Single Letter

HAM/2/7

Diary of Mary Hamilton (17 January 1784 - 17 February 1784)

Diplomatic Text


[1]
Saturday 17th: Janry. 1784 -- dreʃsed
for all day -- Wm Benn gave me
an account of ye.. changes &c in
ye Queens House. Dowg. Lady &
Miʃs W. King for an hour. Mr
Wake
came & staid after them
he sat wth. me from ½ past 2
till near 4. had much converse
his opinion of my character &c
I din'd at home wth. Miʃs C's after
dinner we were together till
½ past 6 A M wrote whilst
I dictated a letter to M: D'agincour
they went to Lady Abdys -- ye. Veseys
carried them. I wrote till 8.



Mrs. Boscowan came for me
to take me to Mrs. Pepys -- she
could go herself as Lady
Frederick
died to day -- her late
Husband
s Sister. we call'd for
Sr Lucas Pepys & Lady Rothes
who were going to Mrs Pepys
met there Dr. Warton -- his
Brother Mr. T. Warton Miʃs
Burney
&c &c &c. a pleasant
Eveg. Mr. & Mrs. Vesey brought
me home. we set Dr W. down



at his Lodgings -- Mr Vesey
got out & weMrs. V & I sat sometime
waiting for him -- I went home
wth them they sent for Miʃs C's
only Is: came we staid till past
12 -- came home A M gone to bed.

Sunday 18th. had after Church
Mrs- Leland Mr. C Smith &
Miʃs Smith -- |Lady Wake for
a few Minutes|
Mrs. Glover for a long time. I wrote parts
of letters to Mon~ D'Agincourt
& Miʃs H More. A M came
home & sat with me till dinner
time after dinner I wrote a long
account of my fly to Miʃs H More
& drew its cage. A M went to
Mr Glovers -- I staid below wth.
Bell till 8 when Mr. Vesey call'd
for us in his Coach we stop'd
at ye. Glovers took up A. Maria &
left Mr. Vesey we went to
Mr. Jacksons -- Mr. Vesey join'd
us & we sup'd & came home
wth. Mr V. at 11 oClock



Monday 19th. Janry1784
dreʃsd in a Habit it was so
cold for all day at ½ past 12
had ye Dʃs. of Portlands Coach
set A M down at Mrs. Jacksons
& went on to Lady C Peacheys
where I left a note did not
get out -- went to ye. Dʃs.'s staid
with her from 1 till near 4 --
we arranged & clean a China
Cabinet Mrs Dyghton her
Woman help'd a little -- had
the Coach at 4 went to Mr. Glovers
where I din'd & spent a tranquil
day not envying ye. fine
folks at ye. Birth day[2] but
enjoying my liberty. Mrs. & Miʃs
Glover
were out. there was only
dear Mr. Glover, & Mrs. Lenton
-- after dinner I read to Mr. Glover
as his eyes were bad. I read from
¼ before 6 till past 10 oClock
a Manuscript -- ye life of
Epaminondas -- by a Mr. Oxendon
who has been dead some years
an old friend of Mr. G. I did
not quite finish it. Mrs. G & Miʃs
G
came home at ¼ before 11 I



came home in their Coach
sat a little with Bell & Anna &
then went to bed.

Tuesday 20 Janry 1784.
Mrs. Carter & Doctr. Wharton to
Breakfast at 10 oClock. we
B. in ye. Parlour with Miʃs C's.
Docr W staid till 12 sensible &
agreeable converse -- Dr. W.
came up in my rooms &
was pleased with them -- said
many handsome things of my
leaving court &c. he went
& Mrs.. Carter sat & workd on till
1 o'Clock. My Uncle Frederick
& his son came & sat ½ an
hour with us -- a frost & snow
as yesterday. Mrs- Carter went
abt. ye. same time wth. my Uncle
Little Katherine Jackson came
at 11 & staid on till near 4 was
with me alone above 2 hours & was
vey engaging. I dreʃs'd when Mrs.
Carter
was gone. at 3 Mr. Wake
came & sat ½ an hour with me
told me he fear'd from sth. Lady W.
said he was troublesome in coming



so often & thought it might be
troublesome to me &c
he staid till ½ past 3 -- [3]
A. M. took little Katherine
home -- I had Lady Wakes
Coach at 4. went to Mrs.
Newton
s to dinner met there
Dr & Mrs. Parker. Mr & Mrs.
Dicey
(Ldy. Bathursts Sister)
Mrs.. Parker is Madame Weldrens
Sister. & Sr. John Elliot -- ye Physician.
had Lady W: Coach came home
before they left ye. dining room
to receive my Company
had a Working Party. Lady
Wake
-- Lady C Peachey -- Miʃs
W. King
. Mrs. Leland. Lady F
Harpur
. -- they left me abt.
10 oClock -- Miʃs C's were out
at Mr. Glovers -- I had Wm. Benn up
to know wch. Visits he had made
for me. I wrote till Miʃs C's
came home at 11. they staid ¼ of
an hour with me -- we went to Bed
I read till 1 in ye Morng Mrs Delanys
letters. A M & I talk'd sometime



were in Bed tho' in differing
rooms &c. Miʃs Markham y ABishop
of York
------ 3d. D:[4] at Mrs N's

[5]21st Janry 1784 had ye.
Dʃs. Dr of Portlands Coach
at ½ past 11 to make Visits
A Maria went wth. me. went to
Mrs. Delany & introduced her
went to Mrs. Hoare sat ½ an
hour (A M staid in ye Coach)
Call'd at Mrs. Turton she was out
sent to enquire after ye. Adam
family
. went to Mrs. Chapone
sat ¼ of an hour she invited
A M. up. call'd on Mrs. Gladdel
she was out. on Mrs. & Miʃs
Majendie
they were out --
On Lady Wallingford -- sat ¼
of an hour -- A M staid in ye.
Coach. to Mrs. Revely she was
at home we both went in
for ¼ of an hour. -- Mrs.
Gambier
-- I went in staid
¼ of an hour -- Mrs. Cole
who was out -- came home
at 3. Lady Stormont &
Lady Courtown & Mrs. Hamilton



had call'd when I was out.
A. M. sat wth. me till Dinner time
I dind at home -- after dinner
I A. M. play'd on ye. harpsicord
I wrote. saw Mr Johnston as
I paʃs'd this Morng my Uncle Wm Calld when I was out[6] -- at 6
oClock A M & I went to Mr. Glovers
She went on to Mrs. Jackson -- I
sat wth. Mr. Glover till past 8 o'Clock
Mrs. G. went out. Miʃs Glover &
Mrs. Lenton were at home I read
some more of ye: life of Epamin
ondas
to Mr. G. A M came for
me -- she came in for a few Min --
Mr.. G.s Eyes were better --
when we came home found Mr.
Vesey
wth. Bell -- we invited him
to Supper as Mrs. was out -- He
went home to write letters & returnd
again -- I went up to ye Drawing Room
Miʃs Planta came at 9 & we sat
together till past 10 -- she told me yt.
ye P of W. often spoke of me &c &c
we went down to supper to Miʃs
C's
& Mr. Vesey she went away at
11 -- Mr. Vesey ½ after.



we sat up till near 1 o'Clock
I working & A M read to us
Gays poem of ye- Fan[7] wch.
we liked extremely.
I read in my room till near 2 Mrs. Delany letters.

22d. Janry 1784 Thursday
The Dʃs. Dr.. of Portland Coach at
½ past 12 -- went to Mrs. Delany
found her not quite so well as
I wish'd -- she made me read Mr
Dewes
's answer to ye letter I wrote
for her.[8] I staid only ¼ of an
hour. call'd at Miʃs Gunnings
did not go in to enquire if she
came to me this Eveg. -- sent to
enquire after Miʃs Tryon --
went to ye. Dʃs. Dr. of Portland
she sent for me into her Breakfast
Room, There we staid ¼ of an hour
I drank a dish of Coffee, -- read her
Mr Dewes letter -- we then went into
ye Dreʃsing room I arranged a Cabinet
of China & Mrs Dighton her Woman
helped in Dusting it Lady Weymouth
came whilst we were busy she staid
½ an hour I staid till near 5 oClock



came home in ye Dʃs Coach, din'd
at home with Miʃs Clarkes, sat wth-
them till past 9 oClock -- we read --
wrote -- A M playd on ye harpsicord
&c. I expected Miʃs Gunning
but she did not come. I went to
ye Dr. room wrote a letter to Mad. Busche
sent for Miʃs A Clarke to come up
to me to read her wht. I had written.
we went down at ½ past 10. had
our supper. had Wm Benn in
& gave him my two foreign letters
to put in ye Post -- ye other was to
Monr D'Agincourt. A M play'd me
a few tunes. we went to bed at
12 oClock. Lady Dartrey call'd when
I was out in ye Morning

23d. Janry. 1784 Friday[9] went to Mrs.
Carter
before 9 oClock to Breakfast
staid with her till 12 oClock -- we work'd
& talk'd -- very interesting conversation
chiefly on religion -- viz faith &c she
walk'd home with me but did not
come in. I found Miʃs Clarkes were
gone out & walk'd thro' ye Park to St.
James's place enquired at Sr. R Gunnings
if Miʃs Gunning was there & as she
was not went on to St. James's sat
with her ½ an hour. read her my
Answer to Made. Busches letter
I then went through ye park to
Mrs. Delany. met Swardy & Mr.



Gunning
spoke to them both -- sat
½ an hour with Dear Mrs Delany
found her pretty well -- saw Miʃs
Port
who came to Town yesterday
with her Uncle Mr. Dewes
thought
her much grown walk'd home
through ye. Park it was a fine
dry frosty day -- Miʃs Gregory
had call'd when I was out.
Mr. Wake came, I saw him but
did not let him stay above 10
Minutes as I was going to
dreʃs -- at ¼ past 4 went to
Mr Veseys to dinner Miʃs H.
More
& Mr. Cambridge din'd
there -- Miʃs H More & I were
equally happy in seeing each
other -- she came to Town on
purpose to pay this visit to
Mrs. V. She goes to Hampton
again tomorrow Morng. Mr.
C.
tired me very much -- for
he never ceased talking -- we
left ye dining room abt. 7 oClock
Miʃs More & I had a little
tête a tête in inner drawing
room -- Mrs. Carter came to us
there &c. ye Company that came
in ye. Eveg were --



Mr Walpole Dr Warton Mrs Carter
Lady Herries Dr & Miʃs Burney
My Uncle Sr William Hamilton
Sr Robt. & 2 Miʃs Gunnings Sr.
Joshua Reynolds
& his niece
Miʃs Palmer -- I sat nextar
Dr Warton Mr Walpole my Uncle
Miʃs More -- a very pleasant
Eveg.. Sr. J: Reynolds Dr Warton
my Uncle & I staid supper
heard ye Gentlemen give their
opinion of former Beauties
ye Gunnings &c &c some
Curious anecdotes relating to
ye. Gunnings. their escape &c &c
I left ym. & came home at
½ past 12 oClock. Miʃs Cs
were gone to bed. but A M
& I had a Conversation as
usual -- I read several of
Mrs. D's letters before I
went to rest.

Saturday 24th. Janry. 1784. My Uncle
Wm.
sent me a letter & ye Jupiters Head.
his servant -- was to deliver it into my
hands -- I had him up -- it was ye faithful
      Swift



Mrs. & Miʃs Glover came -- I saw ym- for
a few Minutes only -- as their Visit was
to Miʃs Clarkes -- Little Mary Jackson came
& was with me alone ½ an hour -- at ½
past 12 had ye. Dʃs.'s Coach. went to Lady
Wake
s left a Meʃsage that I wd. dine there.
went to Mrs. Delany found her pretty well
saw her great Neice Miʃs Port who came
to Town yesterday wth. her Uncle Mr Dewes
I thought her much grown. Mrs. D. sent her
out of ye room -- & took ye opportunity of
shewing her ye. Jupiters head. At 1 oClock I
went to ye Ducheʃs Dr. of Portland. she had me
in ye. Breakfast room & made me drink
coffee. I gave her ye. Jupiters head & shew'd
her my Uncles letter -- we then went
to ye Dining room & arranged & clean
out a Cabinet of China -- Mrs Dighton
her woman left to dust ye shelves -- we
then took out all ye. fine Japan out of
a Cabinet fill'd with it. My Uncle
Wm.
came at 3 -- ye. Dʃs. & him settled
part of ye Busineʃs -- she shew'd him
some very curious & rare & beautiful
pieces of Japan some Medals &c &c
he staid till past 4. I staid near ½ after
had ye. Dʃs. Coach went to Sr. Wm. Wakes
where I din'd. only the family -- after
dinner Miʃs W——s & Richard came
into ye room. left ye dining room abt.
½ past 6 -- Wm.. left ye. dining room soon
after dinner to finish his busineʃs soon
on my Account therefore he came up as
soon as Lady Wake & I did -- I drank
tea & staid till 8 oClock Mr. Catton
at tea &c. went in the Coach



to Mr. Glovers. Wm. went with me &
staid a few minutes. Mr. Cust came
in & told Mr G. ye. Politicks of ye.
day -- Mrs- G. Mrs Lenton & Mr. Cust
went to Cards. Mr. Glover Miʃs
Glover
& I into ye. study. I read
till past 10 to Mr.. Glover in ye. life
of Epaminondas -- he left Miʃs
Glover
& me to see if Supper was
ready. we look'd over some pages of
ye. Manuscript of Jason & Miʃs
Glover
read an Eclogue of ye. Man:
pastoral of Delia written some
years ago by Mr. Glover. he came
& call'd us away to supper. Mr.
Cust
was gone I staid till past 11
Miʃs A. M. Clarke call'd for me.
she had been to Mrs. Jacksons.
we found Is. home alone -- we
soon went to our rooms -- I
wrote after I went to bed &c

Sunday 25th. 1784 Janry. Mr. Dewes
call'd I did not see him I was
dreʃsing -- A M came at ½ past
two & sat sometime with me --
I rcd a note from Mrs Wals:
letting me know Miʃs Boyle
was ill & yt. I could not dine there



Mr. Wake came at 3 oClock
staid till 4. Miʃs C—— had people Mr & Mrs Hoare
to dinner I excused myself & had
dinner in my room. read & wrote
till near 8 oClock -- had Lady Wake's
Coach went to Mrs. Delany -- found her
pretty well. met there Lady Bute
Mr & Mrs. Cole Mr Dewes. Mr. Frederick
Montagu
Mr & Mrs. Soame Jennings
Miʃs Port -- staid till a little past 9
ye. Dʃs. had been at Mrs. Delanys but
was gone to ye. Queen. ye. chief
conversation was Politickss wch. did
not much amuse me. came home
was tired & did not go to ye. Veseys
where I was invited -- sat with
Miʃs Clarkes till ½ past 11 -- A M
read a few letters of R. E: went
to bed read a few of Mrs. D——'s
letters.

Monday 26th. dreʃs'd before 9 for
all day. wrote out Man: till past
2: saw Miʃs Clarkes at different
times My Uncle Frederick & his
son
came. Robert goes to school
tomorrow. Lady Julianna & Miʃs
Penn
& Miʃs Baker came at 3



Monday 26th Janry 1784
I staid till near 4. Lady J. said ------
of my coming to her in a friendly
way &c. A M came to me for
¼ of an hour -- went to Lord
Dartrey
s to dinner. met there
a Mr. Watts an American & Mr
Grove
. after dinner Lady Dartrey
& I had much conversation relative
to Ldy. Wake & poor Mrs Quin Ld.
D.
s Sister who is dying at Bath.
Dear Lady D: not well, a head ache
& Cold. little Julia & I play'd at
Bateldore &c. Mr. Antrobus seemd
better. at 7 Mrs. Vesey call'd for
me we went to Mrs. Chapones met
there Sr Lucas Pepy's & his Ldy.
Lady Rothes. Mr. & Mrs. Pepys Mrs.
Carter
. a merry -- pleasant -- sensible
Eveg.. Politics Mrs. Siddons &c
Mrs. Vesey Mrs. Carter & I came away
at 10 o'Clock. we set Mrs. Carter down
& then me. found Mrs. Glover &
My Uncle Frederick & Mrs. Hamilton
wth. Miʃs Clarkes -- they had had
other company these soon went
Miʃs C's & I sat up till near 12 [10]



------up ½ an hour after them, wrote
------ [j]ournal -- found notes &c
------ letter from Miʃs H More --
Miʃs W King had call'd upon me --

[11]       Tuesday 27th. Janry 1784.
      Breakfasted with Anna Maria at
½ past 9 oClock -- then dreʃs'd in Bells
dreʃsing room for ye day. recd. an
invitation to dine & spend ye day at Mrs.
Walsingham
s as she was not well but was
engaged -- recd. & wrote a vast number of
Notes. A M. sat with me a great part of
ye. Morng.. read over Manuscripts &c
Bell paid me a little Visit. a little before
4 Lady Stormonts Coach & servants came
for me: Lord Stormont & Miʃs Murray
his Daughter. & Mr Nicholson Master
Murray
s Tutor din'd with us we din'd in
Lord Stormonts Breakfast room. after dinner
Lady S: Miʃs Miʃs M. & I were sometime together
ye. 3 little boys came after dinner. Lord Stormon
came up & staid tea & coffee. Miʃs Murray went
away at 9. Then Charles & Archibald
Cathcart
came & Mr. Graham. & Ld. S.
came up a ¼ of an hour before I came
away had Ldy. S. Coach at 11. came home
sat & wrote Miʃs C——'s at ye. Veseys.
they came home at ¾ past 11 -- we went
to bed past 12

[12]



28th. Janry 1784 Wednesday
had my B. upstairs dreʃs'd in my habit
A M. came & sat with me whilst I was
dreʃsing. at 12 oClock Miʃs W King came
for me to go my Uncle Wm. to rec ye- Vase
I stop'd & left a Meʃsage at Mrs Delanys
at my Uncles met Dowg Lady & Young
Lady King -- saw ye. Vase. my Uncle shewd
me one of Mrs. C——'s letters -- abt. ¼ before
1 oClock we left him Dr: Ldy: & Miʃs King
brought me home did not get out. I sat
sometime wth. Miʃs C's -- recd. a meʃsage
from Mrs. Iremonger -- to say she had been
confin'd wth. a Cold since she came to
Town or wd. have been to see me.
Mrs. & Miʃs Bloʃset came & sat ½ an
hour. told me strange storries of ye K
& Queen. Mr. Fisher came after ym.
when he had been wth. me ¼ of an
hour Mr. Wake came. Mr. Fisher staid
near a hour. carried a note for me
to Mrs. Delanys. Wm. & I had just begun
a Conversation when Lady Wake came
to Miʃs Clarkes we went down she staid
¼ of an hour -- she & her son went
away together. I staid on wth. Miʃs C—'s
till after dinner. A M went to Mrs. Jacksons
before 6. I went up to dreʃs wch I did in
a few Minutes -- put on my Gown
in ye Parlour. Staid ½ an hour wth. Bell



went to my B: room & settled ye
plan for a fan to draw for Miʃs
Gunning
had ye Dʃs. Dr. of Portlands
Coach at 7 -- took leave of Bell went
to Mrs. Delany -- Mrs. Astley desired me
to go into her room to see her Sister
who is to live with Mrs. Hamilton
I did & liked her appearance --
found Dr. Mrs. Delany & Miʃs Port
togther -- Mrs. D: pretty well --
Lady Bute & ye Dʃs. Dr. of Portland
soon came. they talk'd of Lady Holderneʃse
her distreʃs abt. Lady Conyers -- who
was released from her sufferings
last Monday -- she was a true penitent[13]
after tea I made Miʃs Port go into
Mrs. D: Bedchamber wth me -- yt. ye. ladies
have an opportunity of talking
&c. we staid there ½ an hour she
entertain'd me wth. an account of her
being at Matlock &c -- when we return'd
to ye Dr: room Ldy Bute was gone -- I
staid wth. ye. Dʃs. & Mrs. Delany till near
10. ye. Dʃs. told me of her visit to ye
Q House. yt. she thought ye King look'd heated
& ill -- ye Prince was there for some time
had ye. Dʃs. Coach home one of ye. Poor horses
fell down in Arlington Street -- he was not
hurt -- an intense frost. found A. M.
& Bell at home -- we had our Supper & Bell
A M play'd on ye.. harpsicord we went
to bed past 12.



29th. Janry. 1784 Thursday -- dreʃs'd for ye. day
A M went out at 12. for ye. Day to Mrs. Harris's
Child
s Christening -- I began to draw Miʃs
Gunning
s fan. Mr. Vesey came for ½ an
hour. Mrs. Hamilton came at ½ past 1 o'Clock
to see Mrs.. Astley & her sister who is to
live with Mrs. H:. they came & I left them
together. went in my Uncles Coach to Mrs. Jacksons
sat ½ an hour with both she & little Fanny
were pretty well again -- I found & left
Bell there -- when I return'd home found
Mrs. H. still talking wth. the Mrs. Astleys -- they
soon went. Mrs. A. told me Mrs. Delany
was pretty well. Mrs. H staid some time
told me of Miʃs Harris being settled as
a Perfumer &c. I wrote till -- 4 Bell
came home & came to me for a few Min.
at ½ past 4 Ldy.. Wake sent her Coach for
me din'd there.. Mr.. Antrobus & Mr. Sly
din'd there. I staid till 8 oClock.
Wm.. & I quarreld. he did not behave well
Went to Mr. Glovers -- in ye Coach Wm. went
wth. me & made his excuses &c left
me there. found Mr & Mrs. G. Mrs. Lenton &
Miʃs G. Lady Wake came at ½ past 8.
Miʃs Glover read a continuation of
Jason to her -- she heard ye. first part
ye. Eveg before. A Maria call'd for me a
little before 10 -- she came in for a Minute
left Ldy. W. there. as we came home
one of ye. Poor horses fell down --
Bell went to ye. Veseys when we
came home. A M read till 11 in
[R] Eloise. She went to bed I ------ till ------[14]



Bell came home. went to bed at 12.
Wm. Benn had been for me to ye. Q House
to enquire after Miʃs Goldsworthy who is
again ill & after Mrs. Schellenberg. &c

[15]

Miʃs Hamilton -- [16]



Friday 230th. Janry. 1784
Had Breakfast sent up to my room
dreʃs'd in my riding Habit. Miʃs
A M Clarke
came to me whilst my
hair was dreʃsing & sat sometime --
at 12 o'Clock -- went over ye way
to the Veseys -- saw Mr & Mrs. Vesey
& Mrs. Handcock -- then went through
ye. Green Park to Mrs. Delany -- a
very cold sharp frost wch. almost
petrified me. found Dear Mrs.
Delany
very well. her Nephew
Mr. Dewes, & her great Neice
Miʃs Port, were with her. I staid
abt. 20 Minutes. came back
through ye. Green Park & walk'd
on to Mrs. Jackson in old Burlington
street -- met Coll. Leland &
Mr. Lyte spoke to them both
staid till near 3 wth. Mrs Jackson
saw her 2 eldest girls. & Mr.
Jackson
. walk'd home. Miʃs
Finch
& Mrs. Newton had
call'd upon me -- went into
ye Parlour to Miʃs Clarkes -- as it



was too late to dreʃs before
dinner -- sat in with them --
we din'd at 4. -- Received a
note from Lady Julianna Penn
to tell me that she had just
recd. ye Queens Commands for
her & Miʃs Penn to come to
her in ye. Eveg. therefore she
could not (have me, I was to
have gone to Ldy. J: P:) I
therefore did not dreʃs. at 6
left Miʃs C's & went to my
Breakfast Room. where I staid
all ye. Eveg. -- Miʃs C's had
Company in ye. Drawing room
Mrs. Jackson also was wth. ym. who
came to me for ¼ of an hour.
Mrs. Boscowan & Miʃs Streatfield
call'd -- but I order'd no one
to be let in -- I wrote &
read till past 10 -- sent a letter
to my Drst. (Miʃs Litchfield)



      Miʃs C—'s Company went
away at 10 -- they open'd ye.
door for they were in ye. next
room to me & I soon join'd
ym. had supper in ye. D: R --
we read a little -- Anna
Maria
read Metastasio &
translated a few lines to me.
She & Bell went to bed at 11
I staid below till ½ past reading
Mrs. Delanys Manuscript
Letters to her late Sister Mrs. Dewes
wch. Mr. Dewes had been so
kind to lend me a large
Parcel off. went to bed --
about 12.


Saturday 31st. Janry. 1784
Got up soon after 8: went down
down to my room -- read in Mrs. D——
letters till past 9 -- then went
down to ye. Parlour & breakfasted
wth. Miʃs A M Clarke -- abt. 11
dreʃs'd for ye. day. at ½ past 12



Lady Stormont came to me
& sat ½ an hour -- talk'd
of our Uncle Sr. Wm. Hamilton
& was not pleased she saw
so little of him &c:
when she was gone Mr. Dewes
came & my Aunt, Dowgr.
Lady Warwick
-- she staid
½ an hour -- ye. common
Topics -- Mr. D: staid till
near 2. oClock. we talk'd
much of Dear Mrs. Delany
of her excellencies -- Virtues
& agremens[17] read and wrote till 4. Lady Wake call'd for me[18] at ½ past 2 to take an airing. I excused myself she did not come in Miʃs Clarke
came to me for a few Minutes
left her in my room as it was
time for me to go to out. had a
Chair went to Dowgr. Lady
King
s -- where I din'd -- a parti
quar̄é -- Viz: Lady & 2 Miʃs
Kings
Lady Wallingford &
myself[19] -- a pleasant dinner
-- I staid till near 8. a Mrs



Hodgkinson
came in to Tea.
The Dʃs. Dowgr. of Portlands Coach
came for me -- went to Mrs
Delany
-- met there. ye. Dʃs
D: Portland
(who comes every
Eveg. to Mrs. Delany unleʃs she is
ill) Mr.. Dewe's & my Uncle
Sr. Wm. -- an agreeable Eveg.
my Uncle is lively clever
& entertaining & always
offers agreeable topics of
discourse -- The Ducheʃs went
out of ye. Room -- & sent for
me. & in ye. most handsome
manner made me a very
beautiful & ------ fine present
a gage d'amitie -- she stated it this was
a Watch & Chain of ye.
newest fashion. ye. Chain of
Silk -- decorated with Taʃsels &
other ornaments of Steel -- Pearl
& Gold Beads --



with a Seal & other Trinkets
suitable in elegance. I shewd
my beautiful present -- to my
Uncle
Mrs. Delany &c who admired
it very much. a ¼ past 10
left Mrs. D:'s -- my Uncle set me
down at Mr. Glovers where I
staid ½ an hour -- My Good friend
Mr. G. was delighted & pleased
wth.. my fine present -- Miʃs A M
Clarke
was there, we came home
together abt. 11. found Miʃs Clarke
at home -- we chatted a little &
then went to our rooms, I read
after I was undreʃs'd till near
12


Sunday 1st.. Febry 1784 -- did not get
up till ½ past 9 -- had Breakfast sent
up to my room -- dreʃs'd at ½ past 10
for ye. day -- did not go to Church as
My Uncle Wm. told me he would call
upon me if he could -- but I saw
nothing of him -- read & drew all Morng.
at ½ past two A Maria came home



she had been to Church. she sat
wth.. me some time Mr. Wake came at
3 oClock (Sr. Wm.s eldest Son) sat with
me till Mrs. Walsinghams Coach
came for me, a little before 4 -- I gave
Mr. Wake some advice -- for he esteems
me as his friend & begs I will
point out whatever I see wrong
in his conduct -- manners &c &c.
& I must do my young Pupil
ye. justice to say he bears my
rebukes wth. patience & endea-
vours
to correct what I mark
out as wrong. I left him
behind to walk wth. Miʃs Clarkes
to Mrs. Jacksons, as I was ob-
liged
to take ye Servant -- went
to Mrs. Walsinghams where I
din'd -- only her & her daughter
Miʃs Boyle -- Mrs. W. was not well
but in good Spirits -- after-dinner
we sat in ye 2d. Drawing room --
Mrs. W. read Mr. Jerninghams
last production -- an Eʃsay on
Scandalavian Poetry[20] -- abt. half



a dozen or a dozen good lines -- his
Poetry is in general but poor
stuff -- but it is harmleʃs
however -- on my expreʃsing
my opinion of this Gentleman
as an Author -- Mrs. W—— agree'd
but said he had written pretty
things, & read me some lines
he had written to Miʃs Boyle
on one of her Birth days --
they certainly had some
merit -- the Compliments
were well turn'd -- the Bishop
of Peterborough -- Hinchliffe)
came in just as I was going
away wch. I did at ¼ before 8 --
had Mrs. W's Coach -- went home
found Miʃs Gunning -- who had been
waiting ½ an hour for me -- we
had tea & she made it whilst
I drew some of the fan wch. she



has desired me to do for
her -- we conversed on various
topics -- on Poor Lady Conyers
death &c -- I shew'd her the late
Lady Hamiltons letters to Sr.
Wm.
wch. he found after her
death -- she was very much
affected by them -- indeed they
breathe such love & tenderneʃs
to him, & such true piety
that ye. perusal of them
must affect a sensible &
well disposed mind. Miʃs G.
left me at 10 oClock -- I wrote my
diary till Miʃs C's came home
they had been wth. Mrs: Jackson --
they came to me abt. 11 -- sat ½ an
hour -- I staid ¼ of an hour after
them. then went to bed -- read
in ye. new whole Duty of Man. &c.




SuMonday 2d. Febry. 1784
Got up ½ past 9 -- went down to
my Morni Room dreʃs'd for
ye. day -- in a Habit as I thought
of walking out & not going to
any place in ye. Eveg. wch. obliged
me to dreʃs -- sat down to my
drawing -- Mrs. & Miʃs Glover
came & sat ½ an hour -- A Maria
came to me whilst they were with
me. I quite scolded poor Mrs.
Glover
for asking A Maria to
accompany her to Sunning Hill
tomorrow & A Maria for consenting
to go as ye. weather was so
severe &c &c. My Uncle
Frederick
came & sat with me
near 2 hours -- Mrs. G &c left me
soon after he came. He talk'd
much of his Mother Lady
Archibald
-- told me many
anecdotes wch. did her Honor --
she was a Woman of the
strictest honor -- liberal --



to a degree & very benevolent
her manners uncommonly
pleasing & highly polished --
her understanding excellent
& she had a lively wit &
brilliant imagination --
she was a very warm & steady
friend -- after having sacrificed
the best part of her life, & her health in the
service of a Court -- she retired
disappointed & disgusted
with the insincerity & great
ingratitude she experienced --
-- many peoples fortunes she
made -- but her own she
injured by her liberalities
& she was of too noble a
spirit -- to advance it by
accepting anything from
ye. Court she quitted &c &c



Lady Wake & her daughter
Charlotte came during ye.
time my Uncle was with me
& staid ¼ of an hour.
A Maria came to me for
a short time after my Uncle
left me. at 4 Lady Wake
call'd for me, & we for Mrs.
Carter
-- we went to dine
at Lord Dartrey's -- found
them pretty well -- no other
Company but their Chil-
dren
& ye. Son's Tutor,
Mr. Antrobus -- ¼ past
7 Lord & Lady D: Ldy. W Mrs.
EC
& I went out in ye.
same Coach. they set me
down at Mr. Jacksons --
found Mr & Mrs. Jackson
alone. I staid there till



11 -- sup'd there. Mr J. went
out for ½ an hour -- brought
us ye. News of ye. House
of Commons -- wch. was just
entering upon the im-
portant
Question whether
or no ye. Present Ministry
ought to remain -- ye.
House it was expected
wd. sit late. had a Coach
at 11. call'd. but did not
get out at Mr. Glovers
for the Miʃs Clarkes. Mr.
Vesey
who was there also
came home with us -- we
set him down -- (I did not
stay above a minute below
went up to bed.[21] A Maria
came to me after I was



in Bed & own'd she did not
much like going with Mrs.
Glover
into ye. Country

Tuesday -- 3d. Febry. 1784
did not get up till ½ past 9
A Maria sent me up Breakfast
& came & staid with me ¼
of an hour before she went
to Sunning Hill. my
Hair was just dreʃs'd when
Mr. Farhill came. I saw
him he had not been long
before Lady Stormont came
they talk'd Politicks, she
inform'd us that Mr. Fox
had gaind a Majority of 19
agst. ye. Ministry, &c.
Mr. F. went away -- & Ldy
Stormont
made me go out
wth. her -- wch. I did & only
put on my long Cloak



over my Robe de Chambre
we call'd at our Uncle Williams
(at Nerots Hotel) he was
out saw his Swiʃs servant
& Ldy. S—— made him bring
a Drawing of two Boys wch-
she was to Copy -- we then
went to ye. Kings House
to our Cousin Coll. Greville,
who has a House there as
Kings Equerry, sat ½ an
hour with him -- saw his
birds &c. he has fitted
up his appartments more
like a fine Ladies -- in
my opinion -- than a Mans.
Lady S. brought me home
but did not come in. I had been at home 10
Minutes before Mr Wake
came & he staid from ½ past



2. till near 4 -- I sorted shells
whilst he was with me. he
was very anxious he told me
to preserve my good opinion
& that he should ever
endeavour to preserve it by
following my advice. he
promised to keep a Journal
of his time & behaviour regularly, he had begun
one last Sunday. this he
is to shew me at ye. end of
the month. by wch. I am
to judge of his conduct
&c &c &c. at 4 went
down to dinner Miʃs Clarke
& I din'd together -- I wrote
my diary, & she read, &
we talk'd, & had tea -- I
had my gown brought down
& dreʃs'd below in ye. Parlour



it was so cold I had not
resolution to go upstairs.
I read a little in a New
Novel -- the 2 Mentors[22] I
am inclined to read it
because it was written by
the Lady who wrote the
Old English Baron
-- wch.
I thought an ingenious
pretty work. at 7. ye. Dʃs:
Dowgr of Portland
s Coach came
for me -- went to her to her
House at WhiteHall -- she
had a Cold & could not go out.
enjoy'd an agreeable tête a
tête with her till ½ past 10
her conversation is always
pleasant & instructive -- she
is so good humor'd -- polite
& attentive -- & is sensible



well inform'd. & well read --
hads a fund of Anecdote --
she told me to night she was
69 Years old -- we talk'd of
ye late Princeʃs Dowager &
Prince of Wales -- their
Characters &c -- I have
not time to enter into ye.
particulars of the conver
sation's
-- when I went
home she desired me to call
at Mrs. Delanys to inform
her she was better -- I did
so -- I did not go in as it
was too late an hour for
Mrs. D: heard she was well,
came home (had ye Dʃs. Coach)
found Miʃs Clarke alone
we eat our Bread & Cheese
& she play'd on ye Harpsicord
to me till ½ past 11 -- we
then separated for Bed --



I read after I got to my
room till 1 -- in ye. Morning

Wednesday 4th. Febry. 1784
got up at 9 -- dreʃs'd for ye. day &
had Breakfast in my room ------
------------ below -- read ye debates
of ye.. House of Commons -- then
set down to my drawing -- Mrs.
Carter
call'd -- when I was dreʃsing
I had given orders not be at
home -- wch I was sorry for when
I found she had call'd -- at 12
Miʃs Wake came & staid an
hour -- I gave her a work draw
to arrange & continued drawing
Mr. Vesey came & he staid 10
Minutes -- he came to invite
me to dinner. Miʃs Clarke
came to me for ¼ of an hour at
½ past two she had been out
wth. our opposite Neighbours ye.
Veseys
-- she left me to dreʃs &
she dined there. I continued



drawing till ½ past 4. when
Sr. Wm. Wakes Coach came for me
-- I dined there. Mr. Jeʃsop &
Mr. Barwick of Waltham Abbey
dined there -- when Lady Wake
& I went up after dinner -- we
had some interesting conversation
abt. her Children -- particularly
Miʃs Wake. After Coffee Lady
W.
went out. & I staid an
hour after & takd talk'd a great
deal alone to Miʃs Wake. & made
her sensible of some errors, in her manner. &c
-- at my desire she wrote a
letter to her Mother &c &c
at ½ past 7 -- Mr. Catton Mr.
Wake
s tutor walk'd acroʃs ye.
way with me to Mr. Glovers
-- he took leave of me at ye
door. found. Mrs. Vesey &
Miʃs Clarke with Mr. Glover



Mrs. Vesey soon went away.
Mr. Devanys came in for ½
an hour. a good humor'd
noisy chattering Man.
Mrs.. Lenton (Mrs. Glovers Sister)
& Miʃs Glover at home. we
sat in Mr. G.'s Study. read
some of Clarendon -- yt. part
wch. treats of ye. Histor
reign of Chs. ye 1st. after
Supper. I read ye. debates
of ye. House of Commons
to Mr. Glover. Miʃs Clarke
& I came home at 11 o'Clock
-- went immediately to our
rooms -- I finish'd ye. 1st.
Vol. of ye. 2 Mentors. wch.
I like very well. wrote in
my dairy. read in ye. New
Whole duty of Man & then
composed myself to rest.



[23]


Lecturing Mr Wake
Page 7 & 16
Miʃs Wake Do- 20




Febry. 5th. 1784 Thursday.
dreʃs'd when I got up for the
day -- this I alway's do when
in my power, as I hate
that loʃs of time wch. dreʃsing
occasions. Breakfasted
alone. employ'd myself till
½ past 12 in looking over
Bills -- ordering dinner &c
as Miʃs A Clarke who keeps
house, was absent. saw
Miʃs Clarke for a moment
only. the Dʃs. Dowg of
Portland
s Coach came for
me at ½ past 12. went
to Mrs. Delany -- she was,
dear Woman! charming
well & happy to see me.
staid ¼ of an hour. her
great neice Miʃs Port
went in ye. Coach as far as
ye. Dʃs.'s but did not come in



-- Staid with ye Ducheʃs till past
4 o'Clock -- my Uncle Wm. came
some time after I had been there
-- we look'd over some Antique
Medals &c. my Uncle & y Dʃs
settled about the Vase &c:
entirely. the Dʃs. made him
give her an impreʃsion of his
arms to have a seal cut
for me for ye. Watch she had
given me. of my Arms. my
Uncle
& I came away together
his Carriage. I set him down
at Lord Dartmouth's -- I
went to Sr. Wm. Wakes where
I dined -- Mrs. Carter dined
there. after dinner Lady
Wake
read ye. 1st. Canto of
a new Poem call'd Aurelia
supposed to be written by Mr
Hoole
[24] -- it seems an imitation
of ye. Rape of ye. Lock[25] I
liked it very well as far as we read -- ye
Numbers were easy.



at 7. I went wth. Sr. Wm. Wake
to Mr. Glovers. he was pretty
well -- Mrs. Lenton & Miʃs Glover
& him were sitting in ye. Study
Mr. Wake came also in ½
an hour -- Sr. Wm. went away
at 8 o'Clock -- Mr. Glover
told us some anecdotes of
Beggars -- their impositions
&c. abt. 10 Lady Wakes Coach
came to carry me home. Mr.
Wake
attended me. I did not
ask him to come in as it was
late. found Miʃs Clarke out
I sat below & wrote a letter
to Miʃs A Clarke in reply to
one she wrote to me to inform
she should not return home
so soon as she had thought
of doing -- &c. Miʃs C. came
at ¼ past 11. we talk'd a little
& then went to our Rooms



Friday 6th. Febry. 1784
Dreʃs'd for ye. day. breakfasted
alone. at 11 Lord Dartrey came
Staid ½ an hour. Mrs. Colter Hoare
at 2 for ½ an hour -- she is a very
sensible & as far as I can
judge a agreeable Young Woman
Mr. Vesey came for ¼ of hour
I drew all Morng. din'd at
home. Miʃs Clarke play'd
to me some of Handels Music
after dinner -- sat wth. her till
½ after 6. came to my room
read & drew till ½ past 8
Miʃs Gunning came & drank
tea with me & staid till 11
The Topics of our Conversation
was various -- nothing very
interesting -- when she left
me except the death of
ye. Beautiful, & by all accounts
amiable Miʃs Copely -- Lord



Apsley
-- was much attached
to her -- & it said he will
wear Widowers Mourning.[26]
Miʃs Clarke came to me
after Miʃs G: went & sat
½ an hour. I went to bed at 12. wrote to my friend
Miʃs L. sent her my diary
expected to have heard from her


Saturday. got up at 8. wrote
notes & had my Breakfast at
½ past 9. had my hair dreʃs'd
for ye. day; whilst it was
dreʃsing finished the two
Mentors -- I think it but
an indifferent thing --
My Uncle Frederick came
at ½ past 12 & staid till
2. To my great surprise
Lord Napier came in -- I
did not expect him in London
this Winter -- he came last
night from Scotland upon



Busineʃs -- he & my Uncle
talk'd Politic's -- it seems
there will be violent measures
& ye. Parliament will be
diʃsolved -- they both left
me at 2. Mrs. Boscowan
came at ½ after 2 & staid
sometime -- I shew'd her my
Watch that ye. Dʃs. Gave me
She told me that ye. Duke of
Rutland
was going Lord
Lieutenant of Ireland &c
din'd at home with Miʃs
Clarke
. after dinner she
was obliging to play on ye.
Harpsicord to me -- some
of Fentons Leʃsons.
I wrote a letter to Miʃs H
More
. at 7 Lady Wakes Coach
came for me -- went to
Lady Caroline Peachey -- a



working Party.. Sr James was
at home & staid till after tea
then left us. My Cousin
Lady Frances Harpur. Lady
Wallingford
. & Mrs. Leland
Lady C: Peacheys Daughter
in Law a Bride -- was in-
troduced
to her -- she was
a Miʃs Jennings -- she has
a Sensible Countenance
& is near being pretty.
Common topics of conver-
sation
-- at 10 I came away
in Lady F: Harpurs
Coach. went to ye. Veseys
their Company were just
gone -- I staid supper. came
home ½ past 11. Miʃs C was
just come from ye. Glovers -- Mrs.
G.
return'd from Sunning Hill
to day -- she left Miʃs A Clarke
with her Sister Mrs. Barnard at



at Eaton -- we talked a little &
then went to our Rooms --

Sunday 8th. Febry. 1784 -- it
was impoʃsible for me to
walk to Church -- ye. Snow had
fallen &c. dreʃs'd at ½ past
10 for ye. day -- read -- wrote
Notes & drew -- Lady Stormont
call'd (but did not come in) to
tell me she wd. send ye Carriage
for me. Mr. Wake came after
2. read to me -- we began
Taʃso -- Hooles translation[27] --
he left me at 4 -- Lady S——
Coach came for me --
I went to Miʃs C. for a
moment to pay my Compts-
for I had not seen her --
went to Lord Stormonts to
dinner. Lord S. came & sat
wth. me as she was not
ready. Lord Napier came



to dinner -- after dinner
the 3 boys came -- we did
not sit long -- nor did the
Gentlemen staid long after
us -- Ld. S & I had a good
deal of conversation -- he
told me he had known
Madame de Boccage -- that
she was a very dull Woman
though it was ye. fashion to
think her a Belle Esprit
she was certainly a woman
of merit & had been a
great Beauty -- as a proof
how capable she was of
translating English into
French -- (for she published
a translation of Paradise
Lost
)[28] she made use of
ye. following words in



asking Lord Stormont to
Dinner -- ------------ Sir --
I beg, pray, You would
Could should can will
dine with me -- nay it
was even more absurd
for he told me the string
of words she used lasted
near a Minute. he
told me of other french
People who made a
parade of translating
English Books -- & that
they did it wth. ye. help
of their Language Master
&c &c. he went to his
Study after Coffee -- the
eldest Boy
sat wth. us the
whole time as his Tutor



was out -- he is the
cleverest Boy of his age
I ever met with -- being
only 7. As a proof ye.
readineʃs of his Wit --
he was talking & giving
his opinion upon some-
thing
that was said -- come
come says Lord Stormont
hold your tongue you're
an aʃs -- he left off
speaking but soon again
began to chatter -- what
says Lord S—— again braying
Wm- Oh Papa if I am
aʃs why you know I
must bray.
Lady S—— took me to her
Boudoir & shew'd me the



Copy she had begun of my
Uncle
's Drawing &c
we soon return'd to Lord
Napier
-- I had Lord S——
Chariot to go away as
Ld. & Ldy. S—— were going to
ye. French Ambaʃsadors --
Lord Napier went wth.
me & I set him down
at his Lodgings in Albe-
marle
Street -- I reproved
him for his shyneʃs in
Company &c he acknow-
ledge
I was in ye. right &c.
&c. I went to Mrs. Delanys
found her alone -- only her
great Neice Miʃs Port wth-
her -- ye Dʃs. Dr. of Portland
was gone to ye. Queen. I
staid till a ¼ before 10, we



look'd over a book of Prints
of Raphaëls Pictures --
when I came home wch. I did in a Chair found
Miʃs C—— alone -- we sup'd
together & I wrote & she
read ye. beginning of an
Old Play -- wch. I did not think
worth attending to. we went
to bed ½ past 11 -- I gave
Hannah who came to me as
Betty was out some good
advice not to encourage
young men who had not good characters &c -- as I
found one came frequently
to her -- she listen'd &
thank'd me -- she is a good
kind of Girl & I wish her
well -- Lady Stormont told me
that ye. Prince of Wales had
enquired after me yesterday
Morning at his Levee -- NB the



first he ever had) -- of Mr-
Greville
& had desired him
to give his Compts. to me.

Monday 9th. Febry. 1784.
Dreʃs'd for ye. day -- at 12 o'Clock
Lady Stormont came for me we
went to Robsons ye. Booksellers
as he had Prints & drawings
upon sale -- we look'd over some
there were few worth buying
Ldy. S—— bought ye. impreʃsions
of our Cousin Mr. Grevilles Gems
& a Portrait -- she then brought
me home abt. ½ past 1 -- I employ'd
myself in paying Bills &c.
Miʃs Clarke came to me at
3 for ¼ of an hour -- left me
to dreʃs -- Lord Napier came
he had been at ye. Kings
Levee. we talk'd over his
affairs -- at 4 Miʃs Clarke



came to ask me to go wth. her
to our opposite Neighbours
where we were to dine -- I
desired her to go & send me
word when dinner was ready
at ½ past 4 went there &
Ld. N. took leave of me at
their door. no other Company
at 8 oClock Miʃs C. went
home & Mr. & Mrs. Vesey set
me down at Mr. Glovers -- it
was Miʃs Glovers Birth day
who enters into her 18th. year[29]
found them en famille --
Sr. Wm. Wake came soon after
I was there. a dull heavy
Eveg. for Politic's was ye.
subject & nothing clever or
new was advanced -- at ¼
before 10 ye. Vesey's call'd
for me & brought me home



Miʃs Clarke was at home -- but
when I came in went to ye. Veseys
where she sup'd -- I wrote my Journal
till she return'd -- we went to bed
abt. ½ past 11

Tuesday 10th. Febry- 1784
dreʃs'd for ye. day at 10 -- as Mrs. Glover
who was to have breakfasted with me
sent me an excuse. Paid Bills
to Betty & Charles a Lady came
to enquire Charles's Character
& she agreed to take him upon my
recommendation -- when she left
me I gave him some advice
respecting his future conduct
wch. he seem'd grateful for.
Lady Wake came at 12 staid ½
an hour told me Sr. Wm. wd.
have come up -- but he was too
lame. Lord Napier came in
before she went -- he staid till
past 3 -- told me had been
at Mr. Dundaʃs's & hoped his
affairs wd. go on well.
Miʃs Clarke came to me for



¼ of an hour. My Uncle
Wm.
call'd but did not come
in -- to tell me he wd. carry
me to Lord Stormonts -- wch. he
did at ¼ past 4. we din'd there
Mr. & Col. Greville din'd there
& Mr. Murray's tutor. an
agreeable dinner -- ye. Gentle-
men
soon came to us after
dinner -- Lord Stormont at
home. Coll. Cathcart & Mr.
Graham
came in ½ an hour
before I came away. My
Uncle
& I left Lord Stormonts
at ¼ past 8. I left him at
Mr. Legges & came in his
Carriage to Lord Dartreys
there was one Whist table
the Company were. Mrs.
Montagu
. Miʃs Gregory. Sr.
Wm.
& Lady Middleton Lady
Wake
. Mr & Mrs. Vesey. Mr.



Selwyn
. Mrs. Boscowan. Mrs-
Bouverie
-- not ye. fine Mrs. B.
& Mrs. Carter. Lady D & I
had some conversation apart
abt. Mr. C—— &c. a little
after 10 Lady Wake brought
me home -- Miʃs Clarke was
gone to bed. wrote a few lines
to Miʃs A M Clarke & enclosed
letters wch. had come for her.
had Wm. Benn in to talk
abt. his Brothers coming &
to tell him I hoped through
Sr. Wm. Hamiltons means
to do him service wth. Mr.
Burrel
&c &c. then went
to my room

11th. Febry. 1784. wrote Notes
&c. had Bettys sister Mrs.
Harman
to Cut my hair &
dreʃs it -- Mrs. Iremonger &



Mr. Fisher call'd -- I did not
see them as I was dreʃsing.
at 2 Mr. Wake came. he
staid till past 3. we talk'd
of various things & I told
him my opinion of improper
Jokes &c. at 4 Mrs. Walsing
hams
Coach came. I went
there to dinner -- we look'd
over some prints before the
dinner was served -- she is
making a Collection -- Miʃs Black
din'd with us as she was to
continue Miʃs Boyles drawing
leʃson after dinner. She & Miʃs
B.
went up at 6 Mrs. Wals——
& I had a good deal of conver-
sation
abt. Mrs. Delany & Mrs
& Miʃs Port at ½ past 6 we
came into ye. drawing room
settled ye. Prints in ye. Porte
Folio &c. had tea I made
it for Mrs. W—— -- talk'd of Miʃs



Black
. Mrs: W. disapproved of
her having alter'd her stile of
living &c &c. Lord Exeter
came in -- talk'd of the
Great Concert of Musick wch.
is to be in honor of Handel
of on ye. 21st. April -- said the
King
& Queen & family were
to honor it with their presence
-- both in ye. Morning & Eveg.
in ye. Morng. it is to be at
Westminster Abbey in ye.
Evening at ye. Pantheon.
Lady Bute & her Daughter
Lady Louisa Stewart came
in -- I had Mrs. Walsinghams
Coach -- at ½ past 8. went
to Mr. Culling Smiths --
met there Mr Mrs Baker
Lady Wake -- we sat wth. Miʃs



Smith
-- in ye. next room
was a Whist Party. Lord &
Lady Dartrey. Mr. Grove. Mr.
Smith
-- at 10 Lady Wake
brought me home. Miʃs
C——
out I sat below till
she came home -- went to
bed ¼ before 12.

12th. Febry. 1784 -- wrote a number
of answers to Notes. dreʃs'd for
ye. day. Mr. Dewes came & sat
½ an hour -- told me how
much he had been pleased
wth. seeing my Uncle Wm..'s fine
antique Vase &c. Mr. Stanhope
came I had Wm. Benn with me
Mr. S—— gave him some advice
abt. applying to Mr. Burrel
abt. his change of place in
ye. excise office. Mr. S——
staid till 2 talking over
old stories -- My Uncle



Frederick
came & he went
away. My Uncle talk'd
over poor Coll. Hamiltons
melancholy situation -- how
ill he had been treated by
his family &c &c promised
to go for me to Mr. Wiggins
for to settle abt. rent of
my Mothers House &c I gave
him Mr. W. letter. he left
me at 3 o'Clock Miʃs Clarke
then came & sat ¾ of an
hour with me. at ½ past
4 Sr. Wm. Hamilton came for
me -- we went together to
Portland Place -- to dinner
our Company consisted of
Lord & Lady Stormont. 2 of
Ldy. Stormonts Brothers -- Lord
Cathcart
& Coll. Cathcart.
Mr. Graham her Brother in



Law -- Coll. Greville. Mr.
Nicolson
Mr. Murrays tutor
After dinner ye. 3 little
Boys
came -- staid till we
went to Coffee -- wch. we had
in Lord Stormonts Library
where we sat till 8 o'Clock.
this was a great favor &
only allowed of as we were
a family party -- abt. 8.
all ye. Men went away
except Col. Greville &
he went up to ye. drawing
room wth. Lady S & me --
we left Lord S—— below --
I gave my Uncle Wm. a paper
to give Mr. Burrel in favor
of Wm. Benn.    Lady S——
read to C: G. & me some of



her Eldest Boys letters --
wch. were uncommonly
clever for his age -- told us that
she was at Carlleton House
ye. Night before -- that ye.
Prince of Wales
did ye.
Honors very well & yt.
there was a very proper
set of People of fashion
aʃsembled -- ye house is
finely furnished -- she
staid supper & got away
abt. 3 in ye. Morng. ye.
1st. part of ye. Eveg was a
Card aʃsembly -- &c &c
Lord Stormont came to us
abt. 10 -- we had our usual
supper -- only Wine & Water
Cakes &c no cloth laid --
Lord S & I had a good



deal of Conversation -- we
talk'd of Abbé Grant who
is now in England -- a Man
of much Esteem'd -- a great
friend of ye. late Pope
Clement Ganganelli
-- if
he had lived Abbé Grant
was to have made a Cardinal
-- Ld. S—— told me that Abbe
Grant
was in ye. wrong
to maintain ye. letters wch.
were published for ye. Pope
were genuine -- as they
certainly were not --



[30]



[31]



[32]



[33]



[34]



1
12th Feb 1784
                                                         1st
Gaganelli (Lord Stormont
said) had never read many
of ye. french Authors quoted
in that book -- that many
of ye. letters were genuine
he made no doubt for yt.
it was a common trick of Authors
to procure some that were
so to paʃs of ye. rest upon
ye. World -- another certain
proof against these letters
being genuine was that
many persons are men-
tion'd
as being in Italy
when to his knowledge
they were not there at ye.
time mentiond &c &c --



I had Lord S——ts Chariot
& Servt. to bring me home
at 11. sat with Miʃs Clarke
sometime -- went to bed at
12. found a letter &c from my Dr.
Friend Miʃs Litchflield

Friday 13th. Febry. 1784 dreʃs'd for
ye. day -- notes in ------ toprofusion to
answer. excuse from my
Uncle Wm. for not going with
me & Lady Stormont -- to see some
Prints wch. were on Sale[35] -- Ldy
S——
Sent he had forgot he was
engaged to ye. British Museum
&c. Ldy. S: also sent me word
as he did not go we wd. put it
of. I employ'd myself in pasting
ye. Prints on ye Medley Screens
wch. I made last spring as they
were many of them loose -- Lord
Napier
came at ½ past 1 o'Clock
& staid above an hour -- talk'd
chiefly of his affairs -- I begun
to make an Air Balloon bag



I had promised Mrs. Glover one
for to hold her Counters. so I
resolved to make it in a
shape to mark ye. year.[36]
Miʃs Clarke came to me for
an hour -- begun another old
Play -- but it was so obsolete we
could not comprehend it. had
Mr. Veseys Coach at 4 Mrs. Carter
& I went to Mrs. Delanys to
dinner. found Dear excellent
Mrs. D. charming well. Mr.
Dewes
her Nephew dined with
us -- Mrs. D. left us for ½ an
hour after dinner to take her
Siesta -- then sent for us to
Coffee -- Mr. Dewes read us a
Clever Dialogue wch. has been
printed in ye. Papers in Verse
ye. political Characters of Lord North &
Mr. Fox & Burke -- at 7 ye.
Ducheʃs Dowager of Portland came
ye. conversation clever & en



tertaining
-- the Ducheʃs's
Daughter Lady Stamford &
her eldest daughter Lady
Harriet Grey
came in for
an hour -- I sat next Lady
—— Grey
& had some conver-
sation
wth. her -- she appears
very good humord & perfectly
civil -- no airs of self con-
sequence
-- after they went
ye Ducheʃs & Mrs. Delany
entertain'd us wth. anecdotes
of past times. Mrs. Carter
& I came home in ye. Dʃs.'s
Coach at ¼ before ten. I set
Mrs. Carter down we talk'd
of ye. agreeableneʃs & excellence
of ye. two friends Mrs. D &
ye. Dʃs. -- found Miʃs C was
out -- I work'd at my bag -- had



my Old Servant Wm. Benn
in -- & told him I had given
his request to my Uncle
Wm.
to give Mr. Burrel &c &c
Miʃs C—— came home at 11 we
sat talking till near 12
then went to bed --

Saturday 14th. Febry. 1784
had my Breakfast then dreʃs'd
work'd hard at the Bag & made
a Box for to hold ye. Fish &
Counters -- Lady Stormont call'd
at 12 to take me out but I
wd. not go as I expected Miʃs
A M Clarke
home from ye.
Country -- she came saw her
several times during ye. course
of ye. Morng. -- she brought a
Miʃs Parker to my room who
came wth. her from Eaton she
was going to Black Land School[37]



She seems an unaffected pleasing
Girl abt. 15 & rather handsome
-- her Father &c live in Cheshire
I gain'd from her some inform-
ation
of the Dickenson family
it was 3 years since she had
seen them but she told me that
Mr. D: Jun: was not then married
& yt. ye. Miʃs D. appear'd very
agreeable. I own I felt a great
satisfaction in hearing of the
welfare of People wth. whom
I might have been so nearly
cottnected. Mr. Wake came &
sat alone with me from ½ past
2 till near 4. he told me an
anecdote wch. gave me an
opportunity of hearing his
sentiments & giving mine
on ye. subject of Suicide
-- he spoke like a very young



Man -- at the same time
his principles are so good
that I flatter myself these
& his understanding will
ever prevent his paʃsions
from hurrying him to
rash & unpardonable.
crimes, is it not extroadinary
that ye. most unnatural of
actions and ye. most unpar-
donable
of crimes against
our Creator shou'd appear
for an instant eligible to
the Mind of a thinking being?
much leʃs can a well instruc-
ted
& benevolent mind.
wth. any color of
reason argue in favor of
Suicide -- we had also some
discourse on taste wch. for the



for ye. disinclination he seem'd
to have of being convinced was
neceʃsary to have I drop'd
till another opportunity.
I din'd at home wth. ye. 2 Miʃs
Clarkes
-- conversed & finish'd my
Bag. Mrs. Jackson came in at
tea time she & A Maria talk'd
over their Eaton friends &c
Mr. Vesey came in at ½ past
8. Mrs. Jackson left us at 10 &
Mr. V. soon after -- we could have
spared his Company -- I wrote
to my friend Miʃs Litchfield
& sent my last weeks diary.
we went to our rooms ½ past
11

Sunday 15th. Febry. 1784
Spent all ye. Morning alone. at
4 Mrs. Walsinghams Coach came
for me to dine there -- she was not



ready as company had prevented
her dreʃsing. I was sometime
alone but was well amused
in looking at ye. pictures ye.
whole room being hung with
Paintings done by herself
& daughter -- Miʃs Boyle
then came to me -- I read to
her some miʃselaneous peices
of Poetry -- The Mouses Petition
by Mrs: Barbauld[38] &c.
Mrs. W. came to us before
5. we went down to dinner
Miʃs Boyle left us before
we went out of ye. dining
room to practise her Musick
Mrs. W. & I talk'd of Lady
Dowg. Spencer
. Mrs. W. said
all her inconsistencies --
her Virtues & V were



owing as Pope describes
it, to ye. Lust of Praise
why else should she all
her life have paid court
to vicious as well as
Virtuous characters. she
told me many anecdotes of
Ldy. S. -- her unsteadineʃs, her
insincerity -- she has been
known to sit up all night
at ye. gaming table -- change
her dreʃs & go to early prayers
at St. James's Chapel &c &c
-- Ah why are we so prone
to blame ye. errors of others? -- let
him says our saviour, “who is
without blemish cast ye. 1st-
Stone.”
we came up at ½
past 6 to tea -- I made it
Mrs. W—— gave me her



opinion on dreʃs -- I do not
think however I shall ever
pay that attention to it
she thinks neceʃsary -- I
am perfectly content to
be so dreʃs'd as not to appear
particular -- I wd. never be
vulgarly dreʃs'd or be at
ye. height of ye. fashion &
I wd. always be rather plain
ly
adorned than decorated. Mrs. W.
read some of Mason's Poetry
till near 8. we then went
in Chairs to Lord Exeters in
Grosvenor Street to a Concert
-- Mrs. W: took me as her Guest
She as a Subscriber has a
right to take 5. There are 5
Subscribers who support this
Concert -- this was ye. 1st. night



the subscribers are. Lord
Exeter
. Sr: Watkin Wm's.. Wynne.
Lord Paget. Mrs. Walsingham
-- I forget ye. 5th. there are to be
10 Concerts -- each to be at a
Sub: house. the company I
met were. Sr. G. Howard Ld &
Lady Amherst. Genl. Mordant
Ld. & Lady Brudenal Lord &
Ladyord Paget. Mr. Fortesque
Lord Lewisham Lady Cornwall Lady Clifford
her daughter Miʃs Southwell
Sr W: W: Wynne my Uncle
Wm:
Lord Sandwich &c &c it was an
agreeable Concert -- all old
Musick -- Cramer play'd
ye. 1st. Violin -- Harrison --
& Miʃs Harewood sung. I
like Harrisons singing -- he
has a fine voice -- I do not
think ye. same of Miʃs Harewood



-- Sr. W: W: W: play'd in two or
three of ye. pieces on ye.
Violincello -- I had a good
deal of conversation between
ye. Acts wth. my Uncle who
was not well & look'd very
ill. I likewise talk'd to
Gell Mordant Howard. Lady
Amherst
. Mrs: Hinchliffe. Lord
Exeter
-- came home in a
Chair ½ past 11. Miʃs C.
gone to bed A M came home
soon after me we chatted ½
an hour & then went to
bed


Monday 16th. Febry- 1784 -- at ten oClock
Mr.. Dewes came to Breakfast with
me -- he staid till past 11 or
rather near 12 -- Mrs. Carter was to
have come but ye. streets being so
slippery from ye. Snow & frost she
did not. Mr. Dewes is a sensible



& very worthy Man -- the life
he leads is so quiet & retired
that it gives him a timid
air in Company -- & he does
not appear to that advantage
he might have done had he
mix'd more in a general society -- he
only paʃses 6 weeks in ye.
year in London -- he is a
Man of letters & is fond of reading &
Musick
& is himself a
performer on ye: harpsicord.
-- he is abt. forty 2 Years of age
a little Man -- look's aged
wth. Ill healh -- & certainly has
no external advantages of
Person or manner -- yet he
has a sensible countenance
& though he has a constrain'd
air -- he does not look vul-
gar
-- & is well bred &
attentive. a reasonable



Woman might paʃs her life
happily with this Man &
a women of principle wd.
if she had no other attach-
ment
, rejoice to be united
with one who was so truly
estimable as I believe
Mr. Dewes to be. he was
so obliging to go to Willertons
ye. toymans[39] for me to change
ye. Key of my new Watch yt. ye.
Dʃs. of P. gave me as it did
not fit -- he also got an ouside
Chrystal Case to preserve it --
he return'd for a few moments
to tell me & brought back my
Watch & a Case -- I am in his
debt for it & shall insist on
paying him -- for he ran out
of ye room & wd. not tell me
what it Cost &c. Lady Wake



came & sat an hour & ½ with
me -- she did not look well &
had a Cold -- we talkd of my
affair with Mr. Dickenson
& she read his fathers letter
to me -- she agree'd wth. me in
thinking yt. if his character
Seewas as unexceptionable as
I esteem'd it to be & if his &
my circumstances would
have been sufficient I might
have been happy in marrying
him -- but all this is at
an end & has been upwards
of 3 years. Lady Wake had not
left me for long before her Woman
Mrs. Beete came -- She wish'd
me to aʃsist her with my advice
She has lived ten years with
my friend & is very sincerely
attach'd to her. -- but having
a desire to settle herself in
ye. World, as she has near 500.L &
& go into Busineʃs. She wanted me



to speak to Lady Wake as
she could not bring herself
to ye. resolution of doing so.
I promised all she requested
for I have a great kindneʃs
for her -- she having behaved
towards Lady W. & in her
family in a very proper
manner -- & is poʃseʃsed of
many most valuable qualities.
She is ye. daughter of a Clergy-
man
[40] who dying left his
family in distreʃs'd cir---cumstances
I heard of & recommended her
to Lady W. wth. whom she has
continued ever since & a
real treasure she has been to
her -- & has been treated wth.
ye. kindneʃs of parental affection
by Lady W——. when she left
me I dreʃs'd. my Uncle
Frederick
sent his Coach before
4 -- I call'd & took up Lord
Napier
& Miʃs Glover & we
went to dine at my Uncles



-- there were no other Guests
-- Mrs. Hamilton told me she
had been disappointed of
my two Cousins Coll. Greville
& Cathcart -- they both had Colds
-- there came to tea some Young
People from Mrs. Beavers
with her 2 Daughters -- a Miʃs
Preton
. 2 2 Miʃs Booths
My Uncle Wm. also came --
he was better. & a Mr.
Burgeʃs
[41] this Mr. B. has
some genius for Musick he
play'd & sung some of his own
compositions -- seem'd very
well satisfied with himself
Miʃs Hamilton my Cousin
Play'd & sung 2 Italian Songs
she has a very just ear &
very fine voice & I think
wth. ye. great advantage she
has of ye. very best Masters
both for playing & singing



she will be a capital
preformer -- I have better
authority than my own
judgement for Sr. Wm. Hamilton
& my Uncle Frederick who
have both great taste think
ye. same -- Miʃs Hamilton
is 15 -- elegant in her person
& almost pretty -- has good
abilities & a good heart
& looks like a girl of
fashion. I am much
interested abt. her -- she is,
& deservedly, ye. darling of
her Father & Mother. I had
my Uncle F:'s Coach home
set Miʃs Glover down & took
up Miʃs A M Clarke who was
at Mr. Glovers -- Lord Napier
came home with us -- we found
Miʃs C. at home -- we had supper
& he staid chatting till ½ past
12 -- we then went to bed.




Tuesday 17th Febry. 1784
-- at 11 Mrs. Sorrel dreʃser
to ye. Younger Princeʃs's[42]
came to me -- told me of
her intended Marriage of
wch. she had made ye. confi-
dant
some time ago -- thankd
me for my advice &c &c
I promised to recommend custom to
her future who is a Mr. Rowe
Linnen Draper in ye.
Strand. I made her a
trifling present it was not in my power to offer a better -- 2 Enamel'd
China Mugs as a mark
of goodwill &c &c &c
she was as much pleased
as if they had been Gold.
I then had my Hair dreʃs'd
Mr. Wake came saw him only
for a Moment as I sent him
away expecting Mrs. Hamilton
my Uncle F. wife. he
came to beg I would dine
at Sr. Wm.s & to invite the



2 Miʃs Clarkes also --
I then finish'd dreʃsing &
Mrs. Hamilton came &
sat ½ an hour -- talk'd
over ye. Md. I had re-
commended
&c &c.
When she went Miʃs A M
Clarke
came for ½ an hour
I had Wm. Benn & he
promised to carry tickets
or rather make Visits for
me in ye. Eveg. at 4 ye. 2
Miʃs Cs
& I had Sr. Wm. Wakes
Coach went to Sr. Wm..s- only
ye. family. after dinner
Lady Wake was taken ill. I
went up wth. her to her Bed
Room she undreʃsed & took an
Emetick I sat with her till 7
oClock -- her 2 Girls stay'd wth.
Miʃs Clarkes -- Lady W. was
much better before I left
her. I took an opportunity of



telling her Mrs. Beetes intention
of leaving her -- she said it
was what she expected -- that she
should regret parting with her
but that as she wish'd her too well
not to be glad she was now
likely to be well established --
before I left ye. House I took
an opportunity of telling Mrs.
B.
I had broke ye. ice for
her &c &c Mrs. Iremongers
Coach came for me at 7 --
I made Ldy. W. apology to
Miʃs C's -- Mr. W. attended
me to ye. Coach & promised
to write a Note to inform
me how his Mother was in
ye. Eveg. I greatly approved
of his behaviour to day to
her it was tender & affecti
onate
-- Miʃs W is still very
poorly. I took Miʃs A M
Clarke
away with me.



& set her down at her
Sisters Mrs. Jackson's. Miʃs
C——
went home in a Chair --
I went on to Mrs. Iremongers
Mrs. Carter soon came to
us & a very agreeable
afternoon I spent. there
were only us three. Mrs.
I——
is one of ye. most
pleasing women in person
& manners I know -- she
is 52 Years of age but
still poʃseʃses beauties. She
has also a polish'd under-
standing
& is perfectly
feminine -- in ye. Course
of Conversation Mrs. Carter
told us two Anecdotes
wch. as they are singular
& authentic I will
relate.



The late Lord Bath told Mrs..
Carter
-- that when the famous
Sr. Walter Rawleigh was a
Young man he was for some
time in Spain -- one day
as he was walking in ye. Streets
a Woman accosted him &
ask'd him if he would
suffer himself to be con-
ducted
by her to a Lady
who having admired his
Person -- (for Sr. W. R: was
a remarkable Handsome
& elegant Man -- of very
attractive addreʃs &
Manners) -- wish'd to be-
come
acquainted with him
Sr. W. R. was too gallant
not to accept ye. invitation
so at an hour fix'd he was
secretly conducted by
ye. Duenna blindfolded
through intricate Paʃsages



into a Large House --
when his eyes were
uncover'd he found
himself in a room
very superbly furnished
& was recd. by a beautiful
Woman whom he found
to be ye. Miʃtreʃs of ye.
House & ye. one who had
sent him ye. flattering
invitation -- they were
soon well acquainted &
he remain'd wth. her 3 or
4 days -- the day that
was fix'd for his departure
the Lady said she must
introduce him to her
Husband -- this Sr. W. R.
did not much relish
but was obliged to submit
to -- he was shewn into
an apartment & presented



to an Old Gentleman
who thank'd him for
having complied with his
Wife's request -- inform'd
him that his next Heir
having disobliged him
he was anxious to have
an Heir to his Estate &
that his Wife had acted
with his desire & yt. he
highly approved of ye
choice she had made --
desired Sr. W. R. wd. not
make enquiries who
they were -- & dismiʃs'd
him politely giving
him a fine present.
Every one know that
when Sr. W: R. was
barbarously sacrificed
to ye. Spaniards -- ye. Span
ish
Ambaʃsador then in[43]

(hover over blue text or annotations for clarification;
red text is normalised and/or unformatted in other panel)


Notes


 1. The loose pages inserted at the beginning of the diary have in this transcription been restored to their dated order. The order of images therefore differs from that in the University of Manchester LUNA catalogue.
 2. January 18 was Queen Charlotte's official birthday.
 3. A small section of the page has been cut away here but it is unclear whether any text has been removed on this side of the sheet.
 4. The Archibishop's third daughter Alicia Henrietta would be, at most, 13 years old at this point, with her two older sisters not yet married, so it's unlikely that this is who Hamilton means. It also would be unusual for Hamilton not to observe the usual naming convention of 'Miss Alicia Markham'. 'Miss Markham' is much more likely to be the Bishop Markham's eldest daughter, and his fourth (not third) child, Henrietta Sarah, who was 19 or 20 years old.
 5. A diagonal section of the page has been cut away. It is not clear whether any text has been lost.
 6. This addition is in pencil.
 7. John Gay, 'The Fan: A Poem' (1713).
 8. See the letter from Court Dewes to Mary Hamilton in LWL Mss Vol. 75(52).
 9. This entry has been partially drafted in pencil before being over-written later in ink. There are no visible differences in the text; however, the fair copy is more neatly written thus the two become out of sync on the page towards the end of the entry.
 10. Remains of a wax seal, suggesting this section of the journal may have been sent to a correspondent or written on a reused cover.
 11. Remains of a seal, in red wax.
 12. Remains of a seal in red wax in the bottom-left corner.
 13. Lady Holderness's daughter, Amelia Osborne née Darcy, had eloped in 1778 with Captain John Byron, whom she married following a divorce from her husband Lord Camarthen in 1779. Some accounts give her date of death as 27 January 1784, but Hamilton's comment here suggests she died on Monday 26. Earlier in her journal (8 December 1783) Hamilton notes that Lady Conyers is dying, and that she is 'a sincere penitent' (HAM/2/6).
 14. Remains of a seal, in red wax.
 15. Remains of a seal, in red wax.
 16. The address is written upside down at the bottom of the page.
 17. ‘Agreeable qualities, circumstances, etc.’ (OED s.v. agrément n. 1. Accessed 12-07-2021).
 18. This continues vertically along the right margin, indicated by two corresponding crosses. The sentence has been written out of order as Hamilton adds detail to a small space. The original reads: 'at ½ past 2 *she did not come in to take an airing I excused myself'. In this transcription, the logical reading order has been restored.
 19. Mary's use of the phrase 'parti quarré' ('a party of four', usually spelled 'parti carrée') is odd, as she here describes a party of five (including herself).
 20. Edward Jerningham, 'The Rise and Progress of the Scandinavian Poetry'.
 21. Missing closing bracket seems to fit here.
 22. Clara Reeve (1783), The Two Mentors: A Modern Story.
 23. This page is blank, with an annotation in minor hand.
 24. Samuel Hoole (1783) ‘Aurelia. A Poem’.
 25. Alexander Pope (1712) ‘The Rape of the Lock’.
 26. Miss Copley was reported to have died in Lord Apsley's arms (see Neville Thompson [Pen and Sword: 1999], Earl Bathurst and the British Empire, p.14). He eventually married in 1789.
 27. Torquato Tasso trans. John Hoole (1763), Jerusalem Delivered.
 28. Unidentified.
 29. That is, her 17th birthday.
 30. This page is blank.
 31. This page is blank.
 32. This page is blank.
 33. This page is blank.
 34. This page is blank.
 35. See the letter from Sir William Hamilton to Mary Hamilton in HAM/1/4/4/12.
 36. See HAM/1/13/18 in which Eleanor Glover thanks Hamilton for the bag.
 37. Probably Blacklands House, a French boarding school in Chelsea, attended by the daughters of Sir Robert Walpole. See ‘Social history: Education, private schools’, in A History of the County of Middlesex, Vol. 12 Chelsea, (ed. Patricia E C Croot, London, 2004), pp.190-195. British History Online (accessed 30-07-2021).
 38. Anna Letitia Barbauld (1773), 'The Mouse's Petition' in Poems.
 39. Willerton and Roberts, turner and toyman, at the corner of Conduit Street in Old Bond Street, London. See British History Online.
 40. The Reverend George Beet was the Vicar of Duston in Northamptonshire until his death in 1768.
 41. This is possibly Sir James Bland Burgess, though omission of his knighthood is troubling.
 42. Probably Mary and Sophia (but probably not yet Amelia, who was born in 1783).
 43. This anecdote is continued in HAM/2/8.

Normalised Text



Saturday 17th: January 1784 -- dressed
for all day -- William Benn gave me
an account of the changes &c in
the Queens House. Dowager Lady &
Miss Wilhelmina King for an hour. Mr
Wake came & stayed after them
he sat with me from ½ past 2
till near 4. had much converse
his opinion of my character &c
I dined at home with Miss Clarke's after
dinner we were together till
½ past 6 Anna Maria wrote whilst
I dictated a letter to Monsieur D'agincour
they went to Lady Abdys -- the Veseys
carried them. I wrote till 8.



Mrs. Boscowan came for me
to take me to Mrs. Pepys -- she
could go herself as Lady
Frederick died to day -- her late
Husbands Sister. we called for
Sir Lucas Pepys & Lady Rothes
who were going to Mrs Pepys
met there Dr. Warton -- his
Brother Mr. Thomas Warton Miss
Burney &c &c &c. a pleasant
Evening Mr. & Mrs. Vesey brought
me home. we set Dr Warton down



at his Lodgings -- Mr Vesey
got out & Mrs. Vesey & I sat sometime
waiting for him -- I went home
with them they sent for Miss Clarke's
only Isabella came we stayed till past
12 -- came home Anna Maria gone to bed.

Sunday 18th. had after Church
Mrs- Leland Mr. Culling Smith &
Miss Smith -- |Lady Wake for
a few Minutes|
Mrs. Glover for a long time. I wrote parts
of letters to Monsieur D'Agincourt
& Miss Hannah More. Anna Maria came
home & sat with me till dinner
time after dinner I wrote a long
account of my fly to Miss Hannah More
& drew its cage. Anna Maria went to
Mr Glovers -- I stayed below with
Bell till 8 when Mr. Vesey called
for us in his Coach we stopped
at the Glovers took up Anna Maria &
left Mr. Vesey we went to
Mr. Jacksons -- Mr. Vesey joined
us & we supped & came home
with Mr Vesey at 11 o'Clock



Monday 19th. January1784
dressed in a Habit it was so
cold for all day at ½ past 12
had the Duchess of Portlands Coach
set Anna Maria down at Mrs. Jacksons
& went on to Lady Caroline Peacheys
where I left a note did not
get out -- went to the Duchess.'s stayed
with her from 1 till near 4 --
we arranged & clean a China
Cabinet Mrs Dyghton her
Woman helped a little -- had
the Coach at 4 went to Mr. Glovers
where I dined & spent a tranquil
day not envying the fine
folks at the Birth day but
enjoying my liberty. Mrs. & Miss
Glover were out. there was only
dear Mr. Glover, & Mrs. Lenton
-- after dinner I read to Mr. Glover
as his eyes were bad. I read from
¼ before 6 till past 10 o'Clock
a Manuscript -- the life of
Epaminondas -- by a Mr. Oxendon
who has been dead some years
an old friend of Mr. Glover I did
not quite finish it. Mrs. Glover & Miss
Glover came home at ¼ before 11 I



came home in their Coach
sat a little with Bell & Anna &
then went to bed.

Tuesday 20 January 1784.
Mrs. Carter & Doctor Wharton to
Breakfast at 10 o'Clock. we
Breakfasted in the Parlour with Miss Clarke's.
Doctor Warton stayed till 12 sensible &
agreeable converse -- Dr. Warton
came up in my rooms &
was pleased with them -- said
many handsome things of my
leaving court &c. he went
& Mrs.. Carter sat & worked on till
1 o'Clock. My Uncle Frederick
& his son came & sat ½ an
hour with us -- a frost & snow
as yesterday. Mrs- Carter went
about the same time with my Uncle
Little Katherine Jackson came
at 11 & stayed on till near 4 was
with me alone above 2 hours & was
vey engaging. I dressed when Mrs.
Carter was gone. at 3 Mr. Wake
came & sat ½ an hour with me
told me he feared from something Lady Wake
said he was troublesome in coming



so often & thought it might be
troublesome to me &c
he stayed till ½ past 3 --
Maria Maria took little Katherine
home -- I had Lady Wakes
Coach at 4. went to Mrs.
Newtons to dinner met there
Dr & Mrs. Parker. Mr & Mrs.
Dicey (Lady Bathursts Sister)
Mrs.. Parker is Madame Weldrens
Sister. & Sir John Elliot -- the Physician.
had Lady Wake Coach came home
before they left the dining room
to receive my Company
had a Working Party. Lady
Wake -- Lady Caroline Peachey -- Miss
Wilhelmina King. Mrs. Leland. Lady Frances
Harpur. -- they left me about
10 o'Clock -- Miss Clarke's were out
at Mr. Glovers -- I had William Benn up
to know which Visits he had made
for me. I wrote till Miss Clarke's
came home at 11. they stayed ¼ of
an hour with me -- we went to Bed
I read till 1 in the Morning Mrs Delanys
letters. Anna Maria & I talked sometime



were in Bed though in differing
rooms &c. Miss Markham the ArchBishop
of York 3d. Daughter at Mrs Newton's

21st January 1784 had the
Duchess Dowager of Portlands Coach
at ½ past 11 to make Visits
Anna Maria went with me. went to
Mrs. Delany & introduced her
went to Mrs. Hoare sat ½ an
hour (Anna Maria stayed in the Coach)
Called at Mrs. Turton she was out
sent to enquire after the Adam
family. went to Mrs. Chapone
sat ¼ of an hour she invited
Anna Maria up. called on Mrs. Gladdel
she was out. on Mrs. & Miss
Majendie they were out --
On Lady Wallingford -- sat ¼
of an hour -- Anna Maria stayed in the
Coach. to Mrs. Revely she was
at home we both went in
for ¼ of an hour. -- Mrs.
Gambier -- I went in stayed
¼ of an hour -- Mrs. Cole
who was out -- came home
at 3. Lady Stormont &
Lady Courtown & Mrs. Hamilton



had called when I was out.
Anna Maria sat with me till Dinner time
I dined at home -- after dinner
I Anna Maria played on the harpsichord
I wrote. saw Mr Johnston as
I passed this Morning my Uncle William Called when I was out -- at 6
o'Clock Anna Maria & I went to Mr. Glovers
She went on to Mrs. Jackson -- I
sat with Mr. Glover till past 8 o'Clock
Mrs. Glover went out. Miss Glover &
Mrs. Lenton were at home I read
some more of the life of Epaminondas
to Mr. Glover Anna Maria came for
me -- she came in for a few Minutes --
Mr.. Glovers Eyes were better --
when we came home found Mr.
Vesey with Bell -- we invited him
to Supper as Mrs. was out -- He
went home to write letters & returned
again -- I went up to the Drawing Room
Miss Planta came at 9 & we sat
together till past 10 -- she told me that
the Prince of Wales often spoke of me &c &c
we went down to supper to Miss
Clarke's & Mr. Vesey she went away at
11 -- Mr. Vesey ½ after.



we sat up till near 1 o'Clock
I working & Anna Maria read to us
Gays poem of the Fan which
we liked extremely.
I read in my room till near 2 Mrs. Delany letters.

22d. January 1784 Thursday
The Duchess Dowager of Portland Coach at
½ past 12 -- went to Mrs. Delany
found her not quite so well as
I wished -- she made me read Mr
Dewes's answer to the letter I wrote
for her. I stayed only ¼ of an
hour. called at Miss Gunnings
did not go in to enquire if she
came to me this Evening -- sent to
enquire after Miss Tryon --
went to the Duchess Dowager of Portland
she sent for me into her Breakfast
Room, There we stayed ¼ of an hour
I drank a dish of Coffee, -- read her
Mr Dewes letter -- we then went into
the Dressing room I arranged a Cabinet
of China & Mrs Dighton her Woman
helped in Dusting it Lady Weymouth
came whilst we were busy she stayed
½ an hour I stayed till near 5 o'Clock



came home in the Duchess Coach, dined
at home with Miss Clarkes, sat with
them till past 9 o'Clock -- we read --
wrote -- Anna Maria played on the harpsichord
&c. I expected Miss Gunning
but she did not come. I went to
the Drawing room wrote a letter to Madame Busche
sent for Miss Anna Clarke to come up
to me to read her what I had written.
we went down at ½ past 10. had
our supper. had William Benn in
& gave him my two foreign letters
to put in the Post -- the other was to
Monsieur D'Agincourt. Anna Maria played me
a few tunes. we went to bed at
12 o'Clock. Lady Dartrey called when
I was out in the Morning

23d. January 1784 Friday went to Mrs.
Carter before 9 o'Clock to Breakfast
stayed with her till 12 o'Clock -- we worked
& talked -- very interesting conversation
chiefly on religion -- viz faith &c she
walked home with me but did not
come in. I found Miss Clarkes were
gone out & walked through the Park to St.
James's place enquired at Sir Robert Gunnings
if Miss Gunning was there & as she
was not went on to St. James's sat
with her ½ an hour. read her my
Answer to Madame Busches letter
I then went through the park to
Mrs. Delany. met Swardy & Mr.



Gunning spoke to them both -- sat
½ an hour with Dear Mrs Delany
found her pretty well -- thought
walked home
through the Park it was a fine
dry frosty day -- Miss Gregory
had called when I was out.
Mr. Wake came, I saw him but
did not let him stay above 10
Minutes as I was going to
dress -- at ¼ past 4 went to
Mr Veseys to dinner Miss Hannah
More & Mr. Cambridge dined
there -- Miss Hannah More & I were
equally happy in seeing each
other -- she came to Town on
purpose to pay this visit to
Mrs. Vesey. She goes to Hampton
again tomorrow Morning Mr.
Cambridge tired me very much -- for
he never ceased talking -- we
left the dining room about 7 o'Clock
Miss More & I had a little
tête a tête in inner drawing
room -- Mrs. Carter came to us
there &c. the Company that came
in the Evening were --



Mr Walpole Dr Warton Mrs Carter
Lady Herries Dr & Miss Burney
My Uncle Sir William Hamilton
Sir Robert & 2 Miss Gunnings Sr.
Joshua Reynolds & his niece
Miss Palmer -- I sat near
Dr Warton Mr Walpole my Uncle
Miss More -- a very pleasant
Evening. Sir Joshua Reynolds Dr Warton
my Uncle & I stayed supper
heard the Gentlemen give their
opinion of former Beauties
the Gunnings &c &c some
Curious anecdotes relating to
the Gunnings. their escape &c &c
I left them & came home at
½ past 12 o'Clock. Miss Clarkes
were gone to bed. but Anna Maria
& I had a Conversation as
usual -- I read several of
Mrs. Delany's letters before I
went to rest.

Saturday 24th. January 1784. My Uncle
William sent me a letter & the Jupiters Head.
his servant -- was to deliver it into my
hands -- I had him up -- it was the faithful
      Swift



Mrs. & Miss Glover came -- I saw them for
a few Minutes only -- as their Visit was
to Miss Clarkes -- Little Mary Jackson came
& was with me alone ½ an hour -- at ½
past 12 had the Duchess's Coach. went to Lady
Wakes left a Message that I would dine there.
went to Mrs. Delany found her pretty well
saw her great Niece Miss Port who came
to Town yesterday with her Uncle Mr Dewes
I thought her much grown. Mrs. Delany sent her
out of the room -- & took the opportunity of
showing her the Jupiters head. At 1 o'Clock I
went to the Duchess Dowager of Portland. she had me
in the Breakfast room & made me drink
coffee. I gave her the Jupiters head & showed
her my Uncles letter -- we then went
to the Dining room & arranged & clean
out a Cabinet of China -- Mrs Dighton
her woman left to dust the shelves -- we
then took out all the fine Japan out of
a Cabinet filled with it. My Uncle
William came at 3 -- the Duchess & him settled
part of the Business -- she showed him
some very curious & rare & beautiful
pieces of Japan some Medals &c &c
he stayed till past 4. I stayed near ½ after
had the Duchess Coach went to Sir William Wakes
where I dined. only the family -- after
dinner Miss Wakes & Richard came
into the room. left the dining room about
½ past 6 -- William left the dining room soon
after dinner to finish his business soon
on my Account therefore he came up as
soon as Lady Wake & I did -- I drank
tea & stayed till 8 o'Clock Mr. Catton
at tea &c. went in the Coach



to Mr. Glovers. William went with me &
stayed a few minutes. Mr. Cust came
in & told Mr Glover the Politics of the
day -- Mrs- Glover Mrs Lenton & Mr. Cust
went to Cards. Mr. Glover Miss
Glover & I into the study. I read
till past 10 to Mr.. Glover in the life
of Epaminondas -- he left Miss
Glover & me to see if Supper was
ready. we looked over some pages of
the Manuscript of Jason & Miss
Glover read an Eclogue of the Manuscript
pastoral of Delia written some
years ago by Mr. Glover. he came
& called us away to supper. Mr.
Cust was gone I stayed till past 11
Miss Anna Maria Clarke called for me.
she had been to Mrs. Jacksons.
we found Isabella home alone -- we
soon went to our rooms -- I
wrote after I went to bed &c

Sunday 25th. 1784 January Mr. Dewes
called I did not see him I was
dressing -- Anna Maria came at ½ past
two & sat sometime with me --
I received a note from Mrs Walsingham
letting me know Miss Boyle
was ill & that I could not dine there



Mr. Wake came at 3 o'Clock
stayed till 4. Miss Clarke had people Mr & Mrs Hoare
to dinner I excused myself & had
dinner in my room. read & wrote
till near 8 o'Clock -- had Lady Wake's
Coach went to Mrs. Delany -- found her
pretty well. met there Lady Bute
Mr & Mrs. Cole Mr Dewes. Mr. Frederick
Montagu Mr & Mrs. Soame Jennings
Miss Port -- stayed till a little past 9
the Duchess had been at Mrs. Delanys but
was gone to the Queen. the chief
conversation was Politics which did
not much amuse me. came home
was tired & did not go to the Veseys
where I was invited -- sat with
Miss Clarkes till ½ past 11 -- Anna Maria
read a few letters of Rousseau Eloise went
to bed read a few of Mrs. Delany's
letters.

Monday 26th. dressed before 9 for
all day. wrote out Manuscripts till past
2: saw Miss Clarkes at different
times My Uncle Frederick & his
son came. Robert goes to school
tomorrow. Lady Julianna & Miss
Penn & Miss Baker came at 3



Monday 26th January 1784
I stayed till near 4. Lady Juliana said ------
of my coming to her in a friendly
way &c. Anna Maria came to me for
¼ of an hour -- went to Lord
Dartreys to dinner. met there
a Mr. Watts an American & Mr
Grove. after dinner Lady Dartrey
& I had much conversation relative
to Lady Wake & poor Mrs Quin Lord
Dartreys Sister who is dying at Bath.
Dear Lady Dartrey not well, a head ache
& Cold. little Julia & I played at
Battledore &c. Mr. Antrobus seemed
better. at 7 Mrs. Vesey called for
me we went to Mrs. Chapones met
there Sir Lucas Pepy's & his Lady
Lady Rothes. Mr. & Mrs. Pepys Mrs.
Carter. a merry -- pleasant -- sensible
Evening. Politics Mrs. Siddons &c
Mrs. Vesey Mrs. Carter & I came away
at 10 o'Clock. we set Mrs. Carter down
& then me. found Mrs. Glover &
My Uncle Frederick & Mrs. Hamilton
with Miss Clarkes -- they had had
other company these soon went
Miss Clarke's & I sat up till near 12



------up ½ an hour after them, wrote
------ journal -- found notes &c
------ letter from Miss Hannah More --
Miss Wilhelmina King had called upon me --

      Tuesday 27th. January 1784.
      Breakfasted with Anna Maria at
½ past 9 o'Clock -- then dressed in Bells
dressing room for the day. received an
invitation to dine & spend the day at Mrs.
Walsinghams as she was not well but was
engaged -- received & wrote a vast number of
Notes. Anna Maria sat with me a great part of
the Morning. read over Manuscripts &c
Bell paid me a little Visit. a little before
4 Lady Stormonts Coach & servants came
for me: Lord Stormont & Miss Murray
his Daughter. & Mr Nicholson Master
Murrays Tutor dined with us we dined in
Lord Stormonts Breakfast room. after dinner
Lady Stormont Miss Murray & I were sometime together
the 3 little boys came after dinner. Lord Stormon
came up & stayed tea & coffee. Miss Murray went
away at 9. Then Charles & Archibald
Cathcart came & Mr. Graham. & Lord Stormont
came up a ¼ of an hour before I came
away had Lady Stormont Coach at 11. came home
sat & wrote Miss Clarke's at the Veseys.
they came home at ¾ past 11 -- we went
to bed past 12





28th. January 1784 Wednesday
had my Breakfast upstairs dressed in my habit
Anna Maria came & sat with me whilst I was
dressing. at 12 o'Clock Miss Wilhelmina King came
for me to go my Uncle William to receive the Vase
I stopped & left a Message at Mrs Delanys
at my Uncles met Dowager Lady & Young
Lady King -- saw the Vase. my Uncle showed
me one of Mrs. Carter's letters -- about ¼ before
1 o'Clock we left him Dowager Lady & Miss King
brought me home did not get out. I sat
sometime with Miss Clarke's -- received a message
from Mrs. Iremonger -- to say she had been
confined with a Cold since she came to
Town or would have been to see me.
Mrs. & Miss Blosset came & sat ½ an
hour. told me strange stories of the King
& Queen. Mr. Fisher came after them
when he had been with me ¼ of an
hour Mr. Wake came. Mr. Fisher stayed
near a hour. carried a note for me
to Mrs. Delanys. William & I had just begun
a Conversation when Lady Wake came
to Miss Clarkes we went down she stayed
¼ of an hour -- she & her son went
away together. I stayed on with Miss Clarke's
till after dinner. Anna Maria went to Mrs. Jacksons
before 6. I went up to dress which I did in
a few Minutes -- put on my Gown
in the Parlour. Stayed ½ an hour with Bell



went to my Breakfast room & settled the
plan for a fan to draw for Miss
Gunning had the Duchess Dowager of Portlands
Coach at 7 -- took leave of Bell went
to Mrs. Delany -- Mrs. Astley desired me
to go into her room to see her Sister
who is to live with Mrs. Hamilton
I did & liked her appearance --
found Dr. Mrs. Delany & Miss Port
togther -- Mrs. Delany pretty well --
Lady Bute & the Duchess Dowager of Portland
soon came. they talked of Lady Holdernesse
her distress about Lady Conyers -- who
was released from her sufferings
last Monday -- she was a true penitent
after tea I made Miss Port go into
Mrs. Delany Bedchamber with me -- that the ladies
have an opportunity of talking
&c. we stayed there ½ an hour she
entertained me with an account of her
being at Matlock &c -- when we returned
to the Drawing room Lady Bute was gone -- I
stayed with the Duchess & Mrs. Delany till near
10. the Duchess told me of her visit to the
Queen's House. that she thought the King looked heated
& ill -- the Prince was there for some time
had the Duchess Coach home one of the Poor horses
fell down in Arlington Street -- he was not
hurt -- an intense frost. found Anna Maria
& Bell at home -- we had our Supper &
Anna Maria played on the harpsichord we went
to bed past 12.



29th. January 1784 Thursday -- dressed for the day
Anna Maria went out at 12. for the Day to Mrs. Harris's
Childs Christening -- I began to draw Miss
Gunnings fan. Mr. Vesey came for ½ an
hour. Mrs. Hamilton came at ½ past 1 o'Clock
to see Mrs.. Astley & her sister who is to
live with Mrs. Hamilton. they came & I left them
together. went in my Uncles Coach to Mrs. Jacksons
sat ½ an hour with both she & little Fanny
were pretty well again -- I found & left
Bell there -- when I returned home found
Mrs. Hamilton still talking with the Mrs. Astleys -- they
soon went. Mrs. Astley told me Mrs. Delany
was pretty well. Mrs. Hamilton stayed some time
told me of Miss Harris being settled as
a Perfumer &c. I wrote till -- 4 Bell
came home & came to me for a few Minutes
at ½ past 4 Lady Wake sent her Coach for
me dined there.. Mr.. Antrobus & Mr. Sly
dined there. I stayed till 8 o'Clock.
William & I quarrell'd. he did not behave well
Went to Mr. Glovers -- in the Coach William went
with me & made his excuses &c left
me there. found Mr & Mrs. Glover Mrs. Lenton &
Miss Glover Lady Wake came at ½ past 8.
Miss Glover read a continuation of
Jason to her -- she heard the first part
the Evening before. Anna Maria called for me a
little before 10 -- she came in for a Minute
left Lady Wake there. as we came home
one of the Poor horses fell down --
Bell went to the Veseys when we
came home. Anna Maria read till 11 in
Rousseau Eloise. She went to bed I ------ till ------



Bell came home. went to bed at 12.
William Benn had been for me to the Queen's House
to enquire after Miss Goldsworthy who is
again ill & after Mrs. Schellenberg. &c



Miss Hamilton --



Friday 30th. January 1784
Had Breakfast sent up to my room
dressed in my riding Habit. Miss
Anna Maria Clarke came to me whilst my
hair was dressing & sat sometime --
at 12 o'Clock -- went over the way
to the Veseys -- saw Mr & Mrs. Vesey
& Mrs. Handcock -- then went through
the Green Park to Mrs. Delany -- a
very cold sharp frost which almost
petrified me. found Dear Mrs.
Delany very well. her Nephew
Mr. Dewes, & her great Niece
Miss Port, were with her. I stayed
about 20 Minutes. came back
through the Green Park & walked
on to Mrs. Jackson in old Burlington
street -- met Colonel Leland &
Mr. Lyte spoke to them both
stayed till near 3 with Mrs Jackson
saw her 2 eldest girls. & Mr.
Jackson. walked home. Miss
Finch & Mrs. Newton had
called upon me -- went into
the Parlour to Miss Clarkes -- as it



was too late to dress before
dinner -- sat in with them --
we dined at 4. -- Received a
note from Lady Julianna Penn
to tell me that she had just
received the Queens Commands for
her & Miss Penn to come to
her in the Evening therefore she
could not (have me, I was to
have gone to Lady Juliana Penn) I
therefore did not dress. at 6
left Miss Clarke's & went to my
Breakfast Room. where I stayed
all the Evening -- Miss Clarke's had
Company in the Drawing room
Mrs. Jackson also was with them who
came to me for ¼ of an hour.
Mrs. Boscowan & Miss Streatfield
called -- but I ordered no one
to be let in -- I wrote &
read till past 10 -- sent a letter
to my Friend (Miss Litchfield)



      Miss Clarke's Company went
away at 10 -- they opened the
door for they were in the next
room to me & I soon joined
them had supper in the Drawing Room --
we read a little -- Anna
Maria read Metastasio &
translated a few lines to me.
She & Bell went to bed at 11
I stayed below till ½ past reading
Mrs. Delanys Manuscript
Letters to her late Sister Mrs. Dewes
which Mr. Dewes had been so
kind to lend me a large
Parcel of. went to bed --
about 12.


Saturday 31st. January 1784
Got up soon after 8: went down
down to my room -- read in Mrs. Delany
letters till past 9 -- then went
down to the Parlour & breakfasted
with Miss Anna Maria Clarke -- about 11
dressed for the day. at ½ past 12



Lady Stormont came to me
& sat ½ an hour -- talked
of our Uncle Sir William Hamilton
& was not pleased she saw
so little of him &c:
when she was gone Mr. Dewes
came & my Aunt, Dowager
Lady Warwick -- she stayed
½ an hour -- the common
Topics -- Mr. Dewes stayed till
near 2. o'Clock. we talked
much of Dear Mrs. Delany
of her excellencies -- Virtues
& agremens read and wrote till 4. Lady Wake called for me at ½ past 2 to take an airing. I excused myself she did not come in Miss Clarke
came to me for a few Minutes
left her in my room as it was
time for me to go out. had a
Chair went to Dowager Lady
Kings -- where I dined -- a parti
quarré -- Viz: Lady & 2 Miss
Kings Lady Wallingford &
myself -- a pleasant dinner
-- I stayed till near 8. a Mrs



Hodgkinson came in to Tea.
The Duchess Dowager of Portlands Coach
came for me -- went to Mrs
Delany -- met there. the Duchess
Duchess Portland (who comes every
Evening to Mrs. Delany unless she is
ill) Mr.. Dewe's & my Uncle
Sir William -- an agreeable Evening
my Uncle is lively clever
& entertaining & always
offers agreeable topics of
discourse -- The Duchess went
out of the Room -- & sent for
me. & in the most handsome
manner made me a very
beautiful & fine present
a gage d'amitie -- she stated it this was
a Watch & Chain of the
newest fashion. the Chain of
Silk -- decorated with Tassels &
other ornaments of Steel -- Pearl
& Gold Beads --



with a Seal & other Trinkets
suitable in elegance. I showed
my beautiful present -- to my
Uncle Mrs. Delany &c who admired
it very much. a ¼ past 10
left Mrs. Delany's -- my Uncle set me
down at Mr. Glovers where I
stayed ½ an hour -- My Good friend
Mr. Glover was delighted & pleased
with my fine present -- Miss Anna Maria
Clarke was there, we came home
together about 11. found Miss Clarke
at home -- we chatted a little &
then went to our rooms, I read
after I was undressed till near
12


Sunday 1st.. February 1784 -- did not get
up till ½ past 9 -- had Breakfast sent
up to my room -- dressed at ½ past 10
for the day -- did not go to Church as
My Uncle William told me he would call
upon me if he could -- but I saw
nothing of him -- read & drew all Morning
at ½ past two Anna Maria came home



she had been to Church. she sat
with me some time Mr. Wake came at
3 o'Clock (Sir Williams eldest Son) sat with
me till Mrs. Walsinghams Coach
came for me, a little before 4 -- I gave
Mr. Wake some advice -- for he esteems
me as his friend & begs I will
point out whatever I see wrong
in his conduct -- manners &c &c.
& I must do my young Pupil
the justice to say he bears my
rebukes with patience & endeavours
to correct what I mark
out as wrong. I left him
behind to walk with Miss Clarkes
to Mrs. Jacksons, as I was obliged
to take the Servant -- went
to Mrs. Walsinghams where I
dined -- only her & her daughter
Miss Boyle -- Mrs. Walsingham was not well
but in good Spirits -- after-dinner
we sat in the 2d. Drawing room --
Mrs. Walsingham read Mr. Jerninghams
last production -- an Essay on
Scandinavian Poetry -- about half



a dozen or a dozen good lines -- his
Poetry is in general but poor
stuff -- it is harmless
however -- on my expressing
my opinion of this Gentleman
as an Author -- Mrs. Walsingham agreed
but said he had written pretty
things, & read me some lines
he had written to Miss Boyle
on one of her Birth days --
they certainly had some
merit -- the Compliments
were well turned -- the Bishop
of Peterborough -- Hinchliffe)
came in just as I was going
away which I did at ¼ before 8 --
had Mrs. Walsingham's Coach -- went home
found Miss Gunning -- who had been
waiting ½ an hour for me -- we
had tea & she made it whilst
I drew some of the fan which she



has desired me to do for
her -- we conversed on various
topics -- on Poor Lady Conyers
death &c -- I showed her the late
Lady Hamiltons letters to Sir
William which he found after her
death -- she was very much
affected by them -- indeed they
breathe such love & tenderness
to him, & such true piety
that the perusal of them
must affect a sensible &
well disposed mind. Miss Gunning
left me at 10 o'Clock -- I wrote my
diary till Miss Clarke's came home
they had been with Mrs: Jackson --
they came to me about 11 -- sat ½ an
hour -- I stayed ¼ of an hour after
them. then went to bed -- read
in the new whole Duty of Man. &c.




Monday 2d. February 1784
Got up ½ past 9 -- went down to
my Room dressed for
the day -- in a Habit as I thought
of walking out & not going to
any place in the Evening which obliged
me to dress -- sat down to my
drawing -- Mrs. & Miss Glover
came & sat ½ an hour -- Anna Maria
came to me whilst they were with
me. I quite scolded poor Mrs.
Glover for asking Anna Maria to
accompany her to Sunning Hill
tomorrow & Anna Maria for consenting
to go as the weather was so
severe &c &c. My Uncle
Frederick came & sat with me
near 2 hours -- Mrs. Glover &c left me
soon after he came. He talked
much of his Mother Lady
Archibald -- told me many
anecdotes which did her Honour --
she was a Woman of the
strictest honour -- liberal --



to a degree & very benevolent
her manners uncommonly
pleasing & highly polished --
her understanding excellent
& she had a lively wit &
brilliant imagination --
she was a very warm & steady
friend -- after having sacrificed
the best part of her life, & her health in the
service of a Court -- she retired
disappointed & disgusted
with the insincerity & great
ingratitude she experienced --
-- many peoples fortunes she
made -- but her own she
injured by her liberalities
& she was of too noble a
spirit -- to advance it by
accepting anything from
the Court she quitted



Lady Wake & her daughter
Charlotte came during the
time my Uncle was with me
& stayed ¼ of an hour.
Anna Maria came to me for
a short time after my Uncle
left me. at 4 Lady Wake
called for me, & we for Mrs.
Carter -- we went to dine
at Lord Dartrey's -- found
them pretty well -- no other
Company but their Children
& the Son's Tutor,
Mr. Antrobus -- ¼ past
7 Lord & Lady Dartrey Lady Wake Mrs.
Carter & I went out in the
same Coach. they set me
down at Mr. Jacksons --
found Mr & Mrs. Jackson
alone. I stayed there till



11 -- supped there. Mr Jackson went
out for ½ an hour -- brought
us the News of the House
of Commons -- which was just
entering upon the important
Question whether
or no the Present Ministry
ought to remain -- the
House it was expected
would sit late. had a Coach
at 11. called. but did not
get out at Mr. Glovers
for the Miss Clarkes. Mr.
Vesey who was there also
came home with us -- we
set him down -- (I did not
stay above a minute below
went up to bed. Anna Maria
came to me after I was



in Bed & owned she did not
much like going with Mrs.
Glover into the Country

Tuesday -- 3d. February 1784
did not get up till ½ past 9
Anna Maria sent me up Breakfast
& came & stayed with me ¼
of an hour before she went
to Sunning Hill. my
Hair was just dressed when
Mr. Farhill came. I saw
him he had not been long
before Lady Stormont came
they talked Politics, she
informed us that Mr. Fox
had gained a Majority of 19
against the Ministry, &c.
Mr. Farhill went away -- & Lady
Stormont made me go out
with her -- which I did & only
put on my long Cloak



over my Robe de Chambre
we called at our Uncle Williams
(at Nerots Hotel) he was
out saw his Swiss servant
& Lady Stormont made him bring
a Drawing of two Boys which
she was to Copy -- we then
went to the Kings House
to our Cousin Colonel Greville,
who has a House there as
Kings Equerry, sat ½ an
hour with him -- saw his
birds &c. he has fitted
up his apartments more
like a fine Ladies -- in
my opinion -- than a Mans.
Lady Stormont brought me home
but did not come in. I had been at home 10
Minutes before Mr Wake
came & he stayed from ½ past



2. till near 4 -- I sorted shells
whilst he was with me. he
was very anxious he told me
to preserve my good opinion
& that he should ever
endeavour to preserve it by
following my advice. he
promised to keep a Journal
of his time & behaviour regularly, he had begun
one last Sunday. this he
is to show me at the end of
the month. by which I am
to judge of his conduct
&c &c &c. at 4 went
down to dinner Miss Clarke
& I dined together -- I wrote
my diary, & she read, &
we talked, & had tea -- I
had my gown brought down
& dressed below in the Parlour



it was so cold I had not
resolution to go upstairs.
I read a little in a New
Novel -- the 2 Mentors I
am inclined to read it
because it was written by
the Lady who wrote the
Old English Baron -- which
I thought an ingenious
pretty work. at 7. the Duchess
Dowager of Portlands Coach came
for me -- went to her to her
House at WhiteHall -- she
had a Cold & could not go out.
enjoyed an agreeable tête a
tête with her till ½ past 10
her conversation is always
pleasant & instructive -- she
is so good humoured -- polite
& attentive -- & is sensible



well informed. & well read --
has a fund of Anecdote --
she told me to night she was
69 Years old -- we talked of
the late Princess Dowager &
Prince of Wales -- their
Characters &c -- I have
not time to enter into the
particulars of the conversation's
-- when I went
home she desired me to call
at Mrs. Delanys to inform
her she was better -- I did
so -- I did not go in as it
was too late an hour for
Mrs. Delany heard she was well,
came home (had the Duchess Coach)
found Miss Clarke alone
we ate our Bread & Cheese
& she played on the Harpsichord
to me till ½ past 11 -- we
then separated for Bed --



I read after I got to my
room till 1 -- in the Morning

Wednesday 4th. February 1784
got up at 9 -- dressed for the day &
had Breakfast in my room
below -- read the debates
of the House of Commons -- then
set down to my drawing -- Mrs.
Carter called -- when I was dressing
I had given orders not be at
home -- which I was sorry for when
I found she had called -- at 12
Miss Wake came & stayed an
hour -- I gave her a work drawer
to arrange & continued drawing
Mr. Vesey came & he stayed 10
Minutes -- he came to invite
me to dinner. Miss Clarke
came to me for ¼ of an hour at
½ past two she had been out
with our opposite Neighbours the
Veseys -- she left me to dress &
she dined there. I continued



drawing till ½ past 4. when
Sir William Wakes Coach came for me
-- I dined there. Mr. Jessop &
Mr. Barwick of Waltham Abbey
dined there -- when Lady Wake
& I went up after dinner -- we
had some interesting conversation
about her Children -- particularly
Miss Wake. After Coffee Lady
Wake went out. & I stayed an
hour & talked a great
deal alone to Miss Wake. & made
her sensible of some errors, in her manner. &c
-- at my desire she wrote a
letter to her Mother &c &c
at ½ past 7 -- Mr. Catton Mr.
Wakes tutor walked across the
way with me to Mr. Glovers
-- he took leave of me at the
door. found. Mrs. Vesey &
Miss Clarke with Mr. Glover



Mrs. Vesey soon went away.
Mr. Devanys came in for ½
an hour. a good humoured
noisy chattering Man.
Mrs.. Lenton (Mrs. Glovers Sister)
& Miss Glover at home. we
sat in Mr. Glover's Study. read
some of Clarendon -- that part
which treats of the
reign of Charles the 1st. after
Supper. I read the debates
of the House of Commons
to Mr. Glover. Miss Clarke
& I came home at 11 o'Clock
-- went immediately to our
rooms -- I finished the 1st.
Vol. of the 2 Mentors. which
I like very well. wrote in
my dairy. read in the New
Whole duty of Man & then
composed myself to rest.










February 5th. 1784 Thursday.
dressed when I got up for the
day -- this I alway's do when
in my power, as I hate
that loss of time which dressing
occasions. Breakfasted
alone. employed myself till
½ past 12 in looking over
Bills -- ordering dinner &c
as Miss Anna Clarke who keeps
house, was absent. saw
Miss Clarke for a moment
only. the Duchess Dowager of
Portlands Coach came for
me at ½ past 12. went
to Mrs. Delany -- she was,
dear Woman! charming
well & happy to see me.
stayed ¼ of an hour. her
great niece Miss Port
went in the Coach as far as
the Duchess's but did not come in



-- Stayed with the Duchess till past
4 o'Clock -- my Uncle William came
some time after I had been there
-- we looked over some Antique
Medals &c. my Uncle & the Duchess
settled about the Vase &c:
entirely. the Duchess made him
give her an impression of his
arms to have a seal cut
for me for the Watch she had
given me. of my Arms. my
Uncle & I came away together
his Carriage. I set him down
at Lord Dartmouth's -- I
went to Sir William Wakes where
I dined -- Mrs. Carter dined
there. after dinner Lady
Wake read the 1st. Canto of
a new Poem called Aurelia
supposed to be written by Mr
Hoole -- it seems an imitation
of the Rape of the Lock I
liked it very well as far as we read -- the
Numbers were easy.



at 7. I went with Sir William Wake
to Mr. Glovers. he was pretty
well -- Mrs. Lenton & Miss Glover
& him were sitting in the Study
Mr. Wake came also in ½
an hour -- Sir William went away
at 8 o'Clock -- Mr. Glover
told us some anecdotes of
Beggars -- their impositions
&c. about 10 Lady Wakes Coach
came to carry me home. Mr.
Wake attended me. I did not
ask him to come in as it was
late. found Miss Clarke out
I sat below & wrote a letter
to Miss Anna Clarke in reply to
one she wrote to me to inform
she should not return home
so soon as she had thought
of doing -- &c. Miss Clarke came
at ¼ past 11. we talked a little
& then went to our Rooms



Friday 6th. February 1784
Dressed for the day. breakfasted
alone. at 11 Lord Dartrey came
Stayed ½ an hour. Mrs. Colter Hoare
at 2 for ½ an hour -- she is a very
sensible & as far as I can
judge a agreeable Young Woman
Mr. Vesey came for ¼ of hour
I drew all Morning dined at
home. Miss Clarke played
to me some of Handels Music
after dinner -- sat with her till
½ after 6. came to my room
read & drew till ½ past 8
Miss Gunning came & drank
tea with me & stayed till 11
The Topics of our Conversation
was various -- nothing very
interesting --
except the death of
the Beautiful, & by all accounts
amiable Miss Copely -- Lord



Apsley -- was much attached
to her -- & it said he will
wear Widowers Mourning.
Miss Clarke came to me
after Miss Gunning went & sat
½ an hour. I went to bed at 12. wrote to my friend
Miss Litchfield sent her my diary
expected to have heard from her


Saturday. got up at 8. wrote
notes & had my Breakfast at
½ past 9. had my hair dressed
for the day; whilst it was
dressing finished the two
Mentors -- I think it but
an indifferent thing --
My Uncle Frederick came
at ½ past 12 & stayed till
2. To my great surprise
Lord Napier came in -- I
did not expect him in London
this Winter -- he came last
night from Scotland upon



Business -- he & my Uncle
talked Politic's -- it seems
there will be violent measures
& the Parliament will be
dissolved -- they both left
me at 2. Mrs. Boscowan
came at ½ after 2 & stayed
sometime -- I showed her my
Watch that the Duchess Gave me
She told me that the Duke of
Rutland was going Lord
Lieutenant of Ireland &c
dined at home with Miss
Clarke. after dinner she
was obliging to play on the
Harpsichord to me -- some
of Fentons Lessons.
I wrote a letter to Miss Hannah
More. at 7 Lady Wakes Coach
came for me -- went to
Lady Caroline Peachey -- a



working Party.. Sir James was
at home & stayed till after tea
then left us. My Cousin
Lady Frances Harpur. Lady
Wallingford. & Mrs. Leland
Lady Caroline Peacheys Daughter
in Law a Bride -- was introduced
to her -- she was
a Miss Jennings -- she has
a Sensible Countenance
& is near being pretty.
Common topics of conversation
-- at 10 I came away
in Lady Frances Harpurs
Coach. went to the Veseys
their Company were just
gone -- I stayed supper. came
home ½ past 11. Miss Clarke was
just come from the Glovers -- Mrs.
Glover returned from Sunning Hill
to day -- she left Miss Anna Clarke
with her Sister Mrs. Barnard at



Eaton -- we talked a little &
then went to our Rooms --

Sunday 8th. February 1784 -- it
was impossible for me to
walk to Church -- the Snow had
fallen &c. dressed at ½ past
10 for the day -- read -- wrote
Notes & drew -- Lady Stormont
called (but did not come in) to
tell me she would send the Carriage
for me. Mr. Wake came after
2. read to me -- we began
Tasso -- Hooles translation --
he left me at 4 -- Lady Stormont
Coach came for me --
I went to Miss Clarke for a
moment to pay my Compliments
for I had not seen her --
went to Lord Stormonts to
dinner. Lord Stormont came & sat
with me as she was not
ready. Lord Napier came



to dinner -- after dinner
the 3 boys came -- we did
not sit long -- nor did the
Gentlemen stay long after
us -- Lord Stormont & I had a good
deal of conversation -- he
told me he had known
Madame de Boccage -- that
she was a very dull Woman
though it was the fashion to
think her a Belle Esprit
she was certainly a woman
of merit & had been a
great Beauty -- as a proof
how capable she was of
translating English into
French -- (for she published
a translation of Paradise
Lost
) she made use of
the following words in



asking Lord Stormont to
Dinner -- ------------ Sir --
I beg, pray, You would
Could should can will
dine with me -- nay it
was even more absurd
for he told me the string
of words she used lasted
near a Minute. he
told me of other french
People who made a
parade of translating
English Books -- & that
they did it with the help
of their Language Master
&c &c. he went to his
Study after Coffee -- the
eldest Boy sat with us the
whole time as his Tutor



was out -- he is the
cleverest Boy of his age
I ever met with -- being
only 7. As a proof the
readiness of his Wit --
he was talking & giving
his opinion upon something
that was said -- come
come says Lord Stormont
hold your tongue you're
an ass -- he left off
speaking but soon again
began to chatter -- what
says Lord Stormont again braying
William Oh Papa if I am
ass why you know I
must bray.
Lady Stormont took me to her
Boudoir & showed me the



Copy she had begun of my
Uncle's Drawing &c
we soon returned to Lord
Napier -- I had Lord Stormont
Chariot to go away as
Lord & Lady Stormont were going to
the French Ambassadors --
Lord Napier went with
me & I set him down
at his Lodgings in Albemarle
Street -- I reproved
him for his shyness in
Company &c he acknowledge
I was in the right &c.
&c. I went to Mrs. Delanys
found her alone -- only her
great Niece Miss Port with
her -- the Duchess Dowager of Portland
was gone to the Queen. I
stayed till a ¼ before 10, we



looked over a book of Prints
of Raphaëls Pictures --
when I came home which I did in a Chair found
Miss Clarke alone -- we supped
together & I wrote & she
read the beginning of an
Old Play -- which I did not think
worth attending to. we went
to bed ½ past 11 -- I gave
Hannah who came to me as
Betty was out some good
advice not to encourage
young men who had not good characters &c -- as I
found one came frequently
to her -- she listened &
thanked me -- she is a good
kind of Girl & I wish her
well -- Lady Stormont told me
that the Prince of Wales had
enquired after me yesterday
Morning at his Levee -- NB the



first he ever had) -- of Mr-
Greville & had desired him
to give his Compliments to me.

Monday 9th. February 1784.
Dressed for the day -- at 12 o'Clock
Lady Stormont came for me we
went to Robsons the Booksellers
as he had Prints & drawings
upon sale -- we looked over some
there were few worth buying
Lady Stormont bought the impressions
of our Cousin Mr. Grevilles Gems
& a Portrait -- she then brought
me home about ½ past 1 -- I employed
myself in paying Bills &c.
Miss Clarke came to me at
3 for ¼ of an hour -- left me
to dress -- Lord Napier came
he had been at the Kings
Levee. we talked over his
affairs -- at 4 Miss Clarke



came to ask me to go with her
to our opposite Neighbours
where we were to dine -- I
desired her to go & send me
word when dinner was ready
at ½ past 4 went there &
Lord Napier took leave of me at
their door. no other Company
at 8 o'Clock Miss Clarke went
home & Mr. & Mrs. Vesey set
me down at Mr. Glovers -- it
was Miss Glovers Birth day
who enters into her 18th. year
found them en famille --
Sir William Wake came soon after
I was there. a dull heavy
Evening for Politic's was the
subject & nothing clever or
new was advanced -- at ¼
before 10 the Vesey's called
for me & brought me home



Miss Clarke was at home -- but
when I came in went to the Veseys
where she supped -- I wrote my Journal
till she returned -- we went to bed
about ½ past 11

Tuesday 10th. February 1784
dressed for the day at 10 -- as Mrs. Glover
who was to have breakfasted with me
sent me an excuse. Paid Bills
to Betty & Charles a Lady came
to enquire Charles's Character
& she agreed to take him upon my
recommendation -- when she left
me I gave him some advice
respecting his future conduct
which he seemed grateful for.
Lady Wake came at 12 stayed ½
an hour told me Sir William would
have come up -- but he was too
lame. Lord Napier came in
before she went -- he stayed till
past 3 -- told me had been
at Mr. Dundass's & hoped his
affairs would go on well.
Miss Clarke came to me for



¼ of an hour. My Uncle
William called but did not come
in -- to tell me he would carry
me to Lord Stormonts -- which he
did at ¼ past 4. we dined there
Mr. & Colonel Greville dined there
& Mr. Murray's tutor. an
agreeable dinner -- the Gentlemen
soon came to us after
dinner -- Lord Stormont at
home. Colonel Cathcart & Mr.
Graham came in ½ an hour
before I came away. My
Uncle & I left Lord Stormonts
at ¼ past 8. I left him at
Mr. Legges & came in his
Carriage to Lord Dartreys
there was one Whist table
the Company were. Mrs.
Montagu. Miss Gregory. Sir
William & Lady Middleton Lady
Wake. Mr & Mrs. Vesey. Mr.



Selwyn. Mrs. Boscowan. Mrs-
Bouverie -- not the fine Mrs. Bouverie
& Mrs. Carter. Lady Dartrey & I
had some conversation apart
about Mr. Catton &c. a little
after 10 Lady Wake brought
me home -- Miss Clarke was
gone to bed. wrote a few lines
to Miss Anna Maria Clarke & enclosed
letters which had come for her.
had William Benn in to talk
about his Brothers coming &
to tell him I hoped through
Sir William Hamiltons means
to do him service with Mr.
Burrel &c &c. then went
to my room

11th. February 1784. wrote Notes
&c. had Bettys sister Mrs.
Harman to Cut my hair &
dress it -- Mrs. Iremonger &



Mr. Fisher called -- I did not
see them as I was dressing.
at 2 Mr. Wake came. he
stayed till past 3. we talked
of various things & I told
him my opinion of improper
Jokes &c. at 4 Mrs. Walsinghams
Coach came. I went
there to dinner -- we looked
over some prints before the
dinner was served -- she is
making a Collection -- Miss Black
dined with us as she was to
continue Miss Boyles drawing
lesson after dinner. She & Miss
Boyle went up at 6 Mrs. Walsingham
& I had a good deal of conversation
about Mrs. Delany & Mrs
& Miss Port at ½ past 6 we
came into the drawing room
settled the Prints in the Porte
Folio &c. had tea I made
it for Mrs. Walsingham -- talked of Miss



Black. Mrs: Walsingham disapproved of
her having altered her style of
living &c &c. Lord Exeter
came in -- talked of the
Great Concert of Music which
is to be in honour of Handel
on the 21st. April -- said the
King & Queen & family were
to honour it with their presence
-- both in the Morning & Evening
in the Morning it is to be at
Westminster Abbey in the
Evening at the Pantheon.
Lady Bute & her Daughter
Lady Louisa Stewart came
in -- I had Mrs. Walsinghams
Coach -- at ½ past 8. went
to Mr. Culling Smiths --
met there Mr Mrs Baker
Lady Wake -- we sat with Miss



Smith -- in the next room
was a Whist Party. Lord &
Lady Dartrey. Mr. Grove. Mr.
Smith -- at 10 Lady Wake
brought me home. Miss
Clarke out I sat below till
she came home -- went to
bed ¼ before 12.

12th. February 1784 -- wrote a number
of answers to Notes. dressed for
the day. Mr. Dewes came & sat
½ an hour -- told me how
much he had been pleased
with seeing my Uncle William's fine
antique Vase &c. Mr. Stanhope
came I had William Benn with me
Mr. Stanhope gave him some advice
about applying to Mr. Burrel
about his change of place in
the excise office. Mr. Stanhope
stayed till 2 talking over
old stories -- My Uncle



Frederick came & he went
away. My Uncle talked
over poor Colonel Hamiltons
melancholy situation -- how
ill he had been treated by
his family &c &c promised
to go for me to Mr. Wiggins
for to settle the rent of
my Mothers House &c I gave
him Mr. Wiggins letter. he left
me at 3 o'Clock Miss Clarke
then came & sat ¾ of an
hour with me. at ½ past
4 Sir William Hamilton came for
me -- we went together to
Portland Place -- to dinner
our Company consisted of
Lord & Lady Stormont. 2 of
Lady Stormonts Brothers -- Lord
Cathcart & Colonel Cathcart.
Mr. Graham her Brother in



Law -- Colonel Greville. Mr.
Nicolson Mr. Murrays tutor
After dinner the 3 little
Boys came -- stayed till we
went to Coffee -- which we had
in Lord Stormonts Library
where we sat till 8 o'Clock.
this was a great favour &
only allowed of as we were
a family party -- about 8.
all the Men went away
except Colonel Greville &
he went up to the drawing
room with Lady Stormont & me --
we left Lord Stormont below --
I gave my Uncle William a paper
to give Mr. Burrel in favour
of William Benn.    Lady Stormont
read to Colonel Greville & me some of



her Eldest Boys letters --
which were uncommonly
clever for his age -- told us that
she was at Carleton House
the Night before -- that the
Prince of Wales did the
Honours very well & that
there was a very proper
set of People of fashion
assembled -- the house is
finely furnished -- she
stayed supper & got away
about 3 in the Morning the
1st. part of the Evening was a
Card assembly -- &c &c
Lord Stormont came to us
about 10 -- we had our usual
supper -- only Wine & Water
Cakes &c no cloth laid --
Lord Stormont & I had a good



deal of Conversation -- we
talked of Abbé Grant who
is now in England -- a Man
much Esteemed -- a great
friend of the late Pope
Clement Ganganelli -- if
he had lived Abbé Grant
was to have made a Cardinal
-- Lord Stormont told me that Abbe
Grant was in the wrong
to maintain the letters which
were published for the Pope
were genuine -- as they
certainly were not --

























                                                         1st
Gaganelli (Lord Stormont
said) had never read many
of the french Authors quoted
in that book -- that many
of the letters were genuine
he made no doubt for that
it was a common trick of Authors
to procure some that were
so to pass off the rest upon
the World -- another certain
proof against these letters
being genuine was that
many persons are mentioned
as being in Italy
when to his knowledge
they were not there at the
time mentioned &c &c --



I had Lord Stormonts Chariot
& Servant to bring me home
at 11. sat with Miss Clarke
sometime -- went to bed at
12. found a letter &c from my Dear
Friend Miss Litchfield

Friday 13th. February 1784 dressed for
the day -- notes in profusion to
answer. excuse from my
Uncle William for not going with
me & Lady Stormont -- to see some
Prints which were on Sale --
he had forgot he was
engaged to the British Museum
&c. Lady Stormont also sent me word
as he did not go we would put it
off. I employed myself in pasting
the Prints on the Medley Screens
which I made last spring as they
were many of them loose -- Lord
Napier came at ½ past 1 o'Clock
& stayed above an hour -- talked
chiefly of his affairs -- I began
to make an Air Balloon bag



I had promised Mrs. Glover one
for to hold her Counters. so I
resolved to make it in a
shape to mark the year.
Miss Clarke came to me for
an hour -- began another old
Play -- but it was so obsolete we
could not comprehend it. had
Mr. Veseys Coach at 4 Mrs. Carter
& I went to Mrs. Delanys to
dinner. found Dear excellent
Mrs. Delany charming well. Mr.
Dewes her Nephew dined with
us -- Mrs. Delany left us for ½ an
hour after dinner to take her
Siesta -- then sent for us to
Coffee -- Mr. Dewes read us a
Clever Dialogue which has been
printed in the Papers in Verse
the political Characters of Lord North &
Mr. Fox & Burke -- at 7 the
Duchess Dowager of Portland came
the conversation clever & entertaining



-- the Duchess's
Daughter Lady Stamford &
her eldest daughter Lady
Grey came in for
an hour -- I sat next Lady
—— Grey & had some conversation
with her -- she appears
very good humoured & perfectly
civil -- no airs of self consequence
-- after they went
the Duchess & Mrs. Delany
entertained us with anecdotes
of past times. Mrs. Carter
& I came home in the Duchess's
Coach at ¼ before ten. I set
Mrs. Carter down we talked
of the agreeableness & excellence
of the two friends Mrs. Delany &
the Duchess -- Miss Clarke was
out -- I worked at my bag -- had



my Old Servant William Benn
in -- & told him I had given
his request to my Uncle
William to give Mr. Burrel &c &c
Miss Clarke came home at 11 we
sat talking till near 12
then went to bed --

Saturday 14th. February 1784
had my Breakfast then dressed
worked hard at the Bag & made
a Box for to hold the Fish &
Counters -- Lady Stormont called
at 12 to take me out but I
would not go as I expected Miss
Anna Maria Clarke home from the
Country -- she came saw her
several times during the course
of the Morning -- she brought a
Miss Parker to my room who
came with her from Eaton she
was going to Black Land School



She seems an unaffected pleasing
Girl about 15 & rather handsome
-- her Father &c live in Cheshire
I gained from her some information
of the Dickenson family
it was 3 years since she had
seen them but she told me that
Mr. Dickenson Junior was not then married
& that the Miss Dickensons appeared very
agreeable. I own I felt a great
satisfaction in hearing of the
welfare of People with whom
I might have been so nearly
connected. Mr. Wake came &
sat alone with me from ½ past
2 till near 4. he told me an
anecdote which gave me an
opportunity of hearing his
sentiments & giving mine
on the subject of Suicide
-- he spoke like a very young



Man -- at the same time
his principles are so good
that I flatter myself these
& his understanding will
ever prevent his passions
from hurrying him to
rash & unpardonable.
crimes, is it not extraordinary
that the most unnatural of
actions and the most unpardonable
of crimes against
our Creator should appear
for an instant eligible to
the Mind of a thinking being?
much less can a well instructed
& benevolent mind.
with any colour of
reason argue in favour of
Suicide -- we had also some
discourse on taste which for the



disinclination he seemed
to have of being convinced was
necessary to have I dropped
till another opportunity.
I dined at home with the 2 Miss
Clarkes -- conversed & finished my
Bag. Mrs. Jackson came in at
tea time she & Anna Maria talked
over their Eaton friends &c
Mr. Vesey came in at ½ past
8. Mrs. Jackson left us at 10 &
Mr. Vesey soon after -- we could have
spared his Company -- I wrote
to my friend Miss Litchfield
& sent my last weeks diary.
we went to our rooms ½ past
11

Sunday 15th. February 1784
Spent all the Morning alone. at
4 Mrs. Walsinghams Coach came
for me to dine there -- she was not



ready as company had prevented
her dressing. I was sometime
alone but was well amused
in looking at the pictures the
whole room being hung with
Paintings done by herself
& daughter -- Miss Boyle
then came to me -- I read to
her some miscellaneous pieces
of Poetry -- The Mouses Petition
by Mrs: Barbauld &c.
Mrs. Walsingham came to us before
5. we went down to dinner
Miss Boyle left us before
we went out of the dining
room to practise her Music
Mrs. Walsingham & I talked of Lady
Dowager Spencer. Mrs. Walsingham said
all her inconsistencies --
were



owing as Pope describes
it, to the Lust of Praise
why else should she all
her life have paid court
to vicious as well as
Virtuous characters. she
told me many anecdotes of
Lady Spencer -- her unsteadiness, her
insincerity -- she has been
known to sit up all night
at the gaming table -- change
her dress & go to early prayers
at St. James's Chapel &c &c
-- Ah why are we so prone
to blame the errors of others? -- let
him says our saviour, “who is
without blemish cast the 1st-
Stone.”
we came up at ½
past 6 to tea -- I made it
Mrs. Walsingham gave me her



opinion on dress -- I do not
think however I shall ever
pay that attention to it
she thinks necessary -- I
am perfectly content to
be so dressed as not to appear
particular -- I would never be
vulgarly dressed or be at
the height of the fashion &
I would always be rather plainly
adorned than decorated. Mrs. Walsingham
read some of Mason's Poetry
till near 8. we then went
in Chairs to Lord Exeters in
Grosvenor Street to a Concert
-- Mrs. Walsingham took me as her Guest
She as a Subscriber has a
right to take 5. There are 5
Subscribers who support this
Concert -- this was the 1st. night



the subscribers are. Lord
Exeter. Sir Watkin Williams Wynne.
Lord Paget. Mrs. Walsingham
-- I forget the 5th. there are to be
10 Concerts -- each to be at a
Subscriber's house. the company I
met were. Sir George Howard Lord &
Lady Amherst. General Mordant
Lord & Lady Brudenal
Lord Paget. Mr. Fortesque
Lord Lewisham Lady Cornwall Lady Clifford
her daughter Miss Southwell
Sir Watkin Williams Wynne my Uncle
William Lord Sandwich &c &c it was an
agreeable Concert -- all old
Music -- Cramer played
the 1st. Violin -- Harrison --
& Miss Harewood sang. I
like Harrisons singing -- he
has a fine voice -- I do not
think the same of Miss Harewood



-- Sir Watkin Williams Wynne played in two or
three of the pieces on the
Violoncello -- I had a good
deal of conversation between
the Acts with my Uncle who
was not well & looked very
ill. I likewise talked to
General Mordant Howard. Lady
Amherst. Mrs: Hinchliffe. Lord
Exeter -- came home in a
Chair ½ past 11. Miss Clarke
gone to bed Anna Maria came home
soon after me we chatted ½
an hour & then went to
bed


Monday 16th. February 1784 -- at ten o'Clock
Mr.. Dewes came to Breakfast with
me -- he stayed till past 11 or
rather near 12 -- Mrs. Carter was to
have come but the streets being so
slippery from the Snow & frost she
did not. Mr. Dewes is a sensible



& very worthy Man -- the life
he leads is so quiet & retired
that it gives him a timid
air in Company -- & he does
not appear to that advantage
he might have done had he
mixed more in a general society -- he
only passes 6 weeks in the
year in London -- he is a
Man of letters & is fond of reading &
Music
& is himself a
performer on the harpsichord.
-- he is about forty 2 Years of age
a little Man -- look's aged
with Ill health -- & certainly has
no external advantages of
Person or manner -- yet he
has a sensible countenance
& though he has a constrained
air -- he does not look vulgar
-- & is well bred &
attentive. a reasonable



Woman might pass her life
happily with this Man &
a women of principle would
if she had no other attachment
, rejoice to be united
with one who was so truly
estimable as I believe
Mr. Dewes to be. he was
so obliging to go to Willertons
the toymans for me to change
the Key of my new Watch that the
Duchess of Portland gave me as it did
not fit -- he also got an outside
Crystal Case to preserve it --
he returned for a few moments
& brought back my
Watch & a Case -- I am in his
debt for it & shall insist on
paying him -- for he ran out
of the room & would not tell me
what it Cost &c. Lady Wake



came & sat an hour & ½ with
me -- she did not look well &
had a Cold -- we talked of my
affair with Mr. Dickenson
& she read his fathers letter
to me -- she agreed with me in
thinking that if his character
was as unexceptionable as
I esteemed it to be & if his &
my circumstances would
have been sufficient I might
have been happy in marrying
him -- but all this is at
an end & has been upwards
of 3 years. Lady Wake had not
left me for long before her Woman
Mrs. Beete came -- She wished
me to assist her with my advice
She has lived ten years with
my friend & is very sincerely
attached to her. -- but having
a desire to settle herself in
the World, as she has near 500.L &
& go into Business. She wanted me



to speak to Lady Wake as
she could not bring herself
to the resolution of doing so.
I promised all she requested
for I have a great kindness
for her -- she having behaved
towards Lady Wake & in her
family in a very proper
manner -- & is possessed of
many most valuable qualities.
She is the daughter of a Clergyman
who dying left his
family in distressed circumstances
I heard of & recommended her
to Lady Wake with whom she has
continued ever since & a
real treasure she has been to
her -- & has been treated with
the kindness of parental affection
by Lady Wake. when she left
me I dressed. my Uncle
Frederick sent his Coach before
4 -- I called & took up Lord
Napier & Miss Glover & we
went to dine at my Uncles



-- there were no other Guests
-- Mrs. Hamilton told me she
had been disappointed of
my two Cousins Colonel Greville
& Cathcart -- they both had Colds
-- there came to tea some Young
People from Mrs. Beavers
with her 2 Daughters -- a Miss
Preton. 2 Miss Booths
My Uncle William also came --
he was better. & a Mr.
Burgess this Mr. Burgess has
some genius for Music he
played & sang some of his own
compositions -- seemed very
well satisfied with himself
Miss Hamilton my Cousin
Played & sang 2 Italian Songs
she has a very just ear &
very fine voice & I think
with the great advantage she
has of the very best Masters
both for playing & singing



she will be a capital
performer -- I have better
authority than my own
judgement for Sir William Hamilton
& my Uncle Frederick who
have both great taste think
the same -- Miss Hamilton
is 15 -- elegant in her person
& almost pretty -- has good
abilities & a good heart
& looks like a girl of
fashion. I am much
interested about her -- she is,
& deservedly, the darling of
her Father & Mother. I had
my Uncle Frederick's Coach home
set Miss Glover down & took
up Miss Anna Maria Clarke who was
at Mr. Glovers -- Lord Napier
came home with us -- we found
Miss Clarke at home -- we had supper
& he stayed chatting till ½ past
12 -- we then went to bed.




Tuesday 17th February 1784
-- at 11 Mrs. Sorrel dresser
to the Younger Princess's
came to me -- told me of
her intended Marriage of
which she had made the confidant
some time ago -- thanked
me for my advice &c &c
I promised to recommend custom to
her future who is a Mr. Rowe
Linen Draper in the
Strand. I made her a
trifling present it was not in my power to offer a better -- 2 Enamelled
China Mugs as a mark
of goodwill &c &c &c
she was as much pleased
as if they had been Gold.
I then had my Hair dressed
Mr. Wake came saw him only
for a Moment as I sent him
away expecting Mrs. Hamilton
my Uncle Frederick wife. he
came to beg I would dine
at Sir Williams & to invite the



2 Miss Clarkes also --
I then finished dressing &
Mrs. Hamilton came &
sat ½ an hour -- talked
over the Maid I had recommended
&c &c.
When she went Miss Anna Maria
Clarke came for ½ an hour
I had William Benn & he
promised to carry tickets
or rather make Visits for
me in the Evening at 4 the 2
Miss Clarkes & I had Sir William Wakes
Coach went to Sir Williams- only
the family. after dinner
Lady Wake was taken ill. I
went up with her to her Bed
Room she undressed & took an
Emetic I sat with her till 7
o'Clock -- her 2 Girls stayed with
Miss Clarkes -- Lady Wake was
much better before I left
her. I took an opportunity of



telling her Mrs. Beetes intention
of leaving her -- she said it
was what she expected -- that she
should regret parting with her
but that she wished her too well
not to be glad she was now
likely to be well established --
before I left the House I took
an opportunity of telling Mrs.
Beete I had broken the ice for
her &c &c Mrs. Iremongers
Coach came for me at 7 --
I made Lady Wake apology to
Miss Clarke's -- Mr. Wake attended
me to the Coach & promised
to write a Note to inform
me how his Mother was in
the Evening I greatly approved
of his behaviour to day to
her it was tender & affectionate
-- Miss Wake is still very
poorly. I took Miss Anna Maria
Clarke away with me.



& set her down at her
Sisters Mrs. Jackson's. Miss
Clarke went home in a Chair --
I went on to Mrs. Iremongers
Mrs. Carter soon came to
us & a very agreeable
afternoon I spent. there
were only us three. Mrs.
Iremonger is one of the most
pleasing women in person
& manners I know -- she
is 52 Years of age but
still possesses beauties. She
has also a polished understanding
& is perfectly
feminine -- in the Course
of Conversation Mrs. Carter
told us two Anecdotes
which as they are singular
& authentic I will
relate.



The late Lord Bath told Mrs..
Carter -- that when the famous
Sir Walter Rawleigh was a
Young man he was for some
time in Spain -- one day
as he was walking in the Streets
a Woman accosted him &
asked him if he would
suffer himself to be conducted
by her to a Lady
who having admired his
Person -- (for Sir Walter Raleigh was
a remarkable Handsome
& elegant Man -- of very
attractive address &
Manners) -- wished to become
acquainted with him
Sir Walter Raleigh was too gallant
not to accept the invitation
so at an hour fixed he was
secretly conducted by
the Duenna blindfolded
through intricate Passages



into a Large House --
when his eyes were
uncovered he found
himself in a room
very superbly furnished
& was received by a beautiful
Woman whom he found
to be the Mistress of the
House & the one who had
sent him the flattering
invitation -- they were
soon well acquainted &
he remained with her 3 or
4 days -- the day that
was fixed for his departure
the Lady said she must
introduce him to her
Husband -- this Sir Walter Raleigh
did not much relish
but was obliged to submit
to -- he was shown into
an apartment & presented



to an Old Gentleman
who thanked him for
having complied with his
Wife's request -- informed
him that his next Heir
having disobliged him
he was anxious to have
an Heir to his Estate &
that his Wife had acted
with his desire & that he
highly approved of the
choice she had made --
desired Sir Walter Raleigh would not
make enquiries who
they were -- & dismissed
him politely giving
him a fine present.
Every one know that
when Sir Walter Raleigh was
barbarously sacrificed
to the Spaniards -- the Spanish
Ambassador then in

(consult diplomatic text or XML for annotations, deletions, clarifications, persons,
quotations,
spellings, uncorrected forms, split words, abbreviations, formatting)



 1. The loose pages inserted at the beginning of the diary have in this transcription been restored to their dated order. The order of images therefore differs from that in the University of Manchester LUNA catalogue.
 2. January 18 was Queen Charlotte's official birthday.
 3. A small section of the page has been cut away here but it is unclear whether any text has been removed on this side of the sheet.
 4. The Archibishop's third daughter Alicia Henrietta would be, at most, 13 years old at this point, with her two older sisters not yet married, so it's unlikely that this is who Hamilton means. It also would be unusual for Hamilton not to observe the usual naming convention of 'Miss Alicia Markham'. 'Miss Markham' is much more likely to be the Bishop Markham's eldest daughter, and his fourth (not third) child, Henrietta Sarah, who was 19 or 20 years old.
 5. A diagonal section of the page has been cut away. It is not clear whether any text has been lost.
 6. This addition is in pencil.
 7. John Gay, 'The Fan: A Poem' (1713).
 8. See the letter from Court Dewes to Mary Hamilton in LWL Mss Vol. 75(52).
 9. This entry has been partially drafted in pencil before being over-written later in ink. There are no visible differences in the text; however, the fair copy is more neatly written thus the two become out of sync on the page towards the end of the entry.
 10. Remains of a wax seal, suggesting this section of the journal may have been sent to a correspondent or written on a reused cover.
 11. Remains of a seal, in red wax.
 12. Remains of a seal in red wax in the bottom-left corner.
 13. Lady Holderness's daughter, Amelia Osborne née Darcy, had eloped in 1778 with Captain John Byron, whom she married following a divorce from her husband Lord Camarthen in 1779. Some accounts give her date of death as 27 January 1784, but Hamilton's comment here suggests she died on Monday 26. Earlier in her journal (8 December 1783) Hamilton notes that Lady Conyers is dying, and that she is 'a sincere penitent' (HAM/2/6).
 14. Remains of a seal, in red wax.
 15. Remains of a seal, in red wax.
 16. The address is written upside down at the bottom of the page.
 17. ‘Agreeable qualities, circumstances, etc.’ (OED s.v. agrément n. 1. Accessed 12-07-2021).
 18. This continues vertically along the right margin, indicated by two corresponding crosses. The sentence has been written out of order as Hamilton adds detail to a small space. The original reads: 'at ½ past 2 *she did not come in to take an airing I excused myself'. In this transcription, the logical reading order has been restored.
 19. Mary's use of the phrase 'parti quarré' ('a party of four', usually spelled 'parti carrée') is odd, as she here describes a party of five (including herself).
 20. Edward Jerningham, 'The Rise and Progress of the Scandinavian Poetry'.
 21. Missing closing bracket seems to fit here.
 22. Clara Reeve (1783), The Two Mentors: A Modern Story.
 23. This page is blank, with an annotation in minor hand.
 24. Samuel Hoole (1783) ‘Aurelia. A Poem’.
 25. Alexander Pope (1712) ‘The Rape of the Lock’.
 26. Miss Copley was reported to have died in Lord Apsley's arms (see Neville Thompson [Pen and Sword: 1999], Earl Bathurst and the British Empire, p.14). He eventually married in 1789.
 27. Torquato Tasso trans. John Hoole (1763), Jerusalem Delivered.
 28. Unidentified.
 29. That is, her 17th birthday.
 30. This page is blank.
 31. This page is blank.
 32. This page is blank.
 33. This page is blank.
 34. This page is blank.
 35. See the letter from Sir William Hamilton to Mary Hamilton in HAM/1/4/4/12.
 36. See HAM/1/13/18 in which Eleanor Glover thanks Hamilton for the bag.
 37. Probably Blacklands House, a French boarding school in Chelsea, attended by the daughters of Sir Robert Walpole. See ‘Social history: Education, private schools’, in A History of the County of Middlesex, Vol. 12 Chelsea, (ed. Patricia E C Croot, London, 2004), pp.190-195. British History Online (accessed 30-07-2021).
 38. Anna Letitia Barbauld (1773), 'The Mouse's Petition' in Poems.
 39. Willerton and Roberts, turner and toyman, at the corner of Conduit Street in Old Bond Street, London. See British History Online.
 40. The Reverend George Beet was the Vicar of Duston in Northamptonshire until his death in 1768.
 41. This is possibly Sir James Bland Burgess, though omission of his knighthood is troubling.
 42. Probably Mary and Sophia (but probably not yet Amelia, who was born in 1783).
 43. This anecdote is continued in HAM/2/8.

Metadata

Library References

Repository: John Rylands Research Institute and Library, University of Manchester

Archive: Mary Hamilton Papers

Item title: Diary of Mary Hamilton (17 January 1784 - 17 February 1784)

Shelfmark: HAM/2/7

Document Details

Author: Mary Hamilton

Date: from 17 January to 17 February 1784

Summary: The diary covers the period from 17 January to 17 February 1784. Hamilton details her life as an independent woman living in London. She writes about events at Court and the changes in the Queen’s House. The diary also includes Hamilton’s frequent conversations with her many friends and acquaintances on subjects such as politics, the Royal family, the actress Sarah Siddons and the characters of her friends.
    Hamilton details her many visits, social engagements and meetings, including her visits to the Duchess of Portland and Mary Delany, Elizabeth Vesey and Frances Burney. She expresses her contentment with her way of life after leaving Court, remarking after attending a dinner at the Glovers that she spent a ‘tranquil day not envying the fine folks [...] but enjoying my Liberty!’ Hamilton describes how she spent evenings at her friends. After dinner with the Glovers she read a manuscript of the life of Epaminondas to Mr Glover. She remarks that Miss More was particularly happy to see her. Hamilton attended an engagement with Elizabeth Carter, Horace Walpole, Joshua Reynolds, Frances Burney and her uncle, Sir William Hamilton, in which the conversation was of ‘former beauties’. She records a number of anecdotes made by Mrs Carter. The Duchess gave Hamilton ‘a very beautiful & fine present, a gage d’amitee - she styled it – this was a Watch and Chain of the newest fashion, the Chain of Silk, decorated w[i]th Tassels & other ornaments of Steel, Pearl, Gold Beads with a Seal & other Trinkets suitable in elegance’. She also notes that the Duchess asked Sir William Hamilton for an impression of his coat of arms so that she could ‘have a seal cut for me of my arms’. Hamilton enjoyed the Duchess’s company: her conversation was ‘always pleasant and instructive. She is good humoured, polite, sensible and attentive [...] well-informed, well-read and always had some anecdotes’. The diary also details the Duchess’s purchase from Sir William Hamilton of what became known as the ‘Portland Vase’, and Hamilton’s involvement in the proceedings.
    Hamilton records visits to her friends Mrs [Charlotte] Walsingham and Miss Boyle and their reading and discussion on Mr Farmingham’s Scandinavian Poetry , which Hamilton considered ‘poor stuff’. Mrs Walsingham informed her that the poet had previously written a few lines to Miss Boyle for her birthday. She also describes attending the first of a series of ten private concerts, recording those attending.
    The diary contains the gossip and Society news of the day, for example the excitement over the concert of music at Westminster Abbey that was to be held in honour of Handel, which the King and Queen were to attend. She writes about Lady Stormont’s visit to the Prince of Wales at Carleton House, describing the house and of the evening. She discusses the Dowager Countess Spencer whose ‘inconsistencies’, Mrs Walsingham believed, were ‘due to as Pope describes it Lust of Praise ’. Hamilton records anecdotes relating to Lady Spencer including her playing at the gaming table all night, then changing her dress to go to early prayers.
    Hamilton writes about the men who admire and pursue her, including William Wake (son of Hamilton’s friend, Lady Wake). She describes his character and his many visits to her. She told him that his visits were ‘troublesome’ to her and she undertook to advise him on any shortcomings in his conduct; she notes that ‘he takes the criticism with patience’. Hamilton also reports a visit from someone who lived near the Dickenson family in Derbyshire who told her that John Dickenson (her future husband) ‘was not yet married’.
    The diary also records Hamilton’s relationship with her family. She was a frequent visitor to her cousin Lady Stormont and enjoyed the company of her uncle, Sir William Hamilton. Her uncle, Frederick Hamilton, often visited her and told her many anecdotes of her grandmother, Lady Archibald Hamilton, ‘that did her much honour’. Her grandmother was a ‘woman of the strictest honor - liberal – to a degree & very benevolent her manners uncommonly pleasing & highly polished’. She sacrificed the best part of her life and her health in the service of a Court and ‘retired disappointed & disgusted with the insincerity & great ingratitude she experienced – many peoples fortunes she made – but her own she injured by her liberalities and she was of too noble a spirit to advance it by accepting any thing from the Court she quitted.’ On a visit to her cousin Charles Greville’s apartment, she notes that the rooms were fitted out ‘more like a fine Ladies – in my opinion – than a man’s’. She praises her cousin Miss Jane Hamilton for her musical abilities and her ‘good heart’. She notes that Miss Hamilton was about fifteen years old and ‘elegant in her person & almost pretty & looks like a girl of fashion’.
    Hamilton records drawing a design for a new fan for her friend Miss Gunning, making a bag for Mrs Glover in the shape of a balloon, attending a working-party ‘with a number of Ladies’, and spending her time reading, drawing and writing in her diary. She justifies reading a new novel ‘because it was written by the Lady who wrote the Old English Baron, – which I thought an ingenious pretty work’. She writes of reading other poetry and a new translation and also writes of the author Madame [Anne-Marie] du Boccage; Lord Stormont said he had known her and that she was a very dull woman ‘though it was the fashion to think her a Belle Esprit’. Lord Stormont told her that when Madame du Boccage invited him to dinner she used the following words: ‘Sir, I beg, pray, you would could should can will dine with me’. Stormont added that this absurd string of words ‘lasted near a minute’. Hamilton writes of her annoyance at the daily routine of having her hair dressed and of the time it takes dressing for the day: ‘I hate that loss of time which dressing occasions’. She does not place too much attention on dress and on not wanting to be at the height of fashion, preferring to be ‘plain than decorated’.
    Hamilton also writes of being involved in accidents whilst travelling, with two horses falling on two separate trips, and of visiting Robsons the booksellers to look at prints and drawings. She discusses her own and others’ servants, noting that she gave her maid Hannah some ‘good advice on not encouraging young men’ visiting her; Hannah seemed grateful for this advice.
   

Length: 1 volume, 98 images, 47 folios (47 + ii) , 12291 words

Transliteration Information

Editorial declaration: First edited in the project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers' (Hannah Barker, Sophie Coulombeau, David Denison, Tino Oudesluijs, Cassandra Ulph, Christine Wallis & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2019-2023).

All quotation marks are retained in the text and are represented by appropriate Unicode characters. Words split across two lines may have a hyphen on the first, the second or both fragments (reco-|ver, imperfect|-ly, satisfacti-|-on); or a double hyphen (pur=|port, dan|=ger, qua=|=litys); or none (respect|ing). Any point in abbreviations with superscripted letter(s) is placed last, regardless of relative left-right orientation in the original. Thus, Mrs. or Mrs may occur, but M.rs or Mr.s do not.

Acknowledgements: Transcription and XML version created as part of project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers', funded by the Arts & Humanities Research Council under grant AH/S007121/1.

Transliterator: Cassandra Ulph, editorial team (completed 30 June 2021)

Cataloguer: Lisa Crawley, Archivist, The John Rylands Library

Cataloguer: John Hodgson, Head of Special Collections, John Rylands Research Institute and Library

Copyright: Transcriptions, notes and TEI/XML © the editors

Revision date: 3 November 2021

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