through 26 triumphal Arches, every
one different, some with coloured & white
Egg-shells beautifully & simply entermixt wth-
Ever-greens -- others equally pretty with flowers,
paintings -- Ribbons, & Feathers &c. -- The young
Man's name, Josephus Widlt, is embroidered upon
Coloured flags with inscriptions of his abilities &c,
others with tin Silvered &c -- there are hundreds of
colored lamps prepared -- in short every thing yt.
can look most gay -- As were w------ere paʃsing his Fa-
ther
s House Lord Dartrey ordered the carriage to
stop that we might look at its decorations, &
seeing some Servants at the Door, he call'd one and
sent a handsome meʃsage (in all our names) of con-
gratulations
on an event wch. must be sensibly felt
by Parents -- (was not this amiable in Ld. Dartrey?
                                                         but



33
a heart benevolent and overflowing with the milk
of human kindneʃs like his is always on the alert.)
The family were at dinner but the Mother & Sister came
out, and invited us to be at their house at 4 o'Clock, that
we might be better able to see the proceʃsion, afterwards
join in the cavalcade, & be 2 thus 1 able 3 to see the whole.
He is to go to the Cathedral where Te Deum is to be finely
performed, after that to ride through all ye. Streets & go to the Hotel de Ville, where ye-
Burge Maester
, & Towns People are to make him a speech
in Latin, after which there will be a magnificent
Supper: every Town he paʃses through from Louvain
make him a present, Prince Charles of Lorrain a
considerable one -- I believe I heard £2,000; and
he would take place of any Prince, Duke &c. if there
was one in the town, on this day -- Prince Chs. of Lorrain
gives him the upper hand. A Silver Basin & Ewer
are likewise given to him at the Town House. The Father
of this young Man
is a Merchant worth £6,000, he is
esteemed a worthy respectable character. The Bells
ringing and guns firing in every part of the Town. I
dreʃsed myself as gay & fine as I could, so did every
one, and at ½ past 3 I went in a Coach with our favorite
Marquise
& Lord Dartrey -- (Lady Dartrey had a cold
& did not like to venture out) again) and the young
Gentleman
& Mr. Foster in another, we got to the
Father
s House through an innumerable crowd,
there, there were aʃsembled, Uncles, Cousins, &c;
The Mother appears a plain sensible Woman
& who seemed to support her happineʃs with the
                                                         great --



                                                         34
greatest propriety -- the Proceʃsion arrived at last, it was
a long one -- the young Man is handsome and has a charm-
ing
countenance full of sense and sweetneʃs, he rode a
White Horse -- had an air of Modesty, bowed and
smiled gracefully and waved a Branch of Laurel, they
had put into his hand -- we followed the proceʃsion to
the Cathedral and returned home, in a quarter of an
hour had the pleasure of kiʃsing our hands to him
as he paʃsed our windows in Calvalade, as before,
the whole Town is illuminated; Balls & feasting
will continue some days; the Marquise supped wth-
us.
Monday
26 August
      Walking Bathing &c. in ye. Morng -- dined
      early -- All our party went to tea at the
Marquis de La Bedoyere
's Lodgings, he gave us a very
pretty Concert, he played, well, himself on the Violin --
and Lady Dartrey treated us with some of her sweet
songs; the M: & Marquise return'd with us to supper
We recd. a polite meʃsage from the Primus (the
young Student is so stiled) to envite us to the great
Ball at the Jesuists' College -- we all went after
making some alteration in our dreʃs -- we drove through
a great concourse of people, every Tree had a Lamp
stuck in it wch. with all the other decorations had a
beautiful effect -- there was a fine Ball, I danced
with the Marquis who is a fine dancer and as I
felt more acquainted with him I declined other
partners to the number of 8. I had the honor of
dancing a Cottilion[41] with the Primus who preʃsed
hard that I would stay the entertainment that was
to follow the Ball -- the Marquise offered to be my
                                                         chaperon if



35
if I chose to remain, I prefer̄'d returning home wth-
Lady Dartrey; we left the Ball at ½ past ten, a
late hour at Aix la Chapelle. The Marquis and
his Lady supped with us and very merry we
all were.
Tuesday 27th.
August 1776
Aix la Chapelle
      In reply to Mr.. Glover's question pray inform
      him that I have enquired, & am told that
      the Flemish Farmers never let their
Lands lie fallow but sew them succeʃsively wth. different
kinds of Grain, & pulse, as best suits the Ground which
they occasionally aʃsist by manure of wch. I observed they
were very sparing. To continue my journal --
Lord Dartrey & I walked about the Town all Morning --
Ly.- D—— being a little indisposed did not wish to go out, we went
to the Jesuits College where the Ball was yesterday to
see some pictures -- found they were only indifferent Copies --
from good & bad originals -- went to the Hotel de Ville
or State House wch. is a large building wth. some large
Showy Rooms in wch. were Pictures not worth looking at,
There was however a large Picture by Rubens -- ye subject --
The last judg-ment -- it is in wretched condition --
Another said to be by Vandyck -- Representing the
Emperor Charlemagne
giving the Charter to ye. Magis-
strates
of Aix la Chapelle -- In the great Room is an
interesting Picture, but not well painted, of all
the persons aʃsembled at the Congreʃs wch. was held at
the Peace in the year 1748 when Lord Sandwich was
the English Minister -- there are likewise single
Portraits of each Ambaʃsador at that time of the
different Nations employ'd, they are badly painted --
when we returned to the Hotel found a polite
sensible, agreeable Man in conversation wth Ly Dartrey
he is the Polish Ambaʃsador at Rome -- he paid
the visit as having lodgings in the same Hotel --
-- now in London or England this would not be thought
leʃs than impertinent -- but as ye saying is, different Countries
different Customs.



                                                         36
27 August 1776
Mr. Lovel Stanhope, is here in his way frm. Spa to Paris,
Lord Dartrey invited him to dinner -- his conversation
was entertaining & interesting -- he related many anec-
dotes
of the celebrated Wortley Montague -- This singular
eccentric charactedr was at Aix la Chapelle with
Lord Sandwich at the time of the Congreʃs: -- The Germans
could not find time for relaxation & expreʃs'd great
surprise that Ld- Sandwich & Mr. Montagu always
got their busineʃs forward yet did not appear to pay
proper attention to it, for Lord Sandwich spent his
Mornings at Cricket -- & in the Eveg. Mr. Montague held
a Farro Bank[42] -- however Mr. Lovel Stanhope said
they did not neglect their duty, & aʃsured us that
he had seen 3 Copies of the articles written fair by
Mr Montague during that time, a task wch. would
have every Moment of any other persons time to have
accomplished in the time. Mr. Lovel Stanhope told
us he knew it for fact that as soon at Mr.. Montague
hadrecd- information of his Legal Wife's death -- he sent
Advertisements to be put in the London Newspapers -- for
a Woman big with Child wch. he would marry -- he
wanting to disappoint the next heirs, &c. &c, he
also immediately proposed to set out for England wch-
coming to the Knowledge of his head wife (for as a Maho-
Metan
in had several wives) she gave him Poison wch-
caused his death -- there was no truth in other reports
circulated, such as his having been choked by a Bone, &c[43]
There was nothing Mr. Montagu's spirit dared not attempt
& he had genius to accomplish every thing he did attempt.
Mr. Lovel Stanhope related the following anecdote
There was a Dutch Merchant resident at Venice who
had a beautiful & amiable Wife -- Mr.. Montague admired
the Merchants Lady and got introduced to the Husband
to whom he made himself particularly agreeable, & a
great intimacy soon took place -- he then took every opportu-
nity
to make love to the Lady, she was truly attached
to her husband who in return loved her wth ye. truest
                                                         affection, she



37
she therefore had reason to apprehend the most fatal conse-
quence
wd- insue should the infamous treachery of this
insidious friend be discovered, & suffered ye. most cruel
Martrydom -- this continued for a long time -- Montague
finding her proof against all his wiles changed his
plan & became respectful, distant, & reserved -- the
Lady
flattered herself that he was grown weary of perse-
cuting
her & ashamed of the part he had been acting -- &
rejoiced that she had had the prudence to conceal his
Conduct from her Husband whose partiallity, and
unbounded confidence in Montagu was without bounds.
Some affairs required the Merchants personal attendance
in Holland & it was not convenient for him to take
his Wife -- he earnestly entreated Montagu to be her
proctetor during his absence telling him he was
the only person he thought worthy of such a trust. &
departed from Venice wth. a lighter heart than he would
have had had he not poʃseʃsed (as he imagined) so true a frd-
The Merchants Wife was far from happy at this arrangement
but could not bring herself to awaken suspicion &
distrust in a breast whos only aim was to promote
her happineʃs -- he not only had ye. highest opinion
of Montagues integrity, but thought she would find
the separation leʃs tedious by having the society of
of a person so calculated to amuse by the brilliancy
of his wit imagination & inexhaustible fund of
entertainment by he poʃseʃsed by remembering
every occurrence of a most extroadinary life, -- (The
vicious part of wch. he however always was on his
Guard to conceal) -- Mr. M—— behaviour, toward the
Lady
, was such after her Husbands departure that
she had every reason to be well satisfied wth. him
& had almost lost recollection of his former base --
conduct -- things were in this state when she recd-
a letter with the heart breaking intelligence that
her Husband had been taken suddenly ill & was dead
Mr. Montagu did all in his power to aʃsuage her Grief
                                                         He



                                                         38
he desired her not to credit the report but to send to Holland
for certificates by wch. the certainty of ye. fact could be known --
Montagu wrote -- the fatal certificate arrived -- Montagus
whole study was to endeavour to console ye. wretched
Widow
-- after a decent time he proposed himself
said he lived but for her, & that his unwearied attention
deserved some recompence & who could she so proper-
ly
accept as the Man who had been loved & esteem'd
by her late worthy Husband -- the Widow hesitated
some time, she was obliged to acknowledge she lay
under particular obligations to him, he had render-
ed
himself servicable to her wth. respect to her af-
fairs
&c &c -- & she likewise began to think he
truly lov'd her, for what man would have been so very
aʃsidious, so long constant -- she lost sight of ye. criminal-
ity
of his first offers -- she promised to marry him
at ye. expiration of a year & till that time he approved
of her Residing in a Convent -- they were then married.
Will you believe that the Merchant was not dead?
& That Montagu had practised ye. same deceit on
him by sendg. him forged certificates of his Wifes
death -- whose disposition he knew wld. prevent him
from returning to place where she died -- This adven-
ture
was near 5 Years in acting -- some preʃsing
affairs obliged the Merchant to revisit Venice, judge
what he must have felt on finding his Wife alive
& Married to Montagu -- the injured pair sought
for redreʃs -- Montagu escaped, & our Ambaʃsador
screened him from the punishment due to his
crimes -- & he was too artful not to be prepared for
the worst that could happen.
Tuesday August.
27 continued
      After dinner all our party wth. Mr Lovel --
      Standhope
, & the Marquis & Marquise de
la Bedoyere
went to the French Comedy abt. a Mile &
½ from Aix la Chapelle -- the Road bad -- the place
call'd Vaux-hall. -- one large house like an Hotel, -- the
Country romantic -- The Theatre is small but con-
veniently
contrived -- at ye. end of every act the company
                                                         go



39
Aix la Chapelle August 1776
go into Rooms from their Boxes -- where is Lemonade and
various kinds of refreshments -- in one Room there is a
Billiard Table, & in another a Far̄o bank is held. The
Petite Piece was the Pupile of Diderot, it was but
indifferently acted -- after this the Operas of ye Deʃs[44]
The Man who performed ye. Deserteur had good action
&, as far as I am a judge, a fine voice -- the other actors
had little to recommend them to admiration yet they
recd. applause. -- went to the Rooms in the Eveg -- there
was not any dancing as the Primus had engaged the
musicians at ye. jesuits College -- The Marquis & Mar-
quise
de la Bedoyere
sup'd with us.
Wednesday
28 August
      I again accompanied Lord Dartrey to
      the jesuits Colledge to hunt after pic-
tures
, as he wished to purchase some, ashaving heard the Paintings
and all other moveables were to be sold -- the jesuits
being extirpated -- we roamed about the immense
building went into numberleʃs Rooms, all looked
deserted & made one feel quite melancholy -- Lord D——
could not find a Picture worth buying -- I make no
doubt the jesuits had valuable pictures but had
prudently conveyed them away in secret; in this
Lord Dartrey agreed with me. We then went to the
Hotel de Ville or Town Hall to meet Lady Dartrey
Mr. Dawson, the Penn's Mr.. Foster, & Marquis & Marquise de
La Bedoyere
-- We saw from thence a grand proceʃsion
it being St. Austin's day -- A large braʃs Head in wch-
were inclosed some of the Saints bones was carried
before a number of Priests & a great concourse of
people, all walking in pairs, with books in their
hands, chaunting Hymns -- The Host was carried
under a magnificient Canopy -- the High-priest
under another in his best Vestments, his train was
borne by two Pages -- the other Priests walkd accord-
ing
to their rank -- all richly clothed. Incense was
                                                         thrown up,



                                                         40
up, all the way, behind them -- The High Priest performed
many ceremonies, & the People all knelt upon the pavement.
In this Manner they proceeded through all the Streets. --
We then went to see the Play-House wch. is much larger
than ye one we were at yesterday -- it has been shut up for
two Years on acct of some dis-agreement. We saw at an
Apothecary's a complete & valuable collection of Shells, & Foʃsils, --
I regretted time did not allow our seeing them more
particularly; from the Apothecary's proceeded to a jewellers
who had many tempting articles, -- I was most pleased
with an elegant snuff Box, wch. on preʃsing a small
Spring play'd two or three pretty little airs very sweetly.
Here the Marquis & his Lady parted from us, & we call'd
on Lady Webb -- Mrs & 2 Miʃs Boughton's dined wth-
us & left us early -- The Marquis & Marquise came to
take leave, I had the glory of beating him 2 Games at
Cheʃs -- you may easily suppose dear Mama he is no
capital player, I never can win a Game when I play with
You. Lady Dartrey went to the Bath -- Lord Dartrey
Master Grenville Penn & I went for ½ an hour to the
Rooms -- then supper, & early to Bed.
Thursday
29th August
1776
      Nothing could have afforded me such heart-
      felt
satisfaction my Dearest Mama as your
      last letter & the comfortable aʃsurances of
Your being so well, wch. is confirmed by my amiable friends
Katherine & Anna Maria. -- Ladey Dartrey charges me to
aʃsure you that she is quite penetrated by your
constant attention & goodneʃs to her dear Boy -- her
Servts.
have written to inform her how frequently you
go to Hammersmith & the handsome play things you
give him -- Mr. Hudson, Lord Dartreys Butler, is going
to England ------------------ & has promised to take
charge of a packet for me. He will deliver it in per-
son
, & I wish to give you a hint that he has been
Remarkably civil & waited on me as if I had been
his Mistreʃs -- indeed all Lord & Lady Dartrey's Servants
treat me with equal civility, & though I am very careful
not to give them trouble, & wait on me as if it was their
duty. Mrs: Palfrey (who has lived wth. Ly Dartrey long
                                                         before



41
before she married -- I believe since she was a Child,) &
I, are quite friends -- she is a worthy creature and truly
deserving such a Mistreʃs. You will, I believe, my
Dear Mama
receive a visit from Mr. Foster who kindly
says he will call on you to give you a true & satisfactory
account of my health. I will now continue my Journal
-- I am happy you so much approve of my writing
in this manner.
29th We left Aix la Chapelle abt. 8 o'Clock. ------there are
the greatest numbers of Beggars & miserable objects in
this City poʃsible to be conceiv'd -- lame, deformed in
every way, yellow & squalid looking -- it is really very
painful to look at them, and they appear to delight
in unclothedneʃs, as they are very idle & indolent. The
Children when born are bound up like Mumies wth-
bandages -- You will see a Mother in the Streets with a
Child some months old in ther arms wch. till you are
near enough to observe its Monstrous head you wld-
take for a Collar of Brawn bound round; perhaps it
is owing to this method of treating young Children whosethat
there are so many diminutive deformed creatures --
Yet that cannot be the case neither as I am told this
Method is pursued all over the Continent, where there
are tall men & women &c, &c, & in the Scriptures
we read of the Child in swadling Clothes.
We dined at Verviers a neat Town, appeared as large
as Aix la Chapelle -- the Country surrounding is very
beautiful -- There is a very steep hill near ye. Town
from whence you have a delightful view -- the road for some
Miles is rough & Stoney -- near Spa is better and ye-
Country picturesque & Grand -- Hills covered wth.. wood
on each side -- Meadows at the bottom wth. natural
Cascades pouring down from the Hills, & a River by ye-
side of the Road -- we arrived at Spa by tea time &
immediately went to Lodgings -- the Hotel de Lor-
raine
[45] -- Lord Dartrey has taken the whole House wch-
is one of considerable size -- viz. a large drawing Room,
Do. Dining Room, Parlour, &c, and abt. 20 other Rooms.
Mr Dames, a near Relation of the unfortunate Mr-



                                                         42
Mr Dames that lately destroy'd himself, called on Lord D——
he appears a worthy sort of Man; & a young Coxcomb, a
Mr Rumbold.
Spa Friday ye.
30th. August
1776
      In the Morng. went to Mr Descars a civil
      intelligent Bookseller; gave our names to
      be printed -- the custom at Spa is to have
Cards delivered round by a Man to announce yr. arrival --
the compliment is immediately acknowledged by
the visiting Tickets of those who have recd. them, by
the same Man. Thus you are introduced to persons
of all Nations, visitors at Spa. A Mr Nugent, & our
agreeable, good humoured Aix la Chapelle acquain-
tance
, Monr Butin called -- In the Eveg. we went to
the Comedy -- The Play house is a pretty building in
a Circular form -- The Center Box, upstairs, openins --
(after the play is over) into an large elegant Room, or-
namented
with White & Gold, it is calld ye.. Redoute,
where there is an Aʃsembly kept, & when there is no
Comedy performed -- planks are laid acroʃs ye Pit wch-
makes another spacious handsome Room -- there are
also several rooms of leʃs dimensions for Card Tables.

Saturday
31st. August
      Early this Morning I accompanied Lady
      Dartrey
to the Geronstere,[46] abt 2 miles from
Spa -- met Mrs Harry Grenville & Daughter (she is Wife
to the youngest Brother of ye. Temples[47] & was the
handsome clever Peggy Banks whoch you have heard Mr-
Glover
mention -- as a Young Woman was admired for her
beauty (wch. wld have been perfect but for her forehead
wch. was too high & what is called a Knee forehead ye-
hair growing too far back &c) & dreaded for the bitter-
neʃs
of her satirical talents. There were few persons
on the walk where the company generally exercise after
drinking the Water -- it is cut out between Woods, the
Country Romantic, & what I call interesting, the Road
Stony & Rough but safe, There is a Room to shelter in, in
case of Rain something like a large Barn, but where you
may spend Money in Marchandises & Bijouteries -- Lady



43
Lady Dartrey & I return'd to Spa to Breakfast --
In the Evening we went to the Ball at Vauxhall --

Spa 1st Sepbr.
1776
Sunday
      My Dearest Mama -- An hour ago I recd. --
      Your kind letter, & Lady Dartrey was much
pleased with the one you wrote to her, she bids me tell
You she would answer it was she not much hurried in
writing a Number of letters to send to England -- the
Same post brought her an acct. of your carrying her
dear little Son
a Horse, & how happy you had made
him -- Lord & Lady Dartrey charged me wth. many
other things to say to you -- wch. I will tell you some other
opportunity -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --
Spa
31st. continued -- Coll. Pringle an agreeable Soldier like
Gentleman dined with us, we went to Vauxhall in ye.
Evening to a Ball, abt. 14 Couple, I danced first wth-
Mr Dawson -- then with Mr Nugent, Mr Roʃs &c. &c.
we came home early -- Vaux-hall is abt. a quarter
of a Mile distant from the Town -- It is a well proportioned
building & large it has not been finished above 6 or 7 Years.
I did not mention that Lady Dartrey & I walked in ye-
Rooms at Vauxhall in our way from the Geronstere this
Morng. & that Monsieur Butin introduced us to his
Sister
& Niece & they walked wth. us about ye fields near
that place.

Sunday
Sepbr. 1st-
      The Rain prevented Ly. Dartrey going to the
      Geronstere this Morng -- Mr. Foster read the
Morning Service -- abt. 12 Ld: & Ly. D——, Master Grenville
Penn
& I walked up the Mountain as far as *Lubin &
Annettes Cottage,[48] it is a lovely situation & not so much
exposed as one should imagine for there is a rising
Wood wch. on ye. back part shelters it. We partook of some Bouillion
Annette had prepared for dinner, wch. of course Lord
D.
rewarded her for, & left her & Lubin well pleased
wth. our visit. We dined early, then went to the Capu-
Capuchin Church to hear Pere Garnier preach -- it
                                                         was



                                                         44
was a very good discourse on Repentance -- he preached
extempore, he has a clear good voice & pronounces his
words distinctly -- his action chaste; -- The Prayer before
the Sermon was in Latin as were the Texts he quoted.
He was dreʃsed like the Common Capuchin Monks.
After ye. Sermon we walked in the Garden of the Monks
wch. is open to all who chuse to avail themselves of ye
priviledge. -- We then returned to our Hotel -- & all
remain'd at home. At 6 o'Clock on Sundays there is a
Comedy, and the Rooms are open, wth. Faro, &c, as on other
Evenings.

Monday
Sepr. 2d
      Lady Dartrey & I went early to ye. Geronstere.
Mr Butin gave Lord & Ly- Dartrey & their
party a Breakfast on the Mountain (where Lubin &
Annette reside) -- near the Cottage is a large Room, & there
weare two Tents fixed, one in their Garden & anyeother upon
a Graʃs Plat upon an open part of the Mountain for ye.
accomodation of company from Spa -- Mr. Butin,
had invited several Gentlemen & Ladies to meet
us -- the walk to the Mountain is abt. a Mile cut
through the woods to make the as̄ent easy -- the compa
ny
-- besides our party were as follows -- Monr. Butin,
his Sister la Vicomteʃse de Montboisier, her
daughter in law
, who is only 16 & has been married
2 Years, a merry good humour'd creature -- Monr.
D'Orcy
an elegant agreeable French Gentleman, Monr-
*D'Armes
-- a Man paʃsd the middle age, a Man of
taste & amiable manners. Mr.. Jenkinson, and
the celebrated Mr. Hans Stanley -- Mr. Mrs.. & Miʃs
Henry Grenville
. Monr. Butins Servants brought
all ye. refreshments from Spa, such as fruits --
Cakes, Sweatmeats, &c &c &c -- Tea, Coffee, Chocolate
and we had different kinds of Ice made by
Annette -- from an Ice House wch. Lubin had made
himself -- we were all very gay: -- after Breakfast Mr-
Butin
gave us ladies 6 Chances in a Raffle, as a
Man from Spa had followed the party with trinkets in
                                                         hopes of
*His Name is spelt D'Armenston, but he is call'd D'Armes.



45
of selling some -- the Man understood his busineʃs so well
that no prize was gained by any one but Miʃs Grenville
who got a pair of Siʃsors she could not use. The weather
grew cloudy so we all agreed it was prudent to hasten
home -- when we got to the bottom of ye Mountain, the
Vicomteʃse
took Ly D. & me from the promenade de quatres
Heures in her Coach to our Hotel, where she & her
Daughter in Law
sat goʃsiping for above an hour.
Monr Butin, Monr D'Armes La Baronne & I play'd at
Cheʃs. Lady D. as well as myself was pleased and
amused wth. our new foreign acquaintances --
Mrs: & two Miʃs Boughton's came from Aix la Chapelle
& dined with us; -- We went to the Redoute, there
was a Ball, I declined dancing -- having kept on my
Riding Habit -- play'd at Cheʃs in ye rooms wth. ye. Baronne
We came home early.

Tuesday
Septr. 3d
      Paid several visits in the Morng. -- Mr-
      Damer
dined wth. us -- Lord & Lady Dartrey
& I went with the Viscomteʃse &c &c, to the Comedy --
Grotseys Music wch. is very charming, after the play
went for ½ an hour to the Rooms -- In ye. Eveg. Lord D
gave a handsome supper at our Hotel -- to Mr. Boutin,
his Sister, her Daughter in law, Monr. D'Armes, Monr.
D'Orcy
, Lord Westport (a young Irish Nobleman) 20
Years old) & the Eldest Miʃs Boughton.

Wednesday
Septr. 4th.
      Lady Dartrey went early to ye. Geronstere
      with Mr. Grenville Penn -- Lord Dartrey &
I rode on Horseback, & I afterwards rode with Mr Dawson
& Mr Penn & Foster in the Woods as far as the Sauven-
iere
-- I was delighted wth. this ride, there was a pecu-
liar
fragrance in the air from variety of wild herbs,
my young friends enjoy'd it as much as myself.
We all dined at Mr. Tisdalls an Irish Gentleman
of large fortune, the dinner, wines &c. quite Princely
yet all equally easy as elegant -- The Ruʃsian Princeʃs
Dasckaw & her friend Mrs. Hamilton came after dinner. We




                                                         46
Spa
We went to the Rooms for a short time -- Mr. Damer came
home wth. us to Supper -- Monr. Butin, to our regret, came
to take leave as he departs tomorrow Morng.

Thursday
5 Septr.
      Lady Dartrey & I took an airing upon the
      Chauʃsée, *calld on Madame la Viscomteʃse de
M.
& some others -- in the Eveg Monr. D'armenston & D'Orcy called --
and the Viscomteʃse & her Daughter la Baronne came
to bid us Adieu as they leave Spa tomorrow.

Friday
6th Septr.
      Lady Dartrey & I staid at home all Morng as
      it rained -- Mrs. & two Miʃs Boughton's went
with us to the Comedy in ye. afternoon, we went afterwards
for a short time to the Redoute came home early.

Saturday
7th Septr.
      We all Breakfasted at the Rooms at Vaux-
      hall
-- each party have a table either in the
large Ball room, or in the other Rooms, wch. are for Cards,
& wch. open with large folding glaʃs Doors into the great Room --
At the end of the Ball Room wch is a fine one there is a
Band of Music playing during the Breakfast. Many
persons remain here all Morning, till dinner time,
playing at Farro & other games -- Whist appears a
favorite with foreigners as well as English -- Several
Young Men have been utterly ruined in their for-
tunes
this Season at Spa, it is chiefly Irish &
English who have fallen a prey to Gamesters.
A Captain Roache, a Mr. English, & a Mr. Popham[49]
have occasioned much disagreeable conversation
for some days past -- a Duel is to be fought between
Captn. Roache & Mr. English[50] -- CapMr Popham ran away
but they obliged him to return. These 3 Men have
very bad characters -- & they are well known at Water-
drinking
places in England.
After Breakfast Lady Dartrey, & I had a pleasant drive tête
a tête to the Sauveniere (one of ye. Mineral fountains)
& took a delightful walk in the Woods, thro' wch. there
                                                         are
Sauvenire



47
paths cut. -- there is one walk raised at a considerable
expence & gravelled; by some German Count. This
place is more beautiful & retired than the Geronstere
Lady D, & I prefered going when there was no com-
pany
. We met an Old Man who looked like an Her-
mit
; he appeared very old, walked with difficulty &
seemed nearly blind -- his countenance was pre-
poʃseʃsing
wch. induced us to speak to him, after
asking him a few questions to wch. he replied in a
respectful sensible manner, he informed us, that
he had been a Coachman, that one day the carriage
he drove was attack'd by Robbers -- that he was knock'd
from his Seat & so dreadfully beaten as nearly to
lose his life -- in consequence he became nearly blind;
& he was now in so reduced a state of poverty as to
be obliged to lodge in a Stable -- Lady Dartrey wth-
her usual sweetneʃs spoke words of consolation to ye.
poor Man & reminded him that the Saviour of ye. World
slept in a Stable, &c &c -- he seemed penetrated by wt-
she said, and shed tears -- Ly D: gave him an alms, to
wch. I added my mite, & I doubt not but that we left him happier
than we found him.
      The Sauvenire is a place you wd. greatly admire
My Dearest Mama -- the Woods, walks, murmuring streams,
The Air, the quiet -- & then, if neceʃsary, the invigorating
Mineral beverage of the Fountain. -- Not having occasion
for the Waters I do not drink them.
Near the Common Fountain, is another of Marble[51] wth- ye-
following Inscription wch. I copied.
      Patus joes? Baroa Groesbeeck Arch. Condr. Ss.mee
      S. Celnis Cancellarius viciartema vera separaba't
      Anno 1651. Alex. Lud. Marchio de Croix abuxora
      consanguineus Restauravit Anno 1776[52]
Here there is the shape of a Human foot carved out in Stone
wch.. is shewn as the spot where St Ramock[53] of Spa once
stood, & they say that it effects cures if a person puts
their foot in the one carved out whilst they drink some
of the Water of the Fountain. -- In the Eveg afternoon Monr D'Orcy
& Monr D'Armenston sat wth. Lady[54] & me till Supper time.



                                                         48
Spa Sunday
Septr. 8th. 1776
      Mr Foster read the Morning Service --
at 5 o'Clock Lady Dartrey, the young Men, & myself went
to the Capuchin Church -- the same Monk preached who
we heard last Sunday & equally well, the discourse was
an exhortation against Solleneʃs -- staid at home in ye.
Evening = Lord D dined at ye. Club -- he was not very
well, came home early & went to bed.
Monday
9th.Septr.
      We were happy to see Lord D: quite well again
      this Morng.. we walked about to Shops, &c.
before dinner -- Lady D. went to the Ball in the
Evening to Chaperon the Miʃs Boughton's -- I remain'd
at home to write Letters -- we call'd in the Morng. on
Mrs. & Miʃs Harry Grenville -- Miʃs Grenville played a
little to us on the Piano Forte; & we were shewn
some pretty little drawings of her executing: Mrs. H:
Grenville
is very lively &, to me, agreeable in her
conversation.

Tuesday Septr.
10th-
      I got up at five o'Clock that I might be
      ready to preside at the Breakfast Table
for my young Friends Mr. Dawson & The 2 Mr. Penn's
who with their Tutor left Spa this Morng.. After they
were gone Lady Dartrey & I went to the Geronstere; it
is the water of this Fountain she is prescribed to drink.
We returned home to Breakfast, after that we took
an airing upon the Chausée, & before dinner walk'd up
the Mountain to the Temple. Monr. D'Orcy and Mr-
D'Armes
, (or D'amenstene) who the latter is well acquainted wth-
our Friend Leonidas Glover, whom he met at Paris,
he speaks of him with high esteem and desired me to
present his kind regards when I had an opportunity.)
dined with us -- Monr. D'Orcy is a married Man, Mon——
D'Armes
a Batchelor. After dinner Comte Marechal
came in -- he has a post near the Empreʃs of Germanys[55]
person[56] -- his manners are quiet & polite & he has great
taste for the polite arts. The Marquis & Marquise de
Trotti
& their Daughter drank tea wth: us, they appear
worthy kind of persons -- the Marquis is an Italian and
                                                         his



49
      Spa Septr.
his Lady a German. The Marquise made many enquiries
after the Queen of England and said she was very intimate
wth. her as was her Daughter before she left Germany. she asked
also after Mrs. Thursby of Abington whom she had met
at Spa, was pleased to find she was a friend of mine
& sent many kind meʃsages wch. I promised to write
in a few days. The Marquis de Trotti came to Spa
last year in so weak a state as to be unable to move
without being supported by two persons, & was perfectly re-
covered
by drinking ye. water of ye. Geronstere & bathing
in the Tannelet Baths -- he is now here in his way from
Italy -- & his Wife & daughter came to meet him. Miʃs
Grenville
also drank tea wth us & staid till near 9 o'Clock,
a late hour for Spa. Lady Dartrey did not go to
the Ball, so we had a comfortable tête a tête.

Wednesday
11 Septr-
      After breakfast our agreeable acquaintances
      Mr D'Orcy & D'Armes paid us a short visit.
I had the pleasure of riding on Horseback wth. Lord
Dartrey
, -- Lady Dartrey went wth. Mrs. & Miʃs Boughton's,
to the Tannelet where there are both hot & Cold Baths,
& 3 Springs, each different in Taste, as strongly
Mineral as the Pouhon. -- We had no company
at Dinner -- at Tea we had Coll. Conway & Mr. D'Orcy,
Coll. Conway is an old Man who bears an amiable
character -- he is Irish, -- has been many years in
the Empreʃs of Germany's service -- they left us early. --
Sr. John & Lady Webb call'd in their way to ye. Comedy,
wth. Miʃs Boughton, -- Sr. J & Ly. W. arrived from Aix la
Chapelle yesterday. Dear Lady Dartrey & I staid quietly
at home the rest of the Eveg -- the Weather is uncom-
monly
fine.
Thursday
Septr. 12th
      Went wth. Lady Dartrey to ye. Geronstere, return'd
      to Breakfast, the elegant pleasing Monr. D'Orcy
sat with us whilst we breakfasted. Lady D. & I called
on ye. Marquise de Trotti in our way to ye. Sauvenire
                                                         where we



                                                         50
      Spa Septr
we spent the rest of the Morning, enjoying the delightful
Air, & charming walks thro' the woods -- we returned home
only time enough to dreʃs for dinner -- Lord D: dined
at the Club -- after dinner walked with Ly. Dartrey up
the Mountain & 4 o'Clock walk -- Lord D. came home
to tea & went tot the Rooms -- he wanted us to go to the
Ball -- but we prefer̄'d a sociable tête á tête at home &
Ly- D: gave orders to be denied to visitors.

Friday Septr.
13st. --
      Went early wth Ly Dartrey to ye Geronstere.
      Ser: John & Ly Webb, Monr. D'Orcy, Monr-
D'Armes
, & Comte Maréchal breakfasted wth- us, after
which we & weall the party went to Vauxhall -- the Weather
was very Sultry. -- we were introduced to a Channoineʃs
& a Baronne de Fraitture, -- Lord D. din'd at ye. Club,
& Lady D. wth. Mrs. Boughton, I excused myself &
dined alone, employed myself in writing. I went wth.
Ly. D. to the Comedy in ye. afternoon, she had taken a
Whole Box -- her party was Lady Webb, Miʃs Jane
Boughton
Monr. D'Orcy Mr. D'Armes & Comte Marechal
-- after the Comedy we all went to the Redoute.

Saturday
14th- Septr.
      Accompanied Lady Dartrey early to the
      Geronstere -- after Breakfast Ly. Webb came
& we went with her to Vauxhall -- met Mme- Trotti &
the Princeʃs Daschkow, she was in Man Clothes, wch.
is her usual Morning dreʃs -- her hair greasy, powdered
& tied in a Club behind, a very shabby small 3 Cornered
Cock hat -- boots &c. -- Lord & Ly: D. & I dined at
Mr: Tisdall's -- 12 at Table -- after dinner Princeʃs
Daschkaw
and her friend Mrs. Hamilton (an Irish lady) came, they
are both great friends of Mrs. Morgan's (Mr: Tisdall's
only Child -- she is a Widow & has a Child, a Daughter,
who is wth. her -- she is a very agreeable, well bred,
sensible woman, I like her extremely.)
Princeʃs D. made herself very engaging, to oblige Lady
D.
she went into a room where there was a Harpsicord
& playd & sung some music of her own composing, the airs
                                                         were



51
pretty & words plaintive -- she sent for ye. Notes to give
Lady D. a copy -- & presented me wth. a little Manuscript
Poem she had in her Pocket -- Mrs. Morgan told me that
this extroadinary Woman had taken a liking to my
countenance, & desired I would not be reserved
towards her -- Princeʃs D. complained much of ye-
weak State her Nerves were in, & said it was not
poʃsible for her to sing or play in public.
Pʃs. D's voice is sweet
but not strong.
[57]
Lady Dartrey, Lady Webb, & I, went to ye Ball at
Vauxhall -- I only danced two Dances it being hot
& the Rooms so crowded -- Lady D. & I got home as
soon as we could & spent ye remainder of ye. Eveg-
happily together.

Sunday
15th- Septr-
      Monr. D'Orcy breakfasted wth. us, he then
      left us to go to Maʃs. & Ld. & Ly D. & I
went to Mr. Tisdall's to attend Morng. Service -- Mr.
T.
having a Clergyman in his House & where the
English or Protestants aʃsemble every Sunday Morng..
after we returned home Mr: D'armes & many others
persons came in.
Lady Dartrey & I drank tea wth. Princeʃs Dashkow
her powers of entertaining are great, she play'd &
sung -- and read several letters from her friend &
correspondent, the celebrated Monr. Diderot, she
also read a little piece of his called la Vielle robe
de Chambre[58] -- they were clever. She gave Lady D.
a profile of Voltaire cut with Siʃsors out by Mr. Hubert, who
is famous for this art, & can cut out striking
likeneʃs's & the most beautiful Landscapes in
paper without looking, & holding his hands under
the Table. -- We took leave of Mr. Tisdall, Mrs.
Morgan
&c who quit Spa tomorrow.

Monday
16th- Septr-
      Sr. John & Ly Webb, Comte Maréchal
      Sir George O. Paul, Mr. D'armes, D'Orcy,
& Sr. Ralph Paynes breakfasted with us, -- and
                                                         at



                                                         52
      Spa -- 1776
at Dinner we had Mr & Mrs Nugent, Coll. Conway, &
Mr Fitzsimon (an Irish Gentleman a Widower, &
Roman Catholic, who has an only Child, a Son, who is at
the Colledge at Leige) who has a fine voice for
singing, wch. he does in the Italian Stile. -- The Gren-
villes
, Boughton's, -- Mr D'armes D'orcy, &c. called before
it was time for the Ball. -- Lady Dartrey & I re-
mained
quietly at home the rest of ye. Eveg --

Tuesday
17th. Septr.
      Sr. John & Lady Webb, Comte Marade -- Mr D'Orcy &
D'Armes to Breakfast -- afterwards Mr-
Hawkins Brown
-- then the Marquise de Trotti who
sat wth- Ly- D whilst her hair was dreʃsing -- Ly D:
thinks, from her conversation, that she is a very religious
good Woman -- she is at the same time lively and
pleasant. We had at Dinner Comte Marechal, Mr.
Fitzsimon
, D'Armes' & D'orcy -- Lord D: & his company
went to the Ball at ye. Redoute -- Lady D & I remained
quietly at home.

Wednesday
18 Septr-
      Lord & Ly. D. & I went to a Breakfast
given by Mr Bunney, an Englishman, who
is engaged to young Lady of the name of Hurlock, said
to poʃseʃs a very large fortune -- he is a handsome Man,
she is plain. The Breakfast was elegant & plentifully
served -- Ices, fruits, Confectionary of all kinds &c &c
After Breakfast there was a Ball and we danced till
near two o'Clock -- Lord Dartrey had no guests at
dinner. Monr. D'Orcy & D'Armes came to take
leave -- We found out that ye. latter was always called
D'Armes by french people, but that his true name
is Harmensen, a German Name. Ly Webb, Sr.. G. Paul,
Lord Wesport came in before the Comedy. Lady D. & I
paʃsed the eveg. comfortably together.

Thursday
19th. Septr
      Monr. D'Orcy & DHarmanzon came & sat wth. us
      during Breakfast -- Alas! for the last time!
                                                         for their Car-



      Spa Septr.. 1776
53
Carriages were waiting to take them away. they really ap-
peared
concerned to part from Lord & Lady Dartrey, & me
also, I hope. Mr. Harmenzen gave me an open Note
to transcribe for Mr. Glover -- wch. you will be so good to shew
him. Mr. Harmenzen, Bourdeaux; Frere á Madame
“L'Atour feger
, fait mille compliment a Monr Glover, il
“aurait eté enchanté le voir á Spa, ou il paʃsée trois
“Semaines avec bien du plaisir, aijant au le bonheur de
“faire la connoiʃsance de Mi-Lord et Mi-Lady Dártrey
“& Mademoiselle Hamilton; societé si douce et si agre-
“able
quil n'on perderai jam̄ais le souvenir; il se flatte
“quil arait aurait bientot de les revoir & vous auʃsi mon
mon cher Monr. Glover á Londres: un peu de part de votreans
“votre amitie s'il vous plait”
     Coll Nugent paid a visit -- at Dinner we had Mr. & Mrs.
Nugent
& Mr. Fitzsimon, Comte Marechal came after
dinner. Ly Dartrey Ly Webb, &c. went to pay visits -- I
excused myself & remained at home -- at 9 I. went to
the Ball to join Lady Dartrey on purpose to see two Miʃs Corgle-
ton's
dance -- one 8, the other, 6 years old. the eldest dances
inimitably, the other surprisingly well for her age, they are
the Daughters of a Scotch Physician who practises at Spa --
I did not chuse to dance -- Ly- D: & I return'd home early.

Friday 20th-
Sepber-
      Lord & Lady Dartrey went to Vauxhall as
Sir George, O, Paul gave a Public breakfast.
they would not suffer me to go with them as I was a little
indisposed -- & they are as kindly anxious about me as if I
was their own Child. Coll. Hamilton, of the Abercorn
family, in the service of ye. Empreʃs of Ruʃsia; Coll-
Johnson
, who has been in America, Mr Fitzsimons,
& Coll Conway &c. dined with us. Mrs & Miʃs Boughton's
Marquis Marquise de Trotti & their Daughter drank tea. --
Ly Webb came & sat ½ an hour alone with me -- she mention'd
some circumstances relative to her situation wch. were very
interesting. -- We saw also for a short time Sr Ralph &
Lady Payne -- Mr. &Mrs Wedderburne, Mr. Macdonald, Miʃs Mills,[59]
Comte Marechal Mr H. Brown Mr Nugent -- Ly Dartrey & I remain'd at home.
                                                         Satry 21 Septr..


[60]
La Mqse Trotti Le
recomande au Souve
nir
de Mlle d'amilton
et Sa prie d'ètre per-
suadé
que Son amitié
pour Elle ne finera
quavec La Vie.
Elle en auʃsi prie
de Sa rappeller au
Souvenir de Mad:
Tursby
. et de Lui dire
qu'Elle nétoit Suremt.
pas Venu a Spa cette
année parceque
Mr Foulon n'y etoit etoit
pas AB


[61]
Le Coeur de ma fille
est L'interprette du
Mieu, en faisant
------ avec elle. je
vous prie ma chere
Miʃs d'etre persuadés
qu'en tous Les terres et
Les Lieux Vous n'aurés
pas d'amie plus Sincere
que La Mqse de Trotti.


[62]
Marquise de
Trotti
et sa fille
Spa -- Sepr. 1776 -- [63]




      Spa 1776
                                                         54
Saturday
21st Sepbr-

      I was made perfectly happy my Dearest Mama by the
      very comfortable accts. you sent of your health & spirits.
I am glad you are made easy wth. respect to your Agent in Ireland.
it is a pity he is not more punctual. I suppose Lords Spencer
& Warwick will be in Town at ye. meeting of Parliament, & then
My Uncle William & Ly. Hamilton will settle there for a time,
I hope they will be near you -- &c

      Journal in continuation

Spa
Satry.
Septr 21st
1776.
      Lady Dartrey & I called on the Marquise de Trotti &
      spent an hour agreeably in conversation with her & her
lively Daughter
. Lord Dartrey invited Mr Adair[64] to dinner
he is a Surgeon in London & practises as a Physician at
Spa during the Season -- he is a Scotchman -- his manners
are plain but well bred & his conversation sensible &
instructive -- Went to Ball wth. Lady Dartrey in ye. Eveg.
where we took of the Trottis who gave me ye. following Souvenir[65]
in writing -- [66]
                             Chere Miʃse
                             Pensés à une Amie,
                             Pensés ÿ Souvent
                             Pensés que pour la Vie
                             Elle Vous aimera Tendrement
                             Isabelle Mqse Trotti
Sunday
22d. Septr.
      We went to Prayers at 11 oClock at an old lame
      Lady's, her name Fisher. Afterwards walkd up ye.
Mountain to *Lubin's Cottage * Mem. dr. L. & A. -- Lady Webb dined wth. Lady
Dartrey
-- we had no other company as Lord D: dined at ye-
Club. Sr. George Paul, Lord Westport, Mr.. Webb, (Brother to Sr. John)
a pleasant handsome Man, & many others call'd after dinner.
In the Eveg. Comte Marechal sat with Lady Dartrey & me.
there is a melancholy diffused over his countenance that
interests one. He gave us a long detail of Miʃs Louisa.
Nugent
s illneʃs & death -- she died at Spa last Summer. --
He told us that Hervey's Meditations & Young's Night Thoughts
are translated into the German language. It is whis-
pered
here that Comte Marechal was paʃsionately in
love with Miʃs Louisa Nugent, who was elegant, pretty &
amiable, & that after she was dead he contrived to get
into ye. Chamber where ye. Corpse lay & remained a consider-
able
time mourning over it. He told us he should visit
                                                         England next year.
                                                         Monday



55           (Spa 1776)
Monday
Sepbr. 23
      I staid at home all day -- not being quite well --
Lady Dartrey went to the Ball &c -- Many people
called in the course of ye. day.

Tuesday
24th. Sepbr.
      Walked out in ye Morng.. Lord & Ly Dartrey & I
      dind at Sir John Webb's, met Lady Catherine
Belasyse
(who being a zealous Catholic resides at Leige
in the Winter) Comte Marechal, & Mr. & Mrs.. Needham.[67]
In the Eveg. we went to a Concert at the Rooms for a
charitable purpose -- I should be ashamed to tell you
I laugh'd very much had not Dear Lady Dartrey kept
me in countenance -- & been obliged almost to bite off
her thumb & devour a box full of bon bons to endeavour
to sup̄reʃs doing so, Lady Webb behaved no better --
Conceive a miserable, little, figure of a Man in the
Middle of an immense Room playing a Solo on the
German flute, in tones so weak, or delicate, if you chuse,
that no sound reached the ear, except now & then a tone
that resembled ye. squeak of a Pig -- but the serious
part of this Concert was that the little wretch stoked
his ½ Guineas at Farron afterwards -- I had a
great enclination to ask him to repay my Crown --
for I am sure I could have put it out to better interest.
We went, afterwards to the Rooms & returned home early.

Wednesday
Septr. 25th-
      I went after Breakfast to meet Lady Webb at
      Vauxhall -- Comte Maréchall & Mr Needham attended
us, & we had a delightful ride for 3 hours -- the little
Horses here drink like Cats, & one feels more secure
on their backs than scrambling up steep places on
ones feet -- we enjoyed the delicious Breezes on the tops
of Mountains, & was amused by seeking paths through
the close growing Woods. Lady Dartrey & I dined tête
á tête, I regretted she was not equal to riding, as I
am sure she would have felt as much pleasure as
I did this Morng.. -- After dinner we walk'd wth. Mrs. and
Miʃs Boughton's up the Mountain. -- when we return'd
Sr. G: Paul, Mr Adair, Coll. Conway, (a worthy Old Man) & others
                                                         came, also



      Spa 1776
                                                         56
Talso the Channoineʃse -- la Baronne de Gimnick. Ly. D.
& I went to the Rooms, I play'd at Cheʃs wth. Ser R. Herries.

Thursday
216 Septr.
Spa
      Sir George Paul, Mr. Nugent &c came whilst we were
at Breakfast -- I rode out again with Lady Webb
Comte Maréchal & Mr. Needham, the ride was equally pleas-
/ant
at that of yesterday -- we climbed up some of the highest
Mountains & had charming views of ye. Country -- fine
subjects for a Pouʃsin's (my favorite Landscape painter)
Pencil -- tho' I recollect I greatly admire the sublimity
of Salvator Rosa -- & here too is sublimity to be found. --
Some spots are Romantically pretty &c -- in short there is
variety to suit every taste. Lady Dartrey & I dined
tête á tête -- In the Eveg Madme de Fraitture Lady Webb
& the Chan̄oineʃse came Ly D. & I went to ye Ball wth.. them
I danced more than usual -- there being now few families
Remaining -- it is civil to help to keep up ye. Ball, wch-
is 3 times a week -- Ladies here are not at a loʃs for
Partners as they change every dance.

297th Septr.
Friday
      At home all Morng. Mr & Mrs Nugent & Comte MarechallColl. Conway dined
      wth. Ld. & Lady Dartrey -- Many persons call'd both
Morng & afternoon -- went to the Rooms wth. Ly D: I playd at
Cheʃs with Comte Maréchall.

28th- Septr..
Saturday
      At home all Morng.. -- Comte Marechall din'd
      with us -- in the Eveg we went to the Ball, came
home early. Recd. a letter from my excellent friend Mr Glover.

29th. Septr
Sunday
      Mr. Boyce an old Irish Clergyman who resides al-on ye.
---dcontinent on acct. of ill health breakfasted with
us & went with us to Mrs.. Fisher's where he read Prayers
afterward Lord & Ly Dartrey Mrs & Miʃs Boughton's & I
walked to ye. old Spa, & in the 7 o'Clock walk -- dined with-
out
company -- staid at home all Eveg.. Sir G: Paul, the
Webb
[68] Comte Marechall &c &c &c came in ye. afternoon --
had ye happineʃs of recng a letter from my Dear Mama &
some frm other friends --
                                                         Monday



      Spa 1776
57
Monday
Septr 30th.
      Lord & Lady Dartrey & I went to a private
breakfast at the Redoute given by la Bar̄onne
de Fraitture
-- at wch. were Sr. Ralph & Ly Payne, the
Honbl. Mr. Mac-'Donald
, -- Mr. Dalton, Mr. & Mrs. Wedderburne,
Miʃs Mills, the yorkshire beauty who was admired by
the Duke of York[69] -- a great friend of Mrs. Wedderburn who is
also from Yorkshire, -- Count Rice, a dashing Irishman,
in the Emperor of Germanys service[70], he plays well at
all games & fights Duels -- he is tall & genteel in his
person & adr̄eʃs. after breakfast I walk'd wth. Lord
Dartrey
, left Lady Dartrey playing at Cheʃs in the Rooms.
Afterwards took a pleasant tour round ye. Mountains
with Lady Dartrey -- Lady Payne, the Chanoineʃse &
Mr. Hawkins Brown. Comte Marechall dined with
us -- we went to ye. Ball in the Eveg. -- You will have
heard of me from Hammersmith before this time -- .
Lord & Ly Dartrey return you Drst Mama a thousand
thanks for your kindneʃs to their little Boy. Last
night red. the last letters I expected (at Spa) till I get
to Calais -- write by return of Post & direct there --
See the letter I wrote to Mr Glover &c

Tuesday
SepOctbr. 1st.
      The Rooms last night looked rather de-
solate
as many an agreeable acquaintance
had quitted Spa -- not longer did I hear ye: gentle sighs
of -- nor the bombast Compliments of -- .
I accompanied Lord & Ly. Dartrey to a breakfast given
by Mr. Dalton (a young Englishman) at ye. Sauvenire,
it was a private party -- we went at 10 o'clock to ye-
Room near the fountain -- where the Water-drinkers exer-
cise
in rainy weather -- It was a sociable agreeable
party consisting of -- Sr. R: & Ly. Payne, -- Mr Macdonald,
Miʃs Mills, Mr. & Mrs. Wedderburne, Sr. J: & Ly. Webb, Comte
Rice
, Baron & Baronne de Fraitture, & ye. Chanoineʃse de Gimnick, --
& Comte Marechall, & Mr. Webb -- 18 in all -- after



      Spa
                                                         58
after breakfast some play'd at Cheʃs & others walked in
the romantic paths through ye. Woods, carving out Names
on the Barks of Trees; wch. was mighty pretty, and
rurally sentimental, suited to ye. place. Lady D, &
I dined téte a téte -- Lord D: with the Gentlemen at
the Club -- Lord & Ly- D. are admired & liked by all
for their general attention & amiable manners. --
Mr. Wedderburne invited the Party of the Morng. to drink
tea at Lubin & Annettes Cottage -- it was so dark before
we got there that it was neceʃsary to have Candles --
there were Ice's fruits &c &c. and Music playing all
ye. time we were at Table; some difficulty was started
how we should return as no Carriage can ascend ye-
Mountain -- however each Lady took ye. Arm of a
Beau, had her Spa Cane, - Riding great Coat, & tied
her white Handkerchief round her ------Throat & proceeded
down on regular proceʃsion -- the Music playing before
all the way -- the Stars & one Lanthern lighting us.
By way of concluding the frolick we went into the
Rooms in the same order looking like strolling
Gipsies -- as ye. Ladies had no Riding Habits under
their Great Coats. we staid much latter than usual
in the Rooms

Wednesday
SepOctbr. 2d.
      Sir John & Ly. Webb gave a Breakfast at
Lubins Cottage, ye. same party as yesterday
with the addition of Sir G: Paul, Coll. Conway, & Mr.. &
Mrs. Needham, the weather was so warm that we
breakfasted under the Tent upon the Mountain --
After breakfast I walkd with Ly Webb, Sir G: Paul, &
Comte Marechall in the fields on the Mountain.
the rest amused themselves wth. Cheʃs & other Games.
did not return home till dinner time. Sir George
Paul
& Mr. & Mrs. Needham dined with us -- In the after-
noon
several persons called. Ly. D. staid at home I went
wth. Lord Dartrey for a short time to ye. Rooms -- took leave of
Miʃs Asgill & the Needhams who go tomorrow. Miʃs A is very
pretty & has an elegant figure, seems very amiable, Ld- Wesport is most
                             deplorably in love with her.



      Spa 1776
59
Thursday
3d. SOctbr-
      Lord Dartrey & I went to a Breakfast given
      by Mr.. Webb (Ly. D: having a slight Cold
remained at home) at the Tonnelet -- the same party
as Yesterday -- no pleasant walks or Wood, the water
of the Tonnelet is as pleasant as Champange, &
strongly mineral -- there are Hot, & Cold Baths, the former
are heated by fire. Lord D, & I quitted the company
as soon as breakfast was over & returned home
-- In the Eveg we had Sir G. Paul & others --

Friday
Octbr. 4th-
      Lord Dartrey gave a Breakfast on ye. Mountain
      the same party wth. ye addition of Miʃs Boughton[71]
Mr. Bunney, & Mr. Hawkins Brown -- At dinner
we had Mr. H: Brown & Comte Marechall walked
from ye. Mountain wth. Lady Dartrey & me -- whilst
Ly- Dartrey went to dreʃs they sat wth. me Comte
Maréchall
read aloud some of the late Popes letters;
Afterwards I took a walk wth- the Chanoineʃse & Mr-
H. Brown
round ye. Mountain -- Ly. Dartrey remained
at home to write letters, the weather uncommonly
fine. The Chanoineʃse Geminick is a very lively
sensible Woman, appears abt. 40 has a good air &
may be called a handsome Woman, is rather en bon
point, but walks well & actively. Baron Power
& Coll. Conway dined wth. us -- we had abt 26 or 7
People in the afternoon, many to take leave.
      Lord & Lady Dartrey & I went to the Redoute, came
home early.

Saturday
Octbr. 5th
      The worthy Coll. Conway came wth. Lord
      Dartrey
to my bed Chamber door very
early in the Morng to bid me Adieu -- I hasten'd to
dreʃs myself & then went with Lord Dartrey to see
him, we found him at a Shop just going to set off, the
dear Old Man
gave me a parting bleʃsing -- Lord Dartrey
                                                         told



                                                         60
told me he, Coll. Conway;, was born in Ireland, that he had served
abroad many years wth. great honor, & that he was a
most excellent Man -- wth. many other particulars
relating to him I have not leisure to pen down --
Mr. Boyce breakfasted wth. us -- Sr. R. Payne, Miʃs Mills,
Mr. Dalton, d&c, to bid again farewell.
Ly D—— & I remained at home all Mong. a long visit
frm. Mr H. Brown -- we went to ye. Rooms in the
Eveg- -- (the Boughton's, Webb's, Mr: H: Brown &c came
after Dinner)

Sunday
Octbr. 6th
      Mr. Boyce breakfasted wth. us we then went
      to Mrs. Fisher's to prayers -- after wch. I walked
with Lord & Ly Dartrey Mrs. & Miʃs Boughton's Mrs. and
Miʃs Poulteney (who have been here but two or three
days) up the Mountains -- the day was misty (Ld- D——
dined out)
Mr. H: Brown came soon after Ly. D: & I had din'd
he staid the whole Eveg; & to supper. He wrote verses
&c, & I gave him 10 minutes to write an Acrostic
on Lady Dartrey's name wch. he did within ye. time
The lines are as follows --

Dear to her Friends, & to her Husband dear,
adorn'd wth. ev'ry Art, yet most sincere,
Rov'd like some Angel from her Native Shore
To show us Virtues we can boast no more,
Rais'd to high rank wth. brightest lushe shines
Ease & simplicity to breeding joins,
Youth she enjoys & pleasure she refines

Lady Dartrey was born at
Philadelphia in America, & by ye.
Mother
s side Grand Daughter to the
celebrated Quaker Mr. Penn.
her Christian Names are Philadelphia Hannah -- her Sur Name Fraeme --


He observed Milton's Paradise lost on ye. table, wch.
he offered to read -- there was no refusing, & I was
in an agony lest I should get into one of my unfor-
tunate
nervous fits of laughing, as indeed was Dr.
Ly D. both for herself & me, for Mr. H: Brown is one of the
worst stutterers I ever heard -- but our fears soon
subsided for, after the 5 or 6 first lines of ye. Poem he
                                                         went on very



61
Spa
on with tolerable fluency, & convinced us that he
could read as if he well understood ye. sublime Poem,
if the impediment of his speech could be removed --
Every one speaks in favor of Mr. H. Brown's character,
it is a great pity he has such singular awkwardneʃs
of manner & such nervous gestures when he laughs,
& dances, as to provoke risibility from those who
are not acquainted wth. his sense & merits, & give
pain to those who are -- he is a plain Man and
has nothing outwards to recommend him; someone
said he was reckon'd an elegant Claʃsic Scholar -- Mr-
Glover
was acquainted wth: his Father, who was an
elegant Latin Poet.

Monday
Octbr- 7th-
      Marr H: Brown came after Breakfast whom I
      had to entertain for two hours as Lady D——
was engaged in her own Room & Lord Dartrey was out
his conversation was sensible & instructive, but
it certainly requires patience & attention to listen
to him.      Sir John & Ly. Webb, & Mr Webb & Mr.. Boyce[72] dined
with us -- We went to the Rooms in ye Eveg.

Tuesday
Octbr. 8th-
      Mr: Boyce to Breakfast -- the Webb's & others
      call'd had another tête á tête wth. Mr.. H. Brown
I was rather impatiently wishing him to depart
as I wanted to write, at length Lady D. relieved me
& took him to walk with her. -- Mrs & Miʃs Boughtons' &c
dined with us -- we all went to Tea in ye Rooms &
staid rather late.

Wednesday
9th. Octbr-
      As it rained Lord Dartrey put off our
Journey, this being the day he had fix'td
for leaving Spa -- we went to the Rooms to meet ye. Webbs
who are to accompany us to Bruʃsels. Sr. J;, Lady, & Mr. Webb,
& Mr Boyce dined with us -- In the afternoon we had Mr- H:
Brown
, Mr. Grace, Baron & Baron̄eʃse Fraitture Mde. Gimnick, &c.
We went to the Rooms to Meet Mrs Poulteney &c --

                                                         10th.. Octbr-



                                                         62
Spa
Thursday
Octbr. 10th
1776
      The Morning again so wet that Lord Dartrey put off
      ye. Journey -- Mr. H: Brown, Boyce &c visited
      us, & we went to the Room before dinner --
      after dinner we had the Webb's & otheres, then
We went to the Rooms -- from thence I went wth. Ly. Webb --
to her Lodgings to supper -- Lord & Lady Dartrey took
Mr. Boyce home to sup with them -- I came home at
11 o'Clock -- (Comte Sarsfield drank tae at our Table
atin the Rooms he only came to Spa to day)

Friday
Octbr. 11th.
      Miʃs Boughton's came to bid us Adieu -- Mr.. H:
Brown
waited, as he said, to hand me into ye-
Coach for the last time, at 9 o'Clock, when we quitted
Spa. -- poor Mr. Boyce could not bear to part wth. us &
therefore resolved to go with us as far as far as
Leige, & return in a few days to Spa as it was neceʃs-
ary
for his health -- I expect a letter at Calais my
Dearest Mama
-- excuse all blunders I often
write when my hair is dreʃsing wth. ye paper on my
knee &c &c

Friday
11 Octbr
      Journal continued
      Lord & Lady Dartrey & myself left Spa wth-
Regret at 9 o'Clock -- the Rain that had fallen made ye..
Cascades very fine till we arrived at the little
Village of Taux,[73] abt. 3 Miles & ½ from Spa, where
there are many Iron Forges -- stop'd at      the
territory of Stavelef[74] -- from thence lost the beautiful
Mountains & quitteding the road leading to Aix la
Chapelle travelled some Miles over a large barren
Heath -- a long Hill led to it wth. naked Mountains
on each side -- a melancholy contrast to the
lovely scenery we had left -- however 4 or 5 Miles
from Leige we had an extensive prospect over a
a prodigious fine Country, & we were charmed wth-
the approach to Leige -- upon the Hills near ye-
Town saw Vineyards, & large Hop Gardens -- they
inform'd us they made 32 Sorts of Beer. We lodge
at the Aigle Noir. As do Sr. John, Lady, & Mr. Webb --
                                                         Lord Dartrey
                                                         sent



63
      Leige
to Mr. Fitzsimon who resides much at Leige on act-
of ye- education of his Children (I believe we were
misinformed abt. his having only one) he came &
joined our party at Dinner -- we play'd at very low Farren
in the Eveg.. Lord D: held ye Bank & we were very
gay & cheerful.

Leige
Saturday
12 Octbr-
      Before we went down to Breakfast Mr. Boyce
      read Prayers in Lord Dartrey's Room -- A
      Lady Cook, her Daugher, & a Miʃs Crosby who
reside in a Convent at Leige & are Protestants, came to
enjoy the satisfaction of joining on worship wth persons
of their own persuasion. After prayers we joined our
party at Breakfast (viz. Sr. J., Lady & Mr Webb) & Mr-
Boyce
) after wch. Lord & Lady Dartrey Mr. Webb & myself
set out to see some Churches -- 1st: to the Cathedral, dedi-
cated
to Saint Lambert, the entrance resembles that
of Canterbury, ------upon the Great Altar were 14 Silver Candle-
sticks
very finely wrought, the highest 6 feet & ½ high,
& a beautiful large lamp hung before this Altar. The
Porch is curious Gothic artt---chitecture adorned with numberleʃs
figures representing the Martyrdom of St. Lambert:
2d. The Jesuits Church nothing here wch. attracted notice
but Rich Busts of Saints in Silver upon ye. High Altar. --
Mr. Webb related some anecdotes of the Jesuits and
desired us to read the History of the Miʃsion of
Paraguay. 3d- St Pauls, a very large Church, the
Screen before the High Altar is of Marble, it is
elegant & Simple; The Roof of the Church is painted
& is so pretty & light as to resemblye Gauze or Tafety -- one
tolerably painted Picture of bearing the Croʃs.
4th. The Dominicains -- a large Noble Dome, & 7 very
pretty Chapels. 5th. St. Jacques -- Gothic, & very richly
ornamented, it belongs to the Benedictine order
of Monks -- there are 5 neat & beautiful Chapels behind
the Great Altar -- fine painted Windows on wch. are
represented the History of St. Benoit -- The Roof is
                                                         light, &c &c
                                                         &



                                                         64
& there are some very large figures of Saints in Marble well
executed. We transcribed ye. following lines under one ofon a Tomb over
themwch- hangs a picture of St. Bernoit dying wth- a Pigeon coming down
      in a Glory[75] --

De sa chambre Benoist au Ceil levant les yeux
Apparoit un Pigeon qui penetrait les Cience
Cest l'ombe de sa Sœur sous cette resemblance
qui va chercher la prix de sa grande innocence.

The reason of the number of Altars in ye. Romish Churches
is for different Priests to officiate, & who generally
receive the Sacrament every day.
Mr Fitzsimon, Webb's, &c then went wth. us to the English
Convent[76] -- the Reverend Mother had recd. notice of
the intended Visit -- She came to ye. Grate of the Parlour
& desired we would go round to the Stairs where
she recd us, attended by 30 Nuns whose faces were
covered by their Veils -- they ranged themselves on
each side & bowed as we paʃsed -- they then lifted
up their Veils -- We were shewn the whole Convent
wch. was remarkably neat, the Cells were similar
to each other, viz: a Small bed, small Oak Chest --
of Drawers, a Stool to Kneel on, a little Table upon
wch. were placed a Crucifix, an Hour Glaʃs, & a book.
over wch were hung a few wretched bad Prints.
The floors of Oak bright & slippery as Glaʃs, within
the Doors of the Cells there two pieces of quilted
Cloth -- wch. they walk or rather slide on that no
Noise may disturb ye. silence wch. ought to reign --
or those who are beneath -- The Cells are 10 feet
long & 5 wide with a large Window at ye. end wch is
neither fastened nor barred. There are many
neat Altars in different parts of ye. Convent, orna-
mented
with Flowers & Paintings, under one was
represented our Saviour lying in the Sepulchre --
many shabby prints hung round the Walls of the
Paʃsages in wch. are Lottery's for Souls on Purgatory,
                                                         which ye-



65
Satry Octbr
12th.           Leige

                             English Convent
      the Nuns draw out as they paʃs & utter a short
prayer -- one of the Nuns desired me to draw a ticket
out of the Box, wch. I complied with -- it was for those
who had never given Alms for the love of God. We
saw their work Room wch. is large & meanly furnished,
they shewed us beautiful artificial Flowers of
their making & paintings in Miniature also many
in Crayons & Oil. We saw Lord Stourton's Sister
who has been in this Convent ever since she pro-
feʃsed
, wch. is 50 Years, she is well-bred in her man-
ner
& appeared very chearful. One of the Nuns
gave us an account of their stile of living -- they
rise Summer & Winter at 4 o'Clock & spend two hours
in mental prayer in the Choir of the Chapel, then
they Breakfast, (except it is a fast. day when they do
not take any food till ye. hour of dinner wch. is half
past 11 o'Clock) after Breakfast they sit in ye. work-
Room
, all together, till prayer time, after prayers
they dine in a large Room where there never is a fire --
after dinner a Nun sits in a Pulpit in ye. dining
Room & reads to the rest -- after Supper a Nun reads
an hour & ½. They are not prohibited talking unleʃs
it is a strict fast day & then they have not, what they
call, that recreation : They are not allowed to visit
each other in their Cells without permiʃsion, nor may
they go to their Cells during the day but for an hour
when they dust them, -- the laborious part of the work
in the Convent is done by Servants. After dinner &
Supper they go into the Choir to Pray & Sing. (One
of the Nuns, whose name is Wright,[77] play'd to us on
the Organ with taste & skill) -- After ye. Prayers after
dinner they return to the work Room, they keep silent for
some time at their work & a Nun reads aloud, this is
an indulgence. They Sup at 6 & go to bed at 9 -- there
are not any fire-places in their Cells, there is only fire
kept in the work room, & that only in severe weather if
                                                         they



      Leige           Mem. Miʃs Wright                66
they are ill they are put in the Infirmary (in ye. ChurchConvent)
The Abbeʃs of this Convent is stiled Reverend Mother.
She has a small fire place in her Cell, wch. is twice as
large as the others, therefore if she is ill she is not re-
mov'd
to the Infirmary she shewed us a common
Rush bottom great Chair wch. she said she never in-
dulged
herself to sit on unleʃs she was ill. -- We
saw their Apothecary's Shop wch. is a Room well
stored with Drugs, simple waters &c &c One Nun
makes up the chief of the medicines -- there are days
appointed for the poor to come, who have Clothes,
Medicines, & money given to them -- Many Convents
do the same therefore Nuns do not lead such use-
leʃs
lives as is generally supposed. At this
Convent they converse more in English than French,
& in most respects not so strict as most others.
The prohibition of not profeʃsing under a certain
age does not extend here for we saw a Girl who was
not 16, in her year of probation dreʃs'd in the same
Manner as the Nuns, only her garments were White --
All their Bread is made in the House & they shew'd
us a Granary stacked with Corn. We saw a Nun who
had been married & lived ten years in ye. World
, her
Husband
died 3 Years ago, she came here & profeʃsed.
There are a great many Pensioners, or young Ladies
boarded here for their education, we saw ye. School
Room -- two young Nuns were teaching ye. use of the
Globes -- the Bed Rooms of the Pensioners were very airy
& remarkably clean & neat. The Name of ye. Reverend
Mother is Dennis[78] -- she must have been extremely hand-
some
-- her features are beautiful, & her countenance very
sweet -- her complexion pale & delicate -- her manners
gentle & elegant.      The Nuns were polite & chearful
& addreʃsed their conversation to ye. Gentlemen & wth. equal
ease as they did to the ladies. -- I believe we saw every part of

In yt wth- constant attendance on ye Public &
frequent attendance on ye Poor they do ------ &c



67                Leige
of their House & Garden. Miʃs Wright is much accom-
plised
, and draws & Paints as well as she plays --
she was educated here, when she had finished her
education her Father, (a rich Banker) sent for her
to England, & a young Gentleman wished to marry her --
but neither the endearment of Parents, the pleasures
of the World, nor a Lover, could get ye. better of her
predilition for leading the life of a Nun, after some
time she gain'd her point, & came back to this Con-
vent
& took ye. Veil -- she is a well looking Woman.
Our Party proceeded from the CNunnery to Mr Fitz-
Simon
s Lodgings, there were 9 besides ourselves, in
all 16 -- many Irish & English Catholic's reside at
Leige -- tho' it happened to be a fast day & that there
was no butchers Meat -- the dinner was plentiful,
elegant, & exquisitely cooked. Mr Fitzimon had
prepared another dinner for Lord & Ly- Dartrey, &c
two days ago, but ye. weather had obliged Lord D——
to send an excuse -- this had mortified the hospi-
table
Mr Fitzsimon, as that was not a fast day --
&c &c. We left him abt 10 -- he came however
to attend us to our Hotel -- The Webbs & Mr. Boyce
sup'd wth- us, -- Lady Webb sat an hour wth. me in my bed-
chamber
, -- had some interesting conversation, & she
gave me a general outline, & description of the dis-
position
of the French wch.who she had been obliged to
aʃsociate with.

Sunday
Octbr. 13th
      Parted from Mr Boyce whom we left at
Leige to return to Spa, & from the Webb's
for a day, as Lord Dartrey was obliged on acct- of securing
Horses to set off before them.      Leige is situated on
the River Maes or Muse over wch. there are many
Bridges -- one in particular, we drove over under one
                                                         of



                                                         68
iof its Arches which was ye. Street over the River. There
are a great many Churches & Monastries consequently
numerous Eccliasticks -- A large University, wch. is
celebrated for learning &c -- A great Manufactory for
Guns, & Steel Wares -- A very considerable trade is
carried on in Trais's,[79] what we saw were fine, but ye.
price extremely high, they have ye. art of dying ym
of various beautiful col---ours, & also on stripes.
The City of Leige is delightfully situated, the sur-
rounding
or contiguous Hills are picturesque --
the Town is populous, very large, dirty & Narrow
Streets, the Houses of an extroadinary height --
It is very richly endowed yet they told us there was
above 60,000 poor, -- the numberleʃs miserable
we saw in ye. Streets was shocking. The Bishop of Leige is
the richest & most considerable Prince in Germany, he
has a great Revenue from gaming Tables at
Spa & other places. We saw Dogs in abundance
drawing such kind of Carts as Aʃsesthey do in England.
The Streets are lighted at Night by Lamps
hanging by Ropes in the Middle of ye. Streets,
the Ropes being fasten'd to ye: Houses on each
side: -- Bruʃsels, Lisle, and all considerable Towns
are lighted in the same Manner, so I have been
told is Paris -- it answers well as the Streets
have no convenient flag'd foot path but Kennels
at ye. sides & people walk in ye. middle of ye-
Streets where the Carriages drive.

13th-
Octbr.
We left Leige at 10 o'Clock got to Ourai[80] at
12, a post & ¼, (a post is 6 miles) at 2 got to
St. Trone,[81] 1 post & ¼. at 4 to Tirelemont 2
Posts -- where we din'd -- Got to Louvain, 2 Posts --
at       Lodged at ye. Sign of ye. Ville de Cologne, sup'd
& went early to Bed.
                                                         Monday 14th



69
      1776
Louvaine
Monday
Octbr. 14th.
      As soon as we had Breakfasted went to see
      Monr. Van Dormes[82] Pictures, he is a painter,
      & excells in Fruit pieces -- One we thought
exquisitely painted; from Monr Dormes went to ye
Church of the Augustine Monks, 2 Monks attended us
to the Saccristi[83] & shewed us the Saint Sacrament
which they informed us had worked many surprising
Miracles -- it is set in Gold & covered with Glaʃs, one
of the Monks held it to our lips to Kiʃs -- they then
took us to the back of the high Altar, were two Priests
were Kneeling with lighted Torches -- one of ye. Monks
opened a Door & undrew a Curtain wch. hung over a
large Diamond Croʃs, he brought it close to us to see
the Saint Sacrament wch. he said was really in the
Center of ye. Croʃs wch. is two feet high most beauti-
fully
& richly adorned with Diamonds, Rubies, Pearls,
& Emeralds -- it wasits wide in proportion to its height
& entirely covered with fine Jewels -- a Sun is
represented in ye. Center, very rich, & ornamented
with Flowers, leaves, &c. in precious stones. the
donations made to this Church on account of its
being in poʃsesion of this miraculous Jewel having
ye. real St. Sacrament inclosed in it are prodigous,
within the last 4 Years it has received forty thous-
sand
florins.
This City was founded by Julius Cæsar -- the Town
is ill built -- looks very ancient, is situated in a
most fertile Country, its chief Trade Linnen -- there
are 27 Convents & 25 Monastries -- 40 Colleges, and
2 English Colledges -- the Unversity is esteemed the
first in the Netherlands.
Bruʃsels[84]
We left Louvaine at 11 o'Clock at 2 got to Bruʃsels
Lord Dartrey went to the Hotel D'Hollande, after
Dinner I walked with Lady Dartrey to shops, saw
Silks, & Laces, dearer than they can be purchased in
London. In ye. Eveg. the Webb's call'd on us, soon after
                                                         their



                                                         70
      their arrival -- they lodge at another Hotel.
      Dr. Ld. D—— not quite well, went early to Bed --
Bruʃsels
Octbr.

Tuesday
165th. Octbr.
      After we had Breakfasted, Mr. Wilkinson, whom
      we had met at Spa, came, & went wth. Lord D——
& I to the Abbé de Coudenberg, Lord D. bought a
fine Sketch by Vandycke of our Saviour on ye. Croʃs.
Went to Lady Webb, sat some time with her she accom-
panied
me to our Hotel -- prevailed on Ld. D. to remain
another day at Bruʃsels. Lord D. not feeling well
Lady Dartrey would not leave him alone, but wished
me to ---keep an engagement of going to ye. Play -- at ½ --
past 5 Sr.. John & Lady Webb, her Brother, Captn Salvin, & Mr-
Webb
, came to tea, I went wth. them to ye. Theatre. --
Sir John did not remain wth. us but returned to Lord
& Lady Dartrey. The Play House is larger & finer
than those in London -- the interior of an Oval form --
the Scenery most beautifully painted -- the Oches-
tra
is said to ------have ye. best performers in Europe --
a prodigious number of Musicians & various
instruments -- returned to our Hotel at 9 o'Clock --
Lord & Ly Dartrey kept ye. Party to supper.

Wednesday
16th Octbr.
Bruʃsels
      Lady Webb came early this Morng -- Lord
& Ly. Dartrey & myself accompanied her
to her Brother Captn. Salvin's Lodgings
where we all breakfasted -- afterwards ------the whole party
went to the Abbé de Coudenberg who was extremely
attentive & polite, he shewed us the Terrace & Garden
which overlooks the Park, -- the Abbé made Lord D:
a present of a small picture -- his private apartments
are fitted up with taste. From him we went to the
Maison de Ville, wch. is on a very large scale, there
are several fine apartments -- In ye. grand Council
Chamber there are 3 pieces of highly wrought Bruʃsels
Tapestry, in ye. 1st. is represented Charles the 5th-
                                                         giving his



16th
Octbr Bruʃsels

71
his Crown to his Son; 2d. The Crowning of Charles
the 6th-
. 3d. Philip the Good granting privileges.
There was another Piece of Tapestry ye. Colours of wch-
were brilliant, the subject was the History of Clovis.
      This being the day before the great Annual Fair -- ye-
people were making preparations, & many of the
outward Rooms & paʃsages of the Maison de Ville
were fitted up with Shops for various Kinds of
Merchandise -- We then went to the Tapestry
Manufactory, it is curious to see how they weave
it on the wrong side; the Picture of painted pat-
tern
lying underneath -- they shewed us some
beautiful pieces wch. were finished at 2 Guineas
a Yard -- & some square pieces ye. size of common
Screens from 7 to 16 guineas each -- from the
Manufactory proceeded to a large Shop of Articles
from India, & to a superb one of Bijouterie, every
thing extravagantly dear -- to Mr. Danauts a
great Bankers, saw his Cabinet of Pictures, a
choice collection -- wished to have had more time
to look at them, can only mention a few -- A Portrait
of a Mistreʃs of Francois ye. 1st by Leonard de Vinci.[85] --
St. Francis by Guido; a Sleeping Venus by Do. --
there were many by the most celebrated Masters of
the Flemish Schools -- I saw a small picture of
Popea Sabina exactly the same as my large one
[86]at Eaton College ye. provost, Barnard, showed me
one ye. size of Mine a bad Copy -- they call it Jane Shore[87]

Mr Danauts did not know ye. painters name but
said it was by a very old Master.      In one of the
Squares we saw a fine Statue of Minerva holding
the Busts of the Emperor & Empreʃs it stands
on a Fountain & was given by Lord Aylesbury.[88]
We all dined wth- Sr. John & Lady Webb, play'd
at Farron after dinner, at 9 o'Clock we all adjourn'd
to Lord Dartrey's Hotel to supper -- parted at 11 o'Clock in a melan-
choly
mood as we were to seperate tomorrow.
                                                         17th. Octbr-



Thursday
Octbr. 17th
1776
      Left Bruʃsels at 9 o'Clock; 3 posts to Alost, at
      ½ past 12, where we din'd at the Trois Rois --
went again to look at the fine Picture of St.. Rock by
Rubens -- 1 Post & ½ to Quaduct; to Gand (or Ghent) 1 Post,
got there by 5 o'Clock -- to the Hotel St- Sebastian (Buʃso's)
An acquaintance of Lord Dartreys being at ye. Hotel he
introduced her to Lady Dartrey her Name Loten, after
Tea she went with us to the Play -- a good Theatre -- we
saw represented Le Roi, et la Fermier, and la Papile.
We supped at 9, Mrs Loten came for an hour after
supper.

Friday
18th. Octbr
Ghent --
      I got up very early & walk'd out, After
      Breakfast we saw the Ducheʃs of Kinston --
      alias Lady Hervey, she came abt. 1 in the Morng --
to our Hotel from Calais where she has been ever since
her trial -- she is going to Vienna -- afterwards to Rome,
to paʃs the Winter, then intends returning to Calais
in the Spring where she has taken a House. Mr-
Popham
was with her, & her Maids of Honor, who
were dreʃsed in green Staff Gowns, & black Staff bibs --
& aprons, white linnen Caps, & no hats or bonnets.
      We left Gand -- stop'd at Bot Ghent to change
Horses, din'd at Vive St. Eloy -- drank tea & sup'd
early at Courtray at L'Hotel Damier -- Lord D.
pleased wth, ye, people of ye. House they were very
civil -- he paid only 2, 4d english per head for supper,
7 & 7 desert -- Lord D, was by no means well.

Saturday
19th Octbr.
      Lord Dartrey much better -- we left Courtray
      at 10 o'Clock -- changed Horses at Menim --
dined at Lisle at the Hotel de Bourbon a Noble Inn
in la Grande Place -- the apartments well furnished --
rather should say grandly -- two large Crimson quilted
Sattin bed. Chairs, Cabriolet Shape, crimson Velvet wth-
white & Gold frames, The Table covered with Crimson 'Velvet,
                                                         and



73
and edged with broad Gold fringe with 4 large Taʃsels of
Gold, one ---at each corner, Bell ropes, &c, ye. same --
the Room hung with tolerable Tapestry & 2 very large
pier looking Glaʃses.      We went to the Capuchins
Church where we saw a fine Picture by Rubens over
the Great Altar -- the descent from the Croʃs; on the
left hand another fine picture, by ye. same Master, of
the Virgin or Mother Mary, Child & a ---Capuchin, the Child is
very beautiful! After seeing the Church of the --
Capuchins, went to that of the Recollects, A fine
Picture by Vandycke over the Great Altar; the
subject the Crucifixion, the head of Christ, the headfigure
of St. John, and the Virgin are charming & on the right
is a Picture of St. Anthony, well painted, on the left
the Aʃsinicon of the Virgin Mary. There are many good
Pictures on each side of the church by Arnolde
Vuez
. One of the Recollects took us into the Sacristi
(another Gentleman who was in the Church went wth-
us,) he shewed us some Gold Embroidery upon
Red Velvet, and some very fine Tapestry in ye-
form of a Medallion for the high Altar, we saw
a great quantity of fine Silver Ornaments, among
the Rest a large Croʃs in the middle of wch. were
inclosed Relic's of St. Anthony, it was decorated
with mostuch taste, wth. diamonds Croʃses, set ------and flowers
wrought in Silver, &c, It was so maʃsy and
heavy I could not lift it up from ye. place on
wch. it stood. We saw three Pilgrims in the
Church who were arrived from Gand (or Ghent)
to pay offerings & make prayers to St Mark,
as there are Relicks of him in it, for the recovery
of some persons who were too ill to come -- Pilgrims
are paid for these errands, & have a Banner given
them to prove they have faithfully fulfilled yr-
Commiʃsion. Lady Dartrey & I bought some
                                                         of --



                                                         74
[89]



75
of these Banners of an Old Woman for a few Liards
she distributed ym. to the Pilgrims. Went to a
Booksellers; Shops of several kinds &c --
After dinner Ly. D. & I again went to the Shops --
Mrs. Loten came for an hour in the Eveg.. Lord
Dartrey
much better.

Sunday
Octbr 20th
Lisle
      We found this Grand Hotel very dirty --
      there are no Women Servants -- Lord D——
found the Wines bad -- eatables extravagant &
very indifferent. The Valet de Place, or Louage,
a civil, will bred, & well informed Man. NB.
the Hotel Royal is said to be a better house for
Comfort & accomodation -- it is alson on the Grand
Place, wch- is a Noble Square surrounded by very
handsome buildings exactly of ye. same height.
The Corps de Garde & the Charge are Rich looking
Edificis -- this City is call'd pettit Paris -- I
will bring a book wch. gives a description of it.
There are at present five Regiments of Soldiers
who mount Guard in the Grand Place every day; --
Wednesday & Saturday excepted, when ye. Market is
held -- This Morning we saw abt. Nine thousand
Men drawn up, -- French & Austrians, it was a very
grand spectacle -- the person who directed their
Movements -- (I 'dont know his rank) -- appeared
above 7 feet high & uncommonly handsome, an
elegant figure, wth. a martial Mien -- he held a tall dark cold
staff in his hand wch. had a silver ball on the
top -- he was dreʃs'd in Blue.
Left Lisle at 10 o'Clock, two posts to la Waquet
where ye. Horses were chang'd, & again at Bethune
                                                         where we



Octbr. 20th-
                                                         76
we dined there at a miserable unclean house, the one
we were at going to Spa being shut up on account of
a Roberry committed there: whilst dinner was pre-
paring
Lord & Lady Dartrey & I went to see the
Church -- The Windows of which are all of fine old
painted Glaʃs in high preservation -- Some Priests
were catechising Children -- there were a great number,
mostly Girls -- there was 4 Sets.
      From Bethune to Lilliers is a post & ½ -- to Aire
1 Post -- Lord Dartrey went to the House á la Poste
where every thing was clean & the people very civil,
The Supper wch. was excellent was only 3 livers
per head. Here we Met the Marquis de Tangy
whom we had seen in the Church at Lisle, Lord
& Ly. Dartrey invited him to Tea & Supper, he
appears much of ye. Gentleman & his conversation
very sensible -- he is an Italian & is going to see
England; he enquired if we were acquainted wth-
Lord Balgonie, who is a friend he form'd a great
intimacy with in Italy. He shewed us a travelling
Case wch. is uncommonly convenient, & in smaller com-
paʃs
then could be imagined contains articles of
of neceʃsity & luxury -- 2 Silver plates, forks, Spoons,
Cups, Coffee pot, &c. & dreʃsing things &c. &c. &c. & his
Jewels, wch. with Antiques are very valuable, I
believe Money was also in this Case -- a rich booty
for a Robber.

Monday
21st.Octbr.
      After Breakfast left Aire, changed horses
      at St Omers, again a la Recouʃse, here
we had some good cold Bacon & bread, 'twas only a
Cottage with a Mud floors, we were first put in a Room
without a fire as the best room was occupied by
company, who however very politely came soon
to us & requested we would sit with them wch. we did
                                                         They



77
21st
Octbr.

      they appeared to be persons of fashion, the party
      consisted of -- Two very old looking Gentleman,
(who seem'd characters) a pretty French Woman, their
Niece
, her Husband, rather singular looking, & the pretty
French Women
's Brother
, who is an Officer, an affected
Young Man but exceedingly polite, he shewed us his own
Carriage wch. was elegant, & his Horses wch. were fine ones.
The two old Gentlemen always travel wth. 3 large
handsome Grey-hounds, an English Pointer, a
Spaniel, & a pretty small Dog. This party were on
their way to Paris.
We changed Horses at Ardres where Women har-
neʃs'd
and put the Horses to ye. Carriages. Ardes is
the Place where Henry ye 8 of England & Francis ye. 1st-
met in 1520 -- We arrived by tea time at Calais --
the Marquis de Tagy was already there and again
was invited by Ld. & Ly Dartrey to Tea & Supper.
Captain Osborne waited on Lord Dartrey to inform
him that he was engaged to convey the Comte de
Noālles
, Embaʃsador from France, to England, but
that he could return the following night. The
Captain
has ye. air & manners of a true English Sea-
Man
: -- He told us that he was taken Prisoner by the
French during the last War & was confined in a Dungeon
at Dunkirk 3 Months, after that 3 Months more
at Calais where he never saw the light, & had Straw
only one Week to lay upon -- An English Sailor, a
French Deserter
, & himself broke out of their
Prison during the Night, in leʃs than a quarter
of an hour they were pursued & were obliged to
fling themselves over one of the Walls of the
Ramparts wch. was an immense height, they
                                                         were



                                                         78
were senseleʃs for some time & when they recovered
found they were plunged in a Moraʃs, they extricated
themselves & were obliged to climb a Wall almost
as high as the one they had thrown themselves from.
after many difficulties they got to the Harbour,
obtain'---d a Boat & row'd to Deal where they sold her
for 10 Pounds. The French deserter was to have
been Shot the day after they escaped. Capt Osborne
also related that when he was 19 he was preʃsed
for a Sailor & when the Ship was half a Mile from
Land he flung himself Over-board & swam to ye-
Shore, he was Shot at, & 3 times he was in danger
of his life.

Tuesday
22d..Octbr.
Calais.
Deʃsiens Hotel
      The Marquis de Tangy sat wth. us after
      Breakfast -- We walked to Shops, bought
      Gold Thread at 10s. Pr. Ounce -- the Marquis
dined with us & went wth Ld: & Ly Dartrey & me to
the Play House at ye. bottom of the Garden of ye.——
Hotel -- a pretty Theatre, Actors very indifferent as
also the Musicians -- returnd at 8 -- Marquis de Tangy
sup'd with us

Wednesday
23d..Octbr.
      At 6 o'Clock this Morning One of the
      Waiters
informed us Captn. Osborne was
return'd & that ye. Wind was fair -- We embarked in
the Resolution between 9 & 10 o'Clock, & had a
fine Paʃsage of 7 hours -- Marquis de Tangy set off
at ye. same time in Captn. Baxters Veʃsel, and Sr Wm.
Lynch
our late Minister at Turin in another. We
sup'd & slept at the City of London Inn at Dover, as
did M. de Tangy -- the House kept by Mr. Payne --
people civil, every thing clean.
                                                         Thursday



79
Thursday
24th.Octbr
1776
      We left Dover at 10 o'Clock din'd at Sitten-
burn
[90] at the Post House, got to Rochester
at ye. Crown in the Eveg. M: de Tangy drank tea and
sup'd with us.

Friday
25th. Octbr.
      Left Rochester at 9 o'Clock, stop'd at Shooter's
      Hill[91] -- had some Cold meat, saw the fine new
Rooms -- The Weather too Cloudy to see the beautiful
view -- The Marquis de Tangy parted from us in Bridge- 
Street -- my heart felt ye. separation from Lord &
Lady Dartrey -- it will always retain a most
grateful sense of all their goodneʃs towards me.
      My Dearest Mama was waiting dinner for me --
I had seen no Woman equally beautiful during
My Absence.


á Madame Madame La Marquise de Trotti née Baronne
de Notthafft
, á Bonne Sur La Rheine.


Pour envoyer á Milady Webb Chez Monsieur VandenClooster[92]
Banquier à Bruʃselles.





                                                         80
      Memorandums --
*Our God & Soldiers we alike adore
first in the Hour of Danger & no more,
The Danger past, both are alike requited
Our God's neglected & our Soldiers slighted


*from a
Window at
ye. Aigle Noir
at Leige


Inscription on the Pouhon at Spa
Pierre 1er par sa propre Grace despot de toutes
les Russies.


The Marquise de Trotti told us (at Spa) that the
famous Singer Grabriellia is daughter to the Cook
of the Marquis de Gabrillis
, brother in law to her Husband --
(the Marquis de Trotti an Italian) that the Mar-
quise
de Gabriella
stood Godmother to the Child &
gave her the name of Gabriella.


Frederick King of Pruʃsia allowed his Queen so small
an income & so few attendants that she wrote to him
to make complaints (for tho' he did not live wth. her
they corresponded) he replied in a sharp angry manner
& told her she might work to increase her income --
The Queen immediately began & embroidered a --
Waistcoat wch. when finished she sent to ye King wth-
a respectfully worded letter, informing him that
She obeyed his commands but could not offer ye. first
Work she had done for sale to any other person than
his Majesty, & she doubted not but his generosity
wd. induce him to send her the full value. The King
was so much struck by the Queens sensible man-
ner
of acting, & good temper in bearing wth. his harshneʃs
that he doubled her allowance & ordered her a---t
Number of attendants as her situation required


Charles quint naquit L'an 1500. Mourut 1558. il se retira
1555. --



81
A Young Irish Gentleman of fortune was permitted
by his father to visit London, there he became acquainted
with an amiable young Lady wth. whom he becamefell in
love -- fearful his Father would not give his consent, he
married her without his knowledge, he returned to
Ireland & could no obtain forgiveneʃs -- His father
presented a Pistol at his head & forced him to pro-
mise
to marry another Lady of his choosing, the
Son
obeyed and was married, as soon as the cere-
mony
was over, he retired and Shot himself --
His Widows happened to meet, became attached,
Retired from society, & are living together.




                                                         82
Written by a Lady -- given me by Princess Daskaw
                                                         Spa Octbr- 1776


[93]Thou whom wandring fancy leads,
Near this gloom of lonely Shades
Come (for thou hast nought to fear)
Draw thee nigh and lend thy Ear.
                             2
If thy soul ambition fires,
Wayward hopes and rude desires
Motives selfish insincere
Go thy ways -- for peace is here.
                             3
If thou sigh'st for wordly store,
And thy bosom beats for more
If thy heart pale envy glows,
Think not here to find repose.
                             4
If thy heart is not sincere
If one ungentle thought is there,
One rude wish one vice begot,
Beat thy breast and mourn thy lot.
                             5
Here the dreary Willow grows;
Here the weeping streamlet flows,
How could these thy fancy quell
Wayward Stranger fare thee well.
                             6
But if e'er thy bosom knows
What delight from virtue flows;
What the bliss from silence springs,
What repose contentment brings:
                             7
If thy soul is all serene
Free from envy free from Spleen,
                                                         /Free from



83
Free from pride and guilty fear
Gentle Stranger draw thee near.
                             8
Merit clad with simple Weeds
Hast thou mark'd how sore he bleeds
Pilgrim like how sad he goes:
Thro' this dreary scene of woes?
                             9
Hast thou answer'd misry's cry
Dry'd his cheek and wiped his Eye?
Sooth'd his soul when passions move!
Bath'd the wounds of bleeding love?
                             10
Canst thou relish artless youth,
Lonely peace and simple truth,
Pity mild with streaming Eye,
Rural nymph simplicity.
                             11
When dejected worth was low,
Sunk in undeserved woe,
Has thy bosom heard the Sigh?
Has thy tear bedewd thine eye.
                             12
Canst thou relish Cypres Vales?
Cheerless Grotto's, lonely dales,
Mourning streams and Midnight glooms
Where the Cherub Hope ne'er comes.
                             13
Lonely Pilgrim bend thy Knee
Drop thy staff and follow me,
Sweet and soft is virtues toil
Here at least repose a while.




[94]
Sunday Eveg. Spa 6 Octbr. 1776 Dots 5 given



      Emperor Charlemagne

                             Copper Gilt

                             Copper

                             Pierre de Gris[95]

      Mr. G—— Penns Ocbr- 1776. Fountain in ye Grand Place Aix La Chapelle[96]






[97]



[98]




The above 4 by Ly-
Dartrey
Tuesday Eveg.
Louvaine Octbr 13 -- 1776










[99]

(hover over blue text or annotations for clarification;
red text is normalised and/or unformatted in other panel)


Notes


 1. The first image is the marbled outer cover of the journal.
 2. This entry, which was written on a separate piece of paper, has been pasted onto the front of the journal.
 3. A copy of the following section (until p.5) can be found in HAM/1/8/7/21, a letter by Mary Hamilton to her friend Ann Litchfield, albeit worded differently.
 4. The pagination of this journal has been done by at least two different writers in at least two – and likely three – different ways, all of them in pencil. Seeing as Mary Hamilton added a few lines on p.21 in pencil, it is possible she is one of those writers and added (some of the) page numbers as she was adding things to the volume at a later point in time. The pagination starts on this page, with two different writers having added a ‘1’. This continues up until page 7 (image 11), after which page 8 (image 12) only has one page number, which is perhaps simply the result of one of the writers having missed this page when numbering. It could, however, also have something to do with the fact that the letter/entry on this page ends rather abruptly, indicating other pages are missing, which could have resulted in the current state of pagination. This is then followed up by two pages that have corrected page numbers, from 8 to 9 and 9 to 10 respectively. From image 15 onwards, the pagination that runs until the end of the journal is added, starting at number 10. For the first ten images of this run, a previously added pagination (starting at 3 and going up to 12) is ‘corrected’ by the numbering that runs until the end of the journal. It is unclear who added the numbers 3 to 12 as they appear out of order compared to the rest of the journal (it could also have to do with any missing pages that at one point resulted in a different order from the current one). The pagination that 1) starts on this page with ‘1’, 2) misses a number for what would be page 8 (image 12), 3) later received corrections for the subsequent two pages (images 13 and 14), and 4) runs until the end of the journal is assumed to have been added by a member of the Anson family. It is unclear who added the other page numbers for the first 24 images and corrected pages 8 and 9 to 9 and 10 at a later point in time. Besides Mary Hamilton having possibly added some page numbers, it is also possible that the Anson sisters Florence and Elizabeth corrected some of their uncle's work (see also Anson & Anson 1925: v-vi).
 5. The spelling extroadinary is characteristic of Hamilton (11/12 occurrences). The one exception is still a misspelling: extraodinary. On absence of r see Dobson (1968: II 992n.).
 6. ‘This morning’ here refers to the morning of Wednesday 31 July 1776, not Thursday morning 1 August 1776 (see also HAM/1/8/7/21). Mary likely intended to write ‘the (next) morning’ here.
 7. The dot over the i of Miſs seems more like an r here, possibly indicating that Mary Hamilton originally wrote Mr, although such an r is usually attached to the M.
 8. Mary Hamilton seems to have added this annotation at some point during or after 1785, the year in which Mary Cooper and Jean André de Luc married.
 9. This suggested correction of the day is wrong, likely as a result of Mary Hamilton referring to the morning of Wednesday 31 July as 'this morning' when writing on Thursday 1 August (see p.3). The events described here took place on Thursday 1 August, see also HAM/1/8/7/21.
 10. See Act IV Scene VI of King Lear, in which Edgar (disguised as 'Poor Tom') describes the cliffs at Dover and their steep slopes to his blindfolded father, the Earl of Gloucester. This description is also why 'Shakespeare Cliff' became known as such.
 11. The following text is a copy of a letter by Lady Dartrey to Mary Hamilton's mother, Mary Catherine Hamilton, in Mary Hamilton's hand.
 12. Pierre Dessin's hotel, L'Hotel d'Angleterre, was mentioned in, amongst other works, Laurance Sterne's A Sentimental Journey Through France and Italy, published in 1768.
 13. This section has been moved here from the inserted piece of paper in between p.6 and p.7, as most of the events described here occurred before the following section on this page.
 14. This page is a loose leaf that has been inserted in between what has been labeled p.4 and p.5 with pencil at the top of each page. The transcription has been moved to fit the other sections chronologically.
 15. The (red) pencil markings found throughout this journal as well as several others (see e.g. HAM/2/2 and HAM/2/11) are likely by members of the Anson family due to how closely many marked sections correspond to the transcribed parts in Anson & Anson (1925).
 16. Recousse was a post station between Ardres and Saint Omer.
 17. Present-day Aire-sur-la-Lys.
 18. This word 'to' is not visible on the image but has been checked when viewing the document in person.
 19. Moved this addition here from a separate piece of paper inserted between this page and the next, as indicated by Mary Hamilton by paired asterisks.
 20. This page is a loose leaf that has been inserted between what has been labeled p.6 and p.7 in pencil at the top of each page. The transcription has been moved into the main text as indicated by Mary Hamilton herself through the use of asterisks.
 21. Mary Hamilton has '... & was within a few Yards of the Rail when the Soldiers ...' in HAM/1/8/7/23, in which she relates this story to Ann Litchfield. It seems here as if she intended to erase 'Soldiers' to add 'Rail', but subsequently forgot to do so.
 22. The letter ends abruptly here, suggesting that one or more pages are missing.
 23. A copy of the following section (until the middle of p.17) can be found in HAM/1/8/7/23, a letter by Mary Hamilton to her friend Ann Litchfield, albeit worded differently.
 24. Antedates by over a century the entry in OED s.v. casaquin. Accessed 20-09-2022.
 25. This is the most likely place of the addition given in the left-hand margin, but we cannot be sure as the paintings described here have been moved since Mary Hamilton's visit.
 26. De Crayer painted 'Tobias and the Angel' for the Saint Peter's Church in Ghent in 1618.
 27. The painting is now known as 'The Conversion of Saint Bavo'.
 28. Present-day Quatrecht (in French) or Kwatrecht (in Dutch).
 29. Present-day Aalst.
 30. Saint Roch or Rocco.
 31. The following section is not marked up as having been deleted, as it is very likely the case that a member of the Anson family marked this section with pencil to indicate it should not be included in their publication. In Anson & Anson (1925: 40), the part that follows after the word 'Cathedral' is excluded from this entry.
 32. The French word bourreau is normally used in the sense ‘executioner, hangman, or torturer’. It is recorded in English c1550-c1720 (OED s.v. Accessed 22-01-2023).
 33. The Treaties of Peace of Nijmegen consisted of a series of treaties signed in Nijmegen between August 1678 and October 1679, which ended various interconnected wars among many countries, including France, Spain, the Dutch Republic, Sweden and the Holy Roman Empire. The first treaty established peace between France and the Dutch Republic.
 34. ‘Boiled or stewed meat, esp. beef’ (OED s.v. boulli n. Accessed 08-01-2023).
 35. See HAM/1/9/85 for a letter from Mary Hamilton to Sarah and Elizabeth Dickenson in which she writes out Carter's poem. See also Memoirs of the Life of Mrs. Elizabeth Carter, with a new edition of her Poems, by the Rev. Montagu Pennington (ed.) (London: 1816), pp.54-55 for a printed edition.
 36. Similar to the pencil marks on p.21, the big cross in pencil on this page was likely added by a member of the Anson family to indicate that this section was not to be added to their publication (Anson & Anson 1925).
 37. A variant spelling of Borcette (Burtscheid in German), a town just south of Aachen, famous for its hot springs and its Abbey. See also Belgium, Aix-la-Chapelle and Cologne An Entirely New Guide Book for Travellers by William Henry James Weale (1859), pp.418-420.
 38. In fact Hamilton had already covered 17 August on p.27 above, and the following largely replicates that account.
 39. The Karlsbrunnen fountain in Aachen (Aix la Chapelle). For Mary Hamilton's drawing of it, see p.92.
 40. This is a short letter from Lady Dartrey to Mrs Hamilton, who was looking after Dartrey's son, Thomas Dawson.
 41. ‘The name of several dances, chiefly of French origin, consisting of a variety of steps and figures’ (OED s.v. cotillion n. 1.a. Accessed 20-09-2022).
 42. A game of faro (a late seventeenth-century card game from France) was referred to as a 'faro bank'.
 43. Interestingly, this anecdote concerning Montagu's wife using poison to kill him goes against the general current understanding that he did in fact die as a result of an abscess that developed after his throat was pierced by a small broken bone.
 44. This would appear to be a reference to the comic opera Le Déserteur (1769), music by Pierre-Alexandre Monsigny, libretto by Michel-Jean Sedaine (Wikipédia). The mistaken double ſs was erased but the word was not then completed.
 45. According to the 'Liste des Seigneurs et Dames, Venus aux Eaux Minerales de Spa, l'an 1776' (see here), Lord and Lady Dartrey, Mr Dawson, Mary Hamilton, John and Grenville Penn, and Mr Forster all checked in on 1 September 1776, rather than on 29 August 1776.
 46. A mineral spring south of Spa.
 47. 'The Temples' here refers to the six children of Richard Grenville (c.1679-c.1727) and Hester Temple (Countess Temple) (d. 1752). Thomas Henry Grenville was the youngest son but he died in 1747, leaving Henry Grenville the youngest surviving boy.
 48. Marie Schmitz and Gilles Dewalt (who appear to have been both cousins and lovers) were immortalised in a tale by Jean-François Marmontel in 1761, as it is generally accepted that they inspired the story of 'Annette and Lubin' in Spa. After the story became popular both in Belgium and internationally, they adopted the names of Annette and Lubin, and people who visited them referred to them as such. The hill where their cottage was also took their names. The story by Marmontel was adapted in operas, plays, ballet performances, etc., and had many translations into other languages. Schmitz and Dewalt settled in their cottage in Spaloumont (a hamlet in Spa) c. 1764, where they provided a place of dance and entertainment for visitors. Their business started going downhill in the 1780s, and Dewalt died in 1799. What became of Schmitz is unclear.
 49. This is likely Stephen Popham (1745-1795), MP for Castlebar and sometimes described as a swindler.
 50. Apparently, both men missed (Bridget Hourican [2009] 'Roche, David ‘Tiger’ (or ‘Tyger’)', Dictionary of Irish Biography).
 51. This refers to the Groesbeek source, which was built in 1651 and is located a few meters from the Sauvenière source. It was restored in 1776 at the initiative of the Marquis Alix-Louis, Marshal of Croix.
 52. It seems that Mary Hamilton did not manage to correctly transcribe the complete, actual inscription, which reads: PAULUS JOES BARO A GROESBEEK ARCH. IL CONDR. SEREme SUAE CELNIS CANCELLARIUS VICIANTEMA VERA SERABAT ANNO I651. ALEX LUD. MARCHIO DE CROIX AB UXORE CONSANGUINIS RESATAURAVIT ANNO I776.
 53. Saint Remaclus (d. 673).
 54. This is likely to have been Lady Dartrey.
 55. Mary Hamilton is almost certainly talking about Elisabeth Christine of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel-Bevern here, who was the Queen consort of Prussia between 1772 and 1786. The title 'Empress of Germany' was first given to Augusta Marie Luise Katharina of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach (1811-1890), who was the consort of William I (1797-1888), German Emperor.
 56. This reference by Mary Hamilton indicates that 'Comte Marechal' was indeed George Keith, 10th Earl Marischal, as the latter was a close friend of Frederick the Great (King of Prussia from 1740 until 1786), and joined the royal family in Potsdam later in his life.
 57. This sentence was added in the left margin.
 58. The full title is 'Regrets sur ma vieille robe de chambre ou Avis à ceux qui ont plus de goût que de fortune', and was written by Diderot in 1768 and added in the Correspondance Littéraire in 1769.
 59. Possibly the ‘Miss Mills of Yorkshire’ (see also Mary Hamilton's comment about Miss Mills later in this journal) who ended up marrying Mr. Day of Anningsly, as mentioned in a letter from Anna Seward to the editor of the General Evening Post dated 11 October 1789 (see Letters of Anna Seward: Written between the years 1784 and 1807, Vol. 6 (Edinburgh: 1811), p.329).
 60. The transcription for this page is of the first note pasted into the journal between this page and the next. The main text behind it was transcribed as p.58.
 61. The transcription for this page is of the reverse of the first note pasted into the journal. The main text behind it was transcribed as p.58.
 62. The transcription for this page is of the reverse of the second note pasted into the journal. The main text behind it was transcribed as p.58.
 63. This annotation by Mary Hamilton is written upside down on the back of the note written by the Marquise de Trotti.
 64. The Dictionary of Biographical Reference by Phillips (1871, p.9) provides two possible candidates for 'Mr Adair': Robert Adair, a Scottish surgeon, or William Adair (d. 1793), a Scottish physician. James Makittrick Adair (1728-1802), the well-known Scottish physician and medical writer, only took on the name Adair from his mother's side in 1783. A third possibility could be the Irish Robert Adair (1711-1790), who worked in London as inspector-general of military hospitals, surgeon-general, King George III’s sergeant-surgeon, and later as surgeon to Chelsea Hospital. He married the Scottish Lady Caroline Keppel, who wrote the song 'Robin Adair', for which Robert was the inspiration. For this to be the case, however, Mary Hamilton would have wrongly described 'Mr Adair' as Scottish.
 65. This line written in pencil is only partially visible on the image, but has been checked when viewing the document in person.
 66. Here follows the second note pasted into the journal, with a space left for it in the main text. Hamilton's annotation on the reverse was transcribed as p.61, while another note, larger than the space allowed, was transcribed on pp.59-60.
 67. The identity of the Needhams (who are, it seems, not mentioned elsewhere in Hamilton's writings) remains unknown. It is highly unlikely to have been John Tuberville Needham (1713-1781), the well-known English naturalist and fellow of the Royal Society of London who lived in Brussels from 1768 onwards, as he was a Roman Catholic priest, and as such not allowed to marry.
 68. Presumably, Mary Hamilton meant to write 'the Webbs'.
 69. Possibly Prince Edward (1739-1767), the younger brother of George III, as Prince Frederick (1763-1827) only became the Duke of York (and Albany) in November 1784.
 70. Count Rice was a close friend of Joseph II, Holy Roman Emperor. He was sometimes referred to as the 'Emperor of Germany', as Mary Hamilton describes him here, although the title 'Emperor of Germany' was first officially given to William I (1797-1888).
 71. It is unclear whether this is Mary Boughton (Egerton from 1782 onwards) or Jane Boughton (who died unmarried in 1781).
 72. This addition is made at the start of the next line on the left-hand side of the page, but Mary's additional indicator in this line reveals that she intended this addition to appear here, i.e. before the verb.
 73. Present-day Theux.
 74. The present-day municipality of Stavelot lies southeast of Spa, i.e. in the opposite direction of Spa when travelling to Liege, but the historical 'postellerie de Stavelot' (part of the Princely Abbey of Stavelot-Malmedy, which was abolished in 1795) was much bigger, and also included areas to the northwest of Spa.
 75. Saint Benoît enlevé au ciel was painted for the Église Saint-Jacques-le-Mineur de Liège by Théodore-Edmond Plumier (1671-1733). It was confiscated by the French in 1794 and has not been seen since.
 76. The English Sepulchrine convent at Liege was founded in 1642, out of the Flemish convent at Tongres. Nuns remained there until 1794, when they fled to England from the advancing French Revolutionary forces.
 77. Possibly related to the London banker Anthony Wright (c.1710-1782) (see also further below, where Mary Hamilton notes that her father was a rich banker), as well as Charles Wright (1752-1827) (a son of Anthony Wright), who during the eighteenth century spent time in Ghent and Liege.
 78. Presumably Mary Hamilton only heard the name of the prioress and never saw it in writing, and as such remembered and wrote 'Dennis' instead of 'Dennett' when writing up this entry.
 79. Plural traces meant ‘[t]he pair of ropes, chains, or (subsequently usually) leather straps by which the collar of a draught-animal is connected with the splinter-bar or swingletree’ (OED s.v. trace n.2, 1. Accessed 27-01-2023.
 80. Present-day Oreye.
 81. Present-day Saint-Trond.
 82. It seems that Mary Hamilton initially wrote 'Van Dorne', and then added the onset of an 'm' in between the 'r' and the 'n'.
 83. It appears that Mary Hamilton initially wrote 'Sucristi' and then corrected the 'u' to an 'a' without deleting the second upstroke of the 'u', making it look like 'Saccristi'.
 84. It appears that Mary Hamilton wrote this section after having arrived in Brussels, but forgot to add a dateline to indicate the place and time of writing before starting the section, as she has done with other entries, and thus added 'Brussels' in the left-hand margin of the page at a later point in time.
 85. This painting is now known as 'La Belle Ferronnière', and is a portrait of a lady who was eventually identified as Lucretia Crivelli, a married lady-in-waiting to Duchess Beatrice of Milan.
 86. This annotation has been added in pencil by Mary Hamilton vertically in the left-hand margin of the page.
 87. Indeed, the picture at Eton College known as 'Jane Shore with Stone Basin' is in fact a copy of the painting called 'Sabina Poppaea', which portrays the Roman Empress and second wife of the Emperor Nero, Poppaea Sabina.
 88. Thomas Bruce offered the Fountain of Minerva to Brussels, which was first displayed in 1751, as a sign of gratitude. He had spent more than 40 years in Brussels after having been exiled from England, as he was against the restoration of King James II. Empress Maria Theresa, who is depicted on the fountain, had granted him asylum in her Belgian domains.
 89. This page is blank, except for the archival note.
 90. Present-day Sittingbourne in Kent.
 91. Present-day Shooter's Hill is a district in Southeast London in the Royal Borough of Greenwich.
 92. Probably Francis James Vanden Clooster, a Brussels banker about whom little is known other than that he signed various official documents at the start of the nineteenth century.
 93. The following verses have been attributed to John M'Millan of Inverness (1748/9-1774), and were printed in 'The Selector. Number I' (London, 1776), pp.154-155, under the title 'Verses written on the Margin of the CAM'. The version written out here by Mary Hamilton is almost the same, with only a few words being different. No printed edition seems to exist of this version.
 94. This page contains a variety of drawings by Mary Hamilton and at least one by Granville Penn (the Karlsbrunnen Fountain in Aachen), which also contains a few descriptive notes.
 95. It is unclear whether Granville Penn or Mary Hamilton added these descriptive notes to the drawing.
 96. These annotations are written across three lines within the base of the fountain.
 97. This page contains a personal (business) card from Mr. Harmenzen (a.k.a. 'Monsieur D'Armes' throughout most of this journal), which reads 'Monsieur Harmenzen, En Personne. Pour prendre Congé'.
 98. This page contains more drawings by Mary Hamilton, as well as four by Lady Dartrey at the top right of the page.
 99. The final image is the marbled outer cover of the journal.

Normalised Text







Tuesday morning 30th. July 1776 -- between 7 & 8 -- left my Dearest
mama to accompany Lord & Lady Dartrey to Spa -- &c In the
coach. Lord & Lady Dartrey Mr Dawson Lord Dartrey's son ( -- about 17/ by his
first wife -- in the Coach -- Dined at Rochester were joined
by Master Penns & their Tutor -- oldest age 16 youngest
14. -- Slept at Canterbury



Sunday 4th. August -- Mr. Foster



                                                                
Dover. Thursday night 1st. August 1776

My dearest Mama -- I write these few lines
to you from Dover where we are waiting for a fair
wind -- I wrote to Catherine from Canterbury where
we got safe on Tuesday evening. We did not forget to
take an observation of the Moon in its Eclipse
its appearance I thought very extraordinary
& singular; not remembering ever to have seen
that redness or blood colour. We breakfasted this
Morning at Canterbury & as I was the only person in
company who had not seen the Cathedral, Lord &
Lady Dartrey, who are all goodness & attention,
would not suffer me to go from Canterbury without
doing so, I was much pleased with this
Noble structure (very different from those I
had seen at Salisbury &St. Albans -- plain --
-- elegant -- vast in size, but I have not time
for particular descriptions -- we got to Dover
about 1 o'clock -- The corn fields were not
the least agreeable objects we passed, the
stalks loaded with golden grain, but yet
no appearance of Harvest -- the fields were
quite luxuriant -- the Hops also in their
most beautiful state.      At our arrival at
Dover met the celebrated & amiable Mrs:
Carter who came from Deal, where she resides
in Summer, (about 9 miles from hence) and Miss
Cooper an Irish lady I believe you have heard me
mention was with her -- they remained with us till
                                                         the






Evening. The carriages were put on Board the Packet
but the Wind & Tide were against us. In the afternoon
went up the steep Hill to Dover Castle. 30
Acres of Land are enclosed within its walls; The
walls of the Square Tower of Julius Cæsar are remaining
-- they told us their preservation was of consequence
to the Curate of the Church for he is entitled to 30£
per Annum as long as they stand; there is a Round
Tower close to these walls which in the times of Julius
Cæsar had a set of Bells therefore they call it the
Belfry. In the reign of Queen Anne, Admiral
Rooke, after obtaining a victory, desired permission
to remove the Bells to Portsmouth, where they
now are. There are 400 men on Garrison at Dover --
Castle -- the Barracks are neat and comfortable.
The Well which was sunk by order of Julius Cæsar
is 360 feet deep, it is enclosed within a building.
The Water is drawn up by a large Wheel turned by
6 men -- there is always 20 feet water in it --
there is a remarkable echo, I threw a pin in which
I distinctly heard, -- a stone thrown in when
it reaches the Water sounds like the report of a
Pistol -- the noise increasing according to the weight
of what is thrown down -- it is bricked but a few
feet, the rest of the Well isis formed by a fine chalk
Cliff: They also showed us an immense Cannon
                                                         which



                                                                
they call Queen Elizabeth's pocket pistol. I forgot
to mention. that men have gone to the bottom
of the well without proving any inconvenience
from damp air. It was too late for us to see
the Governors apartments, we returned to the Inn
& spent the Evening most sociably and cheerfully --
the youths of our party are equally agreeable as
sensible.
Thursday Morning Wind still contrary -- the Captain
says that is of no consequence but Lady Dartrey's
apprehensions and dread of Sickness, from which she
suffers so severely, makes us young folk patient
notwithstanding our eagerness to see what is to be
seen across the water. (Lord Pomfret with his
two Sons and Daughter, and a Tutor are here in their
way to Calais, they called on Lord & Lady Dartrey this
Morning -- Lord Pomfret is a fine handsome looking Man,
&, when he pleases, a fine Gentleman in manners.
We walked before dinner on the Pier head, saw several
Ships go out & come in, we drank tea in a large
Room built for the Pilots from whence there is
a grand view of the Sea. Mr. Dawson, Mr. Penn,
Mr. Granville Penn & their Tutor walked with me to
Shakespeares Cliff we ascended to the top & spouted that
immortals bards fine description in King Lear: -- the prospect
of the Sea from hence is unbounded -- to look
down is tremendous.       It is now late& I must
conclude -- I am very impatient & anxiousmy dear
Mama to hear how you are. I embrace you tenderly
                             my beloved parent -- your
      dutiful child
                                                         Mary Hamilton




       
      “I have the pleasure of assuring you my Dearest
Mrs: Hamilton that your amiable Daughter is perfectly
well and in charming spirits -- except when a little
cloud comes over them at being absent from you;
we are here waiting for a fair wind & hope to be
able to Sail tomorrow. Lord Dartrey begs to presents his
Respects & joins me in repeating our many thanks to
you for entrusting us with your Treasure, I will
take the greatest care of her and am My Dear Madam
                             your faithful & most
                             Obliged Humble Servant
                                                         Philadelphia Dartrey”
Dover
1st. August 1776

2d. August 1776 about 9 in the Morning left Dover
went on board the Packet (called the Mary -- belonging to
Captain Cosley) we were 5 hours getting to Calais the day very
fine, went to Dessiens celebrated Hotel -- he makes 111 beds --
it seemed strange that in the space of 5 hours every object should
appear so different -- the Buildings, language, dress &c &c
before Dinner we went to the Convent of English nuns -- Mrs Grey
an English lady is the Abbess -- she is styled Reverend Mother --
which it seems is not a title given to all Abbess's of Convents -- we were
only admitted into the Parlour.

My Dearest Mama -- Since we left Calais it
has not been possible for me to write to you -- I
hope you have received the account of our little Voyage
I had no fears but was sick -- 'tis my Dear Mama with --
truth that I can assure you I never was in better health
& the only thing that could add to my present enjoyments would
be receiving a letter from you with good accounts.
2d. August
Friday
      at Calais we went to the Convent of the
      Dominicans -- an English Lady is the
Abbess her name is Grey, she is lively and polite.
She showed us some different works of the Nuns --
Lady Dartrey bought a purse which she gave me, from
the Dominicans we went to the Chapel belonging
to the Capuchins -- there were only 6 men in it --
slept at Monsieur Defseins -- L'Hotel D'Angleterre, it is
a spacious mansion & contains 111 beds, the floors
                                                        







                                                                
are dirty but the linen is white & clean, and the
waiters are clever & attentive. The Town is not remarkable
for cleanliness.
      Saturday the 3d -- we left Calais changed Horses at
Ardres -- 12 miles -- (6 miles is called a post to Recourse 1 post to St. Omer's 2 posts) dined
at St.Omer's at the Hotel de Ville, the room we dined
in was 62 feet long & had 13 windows -- the wainscot
painted blue, ornamented with gilding, -- 5 noble cut glass
Lustres -- a Portrait of Louis the 15th over one chimney
& that of the Dauphin over the other -- the side board
was large and consisted of dirty boards laid across
a frame. We went to the Cathedral and was charmed
with a Picture painted by Rubens, the subject was the
descent from the Cross; -- there is a large Silver Tomb
in this Cathedral ornamented with Filigree work,
which contains the bones of St. Omer -- on one side
of this Tomb is a large silver Coffin in which are deposited
the remains of an Abbess, on the other side another
Silver Coffin containing those of a Monk. The City of St-
Omer is one of the strongest fortified in french Flanders
-- the fortifications are of modern structure, it
is 19 miles from Calais, is a large trading place &
appears very populous -- it is the second City of
Artois -- there is a large plain building which is an
English College.
August 1776 Sunday 4th. After Breakfast we had prayers; &
then walked, we saw 3 shows in honour of the Virgin
Mary in the Market place near which a Woman sang
Cantiques for above an hour, surrounded by a great concourse
of people.* We dined early & went on to Aire --
                                                         a la Poste, which placed




is two posts, or 12 miles, from St. Omer, Aire is also
a fortified town in the French Netherlands, the Country
is richly cultivated, and abundant in grain of all
kinds -- we saw in one Field, Wheat, Barley, Rye,
Flax, French-wheat, Carrots, Beet-root, Rape Seed,
French-beans and Tobacco -- the people are uncommonly
neat and clean & appear extremely industrious. We
went to L'Eglise de St Piere & heard Mass, then went
to the Convent of St. Clara -- the Nuns had not the same
air of happiness as the Seours Grises -- there are 25 English
Nuns, at first they conversed with us, without our seeing
them but on our expressing a desire to do so 3 came
out to the gate, they informed us that they had the
privilege of appearing at the gate but not that of going
out of it, -- they are never allowed to eat anything but
Eggs & Milk, seldom Cheese, nor even at the door of
Death might they have animal food, they exist by
begging alms, and there are two Holy Fathers (as they
call them) who go about collecting for their support;
whilst they were talking to us -- one of these Fathers -- a Monk appeared to
watch them -- when we took leave he reminded us of the duty of his office -- viz
begging for their support.
from St. Clara went to the Convent of the Penitents, but
could only see their Chapel it being too late. The person
who showed us the Chapel told us the sad history
of a Young Lady who was placed in this Convent of
Penitents contrary to her inclinations by her Parents
on account of an attachment she had to a young Man
her inferior / in fortune, after she had been confined
3 Months she found means to escape, but was discovered
before she had gotten far, she ran to the Chapel belonging
to the Convent, which has a part privileged, so
that in case any can get hold of the Rail, which surrounds the Altar, who has attempted to
                             escape, & is pursued, she







                                                        
is secure, & can never again be placed in the Convent, unless
she particularly desires it, this unfortunate Young
Woman -- (who our guide told us, was Jeune et belle à manger) ran
into the Chapel, and was within a few yards of the soldiers
when the Soldiers -- who are always there on guard -- caught
her & delivered her to the Abbess -- who ordered her immediately
to be confined between 4 brick walls, she was
allowed a small portion of bread & a little water daily
in this state she existed 8 Months, continually praying
to God for release from her sufferings: When her
lover heard she was dead he ran to the River and
drowned himself -- this happened only two years
ago -- the man could not inform us what became of
the young Ladys Parents. We supped and slept at Aire
the beds good and every thing very clean; here we
have Hares, Partridges and all sorts of game as plenty as Fowls
Rabbits &c in England -- the Poultry is also good, plenty, and
cheap: Besides two courses well dressed by excellent Cooks there
is always 7 or ten dishes at Dessert consisting of various
fruits and Cakes -- the wines, the gentlemen say, are very
good -- Claret, Burgundy, Vin de Greve, &. No Port wine nor
Beer. The magnificence of the Churches strike me extremely
. We shall reach not Aix la Chapelle so soon as was
at first intended as Lord Dartrey wishes me to see every
picture worth looking at. I should my dearest Mama
write more particularly & acquaint you with every occurence
, but Lord Dartrey has made some gentle remonstrances
against Lady Dartrey & I spending too much time
in scribbling letters, & when we settle for the Evening he likes
to play at Domino or some round game, likewise, as the
post goes out at uncertain times at the places we stop at, it
      is impossible for me to send letters as regularly as I
                             wish -- Adieu Adieu My Dearest Mama
                                                         Mary Hamilton




My Dear Mama -- I was sorry to hear of the Death of
Lord Cathcart -- I had just before been told he was going
to marry again which I should have wondered at, as he
was so terribly afflicted on losing my Aunt, who had
proved herself an exemplary wife and careful Mother,
& that he was arrived at an age when the passion of
Love one should imagine could not master the sober
dictates of prudence, &c.       I mentioned to you that
Lord Bute's Mr. Jenkinson was here, he tells me that
he lately met my Uncle Sir William & Lady Hamilton at
Geneva & that they were going to Paris on the very
pressing invitation of Lord Stormont -- it seems that
my young Cousin is rather difficult to please &
manage, & does not conduct herself quite so
amiably as Lord Stormont wishes; -- it is a great
pity Lord Cathcart required his Daughter to marry
a Man so much older and whom the world, in Paris,
say she evidently dislikes. Mr Jenkinson says Lady Stormont will
not comply properly with the Etiquettes required as
Lady to the English Ambassador -- it is to be hoped
that Lady Hamilton will prevail on her to alter
her conduct. Mr. Jenkinson also says it is my Uncle William
's intention to be in London the first week in
September -- this will afford you great pleasure as
Lady Hamilton has so sincere an affection for you,
as well as my Uncle -- I hope you will go to them as
soon as possible, & pray assure them of my unalterable
affection & that I shall feel impatient to embrace
                                                         them. -- I think



                                                        
Dearest Mama
      I was made extremely happy by the letter I received
from you. Not to lose time I will continue my journal
Monday 5th.
august 1776
      Went to Lilliers where we breakfasted --
      changed Horses at Bethune -- Lord Dartrey said
the woman of the Inn was very imposing & every thing very
dear. -- post -- changed Horses at la Waquet a single house
The people were particularly civil -- the House looked like a
good clean English Farm house, and we had farmers
fare Bacon & Eggs which we enjoyed much and were very
Merry, broiling & cooking ourselves -- I do not
think the Domestics were quite so well satisfied
as we were, though there was plenty of good Bacon
fresh eggs, & sweet bread, to eat. The weather was
very hot -- but not so for Lord Dartrey -- we were all
gasping -- We changed Horses again at Lisle which is
a large city strongly fortified -- though there is much
worth seeing our curiosity must lie dormant, till
we are on our return to England when Lord Dartrey
intends stopping for a day or two. We were struck
with the number of windmills near Lisle Lady
Dartrey & I counted 200 at least -- changed Horses
at Menin -- post -- Lord Dartrey was here obliged
for every set of 4 horses to pay for 6 -- the profit
they say goes partly to the King. -- one Postilion drives
4 horses (they never use more) with long traces, faster, than two postilions
with 6 horses, at least so I was told.
In passing through a Village we saw almost at --
every door women spinning Cotton, they were very
neatly dressed & all wore wooden shoes. We got
                                                        





to Courtray at 8 o'clock -- half an hour before the gates
are shut -- we went to the Hotel Damier every thing
perfectly clean, the Supper was served on Pewter as
bright as silver -- Lord Dartrey paid only 5 escalins
(2s: 11d English) per head we had 2 fine Fowls,
a larded Hare, 6 Quails, a dish of sweetbreads
-- Veal à la Mode, hot, Stewed Peas --
French beans Ditto
Tarts -- and 7 dishes of fruit &c. for dessert. --
The Beds were excellent and the people
extremely civil. The dress continues the same as at
Calais, I do not recollect that I described it. The
Maid Servant and the common people of the Town is
a short Casaquin, or jacket, made of very coarse stuff, the
colour not material -- the petticoats remarkable short
the Stockings white & clean and Slippers, which only cover
the toes, without hind quarters & a heel rather high &
stout. The caps are all of the same form, made of
white linen, Cambric, Lawn or Muslin, with a
double border of the same plaited uncommonly
small & neat, this cap is close to the face, all the
hair is concealed except on the forehead, which is combed
flat to the head and powdered -- these do not wear any
Ribbon, but white bobbin drawn round the head fastens the cap, no woman
is without gold earrings, they have single drops, and a
Cross of gold hangs on their bosoms, these that can
afford it have 3 drops to their earrings and a large gold
Cross embellished with rose diamonds; the poorest creature
who has scarcely clothes to protect her from the weather
has gold earrings and a Cross: Stays are not worn -- the
                                                         jacket is made high
                                                         &



                                                        
conceals the bosom &neck, yet they wear a small white
Neck-kerchief -- the White Caps, &c; give an air of cleanliness
which I am sorry to say the same rank of people
in England have not, -- Women of all conditions
(particularly when they go to mass) wear long Hoods, they
are of various colours -- chiefly light brown, the Hood
shades the face and the cloak entirely disguises the
figure -- the poorest rank wear a long square piece of black
stuff; silk, serge, &c &c which they throw over their
Heads & serves to cover the head &, body. I have
not seen a Hat. The Linen here is remarkably
white, not very fine, and so stiffly starched
as to scratch ones legs in bed.
Tuesday the 6th.
August 1776
Courtray
      We saw L'Eglise Collegiate, over the
      Great Altar is a capital picture of the
      declaration of the Cross by Vandyke, it is
placed between the Windows therefore has not a good
light. There is another picture by Crayer, of the Virgin
Mary & the Trinity: from L Eglise we went to the
Chanoinesses, saw a fine picture, painted by Jourdains,
of the Nativity, the Chanoinesse was polite and
showed me a private Chapel. Lord Dartrey could
not procure a sufficient number of Horses so early as
he wished, and proposed by way of amusement that
we should dine at a Table D'Hote at our Hotel, which
we did -- our company consisted of two Priests, a
Dutchman, who talked as much as he eat, & was
equally impertinent as vulgar, a well bred genteel
looking Man who spoke good french, and 6 ill
dressed strange looking people -- for 2 Escalins,
(14d. English) a head we had as good a dinner as
                                                         what Lord Dartrey




always pays 5 Escalins a head for; -- the rooms are
floored with Bricks. Soon after we got onto Courtray
there was an awful storm of Thunder, lightning
& torrents of rain. We left Courtray soon
after Dinner, changed horses at Vive St Cloy, also
at Betghent, and arrived at Gand or Ghent at
5 o'Clock, we went to L'Hotel St. Sebastian on
the Place de Parade -- the Landlords name Busso, the
Hotel is very large -- excellent beds, good Waiters,
and Mr. Busso himself remarkably attentive -- Brick floors
in the bed-rooms which were covered with Old fine
Tapestry in a sad ragged state -- large glass Lustres
hanging from the Ceiling, & miserable shabby fire
places -- like those in a poor house in England. --
There was a most elegant dinner for us at 6 escalins
a head -- 2 courses, -- the Dessert very handsome with Ices
&c &c.       The Supper was 5 Escalins a head -- fine
Wines, good bread, -- only, the Butter indifferent --
In this Country you have always Napkins and
Silver forks & spoons, but they don't change the Knives.
      Lord Pomfret and children were here, he was ill &
not able to quit his room -- Lady Dartrey took Lady
Charlotte Fermor & her Governess (Mrs: Southern,)
with us to the abbey of St. Piere. The Salle a manger
is a magnificent Room -- 300 feet long -- the Ceiling
painted by Simon (on linen) who is living at
Brussels -- they told us it was painted in 47 days --
the sides of the Room are covered with beautiful
Landscapes -- painted by an artist named Artois --
It was near the time for the Abbe's dinner, and
                                                         the



               
Tables were ready. Over the doors in the Library were
exquisite paintings by Girard in Clair Obscur -- he
resides at Antwerp -- this room is 97 feet long. The
Abbe de St. Piere is Comte de Flanders; there are
32 Abbeys -- The Chapel or Church annexed to it is very
elegant and very rich -- and kept in the nicest order --
the Altar is solid silver as are the Candlestick which
are above 6 feet high. The Stalls for the Singers are
of Oak carved curiously each of which cost 1000 Florins
(or       English) We saw the fine Vestments and
ornaments worn by the Priests, The Point and Brussels
lace was most superb and beautiful -- The whole
amazingly rich & costly -- we saw very fine Tapestry, and
many relics made precious by ornaments of jewels &c
there are many pictures -- we were only particularly struck
by 2 near the Altar -- Tobit by Gaspar Crayer, and our Saviour crucified by Janssins.
We then went to the Cathedral of St. Bavon where is a
fine picture by Reubens the subject of which is disputed --
some affirm it is St. Bavon giving up his treasures to
the Church -- others that it is the Emperor Charles the
5th. giving up the Crown to his Son : the Altar Candlesticks
, an immense size, of Copper richly ornamented,
they were brought from York, the arms of England, are finely
engraved on them -- they were purchased by a Bishop
of Ghent: here is a fine Monument by Jerome
du Qucesnoy. From the Cathedral went to the Church
of the Recollects -- Three fine Pictures by Reubens --
Over the great Altar is represented Christ going to
punish the World -- the Virgin at his feet, as interceding --
and St. Francis below her in an humble affecting
attitude of supplication. Over another Altar St. Francis;
                                                         & on a third a




a dying Magdalen
August 7th- 1776
Ghent
      Lady Charlotte Fermor &c went with
      us to see a private cabinet of pictures
      belonging to an Abbé and were gratified
by the sight of a large collection of flemish pictures
highly finished -- two Lord Dartrey admired much by
Meijers one Bachus and Nymphs, the other a family, &c
From the Abbés we went to see a Collection which is to be
sold -- many fine pictures -- by Reubens, Vandyck --
Carlo Maratti &c &c.       After Tea a Savoyard played
/before the Windows/ extremely well.
Thursday
8th-
      Left Ghent early changed Horses at Quatrect --
      dined at Alost at Les Trois Rois. Saw the
Church of St. Martin saw another capital picture, by
Reubens, of St. Rock interceding during a Plague.
and in the Church of the Carmelites a picture over the
altar by Gaspar Crayer -- the Virgin with the degrees of the
altar from the Pope to the Monk.
      We got to Brussels in the Evening we had a good deal of
Rain which was quite refreshing after the almost intolerable
dust and heat. Lodged at the Hotel D'Angleterre
at our entrance into Brussels the Carriages were
surrounded by men called Valet de Place, they are only
Servants during a strangers residence, to conduct them
to the Churches &c. &c. Lord Dartrey hired one, his
Name Sir Philip -- he is very attentive & civil -- he says
he has a Wife & ten Children who are extremely industrious
. The Room we sit in is 45 feet long. --
Friday 9th. August
Brussels
      We went to see Mr. Varrulst's Cabinet
      of pictures -- This gentleman has not been
out of his house 25 years but he has great pleasure
                                                         in



                                                        
in sharing his pictures, particularly to strangers, he received us
in his study, he is well bred, the dress we saw him in, (& which
I believe he always wears,) was a fine India Chintz Robe
de Chambre, -- a Cambric night cap bound round with a
striped border of chintz -- Slippers, & fine Brussels point
Ruffles, & upon one of his little fingers a large brilliant
Diamond ring of great value -- he has a large fortune, and
we saw a number of man Servants in superb liveries which
denoted it -- as far as appearance goes. Mr. Varrulst showed
us 4 rooms & a closét crammed with highly finished
Flemish & Dutch pictures -- there was one by Rubens
which Mr. Varrulst values as the best he ever painted; From
Mr- Varrulst's we proceeded to Charles Prince of
Lorraine's Court, which is magnificent & in good taste,
(as far as I have experience to judge) the first room
we entered was hung with Tapestry wrought in a
superior style from designs by Rubens -- between
each window were looking Glasses from the Ceiling to
to the Ground; the Cornice & Ceiling beautiful; another
Room was wainscotted with the wood of Nut-Tree
brought from Turkey, ornamented in a light
yet rich manner with Copper gilt. We were shown
many curious pieces of mechanism, Clocks &c. &c. &c.
there was a long narrow Gallery filled with very mean
pictures -- a Salle á Manger (a large Room) also full
of pictures, some good. Prince Charles has two
Millions of Florins per annum; he has also a
Noble Summer Palace. We saw him drive past us
in an open Carriage -- he is a large, bloated, plain
looking Man -- he drinks two bottles of Burgundy every
day at dinner -- each bottle twice the size of English
quart ones. -- besides liquers &c. From the Court we went
                                                        




to see the Arsenal where there is a quantity of curious Armour
amongst that of others we particularly noticed, was that of
Charles the 5th- and Mountezuma's -- the workmanship of
the first was admirable -- that of poor Montezuma's was
made of Indian Reeds and other similar materials. --
From the Arsenal we went to the Capuchins -- over the
great Altar a Picture by Rubens', of Christ dead on the knees
of the Virgin Mary a very affecting and beautiful picture,
the Magdalene's figure and countenance is very lovely.
(The works of Rubens, Vandyck, Gaspar de Crayer, &c.
are chiefly monopolized by the Churches in Flanders &
in them you will find their best productions)
The Capuchin who showed us the Church took us to the
Sacristy & showed us a picture of Christ & Mary his
Mother by Atto Verrius; a fine Ivory Crucifix
by Quernoy -- and two pictures by Vandyck, the one
St. Anthony, the other St. Francis. It is not
possible for me, My dearest Mama, to mention
all the pictures, Sculptures, Relics, Architecture
&c. &c. &c. which are worthy notice in the Churches &
other places -- for besides my want of judgement, we
see things too rapidly for perfect recollection. Lord
Pomfret & suite came here (in his way to Antwerp)
quite recovered. The weather is fine -- we looked
at Lace and Silk Stockings which are dear & to be purchased
as cheap in London. The best society here is elegant.
My Hair was well dressed by the Princess's Hair dresser, not so
extravagantly large as in London -- the fashions very here in
the same manner, Some of the Ladies have their heads well
loaded. We saw elegant small hats composed of Blond's --
foils flowers &c. so small that but a small portion of hair
is covered -- they do not wear any other to walk abroad in,
                                                        



                                                        
they leave the face exposed, & are made with open wires behind to
turn up to the crown of the head, or let down to appear round,
some of these hats have extravagantly high feathers waving
on the top. These Hats we saw at one of the first milliners
they were for Ladies of quality.
Saturday
10th. August
      Left Brussels at 8 o'Clock, dined at Maline or
      Mechlin -- saw some Churches -- arrived in
Antwerp in the Afternoon. L'Hotel d'Angleterre;
went to the Church of the Recollects -- from thence to that of
the Augustines -- from there to Notre Dame called the
Cathedral -- the Tower beautiful Gothic 466 feet high.
The great Altar entirely of Marble very superb, The Statue
of St. Paul finely executed on the top, all his at the
expense of Capello the Bishop of Antwerp -- I shall make
a list of pictures &c ------ the memorandum of our
party & my own and what we marked in the book --

Then to the Dominicans &c. I had a bad Sick headach
                             which kept me at home part of the way &c

Sunday 11th
August
Antwerp
      Mr. Foster read prayers -- after which some of
      our party went again to the Cathedral -- then to
      Mr. Lonty an Historical Painter, & 2 others --
after dinner went to St. Andre -- opposite to the Chapel
of the Saint Sacrament there is an Epitaph to the
Memory of Mary Queen of Scots with her Portrait
over it, the head is beautiful -- on the North Side a
picture by Vandyck of our Saviour & the Virgin Mary --
The Valet de Place Lord Dartrey hired here is a very
intelligent Man & could give an account of every Picture
&c in a clear manner -- his name, de Bois. The City
of Antwerp is the Capital of the Marquisate of the same
name in the Netherlands, with a Citadel reckoned the strongest
in the Low Countries -- the City is built in form of a Crescent
on the River -- it was esteemed 200 years ago the greatest
Trading port in Europe -- but the traffic is removed to
Amsterdam & other Towns in Holland -- In the afternoon
we saw the private collection of the




Chanoine Knyffe, -- & the Abbé de Saint Michel
where we saw some capital Pictures by Rubens, Vandycke,
& other eminent painters -- the apartments are very
spacious & command an extensive view of the River --
Here the Royal family are lodged, & we were shown
some boards burnt, on which it is said, the King of
France & Charles the 1st. of England burnt some papers
of consequence. Antwerp is subject to the house
of Austria
Monday
12th August
1776
      Left Antwerp at 11 -- dined at Mecklin -- (or Malines)
      at a pretty good Inn called la Grue -- saw the
      Cathedral saw no Pictures to rival those at
Antwerp -- went to L'Eglise of St. Jean where is a fine
Picture of the Adoration of the Magi by Rubens --
We drank tea & slept at Brussels to which place we returned
from Antwerp in our way to Aix la Chapelle
Tuesday
13th August
      Saw the Jesuits Church, College &c. &c. it
      was melancholy to see a place so deserted --
all the Vestments of the Priests & about 2000 pictures to
be sold -- they told us the pictures were chiefly copies &
a few good originals -- many were sad daubs -- We then
went to the Abbé de Colbert -- St. Jacques de Coudenberg
-- he received us with great politeness, showed us his
private apartments & his Chapel -- saw two beautiful
sketches by Vandyck, -- he also showed us a drawing of
the Abbey & Church & apartments which are going to be
built upon a noble & extensive scale; to be enabled
to complete this, they intend selling some valuable
Pictures -- we saw a Madonna & Child by Vandyck -- and
3 Pictures by Rubens for -- which said 3 Pictures they ask
four thousand Guineas -- The Abbé de Coudenberg is
a jolly well looking Man, appears about 60 -- There was
an Old Abbé with him who very politely invited us
to go to his House in the Country, on our return from
Spa to see some curious paintings -- flowers &c.
Brussels is Capital of Brabant & all the Austrian --
Netherlands on the Senne -- & Residence of the Vice Roy.
Prince Charles of Lorraine, & subject to Austria --
                                                        



                                                        
The Road for some Miles from Antwerp near Brussels
is charming -- one side thickly planted with Trees, on the
other a fine clear River & a broad good road on each side
the Pavé
Tuesday
13th. August
1776
      Left Brussels at 12, the road beautiful between
     
Brussels & Louvain, 3 & sometimes 4 rows of
      Trees on each side of the Road -- no hedge rows --
we saw 3 wheels on which some malefactors had been executed
these were in a field near the public road -- the land is cultivated
close to the trees planted on the sides of the Road --
The Harvest is begun, they cut the corn with a short Scythe &
hold it down with a Stick in the left hand, women labour
as well as Men. We saw them reap Poppies in the
same manner as the Corn -- they have long narrow --
Carriages drawn sometimes by 4 sometimes 5 horses
3 of them abreast -- on there Vehicles they load a vast
quantity. Women & children wear wooden Shoes, few
have stockings -- Beggars are numerous on The Road &
the Doors of Inns -- we dined at Louvaine (at the
Ville de Cologne) -- every thing good & well dressed --
excellent Beds, very clean, & the people very attentive.
The State House at Louvaine is esteemed a most
beautiful Gothic Building -- tis in good preservation,
we all admired it much. At the Chapel of the Convent
of Les Dames Blanches we saw a fine Picture
by Rubens -- the adoration of the Magi -- at the large
Church of St. Piere we saw some exquisite carving
in Oak, -- walked to the Eglise Dominicans,
belonging to Women & Convent, heard Vespers -- was not
charmed either by the voices of playing of the Nuns
& their Organ was a bad one. Saw St. Augustins
Church -- a fine picture by Crayer -- a Monk gave
a book of Miracles -- Louvaine is not a clean nor
agreeable Town.
Wednesday
14th. August
      At 7 in the Morning left Louvaine, changed
      Horses at Tirlemont -- a large Town, with
3 old Churches -- which Lord Dartrey did not think, worth --
                                                         while stopping
                                                        




to look at; changed Horses again at St. Trond, and of
Tongres where we dined at La Poste -- they made Lord
Dartrey pay extravagantly for a very bad dinner --
The weather was excessively hot which did not agree with
dear Lady Dartrey & we got to Maistretch in the afternoon
a very large Inn, every thing clean, good Beds, well attended,
the Landlord remarkably civil, The Inn called the Moulinn.
Lord Dartrey found the charge reasonable for an elegant
Supper & Dessert. At the entrance of the Town there is a
strict search -- we were stopped by the Burreau (or Customhouse
officer) & asked more questions than usual, for
at every great Town travellers are stopped at the Gates, asked
who they are & whether they have any thing sujet au
droit de sa Majesté, & where they are going, but as we
were going to Aix la Chappelle as travellers & not
Merchants were permitted to pass without the Trunks
being opened -- The officer who examined us appeared
to be an Ensign about 13 or 14 & short of that age, the
Burreaus at some other Towns did not appear of equal
Dignity as they always asked Lord Dartrey for some --
money for Drink. Maestritch is a well built Town,
large & clean, it is situated on the River Maes, it
is garrisoned by the Dutch who have the civil government
of that part called the Town which is 4 miles in
circuit, & strongly & curiously fortified -- there are
3 Dutch Churches -- none for Roman Catholics, -- Lord
Dartrey did not stay to see any thing here. This City
(by the account published,) was taken by the Dutch from the
Spaniards in 1632, & retaken by the French by Louis
the 14th., in person, in 1673, who restored it again to
the Dutch by the Peace of Nemigen in 1679, & has
since continued in their possession.
                                                        
Thursday
15 August
1776
      Left Maestritch after breakfast, a tolerable
      road but no Pavé or rows of Trees -- N.B. the
Road from Calais to near Maestritch is paved the same as the
Streets in London, & on each side of the pavement, which is
broad, is a Road equal to our best turnpike roads in
England -- (In Winter or rainy Weather they drive on the
pavement. The Postilions wear enormous boots, they
                                                        



                                                        
are made of Iron covered with leather -- when I first saw
a number of these Boots standing upright in the Inn-yard
at Calais & the Postilions just before they were to
mount their Horses, thrusting their legs in with shoes on
their feet, I could hardly refrain laughing -- & we were
all amused at the Novel sight of Postilions with long
grises dangling down their backs & Cocked 3 Cornered
Hats -- they use short handle whips with long lashes,
which are thick near the handle which they dexterously crack
several times with considerable noise when they set off or arrive at
an Inn; but to return to the Boots which are more useful
than laughable as they are calculated to save a limb
from being fractured in case of a fall on the paved road.)
Lord Dartrey stopped at a small Village, with his usual
humanity, to rest the horses -- I can't recollect the
name of the Village -- we had Cold meat & good Boullie
on which made an excellent meal -- The Road from this
place to Aix la Chapelle is hilly & the country on are wooded -- (The
roads in Flanders being flat it appeared ridiculous to
us to observe the slow snail-like pace of the Postilions
if they met with the least, almost imperceptible, rise
of ground.) The road near Aix is bad -- the surrounding
country beautiful. About 5 we arrived at the
Great Hotel kept by De Bigh where Lord & Lady Dartrey
found a very handsome suit of apartments ready
to receive them & their party, viz: a very large dining
Room with painted hangings, but I have not time to
stop to describe the rest, only I must say that I
am lodged in a room I feel ashamed to occupy as
it is the best & largest, but Dear Lord & Lady Dartrey would
have it so -- it is next to the dining room, very large & hung with painted
hangings. We found Mrs. Boughton & two of her
Daughters were lodged in this Hotel -- they have been
about 10 days at Aix la Chapelle -- they drank tea with
us -- after which Lady Dartrey felt herself stout enough to
walk with all our party & Mrs. & Miss Boughton's to see
the Baths which are opposite to this Hotel, & to the Emperor's
                                                        





      Baths which are at a greater distance -- we lodge near
the Pump, Ball room, & walks -- I did not go out as I
wished my Dearest Mama to continue my journal
to you -- The weather very Sultry.
      Aix la Chapelle is sovereign State of Germany & an
Imperial City -- large not handsome. The Emperor
Charlemagne was the discoverer of the hot spring --
The Baths are large, handsome & convenient, they
say they are particularly beneficial to those who
are afflicted by Palsey or Scurvy, the water is so
strongly impregnated with Sulphur, that I smell it
when I open my bed-Room Windows, though the Baths
are in a Back Court on the opposite side of the way
or street. -- The water at the Emperors Baths are so
hot as require sipping -- they are not so much
drunk as the water from the Pump near the Hotel
which are cooler.
Friday 16th
August 1776
Aix la Chapelle
      During some hours in the Night there
      was an awful Storm of Thunder, Rain
      Lightning & Hail, you know I am not
particularly affected by Thunder but the lightning
flashed so terribly on me in Bed that I got up, &
thought over those lines of Mrs. Carter's, which Lord Napier
sent me, which you will see in her little Book of poems,
she wrote them during a storm (I think) to a friend --
they begin,Let coward guilt with pallid fear” -- &c.
      I went with Lord Dartrey to the Pump, this Morning, and
drank two glasses of water -- the rest of the day was
chiefly filled up by walking about the Town -- Mrs. &
Miss Boughton's drank tea with us. Mr. Jenkinson
the friend (& formerly Secretary) of Lord Bute, paid Lord
Dartrey a visit in the Evening I have heard he is a
Man of superior political abilities -- but his manner
, voice and countenance are by no means prepossessing
-- he is tall, thin, & most ungainly & awkward.
there is however great shrewdness in his eyes when
                                                         they are



                                                        
not squeezed up by laughing, which he does often, & in no very
harmonious tones.
Saturday
17th. August
Aix la Chapelle
1776
      We got up early, went to the Pump -- people
      take Magnesia & Sulphur at night when they
      intend drinking the water in the next Morning --
Walked on the Parade made acquaintance with
Sir John & Lady Webb -- (she has an elegant figure & is
very handsome -- Fine dark brown hair which grows well
on her forehead -- face oval -- Nose rather Aquiline, eyes
well cut, dark hazle -- fine eye-brows -- good teeth &c &c)
-- also with a polite old French Gentleman who we hear is a
Man of consequence & very rich -- his Daughter just gone
to Spa -- After Dinner we walked to a Convent in a
Village or little Town called Bourchet -- about a Mile
from Aix la Chapelle it is called an Abbaye founded by the
Emperor's Otho 2d. & 3d & Henrys 2 & 3d -- The Ladies
are Noble -- Madame Platenburgh who, obligingly,
showed us the Chapel, has the air of a person of
high fashion and appears amiable -- there is an
Abbess and, only, ten Ladies -- they have leave of
absence once a year to visit their distant Relations, &
they have liberty to pay visits in the Town & receive company
: each have 4 Rooms. which appeared but shabbily
furnished, with paltry pictures &
Prints, & the walls white washed, they live on their
own fortunes, each have a Maid Servant -- or, what we
style, a Ladys Maid -- A Table & every thing requisite
for their Board is provided for them free cost --
They have lately built a large handsome Chapel -- which is
just completed. There is a hot spring in this Town
which boils an Egg in 3 Minutes -- it smells strong of
Sulphur.














                                                        
                                                         Aix la Chapelle
I left off my journal on the 16th. of August -- on Saturday
the 17th- walked in the Morning on the Esplanade met
Sir John & Lady Webb -- they are English and Roman
Catholics -- he looks likes a little french Hair Dresser,
he can tell the history of every one here if you chose
to ask him, they say he has a very large Estate in
England and is shabby & pernicious, chiefly residing on
the Continent -- Lady Webb is his 3d. Wife, he married
her when she was little more than 13 -- she was a Miss
Salvin of York -- she is handsome, has delicate
health, and looks very unhappy. Met also Monsieur
Bartin a pleasant old Frenchman, a very rich --
Financier -- he is Uncle to Madame Monboisier, he
intends to visit England next Winter. Mrs.
Boughton -- (a Bed chamber woman to the Queen) and
her Eldest, and youngest daughter (Jane) went with us
after dinner to Bourchet, a Village about a Mile from
Aix la Chapelle to see an Abbaye founded by the
Emperors Otto &c. there are only ten Ladies including
the Abbess -- they are all Noble; Madame Platenburg
who showed us the Chapel &c. is remarkably
well bred & polite, each of the Ladies have 4
Rooms a Garden & Maid Servant, they are allowed
to visit their Relations & friends, they have also
a very ample table kept for them. Madame Platenburgh
enquired much after Lady Effingham: She
made us promise to pay her another visit; in one
                                                         of the rooms
                                                        




she showed us there were two Gentlemen drinking
tea, they joined us, & one of them attended us to the
boiling Well -- The water is of that degree of heat as to
boil an Egg in 3 minutes; We returned home to tea,
and then went to the Assembly, which is next door to
this Hotel, there were but few people, & as Lady
Dartrey and myself were to Bathe at 8 o'Clock we
came away so early that Cards were not begun --
We made acquaintance with a Marquise de la
Bedoyere a handsome interesting woman, and
a Mrs Nugent, & another Lady of this place, they
were very civil. I found the Bathing very agreeable
, and the attendants and accommodations excellent
.
Sunday the 18th- I drank the proper quantity of
water, 3 glasses, before breakfast, one is not allowed
to breakfast till an hour after the last Glass,
Lord Dartrey calls me up every Morning at 6 o'Clock, walked
to the Emperor's Bath met Mr. Jenkinson, (who
honours me by much notice) he is certainly a very
clever man but not an agreeable one to suit my taste).
The Boughton's, Monsieur Butin &c -- After breakfast
Mr. Foster (the young Gentleman's Tutor) read prayers
, very well, and gave me a good Sermon. In
the afternoon Mrs. & the Miss Boughton's drank tea with
us. Mrs. Boughton left us early & was so gracious as to let her
Daughters remain with us, we spent the Evening very
cheerfully. 19th: Monday Spent the Morning most comfortably
with Dear Lord & Lady Dartrey -- the Young men & their
                                                         Tutor



                                                        
otherwise engaged -- I bathed at 1 o'Clock afterwards had my
hair dressed by a celebrated performer on heads of this
Town. After dinner some good humoured acquaintance Monsieur
Butin came to laugh & Gossip till 7 when we all went to
the Ball, I danced with Mr. Dawson -- a French Count
& two other gentlemen asked me to dance with them but
I did not change my partner -- One of the gentlemen was
a queer looking mortal -- I did not enquire who he
was -- we danced English Country Dances, and were 8
couple -- Monsieur Butin gave tea to all our party, he
lamented that his lameness prevented his opening
the Ball with me -- These little parties are in my opinion
a thousand time more cheerful than a fine
Ball or great assembly. The Marquise De La Bedoyer
danced with Lord Dartrey. Le Marquis her Husband was there, a
genteel handsome young Man. We got home at 10 o'Clock,
Small Blond Hats, & quantities of Feathers, worn
on one side of the head is the general fashion here, it
is both smart & elegant. Tuesday 20th. The weather
too bad to walk much -- In the Evening Lord Dartrey
amused us by teaching us Tarot -- he held the Bank,
& we were as interested about our fourth part of farthings
as if they were Guineas. Wednesday 21 walked with
Lord & Lady Dartrey to pay visits, see shops, and
the Needle Manufacturing which is very curious -- we
dined early, after which, I went with Mr Dawson the
2 Penn's & Mr.. Foster to the Summit of a Mountain
it was difficult for me to climb, but I was rewarded for
my labour by seeing a beautiful & extensive view
of the country. -- on the top of the Mountain saw many
fossil shells -- and great variety of aromatic herbs
                                                         which




perfumed the air. In the Evening we all went tot he
assembly for an hour. Thursday 22 Went with Lord
& Lady Dartrey to pay a visit to the amiable Marquise
de la Bedoyere -- hired some French Books at the Book
Sellers. -- saw the Market place and la Grand Place where
their is a Noble State House or Maison de Ville; in
the Middle of la Grand place is a large beautiful fountain
-- we have seen in every (I think) Town we have gone
through remarkable Pumps and Fountains. We
dined early & went afterwards with the Boughton's &
La Marquise to the Cathedral, the most ancient
building of the kind we have yet seen, there are not
any paintings, but there are great store of Relics, --
L'Archi Pretre Davis showed us every thing worthy
observation -- quantities of celebrated Relics, Bones
of Charlemagne, &c. &c. &c. enclosed in gold cases &
studded with diamonds, pearls, onyx, &c. &c. a
very fine Onyx of an uncommon size, a Cameo of
the Emperor Otho & his wives heads; The Emperor
Charlemagne is buried in this Cathedral
he has no Monument -- a large square pavement
marks where he was buried: In one of the Chapels
there is a Pulpit of Massy gold enriched with precious
stones & gems -- one Onyx measures more
than half a foot: L'Archi Pretre showed us the
Crowns that the Infanta Isabella presented to the
Virgin Mary & the young Saviour for them to wear
on high days -- they are of gold, ornamented with
fine diamond & pearls & their form is beautiful,
                                                        



                                                        
she likewise presented the Vestments which are Satin
finely embroidered with coloured flowers, and quantities
of White Lilies in small pearls -- the border is almost
grounded with small pearls, diamonds and large
pearls. There are hangings for the whole Chair &c, &c,
the gift of some Bishop (I don't just now recollect
his name) they are of Crimson Velvet embroidered
with pearls & gold. We noticed the Stone Chair of
Charlemagne on which all the Emperors are seated when
they are crowned, near it are two fine Verd antique
pillars and two of beautiful Granite. Over the great
Altar is the Escutcheon of Lewis the 13 & 14th- of France, as
soon as Lewis the 15th was buried they sent his to
be placed under Lewis the 14th. -- In this Choir is the
Tomb of the German Emperor Otho. & at the end a small Organ.
The Marquise de la Bedoyere returned with us to tea, we then
went to the Rooms, as there was not any Music, the
Marquis de la Bedoyere very good naturedly offered to
send for his Violin that we might dance, but this
was stopped by his being assured there would be a
Procés commenced against him next day, for infringing
the rights of the Band of Musicians, who
were paid by the gentlemen, what made this appear
ridiculous was that the Musicians were not in
the Assembly rooms because they thought there
would not be Gentlemen enough to pay them; as
there was no dancing we went into one of the Card
Rooms which had no party in it -- but our own & were
amused by the agreeable Marquise teaching us some
french recreations -- similar to Blind Man's Buff &c &c




      My Dear Madam
                             I have begged Miss Hamilton to a---
me to add a Postcript to her Letter, & now she has done so, I almost
scruple making use of her Permission, because it takes up the
Paper She would otherwise fill. & I know what it must be to
you to receive her Letters. I shall therefore in as few words as
possible beg you to be assured how sensibly I feel my obligations
to you for the Treasure you entrust me with = She is the most
delightful Companion I ever travelled with, & I really hope, she
will return to you not the worse for this little Excursion -- She is
I thank God quite well, both the Waters & Bathing seem to agree
with her -- Lord Dartrey & I are charmed with her, & I assure you She is much
admired, but I am a very careful Chaperone. Adieu ma trés chere Madame
nous parlons Francais du matin jusqua'u Soir, mi Lord vous
presente ses baisemains -- & permettez que Je vous offre mes
Respects & toute la reconnaisance, qui vous est dit, de la part
                             de votre Servante Obeissante & tres humble
                                                         Philadelphia Dartrey
a thousand Thanks for the goodness to my Child.)

There is a Tarot-table in the rooms and 3 desperate
Gamesters hold the Bank -- it is very painful to
observe the agitation of those who play, both men
& women.

Aix la Chapelle
Friday 23d. August
1776
      After Breakfast I walked with Lord
      & Lady Dartrey to a Church upon
      a Hill near the Town, from whence
there is a charming prospect, a poor Woman who resides
in a Cottage near the Church brought us chairs
and without our asking her went & milked her
Cow, whilst we were sitting & waiting for the milk, we saw a
poor young woman with a sick infant in her arms, two
children followed her, one held a Rosary and a bottle
of holy water, and the other two Candles, they went
into the Cottage & came out again with the Candles
lighted -- they then went to the Church door, the young
                                                         woman with



                                                        
an expressive countenance of deep affliction made a sign
to us to follow her, which we did and to our great surprise
found a place filled with Straw & Wheat like
a Barn, which we got through with some difficulty
at the end of this Barn without any partition was
a Chapel filled with Crucifixes and wretched daubs
of pictures -- on one side lay an image of Christ, as
dead -- dressed in mourning, & the Virgin & Two Saints
stood behind him, also in Mourning, -- there was
an Altar, a Pulpit, Confessional chair &c. decorated
in as miserable a manner as the Images; the
Ceiling was a Hay loft, filled. The poor young
Woman placed her Candles on each side of the figure
of Christ, & then knelt down with the Sick Child
in her arms -- her two other children knelt on each
side of her -- they were silent but appeared to offer
up prayers with a devotion that was truly affecting,
Such a scene is not easily described, but I feel that it will
not, easily, be effaced from my memory. We went
through the Chapel and discovered the ruins of
Some Gothic architecture -- & an open arched Vault
with a large Stone Tomb. We gave the young Woman
something and left her with very fervent wishes
that her prayers might be granted.      I bathed at
one,. We dined early and walked to Bourchet where
we drank tea at a small House called L'Cerivisse
here there are Baths & Vapeur Baths hotter than
those at Aix. We went to see a Garden belonging
to a Mr: Kounan, a Needle Merchant, there are in
this Garden upwards of 30 figures some as large
                                                        




as life, of Men & Women, they are composed of
Shell work, finished in a style you could hardly imagine
-- notwithstanding Dear Mama your own skill
and taste in Shell work -- we went into a large Grotto where
some Officers were regaling with Mr. Kounan, the
inside was entirely covered with beautiful Shell-work
of fruits, flowers and other ornaments, in shells,
there were figures likewise, the drapery of these
were so well executed as to appear at a short distance
like painting -- it is said £30,00 has been expended
in this place -- Mr. Kounan must be a rich Man for
Aix la Chapelle. NB. I do not admire the needle --
Merchants taste -- I dare say he is a Dutch Man. --
Saturday 24th.
Lady Dartrey & I had a comfortable tete à tète
all Morning, she did not wish to go out. We drank
tea in great form at Mrs. Boughtons which gave
me the fidgets most terribly. -- Miss Boughton's came
to us in the Evening they all sat down to Commerce
& I went to my room to scribble till supper time
Sunday 25th. We had prayers early and Mr- Foster
read an excellent Sermon: afterwards I went with
Lord & Lady Dartrey in a Coach through the principa
streets of the Town to see the preparations
which are making for a great Spectacle, viz: the
Reception of one of the Students of a College of
Louvain. There is one chosen every year out
                                                        



                                                        
of 4 Colleges and 6000 Students who has the greatest
Merit -- the young man who is going to receive these
marks of honour is 18, and has distinguished himself
worthy of the prize in several branches of
learning particularly philosophy -- he is to enter
Aix this day in triumph, & will be received with
every demonstration of joy as it is his native
place -- there has not been one in this City who
has been worthy of this honour 140 years,
and then it was adjudged to one of his family.
The Streets through which he is to pass are decorated with young trees stuck
in the ground 4 feet asunder, -- fine Shrubs are
put out at most of the Doors, in pots, tubs &c
We drove through 26 triumphal Arches, every
one different, some with coloured & white
Egg-shells beautifully & simply intermixed with
Ever-greens -- others equally pretty with flowers,
paintings -- Ribbons, & Feathers &c. -- The young
Man's name, Josephus Widlt, is embroidered upon
Coloured flags with inscriptions of his abilities &c,
others with tin Silvered &c -- there are hundreds of
coloured lamps prepared -- in short every thing that
can look most gay -- As we were passing his Father
s House Lord Dartrey ordered the carriage to
stop that we might look at its decorations, &
seeing some Servants at the Door, he called one and
sent a handsome message (in all our names) of congratulations
on an event which must be sensibly felt
by Parents -- (was not this amiable in Lord Dartrey?
                                                         but




a heart benevolent and overflowing with the milk
of human kindness like his is always on the alert.)
The family were at dinner but the Mother & Sister came
out, and invited us to be at their house at 4 o'Clock, that
we might be better able to see the procession, afterwards
join in the cavalcade, & be 2 thus 1 able 3 to see the whole.
He is to go to the Cathedral where Te Deum is to be finely
performed, after that to ride through all the Streets & go to the Hotel de Ville, where the
Burge Maester, & Towns People are to make him a speech
in Latin, after which there will be a magnificent
Supper: every Town he passes through from Louvain
make him a present, Prince Charles of Lorrain a
considerable one -- I believe I heard £2,000; and
he would take place of any Prince, Duke &c. if there
was one in the town, on this day -- Prince Charles of Lorrain
gives him the upper hand. A Silver Basin & Ewer
are likewise given to him at the Town House. The Father
of this young Man is a Merchant worth £6,000, he is
esteemed a worthy respectable character. The Bells
ringing and guns firing in every part of the Town. I
dressed myself as gay & fine as I could, so did every
one, and at ½ past 3 I went in a Coach with our favourite
Marquise & Lord Dartrey -- (Lady Dartrey had a cold
& did not like to venture out) again) and the young
Gentleman & Mr. Foster in another, we got to the
Fathers House through an innumerable crowd,
there, there were assembled, Uncles, Cousins, &c;
The Mother appears a plain sensible Woman
& who seemed to support her happiness with the
                                                         --



                                                        
greatest propriety -- the Procession arrived at last, it was
a long one -- the young Man is handsome and has a charming
countenance full of sense and sweetness, he rode a
White Horse -- had an air of Modesty, bowed and
smiled gracefully and waved a Branch of Laurel, they
had put in his hand -- we followed the procession to
the Cathedral and returned home, in a quarter of an
hour had the pleasure of kissing our hands to him
as he passed our windows in Cavalcade, as before,
the whole Town is illuminated; Balls & feasting
will continue some days; the Marquise supped with
us.
Monday
26 August
      Walking Bathing &c. in the Morning -- dined
      early -- All our party went to tea at the
Marquis de La Bedoyere's Lodgings, he gave us a very
pretty Concert, he played, well, himself on the Violin --
and Lady Dartrey treated us with some of her sweet
songs; the Marquis & Marquise returned with us
We received a polite message from the Primus (the
young Student is so styled) to invite us to the great
Ball at the Jesuits' College -- we all went after
making some alteration in our dress -- we drove through
a great concourse of people, every Tree had a Lamp
stuck in it which with all the other decorations had a
beautiful effect -- there was a fine Ball, I danced
with the Marquis who is a fine dancer and as I
felt more acquainted with him I declined other
partners to the number of 8. I had the honour of
dancing a Cotillion with the Primus who pressed
hard that I would stay the entertainment that was
to follow the Ball -- the Marquise offered to be my
                                                         chaperone




if I chose to remain, I preferr'd returning home with
Lady Dartrey; we left the Ball at ½ past ten, a
late hour at Aix la Chapelle. The Marquis and
his Lady supped with us and very merry we
all were.
Tuesday 27th.
August 1776
Aix la Chapelle
      In reply to Mr.. Glover's question pray inform
      him that I have enquired, & am told that
      the Flemish Farmers never let their
Lands lie fallow but sew them successively with different
kinds of Grain, & pulse, as best suits the Ground which
they occasionally assist by manure of which I observed they
were very sparing. To continue my journal --
Lord Dartrey & I walked about the Town all Morning --
Lady Dartrey being a little indisposed did not wish to go out, we went
to the Jesuits College where the Ball was yesterday to
see some pictures -- found they were only indifferent Copies --
from good & bad originals -- went to the Hotel de Ville
or State House which is a large building with some large
Showy Rooms in which were Pictures not worth looking at,
There was however a large Picture by Rubens -- the subject --
The last judg-ment -- it is in wretched condition --
Another said to be by Vandyck -- Representing the
Emperor Charlemagne giving the Charter to the Magistrates
of Aix la Chapelle -- In the great Room is an
interesting Picture, but not well painted, of all
the persons assembled at the Congress which was held at
the Peace in the year 1748 when Lord Sandwich was
the English Minister -- there are likewise single
Portraits of each Ambassador at that time of the
different Nations employed, they are badly painted --
when we returned to the Hotel found a polite
sensible, agreeable Man in conversation with Lady Dartrey
he is the Polish Ambassador at Rome -- he paid
the visit as having lodgings in the same Hotel --
-- now in London or England this would not be thought
less than impertinent -- but as the saying is, different Countries
different Customs.



                                                        
27 August 1776
Mr. Lovel Stanhope, is here in his way from Spa to Paris,
Lord Dartrey invited him to dinner -- his conversation
was entertaining & interesting -- he related many anecdotes
of the celebrated Wortley Montague -- This singular
eccentric character was at Aix la Chapelle with
Lord Sandwich at the time of the Congress: -- The Germans
could not find time for relaxation & expressed great
surprise that Lord Sandwich & Mr. Montagu always
got their business forward yet did not appear to pay
proper attention to it, for Lord Sandwich spent his
Mornings at Cricket -- & in the Evening Mr. Montague held
a Farro Bank -- however Mr. Lovel Stanhope said
they did not neglect their duty, & assured us that
he had seen 3 Copies of the articles written fair by
Mr Montague during that time, a task which would
have every Moment of any other person to have
accomplished in the time. Mr. Lovel Stanhope told
us he knew it for fact that as soon at Mr.. Montague
received information of his Legal Wife's death -- he sent
Advertisements to be put in the London Newspapers -- for
a Woman big with Child which he would marry -- he
wanting to disappoint the next heirs, &c. &c, he
also immediately proposed to set out for England which
coming to the Knowledge of his head wife (for as a Mahometan
n had several wives) she gave him Poison which
caused his death -- there was no truth in other reports
circulated, such as his having been choked by a Bone, &c
There was nothing Mr. Montagu's spirit dared not attempt
& he had genius to accomplish every thing he did attempt.
Mr. Lovel Stanhope related the following anecdote
There was a Dutch Merchant resident at Venice who
had a beautiful & amiable Wife -- Mr.. Montague admired
the Merchants Lady and got introduced to the Husband
to whom he made himself particularly agreeable, & a
great intimacy soon took place -- he then took every opportunity
to make love to the Lady, she was truly attached
to her husband who in return loved her with the truest
                                                         affection,




she therefore had reason to apprehend the most fatal consequence
would ensue should the infamous treachery of this
insidious friend be discovered, & suffered the most cruel
Martyrdom -- this continued for a long time -- Montague
finding her proof against all his wiles changed his
plan & became respectful, distant, & reserved -- the
Lady flattered herself that he was grown weary of persecuting
her & ashamed of the part he had been acting -- &
rejoiced that she had had the prudence to conceal his
Conduct from her Husband whose partiality, and
unbounded confidence in Montagu was without bounds.
Some affairs required the Merchants personal attendance
in Holland & it was not convenient for him to take
his Wife -- he earnestly entreated Montagu to be her
protector during his absence telling him he was
the only person he thought worthy of such a trust. &
departed from Venice with a lighter heart than he would
have had had he not possessed (as he imagined) so true a friend
The Merchants Wife was far from happy at this arrangement
but could not bring herself to awaken suspicion &
distrust in a breast whose only aim was to promote
her happiness -- he not only had the highest opinion
of Montagues integrity, but thought she would find
the separation less tedious by having the society of
a person so calculated to amuse by the brilliancy
of his imagination & inexhaustible fund of
entertainment he possessed by remembering
every occurrence of a most extraordinary life, -- (The
vicious part of which he however always was on his
Guard to conceal) -- Mr. Montague behaviour, toward the
Lady, was such after her Husbands departure that
she had every reason to be well satisfied with him
& had almost lost recollection of his former base --
conduct -- things were in this state when she received
a letter with the heart breaking intelligence that
her Husband had been taken suddenly ill & was dead
Mr. Montagu did all in his power to assuage her Grief
                                                        



                                                        
he desired her not to credit the report but to send to Holland
for certificates by which the certainty of the fact could be known --
Montagu wrote -- the fatal certificate arrived -- Montagus
whole study was to endeavour to console the wretched
Widow -- after a decent time he proposed himself
said he lived but for her, & that his unwearied attention
deserved some recompense & who could she so properly
accept as the Man who had been loved & esteemed
by her late worthy Husband -- the Widow hesitated
some time, she was obliged to acknowledge she lay
under particular obligations to him, he had rendered
himself serviceable to her with respect to her affairs
&c &c -- & she likewise began to think he
truly loved her, for what man would have been so very
assiduous, so long constant -- she lost sight of the criminality
of his first offers -- she promised to marry him
at the expiration of a year & till that time he approved
of her Residing in a Convent -- they were then married.
Will you believe that the Merchant was not dead?
& That Montagu had practised the same deceit on
him by sending him forged certificates of his Wifes
death -- whose disposition he knew would prevent him
from returning to place where she died -- This adventure
was near 5 Years in acting -- some pressing
affairs obliged the Merchant to revisit Venice, judge
what he must have felt on finding his Wife alive
& Married to Montagu -- the injured pair sought
for redress -- Montagu escaped, & our Ambassador
screened him from the punishment due to his
crimes -- & he was too artful not to be prepared for
the worst that could happen.
Tuesday August.
27 continued
      After dinner all our party with Mr Lovel --
      Standhope, & the Marquis & Marquise de
la Bedoyere went to the French Comedy about a Mile &
½ from Aix la Chapelle -- the Road bad -- the place
called Vaux-hall. -- one large house like an Hotel, -- the
Country romantic -- The Theatre is small but conveniently
contrived -- at the end of every act the company
                                                        





go into Rooms from their Boxes -- where is Lemonade and
various kinds of refreshments -- in one Room there is a
Billiard Table, & in another a Farro bank is held. The
Petite Piece was the Pupile of Diderot, it was but
indifferently acted -- after this the Opera of the De
The Man who performed the Deserteur had good action
&, as far as I am a judge, a fine voice -- the other actors
had little to recommend them to admiration yet they
received applause. -- went to the Rooms in the Evening -- there
was not any dancing as the Primus had engaged the
musicians at the jesuits College -- The Marquis & Marquise
de la Bedoyere supped with us.
Wednesday
28 August
      I again accompanied Lord Dartrey to
      the jesuits College to hunt after pictures
, as he wished to purchase some, having heard the Paintings
and all other moveables were to be sold -- the jesuits
being extirpated -- we roamed about the immense
building went into numberless Rooms, all looked
deserted & made one feel quite melancholy -- Lord Dartrey
could not find a Picture worth buying -- I make no
doubt the jesuits had valuable pictures but had
prudently conveyed them away in secret; in this
Lord Dartrey agreed with me. We then went to the
Hotel de Ville or Town Hall to meet Lady Dartrey
Mr. Dawson, the Penn's Mr.. Foster, & Marquis & Marquise de
La Bedoyere -- We saw from thence a grand procession
it being St. Austin's day -- A large brass Head in which
were enclosed some of the Saints bones was carried
before a number of Priests & a great concourse of
people, all walking in pairs, with books in their
hands, chanting Hymns -- The Host was carried
under a magnificent Canopy -- the High-priest
under another in his best Vestments, his train was
borne by two Pages -- the other Priests walked according
to their rank -- all richly clothed. Incense was
                                                         thrown ,



                                                        
up, all the way, behind them -- The High Priest performed
many ceremonies, & the People all knelt upon the pavement.
In this Manner they proceeded through all the Streets. --
We then went to see the Play-House which is much larger
than the one we were at yesterday -- it has been shut up for
two Years on account of some dis-agreement. We saw at an
Apothecary's a complete & valuable collection of Shells, & Fossils, --
I regretted time did not allow our seeing them more
particularly; from the Apothecary's proceeded to a jewellers
who had many tempting articles, -- I was most pleased
with an elegant snuff Box, which on pressing a small
Spring played two or three pretty little airs very sweetly.
Here the Marquis & his Lady parted from us, & we called
on Lady Webb -- Mrs & 2 Miss Boughton's dined with
us & left us early -- The Marquis & Marquise came to
take leave, I had the glory of beating him 2 Games at
Chess -- you may easily suppose dear Mama he is no
capital player, I never can win a Game when I play with
You. Lady Dartrey went to the Bath -- Lord Dartrey
Master Grenville Penn & I went for ½ an hour to the
Rooms -- then supper, & early to Bed.
Thursday
29th August
1776
      Nothing could have afforded me such heartfelt
     
satisfaction my Dearest Mama as your
      last letter & the comfortable assurances of
Your being so well, which is confirmed by my amiable friends
Katherine & Anna Maria. -- Ladey Dartrey charges me to
assure you that she is quite penetrated by your
constant attention & goodness to her dear Boy -- her
Servants have written to inform her how frequently you
go to Hammersmith & the handsome play things you
give him -- Mr. Hudson, Lord Dartreys Butler, is going
to England & has promised to take
charge of a packet for me. He will deliver it in person
, & I wish to give you a hint that he has been
Remarkably civil & waited on me as if I had been
his Mistress -- indeed all Lord & Lady Dartrey's Servants
treat me with equal civility, & though I am very careful
not to give them trouble, & wait on me as if it was their
duty. Mrs: Palfrey (who has lived with Lady Dartrey long
                                                        




before she married -- I believe since she was a Child,) &
I, are quite friends -- she is a worthy creature and truly
deserving such a Mistress. You will, I believe, my
Dear Mama receive a visit from Mr. Foster who kindly
says he will call on you to give you a true & satisfactory
account of my health. I will now continue my Journal
-- I am happy you so much approve of my writing
in this manner.
29th We left Aix la Chapelle about 8 o'Clock. there are
the greatest numbers of Beggars & miserable objects in
this City possible to be conceived -- lame, deformed in
every way, yellow & squalid looking -- it is really very
painful to look at them, and they appear to delight
in unclothedness, as they are very idle & indolent. The
Children when born are bound up like Mummies with
bandages -- You will see a Mother in the Streets with a
Child some months old in ther arms which till you are
near enough to observe its Monstrous head you would
take for a Collar of Brawn bound round; perhaps it
is owing to this method of treating young Children that
there are so many diminutive deformed creatures --
Yet that cannot be the case neither as I am told this
Method is pursued all over the Continent, where there
are tall men & women &c, &c, & in the Scriptures
we read of the Child in swadling Clothes.
We dined at Verviers a neat Town, appeared as large
as Aix la Chapelle -- the Country surrounding is very
beautiful -- There is a very steep hill near the Town
from whence you have a delightful view -- the road for some
Miles is rough & Stony -- near Spa is better and the
Country picturesque & Grand -- Hills covered with wood
on each side -- Meadows at the bottom with natural
Cascades pouring down from the Hills, & a River by the
side of the Road -- we arrived at Spa by tea time &
immediately went to Lodgings -- the Hotel de Lorraine
-- Lord Dartrey has taken the whole House which
is one of considerable size -- viz. a large drawing Room,
Ditto Dining Room, Parlour, &c, and about 20 other Rooms.
Mr Dames, a near Relation of the unfortunate



                                                        
Mr Dames that lately destroyed himself, called on Lord Dartrey
he appears a worthy sort of Man; & a young Coxcomb, a
Mr Rumbold.
Spa Friday the
30th. August
1776
      In the Morning went to Mr Descars a civil
      intelligent Bookseller; gave our names to
      be printed -- the custom at Spa is to have
Cards delivered round by a Man to announce your arrival --
the compliment is immediately acknowledged by
the visiting Tickets of those who have received them, by
the same Man. Thus you are introduced to persons
of all Nations, visitors at Spa. A Mr Nugent, & our
agreeable, good humoured Aix la Chapelle acquaintance
, Monsieur Butin called -- In the Evening we went to
the Comedy -- The Play house is a pretty building in
a Circular form -- The Centre Box, upstairs, opens --
(after the play is over) into a large elegant Room, ornamented
with White & Gold, it is called the Redoute,
where there is an Assembly kept, & when there is no
Comedy performed -- planks are laid across the Pit which
makes another spacious handsome Room -- there are
also several rooms of less dimensions for Card Tables.

Saturday
31st. August
      Early this Morning I accompanied Lady
      Dartrey to the Geronstere, about 2 miles from
Spa -- met Mrs Harry Grenville & Daughter (she is Wife
to the youngest Brother of the Temples & was the
handsome clever Peggy Banks which you have heard Mr-
Glover mention -- as a Young Woman was admired for her
beauty (which would have been perfect but for her forehead
which was too high & what is called a Knee forehead the
hair growing too far back &c) & dreaded for the bitterness
of her satirical talents. There were few persons
on the walk where the company generally exercise after
drinking the Water -- it is cut out between Woods, the
Country Romantic, & what I call interesting, the Road
Stony & Rough but safe, There is a Room to shelter in, in
case of Rain something like a large Barn, but where you
may spend Money in Merchandises & Bijouteries --




Lady Dartrey & I returned to Spa to Breakfast --
In the Evening we went to the Ball at Vauxhall --

Spa September
1776
Sunday
      My Dearest Mama -- An hour ago I received --
      Your kind letter, & Lady Dartrey was much
pleased with the one you wrote to her, she bids me tell
You she would answer it was she not much hurried in
writing a Number of letters to send to England -- the
Same post brought her an account of your carrying her
dear little Son a Horse, & how happy you had made
him -- Lord & Lady Dartrey charged me with many
other things to say to you -- which I will tell you some other
opportunity -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --
Spa
31st. continued -- Colonel Pringle an agreeable Soldier like
Gentleman dined with us, we went to Vauxhall in the
Evening to a Ball, about 14 Couple, I danced first with
Mr Dawson -- then with Mr Nugent, Mr Ross &c. &c.
we came home early -- Vaux-hall is about a quarter
of a Mile distant from the Town -- It is a well proportioned
building & large it has not been finished above 6 or 7 Years.
I did not mention that Lady Dartrey & I walked in the
Rooms at Vauxhall in our way from the Geronstere this
Morning & that Monsieur Butin introduced us to his
Sister & Niece & they walked with us about the fields near
that place.

Sunday
September 1st-
      The Rain prevented Lady Dartrey going to the
      Geronstere this Morning -- Mr. Foster read the
Morning Service -- about 12 Lord & Lady Dartrey, Master Grenville
Penn & I walked up the Mountain as far as *Lubin &
Annettes Cottage, it is a lovely situation & not so much
exposed as one should imagine for there is a rising
Wood which on the back part shelters it. We partook of some Bouillon
Annette had prepared for dinner, which of course Lord
Dartrey rewarded her for, & left her & Lubin well pleased
with our visit. We dined early, then went to the
Capuchin Church to hear Pere Garnier preach -- it
                                                        



                                                        
was a very good discourse on Repentance -- he preached
extempore, he has a clear good voice & pronounces his
words distinctly -- his action chaste; -- The Prayer before
the Sermon was in Latin as were the Texts he quoted.
He was dressed like the Common Capuchin Monks.
After the Sermon we walked in the Garden of the Monks
which is open to all who choose to avail themselves of the
privilege. -- We then returned to our Hotel -- & all
remained at home. At 6 o'Clock on Sundays there is a
Comedy, and the Rooms are open, with Faro, &c, as on other
Evenings.

Monday
September 2d
      Lady Dartrey & I went early to the Geronstere.
Mr Butin gave Lord & Lady Dartrey & their
party a Breakfast on the Mountain (where Lubin &
Annette reside) -- near the Cottage is a large Room, & there
are two Tents fixed, one in their Garden & the other upon
a Grass Plat upon an open part of the Mountain for the
accommodation of company from Spa -- Mr. Butin,
had invited several Gentlemen & Ladies to meet
us -- the walk to the Mountain is about a Mile cut
through the woods to make the ascent easy -- the company
-- besides our party were as follows -- Monsieur Butin,
his Sister la Vicomtesse de Montboisier, her
daughter in law, who is only 16 & has been married
2 Years, a merry good humoured creature -- Monsieur
D'Orcy an elegant agreeable French Gentleman, Monsieur
D'Armes -- a Man past the middle age, a Man of
taste & amiable manners. Mr.. Jenkinson, and
the celebrated Mr. Hans Stanley -- Mr. Mrs.. & Miss
Henry Grenville. Monsieur Butins Servants brought
all the refreshments from Spa, such as fruits --
Cakes, Sweetmeats, &c &c &c -- Tea, Coffee, Chocolate
and we had different kinds of Ice made by
Annette -- from an Ice House which Lubin had made
himself -- we were all very gay: -- after Breakfast Mr-
Butin gave us ladies 6 Chances in a Raffle, as a
Man from Spa had followed the party with trinkets in
                                                         hopes





of selling some -- the Man understood his business so well
that no prize was gained by any one but Miss Grenville
who got a pair of Scissors she could not use. The weather
grew cloudy so we all agreed it was prudent to hasten
home -- when we got to the bottom of the Mountain, the
Vicomtesse took Lady Dartrey & me from the promenade de quatres
Heures in her Coach to our Hotel, where she & her
Daughter in Law sat gossiping for above an hour.
Monsieur Butin, Monsieur D'Armes La Baronne & I played at
Chess. Lady Dartrey as well as myself was pleased and
amused with our new foreign acquaintances --
Mrs: & two Miss Boughton's came from Aix la Chapelle
& dined with us; -- We went to the Redoute, there
was a Ball, I declined dancing -- having kept on my
Riding Habit -- played at Chess in the rooms with the Baronne
We came home early.

Tuesday
September 3d
      Paid several visits in the Morning -- Mr-
      Damer dined with us -- Lord & Lady Dartrey
& I went with the Viscomtesse &c &c, to the Comedy --
Grotseys Music which is very charming, after the play
went for ½ an hour to the Rooms -- In the Evening Lord Dartrey
gave a handsome supper at our Hotel -- to Mr. Boutin,
his Sister, her Daughter in law, Monsieur D'Armes, Monsieur
D'Orcy, Lord Westport (a young Irish Nobleman) 20
Years old) & the Eldest Miss Boughton.

Wednesday
September 4th.
      Lady Dartrey went early to the Geronstere
      with Mr. Grenville Penn -- Lord Dartrey &
I rode on Horseback, & I afterwards rode with Mr Dawson
& Mr Penn in the Woods as far as the Sauveniere
-- I was delighted with this ride, there was a peculiar
fragrance in the air from variety of wild herbs,
my young friends enjoyed it as much as myself.
We all dined at Mr. Tisdalls an Irish Gentleman
of large fortune, the dinner, wines &c. quite Princely
yet all equally easy as elegant -- The Russian Princess
Dasckaw & her friend Mrs. Hamilton came after dinner.




                                                        

We went to the Rooms for a short time -- Mr. Damer came
home with us to Supper -- Monsieur Butin, to our regret, came
to take leave as he departs tomorrow Morning.

Thursday
5 September
      Lady Dartrey & I took an airing upon the
      Chaussée, *called on Madame la Viscomtesse de
Montboisier & some others -- in the Evening Monsieur D'armenston & D'Orcy called --
and the Viscomtesse & her Daughter la Baronne came
to bid us Adieu as they leave Spa tomorrow.

Friday
6th September
      Lady Dartrey & I stayed at home all Morning as
      it rained -- Mrs. & two Miss Boughton's went
with us to the Comedy in the afternoon, we went afterwards
for a short time to the Redoute came home early.

Saturday
7th September
      We all Breakfasted at the Rooms at Vauxhall
     
-- each party have a table either in the
large Ball room, or in the other Rooms, which are for Cards,
& which open with large folding glass Doors into the great Room --
At the end of the Ball Room which is a fine one there is a
Band of Music playing during the Breakfast. Many
persons remain here all Morning, till dinner time,
playing at Farro & other games -- Whist appears a
favourite with foreigners as well as English -- Several
Young Men have been utterly ruined in their fortunes
this Season at Spa, it is chiefly Irish &
English who have fallen a prey to Gamesters.
A Captain Roache, a Mr. English, & a Mr. Popham
have occasioned much disagreeable conversation
for some days past -- a Duel is to be fought between
Captain Roache & Mr. English -- Mr Popham ran away
but they obliged him to return. These 3 Men have
very bad characters -- & they are well known at Waterdrinking
places in England.
After Breakfast Lady Dartrey, & I had a pleasant drive tête
a tête to the Sauveniere (one of the Mineral fountains)
& took a delightful walk in the Woods, through which there
                                                         are





paths cut. -- there is one walk raised at a considerable
expense & gravelled; by some German Count. This
place is more beautiful & retired than the Geronstere
Lady Dartrey, & I preferred going when there was no company
. We met an Old Man who looked like an Hermit
; he appeared very old, walked with difficulty &
seemed nearly blind -- his countenance was prepossessing
which induced us to speak to him, after
asking him a few questions to which he replied in a
respectful sensible manner, he informed us, that
he had been a Coachman, that one day the carriage
he drove was attacked by Robbers -- that he was knocked
from his Seat & so dreadfully beaten as nearly to
lose his life -- in consequence he became nearly blind;
& he was now in so reduced a state of poverty as to
be obliged to lodge in a Stable -- Lady Dartrey with
her usual sweetness spoke words of consolation to the
poor Man & reminded him that the Saviour of the World
slept in a Stable, &c &c -- he seemed penetrated by what
she said, and shed tears -- Lady Dartrey gave him an alms, to
which I added my mite, & I doubt not but that we left him happier
than we found him.
      The Sauvenire is a place you would greatly admire
My Dearest Mama -- the Woods, walks, murmuring streams,
The Air, the quiet -- & then, if necessary, the invigorating
Mineral beverage of the Fountain. -- Not having occasion
for the Waters I do not drink them.
Near the Common Fountain, is another of Marble with the
following Inscription which I copied.
      Patus joes? Baroa Groesbeeck Arch. Condr. Ss.mee
      S. Celnis Cancellarius viciartema vera separaba't
      Anno 1651. Alex. Lud. Marchio de Croix abuxora
      consanguineus Restauravit Anno 1776
Here there is the shape of a Human foot carved out in Stone
which is shown as the spot where St Ramock of Spa once
stood, & they say that it effects cures if a person puts
their foot in the one carved out whilst they drink some
of the Water of the Fountain. -- In the afternoon Monsieur D'Orcy
& Monsieur D'Armenston sat with Lady & me till Supper time.



                                                        
Spa Sunday
September 8th. 1776
      Mr Foster read the Morning Service --
at 5 o'Clock Lady Dartrey, the young Men, & myself went
to the Capuchin Church -- the same Monk preached who
we heard last Sunday & equally well, the discourse was
an exhortation against Soleness -- stayed at home in the
Evening = Lord Dartrey dined at the Club -- he was not very
well, came home early & went to bed.
Monday
9th.September
      We were happy to see Lord Dartrey quite well again
      this Morning. we walked about to Shops, &c.
before dinner -- Lady Dartrey went to the Ball in the
Evening to Chaperone the Miss Boughton's -- I remained
at home to write Letters -- we called in the Morning on
Mrs. & Miss Harry Grenville -- Miss Grenville played a
little to us on the Piano Forte; & we were shown
some pretty little drawings of her executing: Mrs. Harry
Grenville is very lively &, to me, agreeable in her
conversation.

Tuesday September
10th-
      I got up at five o'Clock that I might be
      ready to preside at the Breakfast Table
for my young Friends Mr. Dawson & The 2 Mr. Penn's
who with their Tutor left Spa this Morning. After they
were gone Lady Dartrey & I went to the Geronstere; it
is the water of this Fountain she is prescribed to drink.
We returned home to Breakfast, after that we took
an airing upon the Chausée, & before dinner walked up
the Mountain to the Temple. Monsieur D'Orcy and Mr-
D'Armes, (or D'amenstene) the latter is well acquainted with
our Friend Leonidas Glover, whom he met at Paris,
he speaks of him with high esteem and desired me to
present his kind regards when I had an opportunity.)
dined with us -- Monsieur D'Orcy is a married Man, Monsieur
D'Armes a Batchelor. After dinner Comte Marechal
came in -- he has a post near the Empress of Germanys
person -- his manners are quiet & polite & he has great
taste for the polite arts. The Marquis & Marquise de
Trotti & their Daughter drank tea with us, they appear
worthy kind of persons -- the Marquis is an Italian and
                                                        




     
his Lady a German. The Marquise made many enquiries
after the Queen of England and said she was very intimate
with her as was her Daughter before she left Germany. she asked
also after Mrs. Thursby of Abington whom she had met
at Spa, was pleased to find she was a friend of mine
& sent many kind messages which I promised to write
in a few days. The Marquis de Trotti came to Spa
last year in so weak a state as to be unable to move
without being supported by two persons, & was perfectly recovered
by drinking the water of the Geronstere & bathing
in the Tannelet Baths -- he is now here in his way from
Italy -- & his Wife & daughter came to meet him. Miss
Grenville also drank tea with us & stayed till near 9 o'Clock,
a late hour for Spa. Lady Dartrey did not go to
the Ball, so we had a comfortable tête a tête.

Wednesday
11 September
      After breakfast our agreeable acquaintances
      Mr D'Orcy & D'Armes paid us a short visit.
I had the pleasure of riding on Horseback with Lord
Dartrey, -- Lady Dartrey went with Mrs. & Miss Boughton's,
to the Tannelet where there are both hot & Cold Baths,
& 3 Springs, each different in Taste, as strongly
Mineral as the Pouhon. -- We had no company
at Dinner -- at Tea we had Colonel Conway & Mr. D'Orcy,
Colonel Conway is an old Man who bears an amiable
character -- he is Irish, -- has been many years in
the Empress of Germany's service -- they left us early. --
Sr. John & Lady Webb called in their way to the Comedy,
with Miss Boughton, -- Sir John & Lady Webb arrived from Aix la
Chapelle yesterday. Dear Lady Dartrey & I stayed quietly
at home the rest of the Evening -- the Weather is uncommonly
fine.
Thursday
September 12th
      Went with Lady Dartrey to the Geronstere, returned
      to Breakfast, the elegant pleasing Monsieur D'Orcy
sat with us whilst we breakfasted. Lady Dartrey & I called
on the Marquise de Trotti in our way to the Sauvenire
                                                         where



                                                        
     
we spent the rest of the Morning, enjoying the delightful
Air, & charming walks through the woods -- we returned home
only time enough to dress for dinner -- Lord Dartrey dined
at the Club -- after dinner walked with Lady Dartrey up
the Mountain & 4 o'Clock walk -- Lord Dartrey came home
to tea & went tot the Rooms -- he wanted us to go to the
Ball -- but we preferr'd a sociable tête á tête at home &
Lady Dartrey gave orders to be denied to visitors.

Friday September
13st. --
      Went early with Ly Dartrey to the Geronstere.
      Ser: John & Lady Webb, Monsieur D'Orcy, Monsieur
D'Armes, & Comte Maréchal breakfasted with us, after
which we & all the party went to Vauxhall -- the Weather
was very Sultry. -- we were introduced to a Channoiness
& a Baronne de Fraitture, -- Lord Dartrey dined at the Club,
& Lady Dartrey with Mrs. Boughton, I excused myself &
dined alone, employed myself in writing. I went with
Lady Dartrey to the Comedy in the afternoon, she had taken a
Whole Box -- her party was Lady Webb, Miss Jane
Boughton Monsieur D'Orcy Mr. D'Armes & Comte Marechal
-- after the Comedy we all went to the Redoute.

Saturday
14th- September
      Accompanied Lady Dartrey early to the
      Geronstere -- after Breakfast Lady Webb came
& we went with her to Vauxhall -- met Madame Trotti &
the Princess Daschkow, she was in Man Clothes, which
is her usual Morning dress -- her hair greasy, powdered
& tied in a Club behind, a very shabby small 3 Cornered
Cock hat -- boots &c. -- Lord & Lady Dartrey & I dined at
Mr: Tisdall's -- 12 at Table -- after dinner Princess
Daschkaw and her friend Mrs. Hamilton (an Irish lady) came, they
are both great friends of Mrs. Morgan's (Mr: Tisdall's
only Child -- she is a Widow & has a Child, a Daughter,
who is with her -- she is a very agreeable, well bred,
sensible woman, I like her extremely.)
Princess Daschkow made herself very engaging, to oblige Lady
Dartrey she went into a room where there was a Harpsichord
& played & sang some music of her own composing, the airs
                                                         were




pretty & words plaintive -- she sent for the Notes to give
Lady Dartrey a copy -- & presented me with a little Manuscript
Poem she had in her Pocket -- Mrs. Morgan told me that
this extraordinary Woman had taken a liking to my
countenance, & desired I would not be reserved
towards her -- Princess Daschkow complained much of the
weak State her Nerves were in, & said it was not
possible for her to sing or play in public.
Princess Daschkow's voice is sweet
but not strong.

Lady Dartrey, Lady Webb, & I, went to the Ball at
Vauxhall -- I only danced two Dances it being hot
& the Rooms so crowded -- Lady Dartrey & I got home as
soon as we could & spent the remainder of the Evening
happily together.

Sunday
15th- September
      Monsieur D'Orcy breakfasted with us, he then
      left us to go to Mass. & Lord & Lady Dartrey & I
went to Mr. Tisdall's to attend Morning Service -- Mr.
Tisdall having a Clergyman in his House & where the
English or Protestants assemble every Sunday Morning.
after we returned home Mr: D'armes & many others
persons came in.
Lady Dartrey & I drank tea with Princess Dashkow
her powers of entertaining are great, she played &
sang -- and read several letters from her friend &
correspondent, the celebrated Monsieur Diderot, she
also read a little piece of his called la Vielle robe
de Chambre -- they were clever. She gave Lady Dartrey
a profile of Voltaire cut with Scissors out by Mr. Hubert, who
is famous for this art, & can cut out striking
likeness's & the most beautiful Landscapes in
paper without looking, & holding his hands under
the Table. -- We took leave of Mr. Tisdall, Mrs.
Morgan &c who quit Spa tomorrow.

Monday
16th- September
      Sir John & Lady Webb, Comte Maréchal
      Sir George Onesiphorus Paul, Mr. D'armes, D'Orcy,
& Sir Ralph Paynes breakfasted with us, -- and
                                                        



                                                        
     
at Dinner we had Mr & Mrs Nugent, Colonel Conway, &
Mr Fitzsimon (an Irish Gentleman a Widower, &
Roman Catholic, who has an only Child, a Son, who is at
the College at Leige) who has a fine voice for
singing, which he does in the Italian Style. -- Grenvilles
, Boughton's, -- Mr D'armes D'orcy, &c. called before
it was time for the Ball. -- Lady Dartrey & I remained
quietly at home the rest of the Evening --

Tuesday
17th. September
      Sir John & Lady Webb, Comte Marade -- Mr D'Orcy &
D'Armes to Breakfast -- afterwards Mr-
Hawkins Brown -- then the Marquise de Trotti who
sat with Lady Dartrey whilst her hair was dressing -- Lady Dartrey
thinks, from her conversation, that she is a very religious
good Woman -- she is at the same time lively and
pleasant. We had at Dinner Comte Marechal, Mr.
Fitzsimon, D'Armes' & D'orcy -- Lord Dartrey & his company
went to the Ball at the Redoute -- Lady Dartrey & I remained
quietly at home.

Wednesday
18 September
      Lord & Lady Dartrey & I went to a Breakfast
given by Mr Bunney, an Englishman, who
is engaged to young Lady of the name of Hurlock, said
to possess a very large fortune -- he is a handsome Man,
she is plain. The Breakfast was elegant & plentifully
served -- Ices, fruits, Confectionary of all kinds &c &c
After Breakfast there was a Ball and we danced till
near two o'Clock -- Lord Dartrey had no guests at
dinner. Monsieur D'Orcy & D'Armes came to take
leave -- We found out that the latter was always called
D'Armes by french people, but that his true name
is Harmensen, a German Name. Lady Webb, Sir George Paul,
Lord Wesport came in before the Comedy. Lady Dartrey & I
passed the evening comfortably together.

Thursday
19th. September
      Monsieur D'Orcy & DHarmanzon came & sat with us
      during Breakfast -- Alas! for the last time!
                                                         for their



     

Carriages were waiting to take them away. they really appeared
concerned to part from Lord & Lady Dartrey, & me
also, I hope. Mr. Harmenzen gave me an open Note
to transcribe for Mr. Glover -- which you will be so good to show
him. “Mr. Harmenzen, Bourdeaux; Frere á Madame
“L'Atour feger, fait mille compliment a Monsieur Glover, il
“aurait eté enchanté le voir á Spa, ou il passée trois
“Semaines avec bien du plaisir, aijant au le bonheur de
“faire la connoissance de Mi-Lord et Mi-Lady Dártrey
“& Mademoiselle Hamilton; societé si douce et si agreable
quil n'on perderai jammais le souvenir; il se flatte
“quil aurait bientot de les revoir & vous aussi mon
“ cher Monsieur Glover á Londres: un peu de part dans
“votre amitie s'il vous plait”
     Colonel Nugent paid a visit -- at Dinner we had Mr. & Mrs.
Nugent & Mr. Fitzsimon, Comte Marechal came after
dinner. Lady Dartrey Lady Webb, &c. went to pay visits -- I
excused myself & remained at home -- at 9 I. went to
the Ball to join Lady Dartrey on purpose to see two Miss Corgleton's
dance -- one 8, the other, 6 years old. the eldest dances
inimitably, the other surprisingly well for her age, they are
the Daughters of a Scotch Physician who practises at Spa --
I did not choose to dance -- Lady Dartrey & I returned home early.

Friday 20th-
September
      Lord & Lady Dartrey went to Vauxhall as
Sir George, Onesiphorus, Paul gave a Public breakfast.
they would not suffer me to go with them as I was a little
indisposed -- & they are as kindly anxious about me as if I
was their own Child. Colonel Hamilton, of the Abercorn
family, in the service of the Empress of Russia; Colonel
Johnson, who has been in America, Mr Fitzsimons,
& Colonel Conway &c. dined with us. Mrs & Miss Boughton's
Marquis Marquise de Trotti & their Daughter drank tea. --
Lady Webb came & sat ½ an hour alone with me -- she mentioned
some circumstances relative to her situation which were very
interesting. -- We saw also for a short time Sir Ralph &
Lady Payne -- Mr. &Mrs Wedderburn, Mr. Macdonald, Miss Mills,
Comte Marechal Mr Hawinks Brown Mr Nugent -- Lady Dartrey & I remained at home.
                                                        



La Marquise Trotti Le
recomande au Souvenir
de Mademoiselle d'amilton
et Sa prie d'ètre persuadé
que Son amitié
pour Elle ne finera
quavec La Vie.
Elle en aussi prie
de Sa rappeller au
Souvenir de Madame
Tursby. et de Lui dire
qu'Elle nétoit Surement
pas Venu a Spa cette
année parceque
Mr Foulon n'y etoit etoit
pas AB



Le Coeur de ma fille
est L'interprette du
Mieu, en faisant
------ avec elle. je
vous prie ma chere
Miss d'etre persuadés
qu'en tous Les terres et
Les Lieux Vous n'aurés
pas d'amie plus Sincere
que La Marquise de Trotti.







     
                                                        

      I was made perfectly happy my Dearest Mama by the
      very comfortable accounts you sent of your health & spirits.
I am glad you are made easy with respect to your Agent in Ireland.
it is a pity he is not more punctual. I suppose Lords Spencer
& Warwick will be in Town at the meeting of Parliament, & then
My Uncle William & Lady Hamilton will settle there for a time,
I hope they will be near you -- &c

     

Spa
Saturday
September 21st
1776.
      Lady Dartrey & I called on the Marquise de Trotti &
      spent an hour agreeably in conversation with her & her
lively Daughter. Lord Dartrey invited Mr Adair to dinner
he is a Surgeon in London & practises as a Physician at
Spa during the Season -- he is a Scotchman -- his manners
are plain but well bred & his conversation sensible &
instructive -- Went to Ball with Lady Dartrey in the Evening
where we took of the Trottis who gave me the following Souvenir
in writing --
                             Chere Misse
                             Pensés à une Amie,
                             Pensés ÿ Souvent
                             Pensés que pour la Vie
                             Elle Vous aimera Tendrement
                             Isabelle Marquise Trotti
Sunday
22d. September
      We went to Prayers at 11 o'Clock at an old lame
      Lady's, her name Fisher. Afterwards walked up the
Mountain to Lubin's Cottage -- Lady Webb dined with Lady
Dartrey -- we had no other company as Lord Dartrey dined at the
Club. Sir George Paul, Lord Westport, Mr.. Webb, (Brother to Sir John)
a pleasant handsome Man, & many others called after dinner.
In the Evening Comte Marechal sat with Lady Dartrey & me.
there is a melancholy diffused over his countenance that
interests one. He gave us a long detail of Miss Louisa.
Nugents illness & death -- she died at Spa last Summer. --
He told us that Hervey's Meditations & Young's Night Thoughts
are translated into the German language. It is whispered
here that Comte Marechal was passionately in
love with Miss Louisa Nugent, who was elegant, pretty &
amiable, & that after she was dead he contrived to get
into the Chamber where the Corpse lay & remained a considerable
time mourning over it. He told us he should visit
                                                         England next year.
                                                        



          
Monday
September 23
      I stayed at home all day -- not being quite well --
Lady Dartrey went to the Ball &c -- Many people
called in the course of the day.

Tuesday
24th. September
      Walked out in the Morning. Lord & Lady Dartrey & I
      dined at Sir John Webb's, met Lady Catherine
Belasyse (who being a zealous Catholic resides at Leige
in the Winter) Comte Marechal, & Mr. & Mrs.. Needham.
In the Evening we went to a Concert at the Rooms for a
charitable purpose -- I should be ashamed to tell you
I laughed very much had not Dear Lady Dartrey kept
me in countenance -- & been obliged almost to bite off
her thumb & devour a box full of bon bons to endeavour
to suppress doing so, Lady Webb behaved no better --
Conceive a miserable, little, figure of a Man in the
Middle of an immense Room playing a Solo on the
German flute, in tones so weak, or delicate, if you choose,
that no sound reached the ear, except now & then a tone
that resembled the squeak of a Pig -- but the serious
part of this Concert was that the little wretch stoked
his ½ Guineas at Farron afterwards -- I had a
great inclination to ask him to repay my Crown --
for I am sure I could have put it out to better interest.
We went, afterwards to the Rooms & returned home early.

Wednesday
September 25th-
      I went after Breakfast to meet Lady Webb at
      Vauxhall -- Comte Maréchall & Mr Needham attended
us, & we had a delightful ride for 3 hours -- the little
Horses here drink like Cats, & one feels more secure
on their backs than scrambling up steep places on
ones feet -- we enjoyed the delicious Breezes on the tops
of Mountains, & was amused by seeking paths through
the close growing Woods. Lady Dartrey & I dined tête
á tête, I regretted she was not equal to riding, as I
am sure she would have felt as much pleasure as
I did this Morning. -- After dinner we walked with Mrs. and
Miss Boughton's up the Mountain. -- when we returned
Sir George Paul, Mr Adair, Colonel Conway, (a worthy Old Man) & others
                                                         came,



     
                                                        
also the Chanoinesse -- la Baronne de Gimnick. Lady Dartrey
& I went to the Rooms, I played at Chess with Ser Robert Herries.

Thursday
26 September
Spa
      Sir George Paul, Mr. Nugent &c came whilst we were
at Breakfast -- I rode out again with Lady Webb
Comte Maréchal & Mr. Needham, the ride was equally pleasant
at that of yesterday -- we climbed up some of the highest
Mountains & had charming views of the Country -- fine
subjects for a Poussin's (my favourite Landscape painter)
Pencil -- though I recollect I greatly admire the sublimity
of Salvator Rosa -- & here too is sublimity to be found. --
Some spots are Romantically pretty &c -- in short there is
variety to suit every taste. Lady Dartrey & I dined
tête á tête -- In the Evening Madame de Fraitture Lady Webb
& the Channoinesse came Lady Dartrey & I went to the Ball with them
I danced more than usual -- there being now few families
Remaining -- it is civil to help to keep up the Ball, which
is 3 times a week -- Ladies here are not at a loss for
Partners as they change every dance.

27th September
Friday
      At home all Morning Mr & Mrs Nugent & Colonel Conway dined
      with Lord & Lady Dartrey -- Many persons called both
Morning & afternoon -- went to the Rooms with Lady Dartrey I played at
Chess with Comte Maréchall.

28th- September
Saturday
      At home all Morning. -- Comte Marechall dined
      with us -- in the Evening we went to the Ball, came
home early. Received a letter from my excellent friend Mr Glover.

29th. September
Sunday
      Mr. Boyce an old Irish Clergyman who resides on the
continent on account of ill health breakfasted with
us & went with us to Mrs.. Fisher's where he read Prayers
afterward Lord & Lady Dartrey Mrs & Miss Boughton's & I
walked to the old Spa, & in the 7 o'Clock walk -- dined without
company -- stayed at home all Evening. Sir George Paul, the
Webb Comte Marechall &c &c &c came in the afternoon --
had the happiness of receiving a letter from my Dear Mama &
some from other friends --
                                                        



     

Monday
September 30th.
      Lord & Lady Dartrey & I went to a private
breakfast at the Redoute given by la Barronne
de Fraitture -- at which were Sir Ralph & Lady Payne, the
Honourable Mr. Mac-'Donald, -- Mr. Dalton, Mr. & Mrs. Wedderburne,
Miss Mills, the yorkshire beauty who was admired by
the Duke of York -- a great friend of Mrs. Wedderburn who is
also from Yorkshire, -- Count Rice, a dashing Irishman,
in the Emperor of Germanys service, he plays well at
all games & fights Duels -- he is tall & genteel in his
person & address. after breakfast I walked with Lord
Dartrey, left Lady Dartrey playing at Chess in the Rooms.
Afterwards took a pleasant tour round the Mountains
with Lady Dartrey -- Lady Payne, the Chanoinesse &
Mr. Hawkins Brown. Comte Marechall dined with
us -- we went to the Ball in the Evening -- You will have
heard of me from Hammersmith before this time -- .
Lord & Lady Dartrey return you Dearest Mama a thousand
thanks for your kindness to their little Boy. Last
night received the last letters I expected (at Spa) till I get
to Calais -- write by return of Post & direct there --
See the letter I wrote to Mr Glover &c

Tuesday
October 1st.
      The Rooms last night looked rather desolate
as many an agreeable acquaintance
had quitted Spa -- not longer did I hear the gentle sighs
of -- nor the bombast Compliments of -- .
I accompanied Lord & Lady Dartrey to a breakfast given
by Mr. Dalton (a young Englishman) at the Sauvenire,
it was a private party -- we went at 10 o'clock to the
Room near the fountain -- where the Water-drinkers exercise
in rainy weather -- It was a sociable agreeable
party consisting of -- Sir Ralph & Lady Payne, -- Mr Macdonald,
Miss Mills, Mr. & Mrs. Wedderburne, Sir George & Lady Webb, Comte
Rice, Baron & Baronne de Fraitture, the Chanoinesse de Gimnick, --
Comte Marechall, & Mr. Webb -- 18 in all --



     
                                                        
after breakfast some played at Chess & others walked in
the romantic paths through the Woods, carving out Names
on the Barks of Trees; which was mighty pretty, and
rurally sentimental, suited to the place. Lady Dartrey, &
I dined téte a téte -- Lord Dartrey with the Gentlemen at
the Club -- Lord & Lady Dartrey are admired & liked by all
for their general attention & amiable manners. --
Mr. Wedderburne invited the Party of the Morning to drink
tea at Lubin & Annettes Cottage -- it was so dark before
we got there that it was necessary to have Candles --
there were Ice's fruits &c &c. and Music playing all
the time we were at Table; some difficulty was started
how we should return as no Carriage can ascend the
Mountain -- however each Lady took the Arm of a
Beau, had her Spa Cane, Riding great Coat, tied
her white Handkerchief round her Throat & proceeded
down on regular procession -- the Music playing before
all the way -- the Stars & one Lantern lighting us.
By way of concluding the frolick we went into the
Rooms in the same order looking like strolling
Gipsies -- as the Ladies had no Riding Habits under
their Great Coats. we stayed much later than usual
in the Rooms

Wednesday
October 2d.
      Sir John & Lady Webb gave a Breakfast at
Lubins Cottage, the same party as yesterday
with the addition of Sir George Paul, Colonel Conway, & Mr.. &
Mrs. Needham, the weather was so warm that we
breakfasted under the Tent upon the Mountain --
After breakfast I walked with Lady Webb, Sir George Paul, &
Comte Marechall in the fields on the Mountain.
the rest amused themselves with Chess & other Games.
did not return home till dinner time. Sir George
Paul & Mr. & Mrs. Needham dined with us -- In the afternoon
several persons called. Lady Dartrey stayed at home I went
with Lord Dartrey for a short time to the Rooms -- took leave of
Miss Asgill & the Needhams who go tomorrow. Miss Asgill is very
pretty & has an elegant figure, seems very amiable, Lord Wesport is most
                             deplorably in love with her.



     

Thursday
3d. October
      Lord Dartrey & I went to a Breakfast given
      by Mr.. Webb (Lady Dartrey having a slight Cold
remained at home) at the Tonnelet -- the same party
as Yesterday -- no pleasant walks or Wood, the water
of the Tonnelet is as pleasant as Champagne, &
strongly mineral -- there are Hot, & Cold Baths, the former
are heated by fire. Lord Dartrey, & I quitted the company
as soon as breakfast was over & returned home
-- In the Evening we had Sir George Paul & others --

Friday
October 4th-
      Lord Dartrey gave a Breakfast on the Mountain
      the same party with the addition of Miss Boughton
Mr. Bunney, & Mr. Hawkins Brown --
Mr. Hawkins Brown & Comte Marechall walked
from the Mountain with Lady Dartrey & me -- whilst
Lady Dartrey went to dress they sat with me Comte
Maréchall read aloud some of the late Popes letters;
Afterwards I took a walk with the Chanoinesse & Mr-
Hawkins Brown round the Mountain -- Lady Dartrey remained
at home to write letters, the weather uncommonly
fine. The Chanoinesse Geminick is a very lively
sensible Woman, appears about 40 has a good air &
may be called a handsome Woman, is rather en bon
point, but walks well & actively. Baron Power
& Colonel Conway dined with us -- we had about 26 or 7
People in the afternoon, many to take leave.
      Lord & Lady Dartrey & I went to the Redoute, came
home early.

Saturday
October 5th
      The worthy Colonel Conway came with Lord
      Dartrey to my bed Chamber door very
early in the Morning to bid me Adieu -- I hastened to
dress myself & then went with Lord Dartrey to see
him, we found him at a Shop just going to set off, the
dear Old Man gave me a parting blessing -- Lord Dartrey
                                                        



                                                        
told me he, Colonel Conway;, was born in Ireland, that he had served
abroad many years with great honour, & that he was a
most excellent Man -- with many other particulars
relating to him I have not leisure to pen down --
Mr. Boyce breakfasted with us -- Sir Ralph Payne, Miss Mills,
Mr. Dalton, &c, to bid again farewell.
Lady Dartrey & I remained at home all Morning a long visit
from Mr Hawkins Brown -- we went to the Rooms in the
Evening -- (the Boughton's, Webb's, Mr: Hawkins Brown &c came
after Dinner)

Sunday
October 6th
      Mr. Boyce breakfasted with us we then went
      to Mrs. Fisher's to prayers -- after which I walked
with Lord & Lady Dartrey Mrs. & Miss Boughton's Mrs. and
Miss Poulteney (who have been here but two or three
days) up the Mountains -- the day was misty (Lord Dartrey
dined out)
Mr. Hawkins Brown came soon after Lady Dartrey & I had dined
he stayed the whole Evening; & to supper. He wrote verses
&c, & I gave him 10 minutes to write an Acrostic
on Lady Dartrey's name which he did within the time
The lines are as follows --

Dear to her Friends, & to her Husband dear,
adorn'd with ev'ry Art, yet most sincere,
Rov'd like some Angel from her Native Shore
To show us Virtues we can boast no more,
Rais'd to high rank with brightest lushe shines
Ease & simplicity to breeding joins,
Youth she enjoys & pleasure she refines

Lady Dartrey was born at
Philadelphia in America, & by the
Mothers side Grand Daughter to the
celebrated Quaker Mr. Penn.
her Christian Names are Philadelphia Hannah -- her Sur Name Fraeme --


He observed Milton's Paradise lost on the table, which
he offered to read -- there was no refusing, & I was
in an agony lest I should get into one of my unfortunate
nervous fits of laughing, as indeed was Dear
Lady D. both for herself & me, for Mr. Hawkins Brown is one of the
worst stutterers I ever heard -- but our fears soon
subsided for, after the 5 or 6 first lines of the Poem he
                                                         went





on with tolerable fluency, & convinced us that he
could read as if he well understood the sublime Poem,
if the impediment of his speech could be removed --
Every one speaks in favour of Mr. Hawkins Brown's character,
it is a great pity he has such singular awkwardness
of manner & such nervous gestures when he laughs,
& dances, as to provoke risibility from those who
are not acquainted with his sense & merits, & give
pain to those who are -- he is a plain Man and
has nothing outwards to recommend him; someone
said he was reckoned an elegant Classic Scholar -- Mr-
Glover was acquainted with his Father, who was an
elegant Latin Poet.

Monday
October 7th-
      Mr Hawkins Brown came after Breakfast whom I
      had to entertain for two hours as Lady Dartrey
was engaged in her own Room & Lord Dartrey was out
his conversation was sensible & instructive, but
it certainly requires patience & attention to listen
to him.      Sir John & Lady Webb, Mr Webb & Mr.. Boyce dined
with us -- We went to the Rooms in the Evening.

Tuesday
October 8th-
      Mr: Boyce to Breakfast -- the Webb's & others
      called had another tête á tête with Mr.. Hawkins Brown
I was rather impatiently wishing him to depart
as I wanted to write, at length Lady Dartrey relieved me
& took him to walk with her. -- Mrs & Miss Boughtons' &c
dined with us -- we all went to Tea in the Rooms &
stayed rather late.

Wednesday
9th. October
      As it rained Lord Dartrey put off our
Journey, this being the day he had fix'd
for leaving Spa -- we went to the Rooms to meet the Webbs
who are to accompany us to Brussels. Sir John, Lady, Mr. Webb,
& Mr Boyce dined with us -- In the afternoon we had Mr- Hawkins
Brown, Mr. Grace, Baron & Baronnesse Fraitture Madame Gimnick, &c.
We went to the Rooms to Meet Mrs Poulteney &c --

                                                        



                                                        
Spa
Thursday
October 10th
1776
      The Morning again so wet that Lord Dartrey put off
      the Journey -- Mr. Hawkins Brown, Boyce &c visited
      us, & we went to the Room before dinner --
      after dinner we had the Webb's & otheres, then
We went to the Rooms -- from thence I went with Lady Webb --
to her Lodgings to supper -- Lord & Lady Dartrey took
Mr. Boyce home to sup with them -- I came home at
11 o'Clock -- (Comte Sarsfield drank tae at our Table
in the Rooms he only came to Spa to day)

Friday
October 11th.
      Miss Boughton's came to bid us Adieu -- Mr.. Hawkins
Brown waited, as he said, to hand me into the
Coach for the last time, at 9 o'Clock, when we quitted
Spa. -- poor Mr. Boyce could not bear to part with us &
therefore resolved to go with us as far as
Leige, & return in a few days to Spa as it was necessary
for his health -- I expect a letter at Calais my
Dearest Mama -- excuse all blunders I often
write when my hair is dressing with the paper on my
knee &c &c

Friday
11 October
     
      Lord & Lady Dartrey & myself left Spa with
Regret at 9 o'Clock -- the Rain that had fallen made the
Cascades very fine till we arrived at the little
Village of Taux, about 3 Miles & ½ from Spa, where
there are many Iron Forges -- stopped at      the
territory of Stavelef -- from thence lost the beautiful
Mountains & quitting the road leading to Aix la
Chapelle travelled some Miles over a large barren
Heath -- a long Hill led to it with naked Mountains
on each side -- a melancholy contrast to the
lovely scenery we had left -- however 4 or 5 Miles
from Leige we had an extensive prospect over a
a prodigious fine Country, & we were charmed with
the approach to Leige -- upon the Hills near the
Town saw Vineyards, & large Hop Gardens -- they
informed us they made 32 Sorts of Beer. We lodge
at the Aigle Noir. As do Sir John, Lady, & Mr. Webb --
                                                         Lord Dartrey
                                                         sent




     
to Mr. Fitzsimon who resides much at Leige on account
of the education of his Children (I believe we were
misinformed about his having only one) he came &
joined our party at Dinner -- we played at very low Farren
in the Evening. Lord Dartrey held the Bank & we were very
gay & cheerful.

Leige
Saturday
12 October
      Before we went down to Breakfast Mr. Boyce
      read Prayers in Lord Dartrey's Room -- A
      Lady Cook, her Daugher, & a Miss Crosby who
reside in a Convent at Leige & are Protestants, came to
enjoy the satisfaction of joining on worship with persons
of their own persuasion. After prayers we joined our
party at Breakfast (viz. Sir John, Lady & Mr Webb) & Mr-
Boyce) after which Lord & Lady Dartrey Mr. Webb & myself
set out to see some Churches -- 1st: to the Cathedral, dedicated
to Saint Lambert, the entrance resembles that
of Canterbury, upon the Great Altar were 14 Silver Candlesticks
very finely wrought, the highest 6 feet & ½ high,
& a beautiful large lamp hung before this Altar. The
Porch is curious Gothic architecture adorned with numberless
figures representing the Martyrdom of St. Lambert:
2d. The Jesuits Church nothing here which attracted notice
but Rich Busts of Saints in Silver upon the High Altar. --
Mr. Webb related some anecdotes of the Jesuits and
desired us to read the History of the Mission of
Paraguay. 3d- St Pauls, a very large Church, the
Screen before the High Altar is of Marble, it is
elegant & Simple; The Roof of the Church is painted
& is so pretty & light as to resemble Gauze or Taffety -- one
tolerably painted Picture of bearing the Cross.
4th. The Dominicans -- a large Noble Dome, & 7 very
pretty Chapels. 5th. St. Jacques -- Gothic, & very richly
ornamented, it belongs to the Benedictine order
of Monks -- there are 5 neat & beautiful Chapels behind
the Great Altar -- fine painted Windows on which are
represented the History of St. Benoit -- The Roof is
                                                         light, &c &c
                                                        



                                                        
& there are some very large figures of Saints in Marble well
executed. We transcribed the following lines on a Tomb over
which hangs a picture of St. Bernoit dying with a Pigeon coming down
      in a Glory --

De sa chambre Benoist au Ceil levant les yeux
Apparoit un Pigeon qui penetrait les Cience
Cest l'ombe de sa Sœur sous cette resemblance
qui va chercher la prix de sa grande innocence.

The reason of the number of Altars in the Romish Churches
is for different Priests to officiate, & who generally
receive the Sacrament every day.
Mr Fitzsimon, Webb's, &c then went with us to the English
Convent -- the Reverend Mother had received notice of
the intended Visit -- She came to the Grate of the Parlour
& desired we would go round to the Stairs where
she received us, attended by 30 Nuns whose faces were
covered by their Veils -- they ranged themselves on
each side & bowed as we passed -- they then lifted
up their Veils -- We were shown the whole Convent
which was remarkably neat, the Cells were similar
to each other, viz: a Small bed, small Oak Chest --
of Drawers, a Stool to Kneel on, a little Table upon
which were placed a Crucifix, an Hour Glass, & a book.
over which were hung a few wretched bad Prints.
The floors of Oak bright & slippery as Glass, within
the Doors of the Cells there two pieces of quilted
Cloth -- which they walk or rather slide on that no
Noise may disturb the silence which ought to reign --
or those who are beneath -- The Cells are 10 feet
long & 5 wide with a large Window at the end which is
neither fastened nor barred. There are many
neat Altars in different parts of the Convent, ornamented
with Flowers & Paintings, under one was
represented our Saviour lying in the Sepulchre --
many shabby prints hung round the Walls of the
Passages in which are Lottery's for Souls on Purgatory,
                                                         which





                            
      the Nuns draw out as they pass & utter a short
prayer -- one of the Nuns desired me to draw a ticket
out of the Box, which I complied with -- it was for those
who had never given Alms for the love of God. We
saw their work Room which is large & meanly furnished,
they showed us beautiful artificial Flowers of
their making & paintings in Miniature also many
in Crayons & Oil. We saw Lord Stourton's Sister
who has been in this Convent ever since she professed
, which is 50 Years, she is well-bred in her manner
& appeared very cheerful. One of the Nuns
gave us an account of their style of living -- they
rise Summer & Winter at 4 o'Clock & spend two hours
in mental prayer in the Choir of the Chapel, then
they Breakfast, (except it is a fast. day when they do
not take any food till the hour of dinner which is half
past 11 o'Clock) after Breakfast they sit in the work-Room
, all together, till prayer time, after prayers
they dine in a large Room where there never is a fire --
after dinner a Nun sits in a Pulpit in the dining
Room & reads to the rest -- after Supper a Nun reads
an hour & ½. They are not prohibited talking unless
it is a strict fast day & then they have not, what they
call, that recreation : They are not allowed to visit
each other in their Cells without permission, nor may
they go to their Cells during the day but for an hour
when they dust them, -- the laborious part of the work
in the Convent is done by Servants. After dinner &
Supper they go into the Choir to Pray & Sing. (One
of the Nuns, whose name is Wright, played to us on
the Organ with taste & skill) -- After the Prayers after
dinner they return to the work Room, they keep silent for
some time at their work & a Nun reads aloud, this is
an indulgence. They Sup at 6 & go to bed at 9 -- there
are not any fire-places in their Cells, there is only fire
kept in the work room, & that only in severe weather if
                                                        



                                
they are ill they are put in the Infirmary (in the Convent)
The Abbess of this Convent is styled Reverend Mother.
She has a small fire place in her Cell, which is twice as
large as the others, therefore if she is ill she is not removed
to the Infirmary she showed us a common
Rush bottom great Chair which she said she never indulged
herself to sit on unless she was ill. -- We
saw their Apothecary's Shop which is a Room well
stored with Drugs, simple waters &c &c One Nun
makes up the chief of the medicines -- there are days
appointed for the poor to come, who have Clothes,
Medicines, & money given to them -- Many Convents
do the same therefore Nuns do not lead such useless
lives as is generally supposed. At this
Convent they converse more in English than French,
& in most respects not so strict as most others.
The prohibition of not professing under a certain
age does not extend here for we saw a Girl who was
not 16, in her year of probation dressed in the same
Manner as the Nuns, only her garments were White --
All their Bread is made in the House & they showed
us a Granary stacked with Corn. We saw a Nun who
had been married & lived ten years in the World, her
Husband died 3 Years ago, she came here & professed.
There are a great many Pensioners, or young Ladies
boarded here for their education, we saw the School
Room -- two young Nuns were teaching the use of the
Globes -- the Bed Rooms of the Pensioners were very airy
& remarkably clean & neat. The Name of the Reverend
Mother is Dennis -- she must have been extremely handsome
-- her features are beautiful, & her countenance very
sweet -- her complexion pale & delicate -- her manners
gentle & elegant.      The Nuns were polite & cheerful
& addressed their conversation to the Gentlemen with equal
ease as they did to the ladies. -- I believe we saw every part

In that with constant attendance on the Public &
frequent attendance on the Poor they do ------ &c



               
of their House & Garden. Miss Wright is much accomplished
, and draws & Paints as well as she plays --
she was educated here, when she had finished her
education her Father, (a rich Banker) sent for her
to England, & a young Gentleman wished to marry her --
but neither the endearment of Parents, the pleasures
of the World, nor a Lover, could get the better of her
predilection for leading the life of a Nun, after some
time she gained her point, came back to this Convent
& took the Veil -- she is a well looking Woman.
Our Party proceeded from the Nunnery to Mr FitzSimon
s Lodgings, there were 9 besides ourselves, in
all 16 -- many Irish & English Catholic's reside at
Leige -- though it happened to be a fast day & that there
was no butchers Meat -- the dinner was plentiful,
elegant, & exquisitely cooked. Mr Fitzimon had
prepared another dinner for Lord & Lady Dartrey, &c
two days ago, but the weather had obliged Lord Dartrey
to send an excuse -- this had mortified the hospitable
Mr Fitzsimon, as that was not a fast day --
&c &c. We left him about 10 -- he came however
to attend us to our Hotel -- The Webbs & Mr. Boyce
supped with us, -- Lady Webb sat an hour with me in my bedchamber
, -- had some interesting conversation, & she
gave me a general outline, & description of the disposition
of the French who she had been obliged to
associate with.

Sunday
October 13th
      Parted from Mr Boyce whom we left at
Leige to return to Spa, & from the Webb's
for a day, as Lord Dartrey was obliged on account of securing
Horses to set off before them.      Leige is situated on
the River Maes or Muse over which there are many
Bridges -- one in particular, we drove over under one
                                                        



                                                        
of its Arches which was the Street over the River. There
are a great many Churches & Monasteries consequently
numerous Ecclesiastics -- A large University, which is
celebrated for learning &c -- A great Manufactory for
Guns, & Steel Wares -- A very considerable trade is
carried on in Traces, what we saw were fine, but the
price extremely high, they have the art of dyeing them
of various beautiful colours, & also on stripes.
The City of Leige is delightfully situated, the surrounding
or contiguous Hills are picturesque --
the Town is populous, very large, dirty & Narrow
Streets, the Houses of an extraordinary height --
It is very richly endowed yet they told us there was
above 60,000 poor, -- the numberless miserable
we saw in the Streets was shocking. The Bishop of Leige is
the richest & most considerable Prince in Germany, he
has a great Revenue from gaming Tables at
Spa & other places. We saw Dogs in abundance
drawing such kind of Carts as Asses do in England.
The Streets are lighted at Night by Lamps
hanging by Ropes in the Middle of the Streets,
the Ropes being fastened to the Houses on each
side: -- Brussels, Lisle, and all considerable Towns
are lighted in the same Manner, so I have been
told is Paris -- it answers well as the Streets
have no convenient flagged foot path but Kennels
at the sides & people walk in the middle of the
Streets where the Carriages drive.

13th-
October
We left Leige at 10 o'Clock got to Ourai at
12, a post & ¼, (a post is 6 miles) at 2 got to
St. Trone, 1 post & ¼. at 4 to Tirelemont 2
Posts -- where we dined -- Got to Louvain, 2 Posts --
at       Lodged at the Sign of the Ville de Cologne, supped
& went early to Bed.
                                                        




     
Louvaine
Monday
October 14th.
      As soon as we had Breakfasted went to see
      Monsieur Van Dormes Pictures, he is a painter,
      & excels in Fruit pieces -- One we thought
exquisitely painted; from Monsieur Dormes went to the
Church of the Augustine Monks, 2 Monks attended us
to the Sacristy & showed us the Saint Sacrament
which they informed us had worked many surprising
Miracles -- it is set in Gold & covered with Glass, one
of the Monks held it to our lips to Kiss -- they then
took us to the back of the high Altar, were two Priests
were Kneeling with lighted Torches -- one of the Monks
opened a Door & undrew a Curtain which hung over a
large Diamond Cross, he brought it close to us to see
the Saint Sacrament which he said was really in the
Centre of the Cross which is two feet high most beautifully
& richly adorned with Diamonds, Rubies, Pearls,
& Emeralds -- it is wide in proportion to its height
& entirely covered with fine Jewels -- a Sun is
represented in the Centre, very rich, & ornamented
with Flowers, leaves, &c. in precious stones. the
donations made to this Church on account of its
being in possesion of this miraculous Jewel having
the real St. Sacrament enclosed in it are prodigious,
within the last 4 Years it has received forty thousand
florins.
This City was founded by Julius Cæsar -- the Town
is ill built -- looks very ancient, is situated in a
most fertile Country, its chief Trade Linen -- there
are 27 Convents & 25 Monasteries -- 40 Colleges, and
2 English Colleges -- the Unversity is esteemed the
first in the Netherlands.
Brussels
We left Louvaine at 11 o'Clock at 2 got to Brussels
Lord Dartrey went to the Hotel D'Hollande, after
Dinner I walked with Lady Dartrey to shops, saw
Silks, & Laces, dearer than they can be purchased in
London. In the Evening the Webb's called on us, soon after
                                                        



                                                        
      their arrival -- they lodge at another Hotel.
      Dear Ld. Dartrey not quite well, went early to Bed --
Brussels
October

Tuesday
15th. October
      After we had Breakfasted, Mr. Wilkinson, whom
      we had met at Spa, came, & went with Lord Dartrey
& I to the Abbé de Coudenberg, Lord Dartrey bought a
fine Sketch by Vandycke of our Saviour on the Cross.
Went to Lady Webb, sat some time with her she accompanied
me to our Hotel -- prevailed on Lord Dartrey to remain
another day at Brussels. Lord Dartrey not feeling well
Lady Dartrey would not leave him alone, but wished
me to keep an engagement of going to the Play -- at ½ --
past 5 Sir John & Lady Webb, her Brother, Captain Salvin, & Mr-
Webb, came to tea, I went with them to the Theatre. --
Sir John did not remain with us but returned to Lord
& Lady Dartrey. The Play House is larger & finer
than those in London -- the interior of an Oval form --
the Scenery most beautifully painted -- the Orchestra
is said to have the best performers in Europe --
a prodigious number of Musicians & various
instruments -- returned to our Hotel at 9 o'Clock --
Lord & Lady Dartrey kept the Party to supper.

Wednesday
16th October
Brussels
      Lady Webb came early this Morning -- Lord
& Lady Dartrey & myself accompanied her
to her Brother Captain Salvin's Lodgings
where we all breakfasted -- afterwards the whole party
went to the Abbé de Coudenberg who was extremely
attentive & polite, he showed us the Terrace & Garden
which overlooks the Park, -- the Abbé made Lord Dartrey
a present of a small picture -- his private apartments
are fitted up with taste. From him we went to the
Maison de Ville, which is on a very large scale, there
are several fine apartments -- In the grand Council
Chamber there are 3 pieces of highly wrought Brussels
Tapestry, in the 1st. is represented Charles the 5th-
                                                         giving





his Crown to his Son; 2d. The Crowning of Charles
the 6th-. 3d. Philip the Good granting privileges.
There was another Piece of Tapestry the Colours of which
were brilliant, the subject was the History of Clovis.
      This being the day before the great Annual Fair -- the
people were making preparations, & many of the
outward Rooms & passages of the Maison de Ville
were fitted up with Shops for various Kinds of
Merchandise -- We then went to the Tapestry
Manufactory, it is curious to see how they weave
it on the wrong side; the Picture of painted pattern
lying underneath -- they showed us some
beautiful pieces which were finished at 2 Guineas
a Yard -- & some square pieces the size of common
Screens from 7 to 16 guineas each -- from the
Manufactory proceeded to a large Shop of Articles
from India, & to a superb one of Bijouterie, every
thing extravagantly dear -- to Mr. Danauts a
great Bankers, saw his Cabinet of Pictures, a
choice collection -- wished to have had more time
to look at them, can only mention a few -- A Portrait
of a Mistress of Francois the 1st by Leonard de Vinci. --
St. Francis by Guido; a Sleeping Venus by Ditto --
there were many by the most celebrated Masters of
the Flemish Schools -- I saw a small picture of
Popea Sabina exactly the same as my large one

Mr Danauts did not know the painters name but
said it was by a very old Master.      In one of the
Squares we saw a fine Statue of Minerva holding
the Busts of the Emperor & Empress it stands
on a Fountain & was given by Lord Aylesbury.
We all dined with Sir John & Lady Webb, played
at Farron after dinner, at 9 o'Clock we all adjourned
to Lord Dartrey's Hotel to supper -- parted at 11 o'Clock in a melancholy
mood as we were to separate tomorrow.
                                                        



Thursday
October 17th
1776
      Left Brussels at 9 o'Clock; 3 posts to Alost, at
      ½ past 12, where we dined at the Trois Rois --
went again to look at the fine Picture of St.. Rock by
Rubens -- 1 Post & ½ to Quaduct; to Gand (or Ghent) 1 Post,
got there by 5 o'Clock -- to the Hotel St- Sebastian (Busso's)
An acquaintance of Lord Dartreys being at the Hotel he
introduced her to Lady Dartrey her Name Loten, after
Tea she went with us to the Play -- a good Theatre -- we
saw represented Le Roi, et la Fermier, and la Papile.
We supped at 9, Mrs Loten came for an hour after
supper.

Friday
18th. October
Ghent --
      I got up very early & walked out, After
      Breakfast we saw the Duchess of Kinston --
      alias Lady Hervey, she came about 1 in the Morning --
to our Hotel from Calais where she has been ever since
her trial -- she is going to Vienna -- afterwards to Rome,
to pass the Winter, then intends returning to Calais
in the Spring where she has taken a House. Mr-
Popham was with her, & her Maids of Honour, who
were dressed in green Staff Gowns, & black Staff bibs --
& aprons, white linen Caps, & no hats or bonnets.
      We left Gand -- stopped at Bot Ghent to change
Horses, dined at Vive St. Eloy -- drank tea & supped
early at Courtray at L'Hotel Damier -- Lord Dartrey
pleased with the people of the House they were very
civil -- he paid only 2, 4d english per head for supper,
7 & 7 dessert -- Lord Dartrey, was by no means well.

Saturday
19th October
      Lord Dartrey much better -- we left Courtray
      at 10 o'Clock -- changed Horses at Menim --
dined at Lisle at the Hotel de Bourbon a Noble Inn
in la Grande Place -- the apartments well furnished --
rather should say grandly -- two large Crimson quilted
Satin bed. Chairs, Cabriolet Shape, crimson Velvet with
white & Gold frames, The Table covered with Crimson 'Velvet,
                                                        




and edged with broad Gold fringe with 4 large Tassels of
Gold, one at each corner, Bell ropes, &c, the same --
the Room hung with tolerable Tapestry & 2 very large
pier looking Glasses.      We went to the Capuchins
Church where we saw a fine Picture by Rubens over
the Great Altar -- the descent from the Cross; on the
left hand another fine picture, by the same Master, of
the Virgin or Mother Mary, Child & a Capuchin, the Child is
very beautiful! After seeing the Church of the --
Capuchins, went to that of the Recollects, A fine
Picture by Vandycke over the Great Altar; the
subject the Crucifixion, the head of Christ, the figure
of St. John, and the Virgin are charming & on the right
is a Picture of St. Anthony, well painted, on the left
the Ascension of the Virgin Mary. There are many good
Pictures on each side of the church by Arnolde
Vuez. One of the Recollects took us into the Sacristi
(another Gentleman who was in the Church went with
us,) he showed us some Gold Embroidery upon
Red Velvet, and some very fine Tapestry in the
form of a Medallion for the high Altar, we saw
a great quantity of fine Silver Ornaments, among
the Rest a large Cross in the middle of which were
enclosed Relic's of St. Anthony, it was decorated
with much taste, with diamond Crosses, and flowers
wrought in Silver, &c, It was so massy and
heavy I could not lift it up from the place on
which it stood. We saw three Pilgrims in the
Church who were arrived from Gand (or Ghent)
to pay offerings & make prayers to St Mark,
as there are Relics of him in it, for the recovery
of some persons who were too ill to come -- Pilgrims
are paid for these errands, & have a Banner given
them to prove they have faithfully fulfilled their
Commission. Lady Dartrey & I bought some
                                                         --



                                                        





of these Banners of an Old Woman for a few Liards
she distributed them to the Pilgrims. Went to a
Booksellers; Shops of several kinds &c --
After dinner Lady Dartrey & I again went to the Shops --
Mrs. Loten came for an hour in the Evening. Lord
Dartrey much better.

Sunday
October 20th
Lisle
      We found this Grand Hotel very dirty --
      there are no Women Servants -- Lord Dartrey
found the Wines bad -- eatables extravagant &
very indifferent. The Valet de Place, or Louage,
a civil, will bred, & well informed Man. NB.
the Hotel Royal is said to be a better house for
Comfort & accommodation -- it is also on the Grand
Place, which is a Noble Square surrounded by very
handsome buildings exactly of the same height.
The Corps de Garde & the Charge are Rich looking
Edifices -- this City is called pettit Paris -- I
will bring a book which gives a description of it.
There are at present five Regiments of Soldiers
who mount Guard in the Grand Place every day; --
Wednesday & Saturday excepted, when the Market is
held -- This Morning we saw about Nine thousand
Men drawn up, -- French & Austrians, it was a very
grand spectacle -- the person who directed their
Movements -- (I don't know his rank) -- appeared
above 7 feet high & uncommonly handsome, an
elegant figure, with a martial Mien -- he held a tall dark cold
staff in his hand which had a silver ball on the
top -- he was dressed in Blue.
Left Lisle at 10 o'Clock, two posts to la Waquet
where the Horses were changed, & again at Bethune
                                                         where




                                                        
we dined there at a miserable unclean house, the one
we were at going to Spa being shut up on account of
a Robbery committed there: whilst dinner was preparing
Lord & Lady Dartrey & I went to see the
Church -- The Windows of which are all of fine old
painted Glass in high preservation -- Some Priests
were catechising Children -- there were a great number,
mostly Girls -- there was 4 Sets.
      From Bethune to Lilliers is a post & ½ -- to Aire
1 Post -- Lord Dartrey went to the House á la Poste
where every thing was clean & the people very civil,
The Supper which was excellent was only 3 livers
per head. Here we Met the Marquis de Tangy
whom we had seen in the Church at Lisle, Lord
& Lady Dartrey invited him to Tea & Supper, he
appears much of the Gentleman & his conversation
very sensible -- he is an Italian & is going to see
England; he enquired if we were acquainted with
Lord Balgonie, who is a friend he formed a great
intimacy with in Italy. He showed us a travelling
Case which is uncommonly convenient, & in smaller compass
then could be imagined contains articles of
of necessity & luxury -- 2 Silver plates, forks, Spoons,
Cups, Coffee pot, &c. & dressing things &c. &c. &c. & his
Jewels, which with Antiques are very valuable, I
believe Money was also in this Case -- a rich booty
for a Robber.

Monday
21st.October
      After Breakfast left Aire, changed horses
      at St Omers, again a la Recousse, here
we had some good cold Bacon & bread, 'twas only a
Cottage with Mud floors, we were first put in a Room
without a fire as the best room was occupied by
company, who however very politely came soon
to us & requested we would sit with them which we did
                                                        





      they appeared to be persons of fashion, the party
      consisted of -- Two very old looking Gentleman,
(who seemed characters) a pretty French Woman, their
Niece, her Husband, rather singular looking, & the pretty
French Women's Brother, who is an Officer, an affected
Young Man but exceedingly polite, he showed us his own
Carriage which was elegant, & his Horses which were fine ones.
The two old Gentlemen always travel with 3 large
handsome Grey-hounds, an English Pointer, a
Spaniel, & a pretty small Dog. This party were on
their way to Paris.
We changed Horses at Ardres where Women harnessed
and put the Horses to the Carriages. Ardes is
the Place where Henry the 8 of England & Francis the 1st-
met in 1520 -- We arrived by tea time at Calais --
the Marquis de Tagy was already there and again
was invited by Ld. & Lady Dartrey to Tea & Supper.
Captain Osborne waited on Lord Dartrey to inform
him that he was engaged to convey the Comte de
Noailles, Embassador from France, to England, but
that he could return the following night. The
Captain has the air & manners of a true English Seaman
: -- He told us that he was taken Prisoner by the
French during the last War & was confined in a Dungeon
at Dunkirk 3 Months, after that 3 Months more
at Calais where he never saw the light, & had Straw
only one Week to lay upon -- An English Sailor, a
French Deserter, & himself broke out of their
Prison during the Night, in less than a quarter
of an hour they were pursued & were obliged to
fling themselves over one of the Walls of the
Ramparts which was an immense height, they
                                                        



                                                        
were senseless for some time & when they recovered
found they were plunged in a Morass, they extricated
themselves & were obliged to climb a Wall almost
as high as the one they had thrown themselves from.
after many difficulties they got to the Harbour,
obtain'd a Boat & rowed to Deal where they sold her
for 10 Pounds. The French deserter was to have
been Shot the day after they escaped. Captain Osborne
also related that when he was 19 he was pressed
for a Sailor & when the Ship was half a Mile from
Land he flung himself Overboard & swam to the
Shore, he was Shot at, & 3 times he was in danger
of his life.

Tuesday
22d..October
Calais.
Dessiens Hotel
      The Marquis de Tangy sat with us after
      Breakfast -- We walked to Shops, bought
      Gold Thread at 10s. Per Ounce -- the Marquis
dined with us & went with Lord & Lady Dartrey & me to
the Play House at the bottom of the Garden of the
Hotel -- a pretty Theatre, Actors very indifferent as
also the Musicians -- returned at 8 -- Marquis de Tangy
supped with us

Wednesday
23d..October
      At 6 o'Clock this Morning One of the
      Waiters informed us Captain Osborne was
returned & that the Wind was fair -- We embarked in
the Resolution between 9 & 10 o'Clock, & had a
fine Passage of 7 hours -- Marquis de Tangy set off
at the same time in Captain Baxters Vessel, and Sir William
Lynch our late Minister at Turin in another. We
supped & slept at the City of London Inn at Dover, as
did Marquis de Tangy -- the House kept by Mr. Payne --
people civil, every thing clean.
                                                        




Thursday
24th.October
1776
      We left Dover at 10 o'Clock dined at Sittenburn
at the Post House, got to Rochester
at the Crown in the Evening. Marquis de Tangy drank tea and
supped with us.

Friday
25th. October
      Left Rochester at 9 o'Clock, stopped at Shooter's
      Hill -- had some Cold meat, saw the fine new
Rooms -- The Weather too Cloudy to see the beautiful
view -- The Marquis de Tangy parted from us in Bridge- 
Street -- my heart felt the separation from Lord &
Lady Dartrey -- it will always retain a most
grateful sense of all their goodness towards me.
      My Dearest Mama was waiting dinner for me --
I had seen no Woman equally beautiful during
My Absence.


á Madame La Marquise de Trotti née Baronne
de Notthafft, á Bonne Sur La Rheine.


Pour envoyer á Milady Webb Chez Monsieur VandenClooster
Banquier à Brusselles.





                                                        
      Memorandums --
Our God & Soldiers we alike adore
first in the Hour of Danger & no more,
The Danger past, both are alike requited
Our God's neglected & our Soldiers slighted





Pierre 1er par sa propre Grace despot de toutes
les Russies.


The Marquise de Trotti told us (at Spa) that the
famous Singer Gabriella is daughter to the Cook
of the Marquis de Gabrillis, brother in law to her Husband --
(the Marquis de Trotti an Italian) that the Marquise
de Gabriella stood Godmother to the Child &
gave her the name of Gabriella.


Frederick King of Prussia allowed his Queen so small
an income & so few attendants that she wrote to him
to make complaints (for though he did not live with her
they corresponded) he replied in a sharp angry manner
& told her she might work to increase her income --
The Queen immediately began & embroidered a --
Waistcoat which when finished she sent to the King with
a respectfully worded letter, informing him that
She obeyed his commands but could not offer the first
Work she had done for sale to any other person than
his Majesty, & she doubted not but his generosity
would induce him to send her the full value. The King
was so much struck by the Queens sensible manner
of acting, & good temper in bearing with his harshness
that he doubled her allowance & ordered her a---t
Number of attendants as her situation required


Charles quint naquit L'an 1500. Mourut 1558. il se retira
1555. --




A Young Irish Gentleman of fortune was permitted
by his father to visit London, there he became acquainted
with an amiable young Lady with whom he fell in
love -- fearful his Father would not give his consent, he
married her without his knowledge, he returned to
Ireland & could no obtain forgiveness -- His father
presented a Pistol at his head & forced him to promise
to marry another Lady of his choosing, the
Son obeyed and was married, as soon as the ceremony
was over, he retired and Shot himself --
His Widows happened to meet, became attached,
Retired from society, & are living together.




                                                        

                                                         Spa October 1776


Thou whom wandring fancy leads,
Near this gloom of lonely Shades
Come (for thou hast nought to fear)
Draw thee nigh and lend thy Ear.
                            
If thy soul ambition fires,
Wayward hopes and rude desires
Motives selfish insincere
Go thy ways -- for peace is here.
                            
If thou sigh'st for wordly store,
And thy bosom beats for more
If thy heart pale envy glows,
Think not here to find repose.
                            
If thy heart is not sincere
If one ungentle thought is there,
One rude wish one vice begot,
Beat thy breast and mourn thy lot.
                            
Here the dreary Willow grows;
Here the weeping streamlet flows,
How could these thy fancy quell
Wayward Stranger fare thee well.
                            
But if e'er thy bosom knows
What delight from virtue flows;
What the bliss from silence springs,
What repose contentment brings:
                            
If thy soul is all serene
Free from envy free from Spleen,
                                                        




Free from pride and guilty fear
Gentle Stranger draw thee near.
                            
Merit clad with simple Weeds
Hast thou mark'd how sore he bleeds
Pilgrim like how sad he goes:
Through this dreary scene of woes?
                            
Hast thou answer'd misry's cry
Dry'd his cheek and wiped his Eye?
Sooth'd his soul when passions move!
Bath'd the wounds of bleeding love?
                            
Canst thou relish artless youth,
Lonely peace and simple truth,
Pity mild with streaming Eye,
Rural nymph simplicity.
                            
When dejected worth was low,
Sunk in undeserved woe,
Has thy bosom heard the Sigh?
Has thy tear bedewd thine eye.
                            
Canst thou relish Cypres Vales?
Cheerless Grotto's, lonely dales,
Mourning streams and Midnight glooms
Where the Cherub Hope ne'er comes.
                            
Lonely Pilgrim bend thy Knee
Drop thy staff and follow me,
Sweet and soft is virtues toil
Here at least repose a while.





Sunday Evening Spa 6 October 1776 Dots 5 given



      Emperor Charlemagne

                             Copper Gilt

                             Copper

                             Pierre de Gris

      Mr. Granville Penns October 1776. Fountain in the Grand Place Aix La Chapelle















The above 4 by Lady
Dartrey Tuesday Evening
Louvaine October 13 -- 1776











(consult diplomatic text or XML for annotations, deletions, clarifications, persons,
quotations,
spellings, uncorrected forms, split words, abbreviations, formatting)



 1. The first image is the marbled outer cover of the journal.
 2. This entry, which was written on a separate piece of paper, has been pasted onto the front of the journal.
 3. A copy of the following section (until p.5) can be found in HAM/1/8/7/21, a letter by Mary Hamilton to her friend Ann Litchfield, albeit worded differently.
 4. The pagination of this journal has been done by at least two different writers in at least two – and likely three – different ways, all of them in pencil. Seeing as Mary Hamilton added a few lines on p.21 in pencil, it is possible she is one of those writers and added (some of the) page numbers as she was adding things to the volume at a later point in time. The pagination starts on this page, with two different writers having added a ‘1’. This continues up until page 7 (image 11), after which page 8 (image 12) only has one page number, which is perhaps simply the result of one of the writers having missed this page when numbering. It could, however, also have something to do with the fact that the letter/entry on this page ends rather abruptly, indicating other pages are missing, which could have resulted in the current state of pagination. This is then followed up by two pages that have corrected page numbers, from 8 to 9 and 9 to 10 respectively. From image 15 onwards, the pagination that runs until the end of the journal is added, starting at number 10. For the first ten images of this run, a previously added pagination (starting at 3 and going up to 12) is ‘corrected’ by the numbering that runs until the end of the journal. It is unclear who added the numbers 3 to 12 as they appear out of order compared to the rest of the journal (it could also have to do with any missing pages that at one point resulted in a different order from the current one). The pagination that 1) starts on this page with ‘1’, 2) misses a number for what would be page 8 (image 12), 3) later received corrections for the subsequent two pages (images 13 and 14), and 4) runs until the end of the journal is assumed to have been added by a member of the Anson family. It is unclear who added the other page numbers for the first 24 images and corrected pages 8 and 9 to 9 and 10 at a later point in time. Besides Mary Hamilton having possibly added some page numbers, it is also possible that the Anson sisters Florence and Elizabeth corrected some of their uncle's work (see also Anson & Anson 1925: v-vi).
 5. The spelling extroadinary is characteristic of Hamilton (11/12 occurrences). The one exception is still a misspelling: extraodinary. On absence of r see Dobson (1968: II 992n.).
 6. ‘This morning’ here refers to the morning of Wednesday 31 July 1776, not Thursday morning 1 August 1776 (see also HAM/1/8/7/21). Mary likely intended to write ‘the (next) morning’ here.
 7. The dot over the i of Miſs seems more like an r here, possibly indicating that Mary Hamilton originally wrote Mr, although such an r is usually attached to the M.
 8. Mary Hamilton seems to have added this annotation at some point during or after 1785, the year in which Mary Cooper and Jean André de Luc married.
 9. This suggested correction of the day is wrong, likely as a result of Mary Hamilton referring to the morning of Wednesday 31 July as 'this morning' when writing on Thursday 1 August (see p.3). The events described here took place on Thursday 1 August, see also HAM/1/8/7/21.
 10. See Act IV Scene VI of King Lear, in which Edgar (disguised as 'Poor Tom') describes the cliffs at Dover and their steep slopes to his blindfolded father, the Earl of Gloucester. This description is also why 'Shakespeare Cliff' became known as such.
 11. The following text is a copy of a letter by Lady Dartrey to Mary Hamilton's mother, Mary Catherine Hamilton, in Mary Hamilton's hand.
 12. Pierre Dessin's hotel, L'Hotel d'Angleterre, was mentioned in, amongst other works, Laurance Sterne's A Sentimental Journey Through France and Italy, published in 1768.
 13. This section has been moved here from the inserted piece of paper in between p.6 and p.7, as most of the events described here occurred before the following section on this page.
 14. This page is a loose leaf that has been inserted in between what has been labeled p.4 and p.5 with pencil at the top of each page. The transcription has been moved to fit the other sections chronologically.
 15. The (red) pencil markings found throughout this journal as well as several others (see e.g. HAM/2/2 and HAM/2/11) are likely by members of the Anson family due to how closely many marked sections correspond to the transcribed parts in Anson & Anson (1925).
 16. Recousse was a post station between Ardres and Saint Omer.
 17. Present-day Aire-sur-la-Lys.
 18. This word 'to' is not visible on the image but has been checked when viewing the document in person.
 19. Moved this addition here from a separate piece of paper inserted between this page and the next, as indicated by Mary Hamilton by paired asterisks.
 20. This page is a loose leaf that has been inserted between what has been labeled p.6 and p.7 in pencil at the top of each page. The transcription has been moved into the main text as indicated by Mary Hamilton herself through the use of asterisks.
 21. Mary Hamilton has '... & was within a few Yards of the Rail when the Soldiers ...' in HAM/1/8/7/23, in which she relates this story to Ann Litchfield. It seems here as if she intended to erase 'Soldiers' to add 'Rail', but subsequently forgot to do so.
 22. The letter ends abruptly here, suggesting that one or more pages are missing.
 23. A copy of the following section (until the middle of p.17) can be found in HAM/1/8/7/23, a letter by Mary Hamilton to her friend Ann Litchfield, albeit worded differently.
 24. Antedates by over a century the entry in OED s.v. casaquin. Accessed 20-09-2022.
 25. This is the most likely place of the addition given in the left-hand margin, but we cannot be sure as the paintings described here have been moved since Mary Hamilton's visit.
 26. De Crayer painted 'Tobias and the Angel' for the Saint Peter's Church in Ghent in 1618.
 27. The painting is now known as 'The Conversion of Saint Bavo'.
 28. Present-day Quatrecht (in French) or Kwatrecht (in Dutch).
 29. Present-day Aalst.
 30. Saint Roch or Rocco.
 31. The following section is not marked up as having been deleted, as it is very likely the case that a member of the Anson family marked this section with pencil to indicate it should not be included in their publication. In Anson & Anson (1925: 40), the part that follows after the word 'Cathedral' is excluded from this entry.
 32. The French word bourreau is normally used in the sense ‘executioner, hangman, or torturer’. It is recorded in English c1550-c1720 (OED s.v. Accessed 22-01-2023).
 33. The Treaties of Peace of Nijmegen consisted of a series of treaties signed in Nijmegen between August 1678 and October 1679, which ended various interconnected wars among many countries, including France, Spain, the Dutch Republic, Sweden and the Holy Roman Empire. The first treaty established peace between France and the Dutch Republic.
 34. ‘Boiled or stewed meat, esp. beef’ (OED s.v. boulli n. Accessed 08-01-2023).
 35. See HAM/1/9/85 for a letter from Mary Hamilton to Sarah and Elizabeth Dickenson in which she writes out Carter's poem. See also Memoirs of the Life of Mrs. Elizabeth Carter, with a new edition of her Poems, by the Rev. Montagu Pennington (ed.) (London: 1816), pp.54-55 for a printed edition.
 36. Similar to the pencil marks on p.21, the big cross in pencil on this page was likely added by a member of the Anson family to indicate that this section was not to be added to their publication (Anson & Anson 1925).
 37. A variant spelling of Borcette (Burtscheid in German), a town just south of Aachen, famous for its hot springs and its Abbey. See also Belgium, Aix-la-Chapelle and Cologne An Entirely New Guide Book for Travellers by William Henry James Weale (1859), pp.418-420.
 38. In fact Hamilton had already covered 17 August on p.27 above, and the following largely replicates that account.
 39. The Karlsbrunnen fountain in Aachen (Aix la Chapelle). For Mary Hamilton's drawing of it, see p.92.
 40. This is a short letter from Lady Dartrey to Mrs Hamilton, who was looking after Dartrey's son, Thomas Dawson.
 41. ‘The name of several dances, chiefly of French origin, consisting of a variety of steps and figures’ (OED s.v. cotillion n. 1.a. Accessed 20-09-2022).
 42. A game of faro (a late seventeenth-century card game from France) was referred to as a 'faro bank'.
 43. Interestingly, this anecdote concerning Montagu's wife using poison to kill him goes against the general current understanding that he did in fact die as a result of an abscess that developed after his throat was pierced by a small broken bone.
 44. This would appear to be a reference to the comic opera Le Déserteur (1769), music by Pierre-Alexandre Monsigny, libretto by Michel-Jean Sedaine (Wikipédia). The mistaken double ſs was erased but the word was not then completed.
 45. According to the 'Liste des Seigneurs et Dames, Venus aux Eaux Minerales de Spa, l'an 1776' (see here), Lord and Lady Dartrey, Mr Dawson, Mary Hamilton, John and Grenville Penn, and Mr Forster all checked in on 1 September 1776, rather than on 29 August 1776.
 46. A mineral spring south of Spa.
 47. 'The Temples' here refers to the six children of Richard Grenville (c.1679-c.1727) and Hester Temple (Countess Temple) (d. 1752). Thomas Henry Grenville was the youngest son but he died in 1747, leaving Henry Grenville the youngest surviving boy.
 48. Marie Schmitz and Gilles Dewalt (who appear to have been both cousins and lovers) were immortalised in a tale by Jean-François Marmontel in 1761, as it is generally accepted that they inspired the story of 'Annette and Lubin' in Spa. After the story became popular both in Belgium and internationally, they adopted the names of Annette and Lubin, and people who visited them referred to them as such. The hill where their cottage was also took their names. The story by Marmontel was adapted in operas, plays, ballet performances, etc., and had many translations into other languages. Schmitz and Dewalt settled in their cottage in Spaloumont (a hamlet in Spa) c. 1764, where they provided a place of dance and entertainment for visitors. Their business started going downhill in the 1780s, and Dewalt died in 1799. What became of Schmitz is unclear.
 49. This is likely Stephen Popham (1745-1795), MP for Castlebar and sometimes described as a swindler.
 50. Apparently, both men missed (Bridget Hourican [2009] 'Roche, David ‘Tiger’ (or ‘Tyger’)', Dictionary of Irish Biography).
 51. This refers to the Groesbeek source, which was built in 1651 and is located a few meters from the Sauvenière source. It was restored in 1776 at the initiative of the Marquis Alix-Louis, Marshal of Croix.
 52. It seems that Mary Hamilton did not manage to correctly transcribe the complete, actual inscription, which reads: PAULUS JOES BARO A GROESBEEK ARCH. IL CONDR. SEREme SUAE CELNIS CANCELLARIUS VICIANTEMA VERA SERABAT ANNO I651. ALEX LUD. MARCHIO DE CROIX AB UXORE CONSANGUINIS RESATAURAVIT ANNO I776.
 53. Saint Remaclus (d. 673).
 54. This is likely to have been Lady Dartrey.
 55. Mary Hamilton is almost certainly talking about Elisabeth Christine of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel-Bevern here, who was the Queen consort of Prussia between 1772 and 1786. The title 'Empress of Germany' was first given to Augusta Marie Luise Katharina of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach (1811-1890), who was the consort of William I (1797-1888), German Emperor.
 56. This reference by Mary Hamilton indicates that 'Comte Marechal' was indeed George Keith, 10th Earl Marischal, as the latter was a close friend of Frederick the Great (King of Prussia from 1740 until 1786), and joined the royal family in Potsdam later in his life.
 57. This sentence was added in the left margin.
 58. The full title is 'Regrets sur ma vieille robe de chambre ou Avis à ceux qui ont plus de goût que de fortune', and was written by Diderot in 1768 and added in the Correspondance Littéraire in 1769.
 59. Possibly the ‘Miss Mills of Yorkshire’ (see also Mary Hamilton's comment about Miss Mills later in this journal) who ended up marrying Mr. Day of Anningsly, as mentioned in a letter from Anna Seward to the editor of the General Evening Post dated 11 October 1789 (see Letters of Anna Seward: Written between the years 1784 and 1807, Vol. 6 (Edinburgh: 1811), p.329).
 60. The transcription for this page is of the first note pasted into the journal between this page and the next. The main text behind it was transcribed as p.58.
 61. The transcription for this page is of the reverse of the first note pasted into the journal. The main text behind it was transcribed as p.58.
 62. The transcription for this page is of the reverse of the second note pasted into the journal. The main text behind it was transcribed as p.58.
 63. This annotation by Mary Hamilton is written upside down on the back of the note written by the Marquise de Trotti.
 64. The Dictionary of Biographical Reference by Phillips (1871, p.9) provides two possible candidates for 'Mr Adair': Robert Adair, a Scottish surgeon, or William Adair (d. 1793), a Scottish physician. James Makittrick Adair (1728-1802), the well-known Scottish physician and medical writer, only took on the name Adair from his mother's side in 1783. A third possibility could be the Irish Robert Adair (1711-1790), who worked in London as inspector-general of military hospitals, surgeon-general, King George III’s sergeant-surgeon, and later as surgeon to Chelsea Hospital. He married the Scottish Lady Caroline Keppel, who wrote the song 'Robin Adair', for which Robert was the inspiration. For this to be the case, however, Mary Hamilton would have wrongly described 'Mr Adair' as Scottish.
 65. This line written in pencil is only partially visible on the image, but has been checked when viewing the document in person.
 66. Here follows the second note pasted into the journal, with a space left for it in the main text. Hamilton's annotation on the reverse was transcribed as p.61, while another note, larger than the space allowed, was transcribed on pp.59-60.
 67. The identity of the Needhams (who are, it seems, not mentioned elsewhere in Hamilton's writings) remains unknown. It is highly unlikely to have been John Tuberville Needham (1713-1781), the well-known English naturalist and fellow of the Royal Society of London who lived in Brussels from 1768 onwards, as he was a Roman Catholic priest, and as such not allowed to marry.
 68. Presumably, Mary Hamilton meant to write 'the Webbs'.
 69. Possibly Prince Edward (1739-1767), the younger brother of George III, as Prince Frederick (1763-1827) only became the Duke of York (and Albany) in November 1784.
 70. Count Rice was a close friend of Joseph II, Holy Roman Emperor. He was sometimes referred to as the 'Emperor of Germany', as Mary Hamilton describes him here, although the title 'Emperor of Germany' was first officially given to William I (1797-1888).
 71. It is unclear whether this is Mary Boughton (Egerton from 1782 onwards) or Jane Boughton (who died unmarried in 1781).
 72. This addition is made at the start of the next line on the left-hand side of the page, but Mary's additional indicator in this line reveals that she intended this addition to appear here, i.e. before the verb.
 73. Present-day Theux.
 74. The present-day municipality of Stavelot lies southeast of Spa, i.e. in the opposite direction of Spa when travelling to Liege, but the historical 'postellerie de Stavelot' (part of the Princely Abbey of Stavelot-Malmedy, which was abolished in 1795) was much bigger, and also included areas to the northwest of Spa.
 75. Saint Benoît enlevé au ciel was painted for the Église Saint-Jacques-le-Mineur de Liège by Théodore-Edmond Plumier (1671-1733). It was confiscated by the French in 1794 and has not been seen since.
 76. The English Sepulchrine convent at Liege was founded in 1642, out of the Flemish convent at Tongres. Nuns remained there until 1794, when they fled to England from the advancing French Revolutionary forces.
 77. Possibly related to the London banker Anthony Wright (c.1710-1782) (see also further below, where Mary Hamilton notes that her father was a rich banker), as well as Charles Wright (1752-1827) (a son of Anthony Wright), who during the eighteenth century spent time in Ghent and Liege.
 78. Presumably Mary Hamilton only heard the name of the prioress and never saw it in writing, and as such remembered and wrote 'Dennis' instead of 'Dennett' when writing up this entry.
 79. Plural traces meant ‘[t]he pair of ropes, chains, or (subsequently usually) leather straps by which the collar of a draught-animal is connected with the splinter-bar or swingletree’ (OED s.v. trace n.2, 1. Accessed 27-01-2023.
 80. Present-day Oreye.
 81. Present-day Saint-Trond.
 82. It seems that Mary Hamilton initially wrote 'Van Dorne', and then added the onset of an 'm' in between the 'r' and the 'n'.
 83. It appears that Mary Hamilton initially wrote 'Sucristi' and then corrected the 'u' to an 'a' without deleting the second upstroke of the 'u', making it look like 'Saccristi'.
 84. It appears that Mary Hamilton wrote this section after having arrived in Brussels, but forgot to add a dateline to indicate the place and time of writing before starting the section, as she has done with other entries, and thus added 'Brussels' in the left-hand margin of the page at a later point in time.
 85. This painting is now known as 'La Belle Ferronnière', and is a portrait of a lady who was eventually identified as Lucretia Crivelli, a married lady-in-waiting to Duchess Beatrice of Milan.
 86. This annotation has been added in pencil by Mary Hamilton vertically in the left-hand margin of the page.
 87. Indeed, the picture at Eton College known as 'Jane Shore with Stone Basin' is in fact a copy of the painting called 'Sabina Poppaea', which portrays the Roman Empress and second wife of the Emperor Nero, Poppaea Sabina.
 88. Thomas Bruce offered the Fountain of Minerva to Brussels, which was first displayed in 1751, as a sign of gratitude. He had spent more than 40 years in Brussels after having been exiled from England, as he was against the restoration of King James II. Empress Maria Theresa, who is depicted on the fountain, had granted him asylum in her Belgian domains.
 89. This page is blank, except for the archival note.
 90. Present-day Sittingbourne in Kent.
 91. Present-day Shooter's Hill is a district in Southeast London in the Royal Borough of Greenwich.
 92. Probably Francis James Vanden Clooster, a Brussels banker about whom little is known other than that he signed various official documents at the start of the nineteenth century.
 93. The following verses have been attributed to John M'Millan of Inverness (1748/9-1774), and were printed in 'The Selector. Number I' (London, 1776), pp.154-155, under the title 'Verses written on the Margin of the CAM'. The version written out here by Mary Hamilton is almost the same, with only a few words being different. No printed edition seems to exist of this version.
 94. This page contains a variety of drawings by Mary Hamilton and at least one by Granville Penn (the Karlsbrunnen Fountain in Aachen), which also contains a few descriptive notes.
 95. It is unclear whether Granville Penn or Mary Hamilton added these descriptive notes to the drawing.
 96. These annotations are written across three lines within the base of the fountain.
 97. This page contains a personal (business) card from Mr. Harmenzen (a.k.a. 'Monsieur D'Armes' throughout most of this journal), which reads 'Monsieur Harmenzen, En Personne. Pour prendre Congé'.
 98. This page contains more drawings by Mary Hamilton, as well as four by Lady Dartrey at the top right of the page.
 99. The final image is the marbled outer cover of the journal.

Metadata

Library References

Repository: John Rylands Research Institute and Library, University of Manchester

Archive: Mary Hamilton Papers

Item title: Journal-letters of a tour to Spa (Belgium) from Mary Hamilton to Mrs Mary Catherine Hamilton (née Dufresne) (1 August 1776 - October 1776)

Shelfmark: HAM/2/1

Correspondence Details

Sender: Mary Hamilton

Place sent: unknown

Addressee: Mary Catherine Hamilton (née Dufresne)

Place received: unknown

Date sent: from 1 August 1776 to 31 October 1785

Letter Description

Summary: This travel journal covers the period from 1 August to October 1776 and details Mary Hamilton’s visit to Spa [now in Belgium], as a guest of Lord and Lady Dartrey (see HAM/1/11). The travel journal is written largely as journal-letters to her mother, as indicated on pp.13, 26, 34, 40, 45, 46, 47, 48, 52, 58, 62, 63, 65, 70. The remainder could be regarded as journal entries but were clearly intended to be shown to her mother on her return, like those that were posted. An inscription on the first page of the journal, dated 30 July 1776, notes that Hamilton had left her ‘Dear Mama to accompany Lord & Lady Dartrey to Spa’.
    The journal begins at Dover where Hamilton writes of waiting for a ‘fair wind’ before they can board for France. The journal records Hamilton’s journey to Dover, describing the scenery and some of the places and buildings that she visited on her way. She also notes that whilst at Dover she met the ‘celebrated & amiable’ Mrs [Elizabeth] Carter who had come from her home in Deal and writes of other people waiting to go to Calais whom she met in Dover, including Lord Pomfret.
    The journal is full of details of Hamilton’s journey to Spa, her companions, the towns and cities that they stayed in, the various people they met, the dress of the local people, the accommodation they occupied and the food they ate. In Calais they visited the Convent of the Dominicans and met an English lady at the Abbey who showed them the types of work carried out by the nuns there such as making purses. She later writes of visiting the convent of St Clara where the nuns only eat eggs, milk and cheese and who exist by begging, noting that there are two ‘Holy fathers’ who go around the community collecting for the support of the nuns. Hamilton also includes stories relating to the convents themselves. At one she was told that a woman had been placed there two years earlier after having ‘an attachment to a young man’ of whom her parents did not approve. She tried to escape from the convent but was captured and returned by soldiers. The woman starved herself to death and her lover drowned himself after he discovered this.
    The journal is full of Hamilton’s views of the artwork she saw on her travels such as a number of Rubens paintings that she saw at a church in Ghent. She writes of the fashions, hairstyles and society of the different places she visited. In general, the hairstyles are not as extravagant as in London although ‘some of the Ladies have their heads well loaded’. She notes that in Brussels the prevailing fashion is for very small hats that barely cover the head and that the women will not ‘walk abroad’ without them. She also writes of women in another area not wearing stays.
    The journal also contains news of Hamilton’s family and of her companions. Hamilton writes that Lord Dartrey prefers that she and Lady Dartrey play cards at the end of the day rather than write letters. She says that her uncle, Lord Cathcart, wants his daughter [Lady Stormont, later Lady Mansfield (see HAM/1/18] to marry a man much older than her and that her cousin took an instant dislike to the man. Hamilton writes that it is hoped that her cousins ‘will be prevailed upon’. She also notes that her uncle and aunt, Sir William and Lady Hamilton, are on their way to Paris to talk to her cousin. Mary Hamilton also discusses literature, in particular Elizabeth Carter’s book of Poems that her guardian Lord Napier (see HAM/1/19) had sent her.
    In Spa, Hamilton describes how she spends her time, the people she meets, the walks she takes and the dances and entertainments that she attends. She writes of meeting Sir John and Lady Webb (see HAM/1/8/7) and notes that Lady Webb had married Sir John when she was just thirteen. Lady Webb was ‘handsome but in delicate health & looks very unhappy’. She also meets Princess Dashkova [Catherine Dashkova (1743-1810), confidante of Catherine the Great of Russia, educator and author] and notes that she dresses in ‘men’s clothes w[hi]ch is her usual morning dress [...] Her hair is very powdered & tied in a club behind a very shabby small [...] hat’. Hamilton describes spending time with the Princess and comments that she was very ‘obliging’ but the Princess complained about her health and nerves and said that she was not able to sing or play in public because of this. Hamilton writes of the balls that she and Lady Dartrey attended, including details of the types of dances they danced and their various partners. She attended a concert in aid of a charity and was ashamed to admit that she laughed very much through it and that Lady Webb behaved no better. A ‘miserable little man’ in the middle of a large room played a flute ‘in tones so weak, or delicate, if you chuse, that no sound reached the ears except now & then a tone that resembled the squeak of a pig’. The journal continues with the entertainments and waters at Spa