Single Letter

HAM/2/9

Diary of Mary Hamilton (20 March 1784 - 22 April 1784)

Diplomatic Text


at 3 -- A M came & took leave
of me as she was going to Mrs.
Jackson
s & I should not see her
all day -- had Wm. Benn &
got him to write answers to
notes &c -- after I was dreʃsed
scribbled in my diary --
Miʃs Palmer call'd but was
was not let in as I was dreʃsing
-- A little before 5 Lord Stormonts
Charriot came for me went
there to dinner -- only Lady S——
Mr. Nicholson (Mr Murrays tutor
& me -- the 3 boys came down to
desert -- Mr. N. & they left us
soon -- Lady S & I went upstairs
& had a comfortable tête a tête
till near 9 -- she gave me ½
a Guinea for my poor Woman
-- we talk'd of ye. Royal family
-- &c &c. Lord Stormont came in
for 10 Minutes before I came
away -- told us the Prince of
Wales
was better (he has been
very ill again & if he goes
on as he hads done it is



thought he will fall a
Victim to his irregularities.
-- A little after 9 left Ld. St.'s
had his Chariot -- went to
Mrs. Burrows -- a large party
& few People I knew. ex
Conversed wth. Young Mr. Cambridge
Miʃs C Smith M & a few others.
At ½ past ten was brought
home by Mr.. C. Smith & his
daughter
-- . sat up ½ an hour
wrote Notes -- Miʃs C. was
gone to bed -- A M would not
come into ye. room when she
came home as she had been
at Mr. Jacksons[1] --

Sunday -- 21st.. March 1784
Lady Wake call'd to take me
to Church -- I was not ready &
could not go -- after I was dreʃs'd
A M. came & sat wth. me till 3
oClock -- we read together the
letter in R. Eloise[2] on Duelling



A M took leave of me
till thursday -- she is going
to her friend Mrs. Harris.
Mr. Wake came for ½ an hour
told me that the felt that
he was better for the
friendly advice I had given
him -- that he endeavourd
to correct his errors &c &c
Mrs: Vesey call'd for me &
put an end to our conversation
she was good to carry me
to Stratford Place as I was
to dine with Mrs: Walsingham.
-- She set me down but did
not go in. but Lady Denniver
(Lady Cecilia). Rice Lord Talbots
Daughter) & her daughter
Miʃs Rice & Mr. Walker din'd
with us -- After dinner Mr.
Walker
play'd a Hymn &
Songung a Song of his own composing
wch.. was not without merit
-- Mrs. W & Mr. W. talk'd so



much of ye. Beauties of
Matlock & other parts of
Derbyshire that I feel
more impatient than ever
to see these Romantick
Views -- wch. describe so
well. The company went
away before 8. -- Mrs. W. &
I set out soon after -- I set
her down at Lord Exeters &
had Mrs. W. Coach on to Mrs.
Delany
s -- found her alone
only her Great Neice Miʃs
Port
-- ye. Dʃs Dr. of Portland
had been there but was
to the Queen. Mrs. D. was
pretty well -- she shew'd
me some of Swifts Letters
I read one aloud to her. --
She used to correspond with
him -- it was in a lively
stile -- & ye. Compliments he
paid her were just &
expresʃ'd in a peculiar



at ye. same time in an
elegant manner. I wrote
a Note to ye. Dʃs. wch. Mrs. D
was to give her Servt in ye.
Morng. as she sends daily
to enquire after her friend.
to tell her Grace I was not
sure of getting a ticket for
ye. Ancient Musick for to-
morrow
Eveg. &c
at ¼ past nine Lady Wake
sent her Coach for me. calld
for Sr. Wm. at one of ye- Clubs
& we went home together his house
-- found Lady Wake & Mr.
Wake
setting together -- Mr. Catton
gone to Cambridge -- we had
supper & I sat till 11 o'Clock.
-- ye. Diʃsolution of Parliament
&c were ye. topics of conversation.
I came home in a Chair.
saw Miʃs C for a few Minutes
-- she gave me a good account
of Mrs. Jackson & her little Fanny



Monday 22d March 1784
-- Notes from my Uncle Wm. -- wrote
to Mrs. Buller to inform her
she & her Sister Lady Baʃset
might go to see ye. Vase on
Wednesday Morng. & to Mrs.
Aufrere
of Chelsea to say
Sr. Wm. & I wd. come any
Morning she & Mr. Aufrere
were to be at home.
The Dʃs. D Portland sent to me
to know if I had got a ticket
&c. Miʃs Clarke came at 1
o'Clock & sat wth. me an hour
or two. read ye. Papers &
chatted.. Miʃs Nevin -- dreʃser
to ye. Princeʃs's came brought one of
Mrs. Hicks little Girls wth. her.
she staid a good while. talk'd of
ye. Princeʃs's & Ladies of ye.
Queens House. She said ye. Queen
went to see ye Prince of Wales
this Morning before she went
to Windsor -- that she heard he
was better -- Miʃs Glover



came soon after Miʃs Nevin
left me sat ½ an hour. I
promised to go to Mr. Glover in
the Afternoon --
As Miʃs Clarke & I were going
to dinner recd. a Ticket from
Sr. Wm. Hamilton (Sr. W W Wynns)
for ye. Concert -- sent immediately
to ye. Dʃs. Dr. of Portland to
inform her I could have ye.
pleasure of going with her
-- at ½ past 5 ran up &
had my hair better dreʃs'd
& was just finish'd when
ye. Dʃs. Coach came at ½ past
6. went sent an excuse to
Mr. Glover -- Miʃs Clarke was
going there. went to
Whitehall -- did not get out
ye. Dear Dʃs. & I went to
ye. Concert -- saw a great number
of People I knew. conversed wth.
Mr Howard & Lord Gilford &c
I was much pleased with the



Musick -- some of Handels
Chorus's were finely perform'd
-- The Ducheʃs & I quitted ye. C—
before it was quite over --
Lady Greenwich Ldy. Coventry &c
were in ye. waiting Room conversd
a little wth. them & came away
I went home wth. ye. Dʃs. she was
so good to say she had been much
pleased to have me with her.
I did not go in wth. her had her
Coach home. M was at home
at ½ past 10 o'Clock. Miʃs C——
came into my room for ½ an
hour & then we went to our
rooms.

Tuesday 23d. March 1784
Mr. Wake came when I was dreʃs
ing
did not let him in.
Miʃs W: King for ½ an hour
then my old Maid Goodyar who
was wth. me above an hour --
told me she was going to Marry
& ask'd my advice wth. respect
to her affairs & future plans for settling
had Wm. Benn to ask him some



questions respecting the man she
talkd of going into partnership wth.
&c &c. Mrs. & Miʃs Orde & my
Aunt Dowr Lady Warwick they sat
sometime -- my Aunt told me her
Son Col. Greville was better.
When they left me Mr Wake came
went to Miʃs Clarke & sat ½ an
hour with her. Mr. Wake came
a little before three walk'd wth. me
through ye. Park (met Lord Walsingham) to Mrs. Delanys
I did not find her in good spirits
she was unhappy about her Nephew
Mr. John Dewes who was worse.
-- she lent me some very pretty
Verses of ye. late Miʃs Bowdlers
to Copy -- gave me a charge, not to Give
them to any one -- as Dr. Bowdler
her Brother had desired ye.
Copys not be multiplied.
Mr.. Wake call'd for me and
attended me to Miʃs Gunnings
at St. James's left me at ye. door
& said he would call in ½ an
hour to Chaperon me back
again. found her in Bed
wth. an Ague fit -- she was



however in pretty good spirits.
Mr. W. call'd for me & walk'd
wth. me to Mr. Glovers. where I
din'd & spent ye. day -- Mr. G.
in good spirits -- & health -- though his
eyes were bad. only ye. family
Mr. Wake came in after dinner
& brought a Meʃsage to desire
me to go over to their house
this I cld not comply with.
he returnd again at tea time
sat an hour & brought me
a letter from my friend Miʃs
Litchfield
. After he went Miʃs
Glover
read aloud till supper
in Lord Clarendons Hist: part
of ye. reign of Charles ye: 2d. ye.
trial of ye. Earl of Stratford.
Mr: Glover after supper
talk'd over some of the
Characters of ye. Ministers
& great Speakers of ye. House
of Commons in that Reign
-- I had a coach came home
at 11 -- Miʃs C. gone to bed --
read after I got to my room
& was undreʃs'd for an hour



a Dialogue in Plato. &c & my
friend
s letter wch. did not give much comfort

Wednesday 24th: March 1784
After I was dreʃs'd went & set wth.
Miʃs Clarke read ye. Papers to her.
Lord Napier came he was shewn
into ye. Parlour after he had paid
his Compts. to Miʃs C. he desired
me to go upstairs to my breakfast
room as he had something to com
municate
to me -- I complied, I
imagined it was relative to busineʃs
& was not a little surprised when
he told me he had this Morning
made an offer of marriage to
Miʃs C      but was equally
pleased to find he had been
accepted -- as she is a Woman
of good Character -- is I have
heard & from what I have been
able to judge from her manners
& countenance good temper'd
& has a large fortune & is
a Woman of a proper rank in
life for him to marry. we
talk'd ye. affair over -- he desired



me not to mention it for the
present as he had not yet told
any of his family. Mr. Glovers
Coach came for me at 1 oClock
Ld. N. took leave of me. I went to
Mr. Glovers -- Miʃs Glover came &
sat in the Coach wth. me till he
was ready. we went to my Uncle
William
s. Mr. G. only went in
Miʃs G. went on with me to St.
James's & waited for me in ye.
Coach whilst I paid a visit to
Miʃs Gunning -- she was in bed
but better & going to get up --
her Sister was wth. her -- Mr.
Gunning
their Brother came in
& gave us ye. News of the Great
Seal being stole out of ye. Lord
Chancellor
s house. heard that
ye. Prince of Wales was so far
Recoverd that he rode on horse-
back
yesterday & was going to
day
to ye House of Lord's. Mr.
Devaynes
ye. Apothecary came in
he told me ye. Bark wd. soon



Remove Miʃs Gunning's fever &c.
Miʃs G. return'd me ye. paper wch.
I had left wth. her Yesterday con-
taining
the melancholy narrative
of Mrs: Setons distreʃs's wch.
Ldy. Stormont sent me to try to
get something from my acquain-
tance
towards a subscription for
her & her Childrens relief.[3] Miʃs
G.
told me her father had promised
to give something. I staid abt.
20 Min: return'd to Miʃs Glover
She set me down at home &
went back for her father as
they were going into ye. City.
Mr. Fisher & my Uncle Frederick
had call'd during my absence
I wrote a long note to Mrs. Jackson
& work'd. till 4 oClock Miʃs Clarke
& I went & din'd with our opposite
Neighbours ye. Veseys -- only themselves
-- we continued in ye dining room
till 7. I read Mrs. Setons melancholy
Story -- Mr. Vesey promised me
to subscribe -- & Mrs. Handcock
gave me secretly a Guinea &
desired me to take no notice that



she had done so. before tea I
run home stay'd only a few Min:
to answer some notes. Mr. Wake
had call'd & left a Meʃsage abt.
my going this Eveg to Lady Wake
&c. Miʃs Clarke came home --
I return'd to ye. Veseys -- a Mrs.
Trip
came in but did not stay
long -- I wrote an Answer to
a letter I recd. from A M at Mr
Vesey
s & enclosed some letters wch.
had come for her. Mr. H. Walpole
came at 8 & staid till 10 & no
other company so we had the
pleasure of his conversation
uninter̄upted. he talk'd of
Hamiltons works, his Memoirs
of Gram̄ont[4] &c. Mr. Walpole
has lately published a new
Edition of Gram̄ont wth. Notes.
The conversation was well
kept up & was very agreeable
-- I staid supper -- read Miʃs
Bowdler
s Poem on Hope to
Mr. & Mrs. Vesey & Mrs. Handcock
they were much pleased with



it & gave it ye: praises I think
it merits. After supper Mrs.
Vesey
gave me a description
of their Villa in Ireland
(Lucan) she has a warm
imagination & her descriptions
are lively & I may say, very
pictoresque. Lucan is I
have been inform'd a beautiful
Place & Mr. Vesey has built
a fine house there not many
years sinceago. I came home
abt. 12. & went immediately to
my room. My Cousin Mrs. Charteris
                   had call'd when I was out.


Thursday 25th. Employ'd myself
in Notable Work from ye. time
I got up till near 3. Mr. Wake
call'd -- but I had given orders
no body should be let in --
Miʃs Clarke came & sat wth. me
sometime. Betty dreʃs'd my
Hair & kept me near 2 hours
to make me smart. I read
during ye. time in Plato. I
am a great admirer of this
author -- this is the second time



I am reading it. & hope to
reap profit as well as pleasure
by studying him. I generally
read whilst my hair is dreʃsing
by wch. means that time is not so
idle spent. at 5 oClock my
Aunt Warwicks Coach came
for me -- I went there to dinner
-- we had My Uncle William.
My Uncle Frederick & his Wife
& Daughter -- it was near 6
before we went into ye. dining
room -- The conversation
was chiefly family subjects
-- Relations -- connexions &c
I bore little part for I thank
God I have no portion of
family pride. After tea Musick
was ye. topic -- & other general
Subjects. Sr. Wm left us at '9
-- My U: F & his Wife before
10 -- I took leave of him for
6 Weeks as he goes on Monday
to Ireland to settle some affairs.
At 10 oClock Genl. Clarke -- my
Aunt
s Warwicks second Husband. was so obliging



to offer me his Coach for ye. Eveg. as
my Aunts was a new Carriage &
she does not like her Horses to get
into Crowds. for I was going to
two Aʃsemblies -- a ¼ past ten I
went to ye. Ducheʃs of Chandos -- spoke
to her -- walk'd through ye. Room's
it is a very fine house & handsomely
fitted up -- there was a good deal
of Company -- but not many of
ye. 1st. ton. I spoke to a few people
& then came away. went to
Lady Humes (Sr. Abraham Hume's Lad[y)]
This was a more elegant Aʃsembly
This House too is a good one but
not on so large a Scale as Chandos
House -- one room is very elegantly
fitted up & is a pretty form a long
Oval. the other 3 are hung with
some fine Pictures. There were
many of my acquaintance. I had
a good deal of conversation wth.. Mrs.
Charteris
--- Lord Clarendon &c &c
there were few Gentlemen at either
of the Aʃsemblies -- they are all so
busy in Politicks & preparing for
a New Election. the Young Ladies
we--- most ------ them dreʃs'd en habi[t]



de Bal -- as it was an Almack[5]
night. I came soberly home at
11 -- Miʃs C was gone to bed, I sat
up till 12 & wrote in my diary
at Lady Humes saw ye. Marquis de Bouillé

March 26th. -- got up pretty early dreʃs'd
for ye. day -- answer'd Notes. Recd. a
letter from Mrs. Jackson wth. a good
account of little Fanny & telling me
she hoped it wd.. not be long before
we could meet. -- sorted my Papers
work'd -- look'd after our little family of
Birds -- had Miʃs Clarke for some time --
the day so snowin bad -- Snow & rain -- that
I could not walk out to see Miʃs Gunning
& Mrs. Delany as I intended. ½ past 4
oClock Lady Wakes Coach came for me
din'd there we din'd tête a tête -- Sr.
Wm..
& his Son were gone to Eʃsex -- after
Dinner ye. 2 Miʃs Wakes came down to desert
Miʃs Wake looks & is vastly better. they
left us soon. Lady Wake & I sat below for
some time -- I shew'd her Miʃs Bowdlers
verses wth wch. she was much delighted. Ldy.
W——
told me how much satisfaction it
gave her yt. Sr. Wm. wd. not offer himself
a Candidate for ye. New Parliament as
his health was so bad. We went into
ye. Dr. room at 6. Miʃs Wakes were there
& remain'd wth. me we chat[ted] on com---



topicks -- at ½ past 7 -- Lady Dartrey &
Miʃs Penn call'd to take Lady Wake to
Texiers readings -- they wanted to prevail
on me to go but I resisted their entrea
ties
& my own inclinations -- & made
ym. set me down at Mr. Glovers as I knew
he wish'd me to come to him as Miʃs
Glover
was out & he had no one to read to
him &c. I found him & Mrs. Glover at
Backgammon. they soon left off & he & I
conversed together -- we did not want the
aid of a Book -- the American War. the character of
Genl. Washington. whom Mr.
Glover
esteems very highly -- the Marquis
de la Fayette
. Marquis de Boulle -- to
the merit of each of these -- Mr. Glover
did ample justice. Miʃs Glover & Miʃsrs Lenton return'd at ½ past ten from the
Oratorio -- I came away immediately
in their Coach. Miʃs Clarke was out
& as she had been to Mrs. Jacksons I went
to my Room before she return'd home. had
Wm. Benn before I went upstairs to talk
over Goodyars intention, of going into partner
ship
with Mr. J here. He said he thought it
wd. not answer. Miʃs Asgill had been
to see me. left word she had been ill or
shd. have call'd before. a Note from Miʃs
Gunning
wch. inform'd me she was better.

Saturday 27th: March 1784
My Uncle Wm. call'd on me at 9 o'Clock
we went to Chelsea to Breakfast with
Mr: & Mrs: Aufrere. The snow lay as
deep as it had done any time during
ye. Winter -- but ye. Sun was out & the
day look'd chearful. Mr. Aufrere is a



a Man of Large fortune advanced in Years
simple of plain in his manners but well bred & sensible
-- Mrs. Aufere is of a certain age -- well bred
unaffected & very sensible -- they both
poʃseʃs great taste for ye. fine Arts
wch. has been improved by travel.
They have an only Child who is Wife
to the Rich Mr: Pelham of Lincolnshire.
Their House is near Chelsea Hospital
it is large & spacious -- all the principal
rooms of wch. there are a great number are on ye. Ground floor. every
room has an Air of Comfort. & is
furnished wth. fine Pictures of the
firstbest Masters -- Mr. Aufreres collection
is of the first claʃs. Lord Exeter
was wth. them when we went in -- we were
there 20 Min: past 9 & he had walkd
from Town. Sr. Wm. Meredith came in
-- After Breakfast we look'd at some
of ye. Pictures for our time wd. not admit
of seeing them all wth. that attention
they merit. Mr. A. has just made
an addition to his Collection of thr 4
Pictures wch. he got from france. 2 most
beautiful Landscapes of Gasper Pousin
one of Albano wth. cupids. & a Landscape
of Salvator Rosa -- these are very
Capital Pictures -- particularly ye.
Gasper Pousins wch.. are in his very
best manner. We spent our time
much to my satisfaction & ye. conversation
was interesting & agreeable -- at 12
my Uncle & I came away. My Uncle told



me of his intention of visiting Scotland
&c. &c. before his Return to Naples.
he set me down at home. I went in ye.
Parlour made Miʃs Clarke a visit for
a ¼ of an hour. then went to my B.
room scribbled in my diary. Sr. Robert
Gunning
came & sat sometime. told
me Miʃs Gunning was better -- he gave
me a Guinea for Mrs. Seaton. I recd. a
note from Miʃs H More with Mrs. Garricks
Ticket allows me ye. use of her
whole Box without paying any thing at Drury lane Theatre
for one night -- this is for next thursday
when Mrs. Siddons is to act. I ask'd
Sr. Robert Gunning to join my party &
invited Miʃs Bell Gunning -- he was
obliged to me & said he should gladly
accept it & wd. inform me if his
Daughter
could comego -- my Uncle Frederick
came -- he sat sometime -- took leave
of me he goes on Monday to Ireland.
I told him I should be happy to have
Miʃs Hamilton to go to ye. Play on Thursday.
he said she wd. be happyglad to go. I did not
invite Mrs. H. as I will only have
Ladies enough to fill ye. front Row.
Anna Maria came home before dinner
she came to me -- told me how she had left
her friend &c &c. I din'd at home
with Miʃs Clarkes -- sat with them ye.
whole Eveg. -- they left me to go to ye
Veseys
for an hour before tea. I sent



an excuse to Mrs. Pepys for not
going to her aʃsembly -- or rather
Bas bleu. by Mrs. Vesey -- I had a
Headach -- Miʃs C—s --- writing &
conversation fill'd up our whole
Eveg.. Miʃs C. went to their rooms
at 11 I sat an hour after them
finishing an extract out of Mrs.
Delany
s Manuscript letters --
A Maria & I had some conversation
-- though she was in bed & I in
ye. next room -- we can hear each
other so easily that we generally
have some talk after we are in
our rooms.

Sunday 28th. March 1784.
Intended to have gone to Church wth.
A Maria but as Betty was to dreʃs
us both -- I was not ready when Mr.
G.
Coach came -- read ye. Service of
ye. day &c. in my own room.
Lady Stormont came at 1 oClock
& sat some time. I gave her wht
Money I had got for Mrs. Seaton. &c
She told me Lord S. went yesterday
to Scotland & Lord & Lady Cathcart
Mr Graham & Col. Cathcart -- yt.
her sister Mrs. Graham was to
come to her -- to be in ye House on
Tuesday &c. Mrs. Vesey came.



Miʃs Clarke & I went wth. her & Mr.
Vesey
to take a jumble[6]. went to
Portman square -- set Mrs. Vesey
down at Mrs. Montagus -- we took
a drive for ½ an hour return'd
for her -- I went in for ten
Minutes saw Mrs. Montagu &
Miʃs Gregory took leave of ye.
latter who goes next tuesday to
Scotland for some Months. we
then went to Mrs. Iremongers -- set
Mrs Vesey down -- went on to Lord
Dartrey
s -- enquired how they were
I call'd on Ldy. M: Hume & left
word I wd. wait on her & Miʃs
Humes
on tuesday Eveg.. we
then went back for Mrs. Vesey &
came home at 3. Mr. Wake had
call'd -- I found Notes wch. I answerd
-- Miʃs H.[7] cd not go to ye. play --
Miʃs Glover & Miʃs Is. Gunning
could. &c &c &c. at 4 had
Mr. Veseys Coach -- went to Mrs.
Walsingham
s to dinner. Miʃs Jane
Vernon
-- Ldy. H. Vernons daughter
(not ye. Md. of Honor) din'd with us --
after dinner we look'd over some



fine Colord Drawing's & Prints --
of ye. Ornaments &c of ye. Vatican
after tea Miʃs Rice came
she & Miʃs Jane Vernon were going wth.
Mrs. W: to ye. Concert. I like both
these young women -- they are
well bred & fashionable without
Airs. before 8 -- we set out.
I went in ye Coach wth. them -- set
them down at Sr. W: W: Wynne in St.
James Square & went on in Mrs.
W.
Coach to Doctr. Turtons in ye.
Adelphi -- met there Coll. & Miʃs
Goldsworthy
-- Dr. Kaye -- ye. Duke
of Gordon
. Mr. Vanburgh -- & Miʃs
Noseley
who is upon a Visit to Mrs.
Turton
-- we all sup'd at Dr. Turtons
a tolerably pleasant Eveg. --
at ½ past 11 I came home in a
Chair -- Miʃs C did not get home
till 12. Miʃs C's were gone to
bed -- I had some little talk wth-
A Maria -- she had been to Mrs.
Jackson
's & ye. Glovers -- a good
account of Mrs. J & little Fanny



Monday 29th.. March 1784
A Cold Snowny Day. & high Wind.
Mrs. Carter came at 12 & sat sometime
wth. me she was but poorly. She told
me Miʃs Purdecy -- had been in town
but that she had not had time even
to come to her -- wrote abundance
of Notes & a few extracts out of
Mrs. Delanys letters. Mrs. Iremonger
sent to desire me to go to her in ye.
Eveg. as did Miʃs Asgill to come to
me but I was engaged. Anna Maria
came & sat a little wth. me. &
I went to her before she went out.
dreʃs'd at 2. Lord Dartrey call'd but
wd. not come in as I was dreʃsing as
did Miʃs Jane Vernon. after I was
did[8] saw Miʃs Clarke for a short time.
at ½ past 4 Lady Stormont sent her
Carriage for me -- went there to
dinner. Lord Stor: set out on Friday to
Scotland for the Election -- nobody but Mr..
Nicholson
at dinner -- I ask'd him by Lady
Stormont
s desire to go to ye. Play on thursday.
After dinner only ye. 2 youngest boys came
down Master Murray was in disgrace &c.
Lady S. & I had tête a tête from ½ past
5 till 8. she told me Lord & Lady Cathcart were
gone to Scotland for ye. to remain there all
next Winter -- &c &c. Mrs. Graham was to
come to her on Tuesday or Wednesday for a



fortnight before she & Mr. Graham went
to Scotland. we talk'd of Mr. Fielding ye.
R Family
&c &c. at 8 she took me in
her Carriage I set her down at Lady Warwicks
& went on in her Coach to Mrs. Hanburys
Aʃsembly. it was so early that none of ye.
Company were come. I had a tête a tête
wth. her for a ¼ of an hour -- saw her eldest Son
a boy of 4 years old. Mrs. H. told me she had
invited Miʃs Thursby to spend some time
with her in London but did not know
whether Mr Thursby would give her leave
to come &c. A great many people came that
I did not know & some I did. ye. Minchins
Bathursts. Tollemaches Miʃs Scawen
Mrs. C. Hoare. Lady Beaumont &c &c. had
a good deal of Conversation with Lady Tri:
Bathurst
. she is a sensible pleasing Young
Woman. at 10 had Lady Wakes Coach went
there to supper -- only her & Mr. Wake.
Miʃs Clarkes call'd for me at 11 they came
in & sat ½ an hour. when we came home
went immediately to our rooms.

Tuesday 30th. March 1784. After I was dreʃs'd
had A Maria for some time we talk'd over
House affairs. Mr. Adam came & sat
an hour wth. me -- he gave me a description
of Lord Caʃsels place in Scotland (Airshire
& of the House he had built there for
him -- we talk'd of Mr. John Hope
Mr. Adam had known him intimately
for many years. At ½ past 1 oClock Lady Wake
call'd for me set me down at little
Burlington House -- Sr C. Asgills.[9]



[10]



I sat ½ an hour with Miʃs Asgill
we renew'd our old acquaintance
wch. from some accident had been put
a stop to for four years. Lady Asgill
came in before I came away. Lady W:
was so good to call for me I went away
pleased wth. my visit as I really have
always had an affection for Miʃs Asgill
-- she is beautiful -- elegant & I believe
very amiable. I went home wth. Lady
Wake
-- Saw Miʃs Wakes. set down to their
dinner & then went & sat wth. Lady
Wake
whilst she dreʃs'd. a little after 4
we went down to dinner. Sr. Wm. & Mr.
Wake
-- Mr. Baldwin Wake Sr. Wm.s Brother
& Miʃs Wake Sr. Wm.s Sister dined wth. us
-- I stay'd till 7. had Lady W: Coach went
to Lady Mary Humes. there was only
her & her youngest Daughter[11] at home
Lady Mary was not well & has been
ill some time -- we work'd & chatted talkd
of eoconomy. Scotch Relations &c.
at 10 I run over the way to Lord Dartreys
-- sup'd wth. Dr. Lord & Lady Dartrey.
Mr. Davies Mr. Dawsons former tutor
there -- at ½ past 11 came home in
a Chair. Our Man was ill & Wm. Benn
came for me. found Miʃs C: were gone
to bed. went immediately to my room
not without having had some talk
wth. A Maria.



Wednesday 31st. March 1784
Read the 1st. part of ye. Morning. A Maria
came to me for some time. our Man
Servt. Richard very ill wth. an Ague.
Miʃs Gunning sent to me at 12 I walkd
wth. her Servt. to attend me through the
Park. found her but poorly. her
Sister
was wth.. her      I sat till near
2. Sr. Robt. Gunning & Mrs. Lisle
came in -- they talk'd of Lord Napiers
Marriage, as I found it was now
generally known I wrote a note to
him to desire he wd. acquaint ye.
Stormonts
& his other Relations
as they wd. take it ill to hear of
it first from others. went wt.
Miʃs G. Servt. to Mrs. Delany. sat
20 Min: wth. her. found her pretty
well. Miʃs Gunning & her Sister
came for me in ye. Coach. set me
Mrs Hood[12] down at Mrs. Walkinshaws. I sat
½ an hour wth. her -- Mrs. Mary
Moyston
was there. Miʃs G: call'd
for me again & set me down at
Mrs. Glovers. she was ill & confin'd
to her Dreʃsing room -- saw Mr. Glover
Mrs. Lenton & Miʃs Glover. I stay'd
& din'd tête a tête wth. Mrs. Glover in
her room. she told me some anecdotes
of Mr. G's sisters -- their behaviour
to her &c. a little before 6 had her
Coach wch. had brought A Maria to their



house -- came home dreʃs'd -- Miʃs Clarke
came to me for ¼ of an hour. after I
was dreʃs'd wrote in my Diary at
Sr. Wm. Hamilton & Mr. Wake had call'd
when I was out. at ½ past 9 my
Uncle William came for me. we went
together to Mrs. Montagu's a large & fine
Aʃsembly -- ye. French Ambaʃsador
many foreigners -- &c &c. Lady
Bathurst
told me that Lady Triphena
had desired her to give her Compts. to me --
introduced her 2d. Daughter to me &c.
had a good deal of conversation wth.
Lord Hartcourt. Lady Harriet Grey &c.
&c. a pleasant Eveg., more so than a
great aʃsembly generally is. abt. a ½
past 11. my Uncle & I came away he
set me down at home. saw at Mrs. Montagus
ye. new invented Lamp of wch. more hereafter[13]
-- Miʃs C's were gone to bed -- enquired
how our poor Servt. did heard he was very
poorly -- went immediately to my Room.

Thursday 1st. April 1784 --
Miʃs Port came before I was dreʃs'd -- she
staid only a few Minutes told me Mrs. Delany
wish'd to see me next Wedy. afternoon.
went to AMaria sat a little wth her --
spent ye. Morning in reading writing &
working -- Betty's Sister Mrs. Harman came
at 2 & dreʃs'd my Hair. din'd at home



with Miʃs Clarkes. at ½ past 5
Mr. Wake & Miʃs Glover came to
go to ye. Play -- Sr. Rt. Gunnings
Coach came for me & we set out
before 6. Mr: Wake A Maria &
Miʃs Glover went in Mr. Glovers
Coach. I went in Sr. Roberts &
call'd for him & Miʃs Is: Gunning
we got to ye. play before it began
-- Mrs. Siddons was very great in
the Character of Lady Randolph
in Douglaʃs[14] -- ye. other actors were all bad.[15] Mr. Nicholson came to
ye. play -- he told me Mrs. Graham was
come to Lady Stormont &c. ye. play
was over before 9 -- Sr.. Robt. Miʃs Is:
Gunning
& I came away went to
Mrs. Walsinghams Aʃsembly -- saw most
of ye. People I met last night --
ye. French Ambaʃsador &c. I do not like
ye. french Ambaʃsador -- his manners
are not elegant nor does he look
like a Man of fashion. abt. 10 o'Clock
I came away wth. Sr. R: Miʃs Is & Mr.
Gunning
-- set them down at Lord Bathursts
where there was another Aʃsembly came
home in their coach -- undreʃs'd -- put on
my Robe de Chambre & went & sat wth
Miʃs Clarke. A Maria did not come home
from ye. Play as she had staid ye. entertainmt



till ½ past 11 -- we chatted till 12
& then went to our Rooms. Miʃs H. More
Lord Napier & the Mrs. Adams[16] had call'd when I was out.
                                                         in ye. morng


Friday 2d. April 1784
Mr. Wake came at 12 but I did not
let him stay as I was going to make
Visits. the Veseys were so good to lend me
their Coach & a Servt. as ours was still
too ill to go out. went to Mrs. Boscowans,
wish'd her joy of son Lord Falmouths
intended marriage wth. Miʃs Crewe.
she told me she was going to send to invite
me for ye. Eveg. I told her I had no Servt
as mine was ill. she promised to send
both her Coach & Servt. &c. from her
went to Mrs.. Walkinshaws, only staid
a few Minutes -- she was but poorly.
enquired at Mrs: Baker door to know
how she was -- heard but an indifferent
account of her -- left my Name for
her Sister Miʃs Julia Conyers.*
& went to Mrs. Glover -- she was rather better
-- saw Mrs. Lenton & Miʃs Glover -- sat an
hour & ½ -- Mr. Wake came to walk
home wth. me & was very happy to be
my beau. he came & staid till 4
I din'd at home & alone. went up
immediately after to dreʃs -- at 7
run over to ye. Vesey's to see Mrs. Handcock
who had been extremely Ill -- she let
me come into her bed room -- Mrs. Vesey



was sitting with her. I thought good Mrs.
Handcock
was much alter'd wth. her
illneʃs -- at ½ past 7 Mrs. Boscowans
Coach came for me -- went there
met her two Daughters -- viz the
young Ducheʃs of Beaufort & Mrs.
Levenson
-- Mrs. John Pitt, her sister Mrs. Iremon-
ger
-- Dowgr. Lady Gore (Mother in law
to Mrs. Levenson) Counteʃs Rothes
her husband Sr. Lucas Pepys &
her Son (by her first husband who
was a Son of Mrs. Boscowans)[17] --
Lord Leslie. & Mrs.. Price there
was one Card Table. Lady Middleton
was also there who is a very pleasing
Woman -- Elections & Politicks were
ye. principal topicks of Conversation.
at 10 had Mrs. Boscowans Coach she
insisted upon my making what use
I pleased with it, & if ever I was
in distreʃs for a Carriage to send to her.
I went to Madame Saladin de Crans
aʃsembly -- she has not long been
married -- was a Miʃs Egerton -- it was
too early for many people to be there
-- the Churchills ye Humes &c &c
some Men I did not know -- Coll.
Hamilton
of Geneva was there
he desired to be introduced to me



I did not recollect him but he did
me -- told me of having seen me
when very young at my Great Aunts
Lady Mary Colleys -- had some
conversation with him & Mrs. Walpole
& then came away was at home before
11 -- found A Maria in my Breakfast
room -- Miʃs C. gone to bed -- we chatted
for ½ an hour -- then went to our
rooms.

Saturday3d: April 1784.
At 11 ye. Glovers Coach came -- went there
wth. Anna Maria -- she, Mrs. L & Miʃs
Glover
went to ye. City -- Mrs. Glover was
better Lord Napier was paʃsing by as
I was at Mr. Glovers door -- he stop'd &
spoke to me told me he had been to
his Grandmothers in Hertfordshire
-- Dowg Lady Cathcarts', &c I gave him a
note to send for me to my Uncle Wm.s
to desire him not to call for me to take
me to Mrs. Garricks to dinner as he
was to have done. & Anna Maria
took one for me to Mrs. Garricks to excuse
me to her -- I promised to be with her
before ye. Coffee was ready. the reason
of my putting off going was, that Lady
Stormont
had sent a preʃsing invitation
for me to dine wth. her -- as I could have
no other opportunity of seeing her Sisters Mrs:
Graham
& Miʃs Cathcart as they were



to set off tomorrow Morng for Scotland. I sat
wth. Mrs. Glover till 12 -- she was better --
Mr. Glover was not up & I paid him
a Visit in his bed room -- Lady Wake
call'd for me -- I went to introduce her to
Mrs. Newton as she wish'd to see her
Pictures -- we took up Lady Dartrey at
ye. Veseys' & then went for Lord Dartrey
& Master Dawson -- we proceeded to
Mrs. Newton's who recd. us wth. great
civility & took ye. trouble of shewing
us her fine Collection of Pictures.
Mrs. Newton is Widow of ye. late Bishop
of Bristol
s who was a judge &
lover of ye. Art & had indulged
himself in making a collection of ye
works of some of the first Masters -- it would
exceed the limits of my diary to
give a description of those Pictures
wch. pleased me the most -- neither do
I think I am equal to descriptions
of any kind -- at least not to such
as wd. well expreʃs or convey
any true idea. Lady Herries &
some other Company came in before we
came away wch. we did at 2 oClock --
Ldy. D &c set me down at home -- I
wrote for ½ an hour in my Journal
then dreʃs'd -- Miʃs Glover Miʃs A M
C:
came into my room whilst I was
dreʃsing -- told me of their mornings



excursions &c. at 5 Lady Stormonts
Carriage came for me went there -- met
Mr. & Mrs. Graham -- Miʃs Cathcart Lord Napier.
-- we were mutual in our congratulations on
his approaching Marriage -- Lady Stormont
said many kind & proper things & offer'd
to present Lady Napier at Court &c &c
Mrs. Veseys Coach came for me just as
we had din'd -- I took leave of ye Grahams
& Miʃs Cathcart. Mrs. Graham told me she
hoped to return to England in ye. Autumn.
When I got to Mrs. Garricks ye. Company
were still in ye. dining room I went in
to them -- & my excuses for not dining wth.
them were accepted. there were. Mrs.
Montagu
-- her Nephew Mr. Montagu. Mr.
Vesey
. Sr. Joshua Reynolds. Abbé Grant.
Sr. Wm. Hamilton Mrs.. Carter Miʃs H More Doctr.
Turton
-- who said he had been invited to
represent me. -- Mr. H: Walpole came
soon after me & we left him wth. ye.
Gentlemen -- as ye. Company were
coming in we hurried into ye. Drawing
Room -- Dr & Miʃs Burney. Mrs. Walsingham
Mrs. Wilmot. Mrs. Morrice. Mr. S. Jennings.
Mr. & Mrs. Pepys. Mrs. Ord. Lady & Miʃs Younge
Mrs. H. Hoare. Lady Rothes. Bishop of St Astraph
his wife & oldest Daughter (Shipley) & several
others. I spent a very pleasant Eveg.
My Uncle Wm. went away early to go to
see his Neice's Mrs. Graham & Miʃs Cathcart.
Mrs. Carter & I came home wth. Mr. Vesey
-- they set me down first. it was ¼ past



10 when I got home. sat wth. Miʃs Clarkes
till ½ past 11 -- they then went to their
rooms I sat up till 12 --

Sunday 4th. April 1784. Anna Maria
Miʃs Glover & I went to May fair Chapel
-- the Clergyman's Text was taken out
of Isaiah Isaiah -- “For Israel will not
“hear, my People will not Consider.”

he censured ye. diʃsipations of the
fashionable world -- the evils ofarising from bad
example to inferiors. &c. &c. his
language was poor -- his delivery
bad -- upon ye. whole it was sad
common place stuff.[18] After Chapel
we went & sat ½ an hour wth. Mrs.
Carter
who lives near -- Miʃs Glover
parted from us & we went & paid
a visit to Mrs. Carter Vesey
after Mrs. Handcock -- heard she was
better. Miʃs Shipley was sitting with
Mrs. Vesey -- Anna Maria & I came
home -- Mr. Wake came at 2 -- Lord
Napier
soon follow'd & I sent Mr.
Wake
away. Lord Napier & I had an
interesting conversation. we talk'd
over his future plans &c &c he
told me he hoped out friendship
wd. not be leʃsen'd by his Marriage
& yt. I woud esteem his Wife as
my Sister &c &c.      Mrs. Newtons Coach
came for me -- & we parted wth. mutual
aʃsurances of Affection & friendship.



-- I call'd for Mrs. Carter & we went together
to Mrs. Newtons -- we sat sometime together
before Mrs. Newton came we were well
amused in looking at some of the
Pictures. soon after Mrs. Newton camejoin'd
f us -- Mrs. Hood came in who staid
½ an hour -- ye. Westminster Election
was ye. Subject. as soon as Mrs. Hood
left us we went down to dinner.
Mrs. Hood is a little lively old Woman
Wife to Admiral Hood -- The late
Gilbert West was her Brother -- Mrs.
Newton
told me that she was always
much admired by the Men & had
many offers wch. she refused as she
had no inclination to Marry -- her
attractions were, her sense, good humor
& vivacity -- for she never was handsome
& had not even a good Person.
Admiral Hood was in love with
her almost many Years & at last
gain'd her by dint of perseverance
-- she was 50 Years old when she
married, she is now near 80 &
20 Years youngerOlder than her Husband[19]
-- his attachment to her is as
lively as ever & they are a very
happy couple.



Mrs. Newton & Mrs. Carter entertain'd
me very much wth. descriptions of
the dreʃses of former times -- the farthen
gales
[20] -- &c. & ye. ladies riding on
Horseback wth. immense Hoops
& long lappets &c &c. Mrs. Newton
show'd us ye. Catalogue of her pictures
wch- was written by ye. late Bishop
-- it is written in the stile that ye.
French call a Catalogue raisonné
At ½ past 7 Mrs. Carter & I had Mrs.
Newton
s Coach -- she set me down
at the Glovers. Mrs. G. was so much
better that she was down stairs.
Mr. Glover was at home, Mr. John
Antrobus
there for some time
Miʃs Clarkes came before Supper
Politicks was ye. principal topick
of discourse. Miʃs C & I came
home at 11 -- went immediately
to our rooms

Monday 5th. April 1784
A Maria came & sat sometime in my
room before I was up -- we talk'd of
Lord Napiers Marriage &c. at 2
Mr. Wake came & stay'd sometime
this is his Birthday -- he enters
into ye. 17th. Year of his age.[21]



-- he had not left me long before Miʃs
Clavering
came she staid ½ an hour
-- I was very well pleased with her --
she told me she understood from Lord
Napier
that a friendship had long subsisted
between us -- that she hoped I approved his
choice & that she might share in our
friendship in future. she spoke of him as
I believe she felt and as I know he
merited. I have every reason to hope
they will suit each other & be as happy
as the generallity of Mankind are
who are good humor'd, sensible &
prudent. The Dartrey's came for me
& A Maria to carry us to Lady Wakes
to dinner I was not quite ready A M
went wth. ym. & they sent ye. Coach back
for me. As I paʃs'd through
Piccadilly saw ye. Prince of Wales
on Horseback going into ye. Court of
Devonshire House he kiʃs'd his
hand to me -- I thought he look'd
ill. Lord & Lady Dartrey Mr. Dawson
Miʃs A M Clarke Lady Wake Mr.
Wake
& ye. 2 Miʃs Wakes were
the Company -- we congratulated
Lady W & her Son on ye. return of
this[22] -- he shew'd me ye presents he
had recd.. Sr. Wm. & Mr. Catton were



out of Town -- we spent ye. day
chearfully -- Lord Dartrey left us
after Coffee -- Mr. Vesey came to tea
we play'd at Commerce to amuse ye.
Young People -- Mr. V. left us before
supper -- Lady D & her Son ye. moment
it was over. A M & I staid & chatted
wth. Lady Wake & her Son till ½ past
11 -- when we came home A M & I
had a little conversation & then went
to bed.

Tuesday 6th.. April 1784
Recd. many notes & invitations, sent answers.
at 12 both ye. Miʃs Gunnings came they
staid some time. Miʃs G. was got pretty well
again -- told me she had been at Mrs. Hobarts
Yesterday Eveg. for ye. 1st.. time of her going
out since her illneʃs -- there was a Ball
ye. Prince of Wales was there.
After they went Mr. Wake came & sat
above an hour -- told me of some
uncomfortable things that had happen'd.
Lord Napier came & I sent him away.
Lord N. & I talk'd over Miʃs Clavering
&c &c after he went A Maria came
to take leave of me as she was going
out -- I din'd at home & alone --
read & wrote till near 8 when Lady Wake
came to sit ye. Eveg: with me, she told me



of her various distreʃs's -- respecting
her uncertainties inor rather Sr. Wm's
Miʃs Asgill came at ½ past 8 & staid
till 10 -- she look'd very pretty &
affected us much by telling us the
story of her Brothers imprisonment &
danger of losing his life in America --
ye. anxiety & misery of herself &
Parents -- & told her how well the
Queen of France had acted -- how
feelingly she recd. Lady Asgill her
Brother
& herself when they went
to Paris this last summer to return
thanks -- all this I will endeavour
to recollect & write down at large.
-- Miʃs Asgill left us at 10 o'Clock --
Lady Wake & I went down to Supper
Miʃs Clarkes came home & join'd
us -- After Supper Lady W. recd. a
letter from Mr Edwards[23] ye. person
who was to take ye. House she was
in some distreʃs abt. it as she was not
prepared to quit it so soon -- sent to Lord
Dartrey
's &c. we offered all ye. aʃsistance
in our power -- She left us at ½ past 11 --
we soon went to our rooms



Wedn- 7th. April 1784 -- Mr. Wake came
early in ye. Morng. to acquaint me
how affairs went on -- A Maria & I
both saw him -- After he left us
A Maria staid some time with me. Mr.
Wake
came again at 1 o'Clock sat an
hour wth. me & told me they had got
other Lodgings &c &c. when he left
me went to dreʃs Lady Beaumont
& Mrs. Hamilton (my Uncle F: wife)
call'd, I did not see either. Lady
Wake
, Lady Dartrey call'd I did not
see them -- they left meʃsages -- after
I was dreʃs'd A M came & sat wth. me
Lord Napier came for me he came
up -- saw A Maria -- it was 5 oClock
he brought Lady Claverings Coach
for me, we went together to her House
I made him a present of a pair
of Sleeve Buttons -- & made him
give me his old ones. was intro-
duced
to Lady Clavering -- she
appears to me to be a friendly
& good natured Woman -- without
pretensions -- she is Mother in
Law[24] to her late Husbands Children
& I am told has ever treated
them as her own -- they are
all & justly much attached to her



I was also introduced to Mr. &
Mrs. Peachel -- Miʃs Mrs: P. is sister
to Miʃs Clavering -- & appears to
be equallyas sensible & good temper'd
a Woman as Miʃs Clavering is --
before dinner Miʃs Clavering pre-
sented
me with a ring with hers
& Lord Napiers hair enclosed &
repeated her wishes to have an equal
share in my friendship with Lord
Napier
. After dinner when ye. Servts-
were withdrawn -- ye. conversation
turn'd upon ye. several neceʃsary
aranjements respecting ye. mar-
riage
-- we then left ye. Gentlemen
& went up to ye. Drawing room --
I came away before they rejoin'd
us -- the Ducheʃs Dowgr. of Portlands
Coach came for me soon after 7.
I went to Mrs. Delany -- Mr. Barnard
Dewes
was wth. her & her great neice Miʃs
Port
-- I found her out of Spirits for
her Old friend Lady Mansfield is
dangerously Ill[25] -- she was siezed last
Sunday wth. a Paralectic Stroke -- her
friends must wish for her release
as she is I beleive 81[26] & has not been
able to swallow any sustenance or speak



since she was taken. ye. Dowgr. Dʃs
of Portland
came soon after me --
Mr. B. Dewes staid ye. whole time --
Lady Wallingford came & stay'd
½ an hour. after she went I
took an opportunity of asking
ye. Dʃs. if she remember'd Dr.
Sandys
-- my friends grandfather[27]
She & Mrs. Delany both told me
they had known him well -- ye.
Dʃs.
told me many circumstances
relative to him -- & when she found
I knew his Grandaughter made
many kind enquiries after her.
She told me Dr. S— had often
spoke of her wth. ye. tenderest
Affection -- I spoke of my friend
as I felt. at 10 I had her Graces
Coach -- went to Miʃs Tryons Aʃsem
bly
ye. Maid of Honor -- met there foriegners of
Distinction & fine folks -- had
ye usual aʃsembly conversation
wth. those of my acquaintance &
came away in ½ an hour -- there
were Card tables -- & in ye. 1st- Room
Musick -- Miʃs Guest[28] play'd a leʃson
very finely whilst I was there --



I was at home before 11 -- sat wth-
Miʃs Clarkes for near an hour
& then we went to our Rooms

Thursday 8th. April 1784
Mr. Wake came to desire me to
be ready to go out with Lady Wake
-- After he left me had A Maria
for some time -- Abt. 1 he came
to tell me his Mother was coming
that she was at ye. Vesey's -- I went
over ye.. way with him to their house
saw Mr.. & Mrs- Vesey -- Mrs.. Vesey said Mrs..
Handcock
was not so well as she
had been -- Mrs. Boscowan was there
with one of her grandaughters[29] (ye. Duke
of Beaufort
s child.) -- she offer'd to take
me to Mrs. Delanys but I declined it
as I was going out with Lady Wake.
-- Ldy. Wake, her Son, & I went to
make Visits -- went to Miʃs Smith
found her at home sat ¼ of an
hour -- I set Lady W—— down at Lady
M. Milbanke
's -- Wm. went on ye. Coach
wth. me -- I call'd on Lady Beaumont
Mrs. & Miʃs Orde -- & Dgr. Lady Warwick
-- they were all out -- we returned
for Lady Wake & then went on together
we were let in at Mr. Burkes a



West Indian -- where Sr. Wm. Wakes
Sister
is on a Visit -- we saw
only Miʃs Wake sat ½ an hour
with her -- Miʃs W is not at all
a mon gre[30] nor ever was -- she
is a proud, -- mean, under-bred conceited
Miʃs.[31] we call'd at a Shop or two
in our way home -- Mr. Isted of
Northamptonshire paʃs in the
Street -- Mr. W. got out of the Coach
& run after him to enquire wht-
news there was relative to ye.
Elections in that part of ye. World --
Lady Wake & I went on to ye.
Glovers
-- only left a meʃsage at
ye. door -- she then brought me home
-- Mr. Wake return'd to us as I was
getting out of ye. Coach -- I took
leave of them & came in -- met
Mr. Vesey going out of our house he
had been to visit Miʃs C's --
At ½ past 3 Lord Dartrey call'd he
sat with me till past 4 oClock -- our
conversation was wholly relative to
Sr. Wm. Wake. we lamented the
alteration -- &c &c &c



Lord Dartry told me he heard
Mr. Farhill was married to a Miʃs
Wilson
of a large fortune[32] -- After
Lord D: left me I went down to dinner
-- Miʃs Clarke & I din'd tête a tête. A M——
was out. I sat sometime wth. her after
dinner. Mr.. Fisher & Miʃs Egerton had
call'd when I was out in ye. Morning.
before 6 I went to my B room -- wrote
some advice ion general subjects in
a Pocket Book Mr.. Wake had left wth. me
for that purpose -- he came at 6 for
it -- he staid an hour -- told me his
Father was come to Town from Nor'tonshire
& other Places where he had been -- that
he had dined with them at Lord
Dartrey
s -- he told me of ye. mortification
ye. Spencers had recd. by ye. People of
Northampton having rejected Lord Lucan
for their Member -- & having chose
one in opposition to the interest
of yt. family. Mrs. Jackson came
& Mr. W. left us -- Mr. Vesey paid
Miʃs Cs a visit below -- the comfort
able
tête a tête Mrs. J & I, had hoped
to have enjoy'd was cruelly disturbed
by an unforeseen event[33] -- .
Abt. 11 A Maria came home she
came to us -- Mrs. J—— left us abt.
½ past 11 -- A M. & I sat up



for some time, I conceal'd what
had happen'd from her for fear
of agitating her Spirits &c &c
I sat up after she went left me --
went to bed at 12.

Friday 9th. April 1784
A Maria was so very indifferent wth.
a bad Cold that we put off going to
Church. After we were dreʃs'd we spent
ye. Morning together -- we had a very
interesting conversation -- I was
obliged to pain her heart by a
communication of wthht- I had heard
last night. Mr. Wake came wth. a
Meʃsage from his mother to desire
me to take an airing wth. her -- she
was to call in a ¼ of an hour -- I
promised to go & he left me.
Little Mary Jackson came -- I went
down to ye. Miʃs Clarkes till Lady Wake
call'd -- wch. she did at ½ past 1 o'Clock
A M. took little Mary to ye. Coach -- after
they had pd. their Compts. to Lady Wake
I got set out wth. Lady Wake Mr. Wake
& ye. 2 Miʃs Wakes -- we saw Lord Dartry
he croʃs'd ye. Street & spoke to us.
We went through Hyde Park to Kensington
there waswere a great many Carriages & Riders
it look'd lively. we left Miʃs Wakes
at a Lady's House to pay a visit to a
young friend -- call'd at a Mrs. Cummings



she came to ye. Coach & talk'd sometime
wth. Lady Wake -- we then took an airing
for a ½ - a Milean hour -- Lady Wake read
some part of a discourse on ye. day
by ye. Bishop of Chester, Porteous.
we call'd for Miʃs Wakes -- I set
Lady Wake & her daughters went
home. Mr. W. went in ye. Coach wth-
me to Mr. Jackson's. I took leave
of him there. I sat wth. Mrs. Jackson
till she was summond by Mr. J. to
dinner -- I sat by them whilst they
din'd -- at ¼ past 5 Lady Stormont's
Carriage came for me -- went to
dine with her. Mr. Nicholson the Tutor din'd
wth. us -- after dinner ye Children for
some time. Lady Stormont & I had
a tête a tête till near from ½ past
6 till near 11. we talk'd of Lord
Napier
s Marriage -- Lady S. desired me
to inform him that she wd. be happy to
be of use to him &c &c. she means to
present Lady Napier if poor Lady
Mansfield
is soon released[34] -- she still
continues in ye. same state. we talkd
over our Childish days & our old
acquaintances -- our Parents &c &c
I left her before 11. had her Carriage
came home -- found A Maria alone
we conversed together for some time
& then went to our Rooms -- her
Cold was very indifferent --



Saturday 10th. April 1784. AMaria
came & sat with me for some time -- Mr. Wake
call'd I did not see him as I was dreʃsing
he left a Note for me or rather a letter
I was amused in reading it for it was
nothing leʃs than a description of myself
this he had written in ye. stile of a
very partial friend. Mrs. Garrick
& Miʃs H. More came & sat sometime
with me. Mrs: Garrick was in
good spirits & it was an agreeable
Visit. -- After they went Lord Napier
came -- he staid from 2 till 3 oClock -- he
Shew'd me a Watch & Bracelets he
had got to present to Miʃs Clavering.
I told him of Lady Stormonts friendly
offers to ------ him & her &c &c
gave him a little present to present
from me to Miʃs Clavering --
When he left me Mr. Wake came
& staid till 4 o'Clock -- he talk'd to
me of his Tutor -- I was sorry to find
by what he said that he did not
love him -- he spoke however very
sensibly on ye. subject & promised
me to behave always towards him
wth. propriety -- & acquiescd in my
opinion of Mr. C's merits --
but it is not easy to turn aside
ye. prejudices of Young Men of his age --



a ¼ after 4 I forgot to mention yt.
Miʃs Port call'd on me at 11 o'Clock
she brought me a Meʃsage from Mrs-
Delany
-- staid ¼ of an hour.
Abt. 20 Min: past 4 Mr. Glovers Coach
came for me -- as I was going out recd
ye. long expected letter from my friend
from Mansfield -- it depreʃs'd my spirits
for it contain'd an uncomfortable ac-
count
of her health. I din'd wth.
Mrs. Glover her Sister Mrs. Lenton &
Miʃs Glover -- Mr. G. was out -- I staid
wth. them till ½ past 7 when Mr. G. came
home -- he was well -- I had only time
to pay my Compts. to him as his Coach
was waiting for me -- I went to Lord
Dartrey
's. where I spent ye. Evening --
Lady Wake -- Lady Beaumont & Lady
Shelborne
-- Dartrey & myself were
ye. party -- Lady Shelborne told us
a diverting anecdote of A Mans
going a few days ago to the Lord
Chancellor
s -- he told ye. Porter
that he had found & brought
the Seals wch. were lately stol'n[35]
& put a Basket carefully
tied up in his hands -- The
Porter flew to his Lordship who
eagerly order'd & aʃsisted in
opening ye. Basket. -- when to



instead of ye. Seals a pretty
new born Infant was discover'd
-- the Man who brought it did not
stay for his reward.
-- Lady S & B went away at
10 -- I saw at Lord Dartreys where
he is upon a visit to Mr. Dawson
Master George Clayton -- son to
Lady Louisa Clayton -- I thought him
grown -- we went down to Supper
found Lord Dartrey & Sr. Wm. Wake
in ye room -- the Wakes
brought me home at 11 --
Miʃs C's were gone to bed --
I went to my room.

Sunday 11th. April 1784
I went down to Breakfast with Miʃs
C's.
& Miʃs Glover came -- A Marias Cold
being very indifferent I proposed
our reading Prayers together at
home after I was dreʃsd. I went
to dreʃs soon after Breakfast -- Mr.
Wake
call'd but was not let in --
After I was dreʃs'd A M & I were some
time together. Lady & Miʃs Clavering
came at 2 & staid sometime -- Miʃs
C
thank'd me for my little present --
Lady C. hoped our acquaintance wd
improve & other very civil things paʃsd



Lady C. invited me to come to her
House next friday Eveg. the day
ye. new married pair are to return to
Town -- they are to be married tomorrow
After they left me Mr. Wake came to
know whether I could dine at their house
I excused myself as I had promised
to dine at home -- he made me many
promises of future good conduct
-- & many profeʃsions of affection
gratitude & so forth. he staid till
past 4 -- the Miʃs C's & I din'd
together -- I sat with them till
6 -- then went to my room for
½ an hour & read in ye. Scripture
return'd & drank tea wth. Miʃs C's
Miʃs Gunning came to me at 7
oClock & sat wth. me tête à tête
till ½ past 11 -- she opened her
heart to me -- told me the struggles
of her Mind wth. respect to her
attachment to ye. World -- how far
that interfered wth. her love
to God & duty towards him -- I
gave my opinion as well as I was
able -- I do not think we need retire
from ye. world to fulfill our duties -- for if we
are placed in ye. midst of temptations
our resisting them is an example to
our weaker brethern -- & we have certainly
a greater power of doing good & may often
influence by our others to admire &



follow Virtue --
She then told me of her acquain
tance
wth. Rouʃseau whom she
saw at Paris abt. 7 years ago
-- how much she admired him
&c &c. &c.
After she left me A. M. came
to me for ½ an hour we talkd
of Miʃs Clarke -- her opinions
&c -- & then went to our
Rooms[36]




      Monday 12th. April

I hear Lady Mansfield died
this Morng[37]



Monday 12 April 1784
Mr. Wake & Mrs. Carter call'd
when I was dreʃsing -- I did not see
either -- Lord Napier came & staid
½ an hour talk'd over his
Matrimonial arrangements --
seem'd happy & in good spirits.
When he left me A M came to
me & Lady Wake call'd to take
leave of us as she goes into
ye. Country tomorrow -- she said
she hoped to be in Town (as she
is only for ye. present going to
Upshire farm in Eʃsex wch. is
but 14 Miles from London) for
a few days in the Course of
ye- Week. A M left us together
Lady Wake told me how much
(& alas! I fear she has reason)
she was out of spirits.
After she went Miʃs C—— came
to my room -- she staid with me
from 2 till past 4 -- A M just
came in to take leave of us as
she was going out -- Miʃs C &
I had a very interesting conver
sation
we dind together



I staid wth. Miʃs Clarke till 8 oClock
-- When Mr. Mrs. Vesey came for me
went wth. them to Mrs. Ordes -- a
Bas Blue party. there were
Mrs. Montagu Mr. Walpole Mr. & Mrs.
Pepys
. Sr. L: Pepy's Lady Rothes
Mrs. Garrick -- Miʃs H. More -- Dr. &
Miʃs Burney -- Mrs. Wilmot Mrs.
Morrice
-- Sr J: Reynolds Miʃs Palmer
Lord Monboddo -- Miʃs Orde & her Second
Brother
who is in ye. Church.[38] Mrs. Carter.
-- the Chief thing I heard was a
difference of opinion respecting Dryden
Mr. Walpole & Dr. Burney extolld him
above all our Poets.
Miʃs Palmer told me that my Uncle
William
had been often at Sr.
J Reynolds
lately -- that he escorted
my Cousin Chs Grevilles Mistreʃs
in a Hackney Coach & that her Uncle
was painting this Woman's picture
for him to take to Naples -- I shall
make use of this intelligence to
have some entertainment in
plaguing Sr. Wm.. Abt. 10 o'Clock I came
away from Mrs. Ordes -- Mrs: Carter came
away also & ye. Veseys set us both down
Mrs. C at home & me at Sr. Wm. Wakes
I found Sr. Wm. Lady Wake & Mr. Wake at home
I sup'd with ym. & staid till 11 -- came home
in a Chair -- Miʃs C's were gone to bed &
I went to my room immediately --




Tuesday 13th. April 1784
Mr. Wake came before 11 to take leave
of me -- he staid sometime. I gave
him all the advice I thought he
might stand in need of & he recd.
it gratefully -- & his affectionate
heart was so full that he wept
like a Child at parting, though
it is not improbable we may
meet again in a few days as his
father
talks of coming again to
Town -- If this Youth is so happy
as to withstand the snares and
temptations of the world he will
be ye. comfort of his Parents &
the delight of his friends & a
valuable Member of Society.
After he left me A Maria brought
her friend Mr. Harris to pay me
a Visit -- his Ship not sailing
so soon as was expected he is
return'd to his friends for a few
days -- whilst they were with me
Lord Monboddo call'd -- he staid
sometime -- he promised to bring
me some Manuscript Poems -- par-
ticularly
a Song Mrs. Hunter has lately
written. Lord M. is quite a character



sometime or other I will attempt
to describe him. My Old Maid
Goodyar succeeded his Lordship -- she
told me she was married last week[39]
to a Mr Johnstone -- was now settled
in busineʃs &c &c I promised to
use my endeavours to serve her
& gave her a Table Cloth & a
Breakfast Cloth towards her
house linnen. Mrs.
Delany
call'd
but did not come in neither
could I go down to her -- din'd at
home wth. ye Miʃs Clarkes -- read
to them till 6 oClock in Grays
odes -- then went to my room &
begun a letter to my friend Miʃs L.
wrote a note to my Uncle Wm-
to remind him of his promise
to serve Wm. Benn -- at 7 the Dʃs.
Dowgr. of Portland
s Coach came
for me went to Mrs. Delanys --
Lady Andover an old friend of hers
& ye. Dʃs.'s came in -- she did not
stay -- soon after she went the Ducheʃs
came -- both she & Mrs. Delany were
very low ye. death of their old
friend Lady Mansfield had much
afflicted them. orders were given
that no other company was to be
let in -- I esteem'd it a mark of



their affection to wish to have
my Company in preference to
any other person -- I endeavour'd
to amuse them & succeeded pretty
well -- In the course of conversation
I ask'd them whether they thought
Mr. S Jennings a real convert to
Christianity & whether he was an
Observer of Religious duties --
they told me he was both.
At ½ past 9 I left them -- had ye.
Dʃs.
's Coach -- went to enquire how
our Vis a Vis Neighbour Mrs.
Handcock
did -- heard she was so
much better that I went in -- she
was in her Bed room Mr. & Mrs.
Vesey
were sitting wth. her -- they were
very glad to see me & good Mrs. H.
appear'd much recover'd I sat wth.
them till ½ past 10 -- when I came
home found Miʃs C's were gone to
bed -- I run up to enquire how
A M did she said sher Cold was better
& had she known I should have come
home she wd. not have gone to bed
so early -- I came down again to finish
& sent my letter & Diary to my dear
friend at M.——
then went to my
room.



Wedn. 14th. April 1784
A Maria sat wth. me ye. greatest
part of ye. Morng -- I employ'd
all my leisure till dinner time
in looking over & reading letters
some of wch. recall'd very painfull
Ideas of past events.
Mrs. & Miʃs Hamilton came &
sat sometime with me. Mrs. H.
inform'd me she had had good
accounts of my Uncle Frederick
& her daughter Mrs. Stratford &
that my Uncle had sold his Villa
in Ireland & hoped to return to
England very soon. I din'd at
home tête a tête with Miʃs Clarke
A M din'd out. I sat wth. her
the whole afternoon -- except ½
an hour before tea when I went
to my room & wrote in my Diary.
we chatted & read & wrote. till
A M came home

Lady Cecilia Johnston visited
me this Eveg. for ye 1st. time this
Compt. is owing to Lord Napiers
having married her Neice --
they were married yesterday Morng.
recd. notes from Lady Stormont &c &c



Miʃs C—— went to bed at 10 -- A M came
came home before 11 -- we sent ye.
Servts. to bed & sat up writing till
1 o'Clock

Thursday 15th. April 1784
The whole dayMorning I employ'd in
writing extracts from Mrs. Delanys
letters -- A M came & sat sometime
in my room & wrote a letter &
read -
& work'd -- I sent excuses
for not going in the Eveg. to
Lord Dartreys & Mrs. Mansels
Din'd at home Mr. & Mrs. Harris
Master Maʃsey din'd with us --
I left them soon after dinner
& co had tea sent up to me
& continued writing ye. extracts
till 12 o'Clock. saw A M
made me two or three flying
Visits in ye. Course of ye. Eveg.
recd. an invitation from Lady
C Johnston
for next Sunday

Friday 16th. April 1784
Had my Hair Dreʃs'd for ye. day in ye.
Morning -- read in a Novel call'd Hen-
rietta
[40] wch. Mrs. Handcock sent me --
there were strokes of nature wch.
affected me. I employ'd my time
till dinner in writing extracts from



Dear Mrs. Delanys letters. wrote a
Note of congratulations to greet
ye. Lord & Lady Napier when they
came to Town & to tell them wht.
Lady Stormont had desired me.
rec'd. an affectionate answer --
A Maria made me a short visit
-- Din'd at home -- good old Mrs.
Ruʃsel
din'd with us -- came to
my Breakfast room soon after
dinner -- continued writing the
Extracts till near 7 -- then dreʃs'd
in my best bib & Tucker to
wait on ye. Bride & Bridegroom
at ½ past 7 Lord Napiers
Carriage & Servts: -- I went to
Lady Claverings where I was
invited to meet them.[41] notwith-
standing
a Heavy shower of rain
& contrary to ye. custom in Londn-
Ld. N—— flew to hand me out of
ye. Carriage -- hail'd me by the
name accustom'd name of Sister
& handed me up to ye. Drawing
where there were only Lady Clavering
Lady Napier & Mrs. Peachel her
Sister -- I saluted them & my
Brother
took ye. same liberty wth-
me & then return'd to ye. Gentlemen
in ye. dining room whom he had



left on my Arrival -- abt. ½ an
hour after I came ye. Gentlemen
who had din'd there came up --
they were Genl. Johntson (Lady C
Johntson
s husband) Mr. Henry
Clavering
-- (Lady Napiers Youngest
Brother) -- & Mr. Peachel. --
in the Course of the Eveg there
were a good many People came
-- three Card Tables -- those I knew
& convers'd with were Sr. George &
Mr. Howard -- Mr. & Mrs. Peachey --
Lord & Lady Delawar Mrs. Lisle
(Lady Delawar's Mother). Lady M. Hume
Miʃs Egerton. Mr: Jennings (Mrs.
Peachey
s father) -- 2 foreigners from
Bruges a Compte & Compteʃse
Paten
-- Mrs. Anderson -- (Genl.
Johnston
s Daughter) & Lady C—— Johnston,
first Cousin to Lady Napier as
her Mother was sister to Lady
Cecilia Johnston
-- & daughter of
Lord Delawar's Grandfather.
a Mrs. Morrice -- Lady Heathcote
a Mr. & Miʃs Godfrey -- I think that
was ye. name. two of Lord Napiers
half Uncles -- Mr. Napeir ye. elder
married to Lady Sarah Bunbury
that was -- now Lady Sarah Napier
--



Sister to ye. Duke of Richmond --
she too was there & to my great
distreʃs desired Lord Napier to
introduce me to her -- had she
been always good as she was & is
still handsome, good humor'd --
engaging, & agreeable, I should
have been well pleased -- but as
she now is now her acquaintance
can do me no credit. I could
not avoid being civil on this
occasion but my principles &
hers are too opposite for me not
to avoid any further intimacy.
-- I was also introduced to a
Mr.. Francis by Lady Clavering
as an old friend & intimate
of their family -- he appears a
Clever man -- is Son to the
Mr. Francis who translated
Horace -- he was in India when
Sir -- Clavering was there[42] -- a
Man of good character & esteem'd.
Lord Napier introduced me to
Capt. Patrick Napier ye. Younger
Brother of Lady Sarahs Husband
-- he is so like my late friend
Lord Napier that I quite loved
him at first sight -- he is in



ye. Navy -- Modest in his
Manners & a most good humor'd
countenance -- he had for some
time ye. charge of Prince William
at Sea but that Youth not
behaving properly he with a
true spirit of independence
gave up the charge wth. credit
to himself. there were a few
other people I did not know --
When all ye. Company were gone
except. Mr. & Mrs. Peachel --
Lord & Lady Napier -- Lady --
Heathcote
Mrs. Morrice --
Capt Patrick Napier -- & a
Clergyman who appear'd an intimate
I thinkI was introduced to him his name is Wheeler was Stopford
a Man of humour & Sense --
Lady Clavering order'd an impromtu
supper in ye. Drawing room --
we were lively with propriety
& ye- Eveg closed agreeably --
at 12 I had Lord Napiers
Carriage & came home -- Miʃs C's
gone to bed & I went directly to
my room




Saturday 17th.. April 1784
Employ'd myself all morning in
Writing extracts from Mrs. D: letters
-- at ½ past 4 the Miʃs Clarkes &
I went to ye. Veseys to dinner --
Mrs. Handcock well enough recover'd
to dine with us -- Mrs. Carter &
Mr. Richard Burke a Brother of
ye. celebrated Edmund Burke --
he appears a shrewd sensible Man
-- The conversation after dinner turned
on ye trials for Murders -- those
of Miʃs Blaney -- Miʃs Jeffries &
Donnelnan -- Mr.. B—— display'd lawaw
knowledge -- we sat long after dinner --
when we went into ye. Drawing Room
we made a comfortable circle round
a little table & work'd & chatted -- ye. 2
Gentlemen Mr. Vesey & Mr. Burke joind us
for an hour -- Dreams & superstition
were ye. subjects of conversation.
Miʃs Clarkes & I came home before
10 -- we had supper in my B: room.
A M & I wrote. I wrote a letter of
enquiry to Miʃs Planta after ye.
Queens Health as it was & had been
reported she was ill. -- I sat up
sometime after Miʃs C's went to bed
at 12: Mrs. Vesey told me that when she was at
Avignon some years ago she saw ye. Duke
of Ormond
-- that he paid great attentions to
[43]




Sunday 18th- April did not go
to Church -- had my Hair dreʃs'd
for ye. day -- read prayers in my
own room -- & then employ'd my-
self
in writing extracts from
the letters -- till dinner -- had
2 inter̄uptions -- viz Lord Napier
& Mr. Fisher -- Lord N, did not
stay long Mr: Fisher a good
while -- Mr. Fisher told me
Mr. Farhill was not married
to Miʃs Wilson but was to be
in a fortnights time -- he told
me also that he did not imagine ye.
Queen
had been so ill as was represented
at least they hardly mention'd it in
ye. family -- it was a Cold.
I dined at home & alone, therefore
made a hasty meal & return'd to
my writing till past 8 o'Clock
I then put ondreʃs'd myself -- Lady F
Napier
came to visit me, but was
not let in. at 9 Lord Napiers carriage
& Servt. came for me -- our Servt. not
yet being recover'd enough to go out
in an Eveg.. -- went Lady Cicilia
Johnston
s -- met there most of ye. company
I had seen at Lady Claverings -- all ye.
Napiers
&c. & many others -- Ambaʃsadors
Maids of Honor -- Women of Honor &
women without Honor -- such as Lady Derby



&c. a strange mixture -- but all
people of Rank & fashion but few
of Principle -- or real Virtue.
There were several Card Tables --
-- At some of wch. sat old Wrinkled Dow-
agers
-- such as Lady Greenwich &c.
It ws a fine scene for a moralizing
Mind -- I confined my conversation
-- to Lady Clavering -- Lord & Lady Napier
Mr. Wheeler ye. Clergyman -- for there were
2 at this aʃsembly -- Sr. Robt. Gunning
Mr: Howard & my Uncle Sr.. Wm. Hamilton
& Lord Delawarr. at 11 I came away
Lord Napier -- ever attentive to me
as to ye. Sister of his Heart attended &
handed me to his Carriage wch. I had
to bring me home. Miʃs C's were
gone to Bed -- notwithstanding had some
talk wth.. A M whilst I undreʃs'd -- as
we can hear one another very plain
as ye. partition of ye: rooms is but
a thin Wainscote. I read in my
Cordial ye. New Whole Duty of Man
wch.. I always do Morning & Eveg.
this is a most excellent Book
adopted to all stations & capacities
Went to bed abt. 12.



Monday 19th. April 1784 --
Whilst my hair was dreʃsing finishd
ye. Novel of Hen̄riatta[44] -- this Novel
is above ye. common run of these
kind of writings -- there are strokes
of Nature & ye. facts are not all
beyond probability. Lady Dartrey
call'd to invite me for ye. Eveg.
but did not come in. Mr. Wake
came and made me a long
Visit -- he attended his Mother
to town this Morning from
Eʃsex -- she only came on busineʃs
& returns to morrow -- he told me
his Eldest Sister was much better
but that Sr. Wm. was again
confined with ye: Gout. he
repeated & repeated his old
profeʃsions of Affection -- gratitude
&c &c. When he left me saw
A Maria for a little while, em-
ployed
myself wth. my Extracts & working
till near 5 -- when Mr. Glovers Coach came
for me -- went to Mr. Peregrine Custs
(Uncle to Lord Brownlow) to dinner --
Mr. & Mrs. Glover Mrs. Lenton 2 Miʃs
Clarkes
Mr.. Pardo & Mr. Phipps were
ye- Company -- I was I believe ye.
Lady of ye. day and ye. party made on



My Account as this was ye. first
time of my visiting Mr. Cust -- my
inducement for accepting ye. invi-
tation
was to please Dear Mr. Glover
who has for many years lived in
great friendship wth. this Gentleman
Mr. Cust is an Old Batchelor
of abt. 56 years of age -- is
poʃseʃsed of a large independant
fortune wch. he lives up to in a
proper manner is, & has been in Parliament many years -- as far as I
can judge he has a benevolent
temper of mind & much good
humor -- I do not think him
a man of Parts he has
common plain sense & tho he is
not brilliant he is by no means
dull. perfectly civil but not
refined. Mr. Pardo my wise
penetration could make nothing
of for neither his counten-
ance
or manner or conver-
sation
seem to be interesting enough
for me to dwell a moment
upon. Mr. Phipps is an old
friend of ye: Wakes -- a Batchelor
of some standing -- he bears a
most excellent Character -- his
manners are rather more pol-
ished
than Mr. Custs & without
knowing it was so, one would



say -- what a worthy good man
that appears. Mr. Cust gave
us a very handsome dinner
every thing rarest in ye.
Season -- well dreʃs'd -- such a
Dinner as English Men of
fortune used to have -- the
Desert & Wines suitable.
After Mr. Cust had made
all ye. Ladies give their
toasts after dinner --
if a fine lady was peeping
over my Shoulder at this
moment & saw what I wrote
last -- how she wd. exclaim
at ye.. Goth!
we Women went up into
ye. Drawing room where
we sat abt. an hour talking
Nonsense. we then return'd
to ye. Gentlemen who sent
up us word Coffee & tea was
ready -- Mr. Cust having ye
Gout excused himself from
coming up stairs. we went



then to ye: men -- found ye.
Bottles & Glaʃses cleard away
& Tea & Coffee &c placed in
their Stead -- Mrs. Glover did
ye. Honors -- After tea ye. Card
Table was placed -- & a Work
Table -- I seated myself at
ye. latter as did those who cld.
not join'd ye. Whist party ye.
1st Rubber. Mr. Cust Mrs. Glover
2 Miʃs C's & I -- Mr. C gave
us Puz̄lels to find out &
riddles to explain at ¼ before
7 Miʃs C's & I came away --
had Mr. Glovers Coach -- they
set me down at Lord Dartreys
-- Lady Wake Mr. Wake & Mr. Cowslade
were there -- spent an agreeable
Eveg. wth. ye. Dartreys -- sup'd & came
away at ab ye. same time Lady W—
did -- came home in a Chair --
My Young friend Mr. W. very
gallantly walk'd by ye. side
of mine in ye. Mud & till Iwe
got to their House. found ye.



Miʃs C—'s in ye. Parlour after
a little converse -- went to bed.

Tuesday 20th. April 1784 --
Before I was up recd. a Note
in Verse from Lord Napier
with a present of an elegant little bottle
fill'd with of Attar of Roses to hang to my
Watch from Lady Napier. a little
after 10 Lady Wake & Mr. Wake
came according to promise to
breakfast wth. me -- she, amiable
Woman was in tolerable spirits
considering every thing. they staid
wth. me till 11 -- then went below
take leave of Miʃs Clarkes & we
parted not knowing when we
might meet again as Sr. Wm. Wake has
not settled his plans for ye. Summer
-- as soon as they were gone I
endeavour'd to amuse myself
by setting down to writing my
Extracts from Mrs. Delanys letters
-- Mr.. Wake found an excuse to
return'd & staid a considerable
time as he said Lady Dartrey was
wth. his Mother & they did not
set out for Eʃsex till 1 oClock.
Miʃs Port came to his great morti



fication
-- however she did not
stay long -- brought me a Meʃsage
from her great Aunt Mrs. Delany
to desire my Company next
thursday. Mr. Wake expreʃs'd
such affliction & shew'd such
marks of sorrow by not being
able to refrain from tears that
I was obliged to reason with him
on ye: folly of such gr endulging
such grief for a cause that
did not justify it -- he pleaded
that it arose from ye. uncertainty
of seeing me again for a long
time &c &c. Mrs. Iremonger
came to see me & he hurried
away not to expose himself
to her veiw wth.. red-eyes -- ye.
uncommon attachment this
Youth
has conceived for me
is to me no longer a subject
of entertainment wch. it was
at first to his Mother & family
& myself; I esteem'd it a youthful
Vanity of affecting ye. Man but it has lasted
too long & grows too serious



[45]



[46]



for me not to endeavour to
extinguish a Paʃsion wch.. if not
discouraged may mark his
future days with misery.
for how many have been made
wretched by a disappointment
ofin a first attachment -- as it
certainly is when real & ye.
Person poʃseʃsed of great sensi-
bility
the most difficult to
conquer & ye.. most lasting.
Mrs. Iremonger did me the favor of
setting with me a good while
her conversation is always in-
teresting
-- I was
extremely flatter'd by her kindly
preʃsing me to make her a
Visit this Summer -- she wrote
down all the Stages & said when
ever it suited me to come for
a fornight or 3 Weeks I should
acquaint her & she would her
Carriage & Servts. a Stage to
fetch me -- if I go to Mr. Glovers
at Sunning Hill I shall be
44 Miles distant. in short
she endeavour'd to make it



convenient -- & If I could
manage it I am sure it
wd. be highly agreeable. she
took leave of me as she said Mr.
J Iremonger
& herself thought
of going out of Town on friday[47]
but if they did not she hoped
I would go to her on Saturday
Eveg. the acquaintance of
& friendship of such a Woman
as Mrs.. I. is an honor & advan-
tage
to any one who is sensible
of ye. benifit of forminghaving really
virtuous acquaintances &
intimacys -- Mrs. Garrick then
came & brought me a most
beautiful Nosegay wch. she had
just recd. from her Villa at
Hampton -- I had only time
to thank her as she was obliged
to run away immediately --
A: M: came & sat with me whilst
I fill'd my flower Glaʃses &
adorn'd my room -- I gave her
a few to wear & a Rose to present
to little Katherine Jackson as
it was her Birth day & she



was going to dine at her Sisters.
Mrs. Rowe (Miʃs Sorrel that was)
made me a Visit I congratulated
her on her marrigage & she not
look as if she had repented wthht
she had done. Mrs. Newton
came before she left me &
brought her 2 Grandson's ye
Master Hands
-- Mrs. Rowe took
her leave & Mrs. Newton sat
an hour -- I was much pleased
wth. ye. Children -- they were so well
behaved -- ye. eldest 5 years old
a very Sensible boy -- not pretty
ye.. Youngest abt 3 a sweet Child.
Mrs. Newton was so obliging as
to ask me if I wanted to pay
any Visits & as it was a warm
fine day she should have no
objection to be out in ye. Coach
any time I chose, I accepted
her Offer -- we set out at 3 --
I call'd on Lady Napier to thank
her for ye Attar of Roses &c &
took her a Nosegay for Mrs. G.
had brought me a profusion



did not find her at home, but
left ye. flowers -- call'd on
her Sister Mrs. Peachel --
Mrs. & Miʃs Tryon. Lady Frances
Harpur
. Lady Caroline Peachey.
Mrs. Carter -- they were all
out. Mrs. Newton then brought
me home again -- I was out
only ½ an hour -- Saw A Maria
& Miʃs Clarke before they went
out -- sent an Excuse to Mrs:
Jackson
.. din'd alone therefore
made a short & hasty meal --
came to my B room & wrote ye.
Extracts till past 11 o'Clock without
interuptions. Recd. a letter from
Miʃs Planta wch. inform'd me
the Queen had not been so ill
as was represented & that she
was recover'd. Miʃs C's came
home soon after 11 -- sat with me
for a ¼ of an hour -- we then
went to our rooms



Wednesday 21st. April 1784
-- Recd. a Note early in ye. Morng
from Mrs. Walsingham to invite
me to go wth. her to ye. Pantheon at
12 o'Clock as she was a Subscriber
& had ye. liberty of taking her
friends -- to hear ye. Rehearsal
of ye. Concert wch. is to be perform'd
for ye: Memory of Handel -- she
said I should hear Signa. Mara in
great perfection & that she wd send
her Coach for me. I declined accepting this
obliging offer as Mrs. Jackson had
sent me word she would make me a
Visit in ye. Morning -- dreʃs'd for ye.
day when I got up -- was a long time
under Betty's hands as she comb'd
out my Hair. begun ye. Quarto
Edition of Francis Horace for
Hairdreʃsing Reading. Read through
his Preface (wch. I think proves
him a Man of Sense & Modesty)
& several of ye. Odes I& notes -- I
mean to read ym. all wth. attention
I admire Horace as a Satirest --
he is so well bred & good humor'd
that even ye reproved could
not I think be offended. wht.
is said in ye. preface I think very



just: viz. “There is a kind of Satire
of such malignity, as too surely pro-
ceeds
from a desire of gratifying a
constitutional cruelty of temper. the
Satirist does not appear like a magis-
trate
to give sentence on ye. Vices of
Mankind, but like an Executioner to
Slaughter ye. Criminal. He does not
love Mankind as he ought, who indulges[48]
to his natural sagacity in a discernment
of their faults, & an ill natured plea --
sure of exposing them to public View.
“Horace was of another spirit; of a natural
Chearfulneʃs of temper; an easineʃs of
Manners, fashion'd by the Politeneʃs of
Courts, a good Understanding, improved
by conversing with Mankind; a quick
discernment of their frailties, but, in
general, so happy an Art of correcting
them, that he reproves without offending,
& instructs without an affectation of superiority.
He preserves a strenght of reasoning neceʃsary
to persuade, without ye. dogmatical seriousneʃs,
wch. is apt to disgust or disoblige. He has this
advantage over ye. rigid Satirist, yt. we receive
him into our Bosoms, while he reasons wth.
Goodhumour & corrects in ye. language of friend-
ship.
Nor will his Satires be leʃs useful to ye. present
Age, than to yt., in wch. they were written, since he does
not draw his Characters frm. particular persons, but
frm. Human Nature. wch. is invariably ye. same
in all Ages and Countries.
The Morals of Horace are drawn from ye. two
purest fountains of human Wisdom, a
good Heart & a well improved understanding
[49]



-- Lord Monboddo came at 12 o'
Clock
-- he had forgot his promise
of bringing me -- ye letter wch. had
been addreʃsed in one of ye. Papers
to ye. Prince of Wales wch. I have
heard commended & Mrs. Hunters
Poetry but promised to bring it
to me & likewise to add to my
Collection of Manuscript Poems.
Mr. Stanhope came in -- what
a pair of originals[50] had I to
entertain! they talk'd of
ye Dʃs. of Devonshires conduct
in repect to ye. Westminster
Election -- they spoke sensibly
when they reprobated it -- yet
shew'd their good nature in
speaking in milder terms of
this outrageprostitution toof female delicacy
than I had yet heard -- even
from her own Sex. Ld. M:
took his leave after he had been
wth. me ½ an hour -- Mr. Stanhope
remain'd -- Mrs.. Duck of Kew
(one of ye famous Stephen Duck's
daughters) came & made me
a Visit -- she is a good kind of



woman very civil & grateful to me
for some little attentions I pd. to her
& her Sisters[51] when I was at Kew wth.
ye Royal family -- she told me her
motive for coming to Town was to
see her friend Mrs.. Franklin Widow
to Dr. Franklin who was one of ye.
Kings Chaplains & translator of
Sophocles Tragedys. She is left
in distreʃs wth. a large family -- it
was a fortunate circumstance yt.
Mr. Stanhope was with me for as
Mrs. Duck said Mrs. Franklin was
going to publish her late husbands
Sermons by Subscription and yt.
she was going to endeavour to aʃsist
her in getting Subscribers Mr. S—
said he should be happy to
subscribe as Dr. Franklin had
formerly been private Tutor to
him at Westminster School &c.
he therefore put his name
down for 4 Sets -- one for him-
self
, one for his wife Lady
Catherine
one for his Son in
Law Sr. Hungerford Hodgkins &
ye. 4th. for his Daughter Lady Hodgkins.
Mr. Stanhope staid wth- me til
for an hour after Mrs. C. Duck &
renew'd his old entreaty of



[52]



[53]



desiring me to feel as great &
sublime a friendship for him
as he did & had done so long
for me -- told me what a
pattern of perfection he
thought me &c &c I let him
run on till at last my head
quite ach'd wth. listening to
this voluble eccentrick genius
& then I civilly dismiʃs'd him
wth. saying I had letters to
write.      Miʃs Finch (Lady C: Finch's Daughter)
came after Mr. Stanhope sat near
an hour -- was in one of her most
agreeable humours -- when she
pleases no one can be more
pleasant & entertaining.[54]      A Maria came & sat
wth. me for ½ an hour before
she went out -- I was taken
wth. a faintneʃs wch. I fancy
was owing to ye. great change of
Weather as ye. Air was as
sultry as it is often in June
it soon went off by her being
so good to give me some Harts-
shorn
& Water -- Miʃs Clarke
came & though she was dreʃs'd
& going out to dinner preʃs'd
me in ye. kindest manner
to let her remain at home to
attend to me -- this I wd. by no
means either allow her or A. Maria
to do & before they went out



I was quite recover'd.
I din'd at home alone & came to
my B room ye. moment I had din'd
-- recd. a note from Mr. Wake wch.
inform'd me Sr. Wm- Wake was
poorly -- that He & his Mother
had a safe journey & that he
was very miserable & unhap-
py
at having parted from me
&c &c. I was not quite well
& cld. not ------ work or attend
to writing therefore amused
myself till ½ past 6 wth. reading
Warton on ye. Writings & Genius
of Pope.[55] Recd. a letter from
my friend Miʃs Litchfield
wch. affected my Spirits too
much for me to reply to it
this Eveg. -- I sent her by
return of Post my Diary.
at ½ past 7 I went to our
Vis a Vis Neighbours ye. Veseys
Carried Mrs. Handcock the
Reverie to amuse her -- Mrs. & Mr.
Vesey
carried me to Lord Dartreys
to enquire after Lady D— as
she was not well ye. Servant
told us she was better & was



going to bed -- we set Mr. Vesey
down -- & Mrs. Vesey left me
at Mrs. William Egertons where
I was engaged -- there was one
Whist table. Mrs. Shuttleworth
Genl. Balkeley Major & Mrs.
Master
Miʃs Egerton & Mr
Mrs. Egerton -- I sat & chatted
wth.. Mrs. Master & her Sister
Miʃs Egerton -- &c till ½ past 10 when
Mrs. Vesey call'd for me &
brought me home -- I wrote
in my Diary till Miʃs Clarkes
came home wch. was ½ past 11 --
they came & sat with me ½ an
hour & then we went to our
rooms.

Thursday 22d. April 1784 --
I got up at 8 o'Clock unrefreshed
for want of Sleep for my Mind
was so occupied wth. my friend
Miʃs Litchfield & my heart so
pain'd abt. her, that it was
near Morning before I closed
my Eyes & then it was only to
dream of her -- & those dreams
were of ye. most melancholy



kind. I dreʃ had my Hair
dreʃs'd for ye. day as soon
as I got up -- read ye. whole
time in ye. New whole duty
of Man wch.. composed my
Spirits -- After my Head was
dreʃs'd went into ye. Parlour
Mrs. Lenton was come to spend
ye. day at our House -- I sat by
whilst she breakfasted -- read
ye. New's Papers to them. &
Master Dawson call'd he was
shewn into my B Room -- I went
up immediately to him -- he
brought me an account that
Lady Dartrey was better -- he
staid with me a good while &
I amused him & myself with
sorting Shells -- he brought
a bunch of Violets with roots
to them wch. I planted in a pot
of Earth -- when he left me --
I put on my Gown & dreʃs'd
for ye. day -- & then was a
considerable time in arranging
& sorting shells & putting



my boxes &c to rights. begun
a letter to my friend Ms. Litchfield but was
not in spirits to go on with it.
Mrs. Lenton came & sat wth. me ½
an hour before dinner -- we din'd
at 4 -- sat wth. her & Miʃs Clarkes
afterwards till near 6 -- then went
to my B: room & wrote in my
Diary -- at 7 ye.. Ducheʃs Dowg. of
Portland
s Coach came -- I went
& took leave of Mrs. Lenton before I
went out -- call'd upon my old Cousin
Mrs. Walkinshaw for ten Minutes
found her very poorly she told me
she had suffer'd a good deal since
she saw me. -- from her, went to
Mrs. Delany to whom I was engaged
met there Mr. Horace Walpole
ye. Dʃs. Dr. of Portland & Lady
Weymouth
. Paintings -- Vertú
& Beauty were the chief topics
of discourse -- ye. conversation
was agreeable -- informing and
entertaining. Mr. Walpole was in
good spirits & related some lively
anecdotes -- among other things
he told us that he had made a
small collection of ye. smart &



& witty things said by fools --
once in their lives -- for example
A Miʃs Fanny Ruʃsel who was
a grandaughter of Oliver Cromwell
& serv'd ye. Princeʃs Emily as
Woman of ye. Bedchamber being
one 30th. of January in waiting on ye. Princeʃs
The Late Prince of Wales came in just as she
was pinning up ye. train of her RH: Gown --
Oh Fanny says he are you not ashamed not
to be at Church to day -- it is quite extroa-
dinary
that you are not mortifying fasting
& Prayer for ye. Sins of yr Grandfather -- reply'd she I think it much
more extroadinary that the Grand-
daughter
of Oliver Cromwell
should
be employ'd in pinning up the tail
of Your Sisters Gown.”[56]
I staid after Mr. W. & Lady Weymouth
-- The Dʃs. ask'd me when I heard of
my friend Miʃs Litchfield & this brought
on an interesting conversation -- a little
before 10 I left these amiable Women
came home in ye. Dʃs. Coach -- sat wth. Miʃs
Clarkes
till ½ past 11 -- wrote a letter on
Busineʃs to our Landlord Sr. Ricd. Rycroft.
before I went to bed

(hover over blue text or annotations for clarification;
red text is normalised and/or unformatted in other panel)


Notes


 1. Where Fanny Jackson was recovering from smallpox inoculation less than a week earlier (see HAM/2/8 p.99).
 2. Jean Jacques Rousseau (1761) Julie; or, The New Heloise.
 3. See HAM/1/18/79 of 22 March.
 4. Anthony Hamilton, Mémoires du comte de Gramont (Cologne, 1713). Anthony Hamilton was a distant relative of Mary Hamilton via his grandfather James Hamilton, 1st Earl of Abercorn (1575-1618).
 5. See the footnote on Almack's in HAM/2/2 p.61, and further references in HAM/1/15/1/5(4), HAM/1/8/8/21, LWL Mss Vol. 75(69).
 6. The familiar noun jumble had a sense ‘shaking or jolting’, used colloquially for ‘a ride in a carriage (with reference to the shaking experienced)’ (OED s.v. jumble n.1, 2. Accessed 21-02-2023).
 7. Probably Maria Anne Hume (cf. Stephen Hyde Cassa, Lives and Memoirs of the Bishops of Sherborne and Salisbury from the Years 705 to 1824 (1824), p. 324-325).
 8. Perhaps did for dreſs'd, by dittography from the line above, unless the actual reading is dr'd, which is conceivable.
 9. A fragment of p.24, beneath, is visible on the image but it is not part of the text of this page and thus it is not transcribed here.
 10. This page is blank.
 11. Probably Lucy Hume (cf. Stephen Hyde Cassa, Lives and Memoirs of the Bishops of Sherborne and Salisbury from the Years 705 to 1824 (1824), p. 324-325).
 12. This faint annotation appears in the left margin, written vertically.
 13. No further mention has been found. More than likely Hamilton is referring here to the Argand (or Quinquet) lamp, a luxurious, bright lamp patented in Britain in 1784 by the Swiss physicist Aimé Argand. He had been associated with the Montgolfier brothers in Paris, came over to London and demonstrated to a royal audience both a hot-air balloon and his recently-invented lamp. See John E. Crowley, The invention of comfort: Sensibilities and design in early modern Britain and early America (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2001), pp.192-4.
 14. John Home's blank verse play Douglas, first performed in Edinburgh in 1756. The play was produced at both Covent Garden and Drury Lane theatres in 1784. Siddons performed in the Drury Lane cast.
 15. The rest of the cast were as follows: Mr. Brereton, Mr Farren, Mr Palmer, Mr Bensley, Mr Packer, Mr Phillimore, and Miss Wheeler. See Douglas, A tragedy, by Mr. Home [...] (London: T. Lowndes, 1784).
 16. Presumably more than one of Robert Adam's spinster sisters, Jenny, Betty and Margaret.
 17. Lady Rothes's first husband, George Raymond Evelyn, was Mrs. Boscawan's younger half-brother, not her son.
 18. Hamilton also criticises Dr Baker's sermon delivery in her diary entry for 16 May 1784 in HAM/2/10.
 19. This does not seem accurate.
 20. A kind of hooped underskirt popular in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.
 21. That is, it is his sixteenth birthday (William Wake, 9th Baronet, was born on 5 April 1768).
 22. That is, on William Wake's birthday.
 23. Not yet identified.
 24. Mother-in-law in the sense ‘stepmother’ was common up to the eighteenth century but is now marked as regional in the OED (s.v. n., 2. Accessed 05-03-2023).
 25. Elizabeth Murray, Countess of Mansfield, would die a few days later, on 10 April 1784.
 26. The Countess of Mansfield was born on 11 May 1704 and thus would have been 79 on this date and approaching her 80th birthday (or, in contemporary terms, entering her 81st year).
 27. Francis Sandys's will bequeathes his property to ‘my Grand-daughter Ann Litchfield’, her brothers Francis and John and her mother Elizabeth, respectively, leaving his midwifery practice and library to his son-in-law Edward Litchfield.
 28. Not yet identified.
 29. Either Elizabeth (11), Frances (10) or Harriet (9) Somerset.
 30. Hamilton uses the French phrase à mon gré ‘to my liking’ rather than its near-synonym à mon goût ‘to my taste’.
 31. For miss ‘used contemptuously [...] with implication of silliness or sentimentality’, see for example HAM/1/19/34 p.5.
 32. This wedding hadn't actually taken place yet: John Farhill would marry Mary Wilson on 7 July 1784 (that is according to parish records; the Eton College Register gives 8 July as the marriage date). Lord Dartrey had probably heard news of their engagement. Mary Wilson was the younger daughter of Sir Thomas Wilson of County Kent who in his will of 1775 had left her as a dowry a sum of £10,000 in trust and all subsequent profits accumulating from it.
 33. This mysterious event -- something Hamilton had heard -- is alluded to again twice on p.49 but apparently not explained further.
 34. The offer was first made a week earlier on 3 April (see p.36 above), but see now HAM/1/18/82, received 14 April 1784, where Lady Stormont says that she cannot possibly go to Court till the week after her family put on their mourning, which will be too late.
 35. The Great Seal had been stolen from his house on the night of 23-24 March 1784; see p.12 above.
 36. Part of this page is cut away and the image shows text from p.57, below, visible beneath.
 37. Part of this page is cut away and the image shows text from p.54, above, visible beneath.
 38. James Ord had graduated with his BA and was appointed curate of Beddington in September 1783 and would become Rector of Whitfield in July 1784.
 39. Mary Goodyar married Thomas Johnstone on 6 April 1784 in St James's, Westminster.
 40. The novel Henrietta (1758) is by Charlotte Lennox.
 41. See HAM/1/20/86.
 42. Philip Francis was appointed to the Supreme Court of Bengal in 1774, along with Sir John Clavering.
 43. This afterthought continues over the horizontal line with which Hamilton had already closed off the entry. The sentence is incomplete, probably missing the word ‘her’.
 44. See p.63 above.
 45. A blank sheet is inserted between here, as shown in the image. The partial text of p.79 is visible behind.
 46. Verso of blank sheet, as shown in the image. The partial text of p.76 is visible behind.
 47. Hamilton's use of the initial ‘J’ suggests that Mrs Iremonger means to travel with her son-in-law rather than her husband.
 48. Hamilton's generally faithful transcription is considerably abridged at this point. The original reads ‘It was the Saying of a great Man, that he, who hated Vice, hated Mankind; but certainly he does not love them as he ought, who indulges [...]’. She chooses to omit the 'great Man' and his implicit dispraise of those who hate vice, but whether this counts as bowdlerisation is a matter of judgement.
 49. Hamilton explicitly asserts on p.83 that she is reading ‘ye. Quarto Edition’. Francis's translation of the Satires first appeared in 1746. Although by 1784 it had gone through to an 8th edition (9th in Scotland), the 2nd and all after the 3rd were in smaller formats than quarto.
 50. The sense of original here is ‘a singular, odd, or eccentric person' (OED s.v., adj. and n. B.7.a. Accessed 26-08-2022).
 51. Lloyd Sanders lists 'three housekeepers, the three Miss Ducks, Stephen's daughters' amongst the staff who moved to the Dutch House (later the Prince's House) with the Prince of Wales and the Duke of York c.1771. Sanders, Old Kew, Chiswick and Kensington (London: Methuen, 1910).
 52. A sheet is inserted between p.86 and p.89. This side is blank, with the partial text of p.89 visible behind.
 53. The text on the inserted sheet has been moved to its logical position part-way down the next page. The partial text of p.87 is visible behind the inserted sheet.
 54. Moved this mention of Miss Finch's visit here from p.88.
 55. Joseph Warton, An essay on the writings and genius of Pope, vol.1 1756, vol.2 1782.
 56. There is no corresponding quotation mark at the start of this speech.

Normalised Text


at 3 -- Anna Maria came & took leave
of me as she was going to Mrs.
Jacksons & I should not see her
all day -- had William Benn &
got him to write answers to
notes &c -- after I was dressed
scribbled in my diary --
Miss Palmer called but was
was not let in as I was dressing
-- A little before 5 Lord Stormonts
Chariot came for me went
there to dinner -- only Lady Stormont
Mr. Nicholson (Mr Murrays tutor
& me -- the 3 boys came down to
dessert -- Mr. Nicholson & they left us
soon -- Lady Stormont & I went upstairs
& had a comfortable tête a tête
till near 9 -- she gave me ½
a Guinea for my poor Woman
-- we talked of the Royal family
-- &c &c. Lord Stormont came in
for 10 Minutes before I came
away -- told us the Prince of
Wales was better (he has been
very ill again & if he goes
on as he has done it is



thought he will fall a
Victim to his irregularities.
-- A little after 9 left Lord Stormont's
had his Chariot -- went to
Mrs. Burrows -- a large party
& few People I knew.
Conversed with Young Mr. Cambridge
Miss Culling Smith & a few others.
At ½ past ten was brought
home by Mr.. Culling Smith & his
daughter -- . sat up ½ an hour
wrote Notes -- Miss Clarke was
gone to bed -- Anna Maria would not
come into the room when she
came home as she had been
at Mr. Jacksons --

Sunday -- 21st.. March 1784
Lady Wake called to take me
to Church -- I was not ready &
could not go -- after I was dressed
Anna Maria came & sat with me till 3
o'Clock -- we read together the
letter in Rousseau Eloise on Duelling



Anna Maria took leave of me
till thursday -- she is going
to her friend Mrs. Harris.
Mr. Wake came for ½ an hour
told me that he felt that
he was better for the
friendly advice I had given
him -- that he endeavoured
to correct his errors &c &c
Mrs: Vesey called for me &
put an end to our conversation
she was good to carry me
to Stratford Place as I was
to dine with Mrs: Walsingham.
-- She set me down but did
not go in. Lady Denniver
(Lady Cecilia. Rice Lord Talbots
Daughter) & her daughter
Miss Rice & Mr. Walker dined
with us -- After dinner Mr.
Walker played a Hymn &
Sang a Song of his own composing
which was not without merit
-- Mrs. Walsingham & Mr. Walker talked so



much of the Beauties of
Matlock & other parts of
Derbyshire that I feel
more impatient than ever
to see these Romantic
Views -- which describe so
well. The company went
away before 8. -- Mrs. Walsingham &
I set out soon after -- I set
her down at Lord Exeters &
had Mrs. Walsingham Coach on to Mrs.
Delanys -- found her alone
only her Great Niece Miss
Port -- the Duchess Dowager of Portland
had been there but was
to the Queen. Mrs. Delany was
pretty well -- she showed
me some of Swifts Letters
I read one aloud to her. --
She used to correspond with
him -- it was in a lively
style -- & the Compliments he
paid her were just &
expressed in a peculiar



at the same time in an
elegant manner. I wrote
a Note to the Duchess which Mrs. Delany
was to give her Servant in the
Morning as she sends daily
to enquire after her friend.
to tell her Grace I was not
sure of getting a ticket for
the Ancient Musick for tomorrow
Evening &c
at ¼ past nine Lady Wake
sent her Coach for me. called
for Sir William at one of the Clubs
& we went home to his house
-- found Lady Wake & Mr.
Wake sitting together -- Mr. Catton
gone to Cambridge -- we had
supper & I sat till 11 o'Clock.
-- the Dissolution of Parliament
&c were the topics of conversation.
I came home in a Chair.
saw Miss Clarke for a few Minutes
-- she gave me a good account
of Mrs. Jackson & her little Fanny



Monday 22d March 1784
-- Notes from my Uncle William -- wrote
to Mrs. Buller to inform her
she & her Sister Lady Basset
might go to see the Vase on
Wednesday Morning & to Mrs.
Aufrere of Chelsea to say
Sir William & I would come any
Morning she & Mr. Aufrere
were to be at home.
The Duchess Dowager Portland sent to me
to know if I had got a ticket
&c. Miss Clarke came at 1
o'Clock & sat with me an hour
. read the Papers &
chatted.. Miss Nevin -- dresser
to the Princesses came brought one of
Mrs. Hicks little Girls with her.
she stayed a good while. talked of
the Princesses & Ladies of the
Queens House. She said the Queen
went to see the Prince of Wales
this Morning before she went
to Windsor -- that she heard he
was better -- Miss Glover



came soon after Miss Nevin
left me sat ½ an hour. I
promised to go to Mr. Glover in
the Afternoon --
As Miss Clarke & I were going
to dinner received a Ticket from
Sir William Hamilton (Sir Watkin Williams Wynns)
for the Concert -- sent immediately
to the Duchess Dowager of Portland to
inform her I could have the
pleasure of going with her
-- at ½ past 5 ran up &
had my hair better dressed
& was just finished when
the Duchess Coach came at ½ past
6. sent an excuse to
Mr. Glover -- Miss Clarke was
going there. went to
Whitehall -- did not get out
the Dear Duchess & I went to
the Concert -- saw a great number
of People I knew. conversed with
Mr Howard & Lord Gilford &c
I was much pleased with the



Music -- some of Handels
Choruses were finely performed
-- The Duchess & I quitted the Concert
before it was quite over --
Lady Greenwich Lady Coventry &c
were in the waiting Room conversed
a little with them & came away
I went home with the Duchess she was
so good to say she had been much
pleased to have me with her.
I did not go in with her had her
Coach home. was at home
at ½ past 10 o'Clock. Miss Clarke
came into my room for ½ an
hour & then we went to our
rooms.

Tuesday 23d. March 1784
Mr. Wake came when I was dressing
did not let him in.
Miss Wilhelmina King for ½ an hour
then my old Maid Goodyar who
was with me above an hour --
told me she was going to Marry
& asked my advice with respect
to her affairs & future plans for settling
had William Benn to ask him some



questions respecting the man she
talked of going into partnership with
&c &c. Mrs. & Miss Orde & my
Aunt Dowager Lady Warwick they sat
sometime -- my Aunt told me her
Son Colonel Greville was better.
When they left me
went to Miss Clarke & sat ½ an
hour with her. Mr. Wake came
a little before three walked with me
through the Park (met Lord Walsingham) to Mrs. Delanys
I did not find her in good spirits
she was unhappy about her Nephew
Mr. John Dewes who was worse.
-- she lent me some very pretty
Verses of the late Miss Bowdlers
to Copy -- gave me a charge, not to Give
them to any one -- as Dr. Bowdler
her Brother had desired the
Copies not be multiplied.
Mr.. Wake called for me and
attended me to Miss Gunnings
at St. James's left me at the door
& said he would call in ½ an
hour to Chaperone me back
again. found her in Bed
with an Ague fit -- she was



however in pretty good spirits.
Mr. Wake called for me & walked
with me to Mr. Glovers. where I
dined & spent the day -- Mr. Glover
in good spirits -- & health -- though his
eyes were bad. only the family
Mr. Wake came in after dinner
& brought a Message to desire
me to go over to their house
this I could not comply with.
he returned again at tea time
sat an hour & brought me
a letter from my friend Miss
Litchfield. After he went Miss
Glover read aloud till supper
in Lord Clarendons History part
of the reign of Charles the 2d. the
trial of the Earl of Stratford.
Mr: Glover after supper
talked over some of the
Characters of the Ministers
& great Speakers of the House
of Commons in that Reign
-- I had a coach came home
at 11 -- Miss Clarke gone to bed --
read after I got to my room
& was undressed for an hour



a Dialogue in Plato. &c & my
friends letter which did not give much comfort

Wednesday 24th: March 1784
After I was dressed went & set with
Miss Clarke read the Papers to her.
Lord Napier came he was shown
into the Parlour after he had paid
his Compliments to Miss Clarke he desired
me to go upstairs to my breakfast
room as he had something to communicate
to me -- I complied, I
imagined it was relative to business
& was not a little surprised when
he told me he had this Morning
made an offer of marriage to
Miss Clavering but was equally
pleased to find he had been
accepted -- as she is a Woman
of good Character -- is I have
heard & from what I have been
able to judge from her manners
& countenance good tempered
has a large fortune & is
a Woman of a proper rank in
life for him to marry. we
talked the affair over -- he desired



me not to mention it for the
present as he had not yet told
any of his family. Mr. Glovers
Coach came for me at 1 o'Clock
Lord Napier took leave of me. I went to
Mr. Glovers -- Miss Glover came &
sat in the Coach with me till he
was ready. we went to my Uncle
Williams. Mr. Glover only went in
Miss Glover went on with me to St.
James's & waited for me in the
Coach whilst I paid a visit to
Miss Gunning -- she was in bed
but better & going to get up --
her Sister was with her -- Mr.
Gunning their Brother came in
& gave us the News of the Great
Seal being stolen out of the Lord
Chancellors house. heard that
the Prince of Wales was so far
Recovered that he rode on horseback
yesterday & was going today
to the House of Lords. Mr.
Devaynes the Apothecary came in
he told me the Bark would soon



Remove Miss Gunning's fever &c.
Miss Gunning returned me the paper which
I had left with her Yesterday containing
the melancholy narrative
of Mrs: Setons distresses which
Lady Stormont sent me to try to
get something from my acquaintance
towards a subscription for
her & her Childrens relief. Miss
Gunning told me her father had promised
to give something. I stayed about
20 Minutes returned to Miss Glover
She set me down at home &
went back for her father as
they were going into the City.
Mr. Fisher & my Uncle Frederick
had called during my absence
I wrote a long note to Mrs. Jackson
& worked. till 4 o'Clock Miss Clarke
& I went & dined with our opposite
Neighbours the Veseys -- only themselves
-- we continued in the dining room
till 7. I read Mrs. Setons melancholy
Story -- Mr. Vesey promised me
to subscribe -- & Mrs. Handcock
gave me secretly a Guinea &
desired me to take no notice that



she had done so. before tea I
ran home stayed only a few Minutes
to answer some notes. Mr. Wake
had called & left a Message about
my going this Evening to Lady Wake
&c. Miss Clarke came home --
I returned to the Veseys -- a Mrs.
Trip came in but did not stay
long -- I wrote an Answer to
a letter I received from Anna Maria at Mr
Veseys & enclosed some letters which
had come for her. Mr. Horace Walpole
came at 8 & stayed till 10 & no
other company so we had the
pleasure of his conversation
uninterrupted. he talked of
Hamiltons works, his Memoirs
of Grammont &c. Mr. Walpole
has lately published a new
Edition of Grammont with Notes.
The conversation was well
kept up & was very agreeable
-- I stayed supper -- read Miss
Bowdlers Poem on Hope to
Mr. & Mrs. Vesey & Mrs. Handcock
they were much pleased with



it & gave it the praises I think
it merits. After supper Mrs.
Vesey gave me a description
of their Villa in Ireland
(Lucan) she has a warm
imagination & her descriptions
are lively & I may say, very
picturesque. Lucan is I
have been informed a beautiful
Place & Mr. Vesey has built
a fine house there not many
years ago. I came home
about 12. & went immediately to
my room. My Cousin Mrs. Charteris
               had called when I was out.


Thursday 25th. Employed myself
in Notable Work from the time
I got up till near 3. Mr. Wake
called -- but I had given orders
no body should be let in --
Miss Clarke came & sat with me
sometime. Betty dressed my
Hair & kept me near 2 hours
to make me smart. I read
during the time in Plato. I
am a great admirer of this
author -- this is the second time



I am reading it. & hope to
reap profit as well as pleasure
by studying him. I generally
read whilst my hair is dressing
by which means that time is not so
idle spent. at 5 o'Clock my
Aunt Warwicks Coach came
for me -- I went there to dinner
-- we had My Uncle William.
My Uncle Frederick & his Wife
& Daughter -- it was near 6
before we went into the dining
room -- The conversation
was chiefly family subjects
-- Relations -- connexions &c
I bore little part for I thank
God I have no portion of
family pride. After tea Music
was the topic -- & other general
Subjects. Sir William left us at '9
-- My Uncle Frederick & his Wife before
10 -- I took leave of him for
6 Weeks as he goes on Monday
to Ireland to settle some affairs.
At 10 o'Clock General Clarke -- my
Aunts Warwicks second Husband. was so obliging



to offer me his Coach for the Evening as
my Aunts was a new Carriage &
she does not like her Horses to get
into Crowds. for I was going to
two Assemblies -- a ¼ past ten I
went to the Duchess of Chandos -- spoke
to her -- walked through the Room's
it is a very fine house & handsomely
fitted up -- there was a good deal
of Company -- but not many of
the 1st. ton. I spoke to a few people
& then came away. went to
Lady Humes (Sir Abraham Hume's Lady)
This was a more elegant Assembly
This House too is a good one but
not on so large a Scale as Chandos
House -- one room is very elegantly
fitted up & is a pretty form a long
Oval. the other 3 are hung with
some fine Pictures. There were
many of my acquaintance. I had
a good deal of conversation with Mrs.
Charteris --- Lord Clarendon &c &c
there were few Gentlemen at either
of the Assemblies -- they are all so
busy in Politics & preparing for
a New Election. the Young Ladies
we--- most ------ them dressed en habit



de Bal -- as it was an Almack
night. I came soberly home at
11 -- Miss Clarke was gone to bed, I sat
up till 12 & wrote in my diary
at Lady Humes saw the Marquis de Bouillé

March 26th. -- got up pretty early dressed
for the day -- answered Notes. received a
letter from Mrs. Jackson with a good
account of little Fanny & telling me
she hoped it would not be long before
we could meet. -- sorted my Papers
worked -- looked after our little family of
Birds -- had Miss Clarke for some time --
the day so bad -- Snow & rain -- that
I could not walk out to see Miss Gunning
& Mrs. Delany as I intended. ½ past 4
o'Clock Lady Wakes Coach came for me
dined there we dined tête a tête -- Sir
William & his Son were gone to Essex -- after
Dinner the 2 Miss Wakes came down to dessert
Miss Wake looks & is vastly better. they
left us soon. Lady Wake & I sat below for
some time -- I showed her Miss Bowdlers
verses with which she was much delighted. Lady
Wake told me how much satisfaction it
gave her that Sir William would not offer himself
a Candidate for the New Parliament as
his health was so bad. We went into
the Drawing room at 6. Miss Wakes were there
& remained with me we chatted on com---



topics -- at ½ past 7 -- Lady Dartrey &
Miss Penn called to take Lady Wake to
Texiers readings -- they wanted to prevail
on me to go but I resisted their entreaties
& my own inclinations -- & made
them set me down at Mr. Glovers as I knew
he wished me to come to him as Miss
Glover was out & he had no one to read to
him &c. I found him & Mrs. Glover at
Backgammon. they soon left off & he & I
conversed together -- we did not want the
aid of a Book -- the American War. the character of
General Washington. whom Mr.
Glover esteems very highly -- the Marquis
de la Fayette. Marquis de Boulle -- to
the merit of each of these -- Mr. Glover
did ample justice. Miss Glover & Mrs Lenton returned at ½ past ten from the
Oratorio -- I came away immediately
in their Coach. Miss Clarke was out
& as she had been to Mrs. Jacksons I went
to my Room before she returned home. had
William Benn before I went upstairs to talk
over Goodyars intention, of going into partnership
with Mr. Johnstone here. He said he thought it
would not answer. Miss Asgill had been
to see me. left word she had been ill or
should have called before. a Note from Miss
Gunning which informed me she was better.

Saturday 27th: March 1784
My Uncle William called on me at 9 o'Clock
we went to Chelsea to Breakfast with
Mr: & Mrs: Aufrere. The snow lay as
deep as it had done any time during
the Winter -- but the Sun was out & the
day looked cheerful. Mr. Aufrere is



a Man of Large fortune advanced in Years
plain in his manners but well bred & sensible
-- Mrs. Aufere is of a certain age -- well bred
unaffected & very sensible -- they both
possess great taste for the fine Arts
which has been improved by travel.
They have an only Child who is Wife
to the Rich Mr: Pelham of Lincolnshire.
Their House is near Chelsea Hospital
it is large & spacious -- all the
rooms of which there are a great number are on the Ground floor. every
room has an Air of Comfort. & is
furnished with fine Pictures of the
best Masters -- Mr. Aufreres collection
is of the first class. Lord Exeter
was with them when we went in -- we were
there 20 Minutes past 9 & he had walked
from Town. Sir William Meredith came in
-- After Breakfast we looked at some
of the Pictures for our time would not admit
of seeing them all with that attention
they merit. Mr. Aufrere has just made
an addition to his Collection of 4
Pictures which he got from france. 2 most
beautiful Landscapes of Gasper Pousin
one of Albano with cupids. & a Landscape
of Salvator Rosa -- these are very
Capital Pictures -- particularly the
Gasper Pousins which are in his very
best manner. We spent our time
much to my satisfaction & the conversation
was interesting & agreeable -- at 12
my Uncle & I came away. My Uncle told



me of his intention of visiting Scotland
&c. &c. before his Return to Naples.
he set me down at home. I went in the
Parlour made Miss Clarke a visit for
a ¼ of an hour. then went to my Breakfast
room scribbled in my diary. Sir Robert
Gunning came & sat sometime. told
me Miss Gunning was better -- he gave
me a Guinea for Mrs. Seaton. I received a
note from Miss Hannah More with Mrs. Garricks
Ticket which allows me the use of her
whole Box without paying any thing at Drury lane Theatre
for one night -- this is for next thursday
when Mrs. Siddons is to act. I asked
Sr. Robert Gunning to join my party &
invited Miss Bell Gunning -- he was
obliged to me & said he should gladly
accept it & would inform me if his
Daughter could go -- my Uncle Frederick
came -- he sat sometime -- took leave
of me he goes on Monday to Ireland.
I told him I should be happy to have
Miss Hamilton to go to the Play on Thursday.
he said she would be glad to go. I did not
invite Mrs. Hamilton as I will only have
Ladies enough to fill the front Row.
Anna Maria came home before dinner
she came to me -- told me how she had left
her friend &c &c. I dined at home
with Miss Clarkes -- sat with them the
whole Evening -- they left me to go to the
Veseys for an hour before tea. I sent



an excuse to Mrs. Pepys for not
going to her assembly -- or rather
Bas bleu. by Mrs. Vesey -- I had a
Headache -- writing &
conversation filled up our whole
Evening. Miss Clarkes went to their rooms
at 11 I sat an hour after them
finishing an extract out of Mrs.
Delanys Manuscript letters --
Anna Maria & I had some conversation
-- though she was in bed & I in
the next room -- we can hear each
other so easily that we generally
have some talk after we are in
our rooms.

Sunday 28th. March 1784.
Intended to have gone to Church with
Anna Maria but as Betty was to dress
us both -- I was not ready when Mr.
Glover Coach came -- read the Service of
the day &c. in my own room.
Lady Stormont came at 1 o'Clock
& sat some time. I gave her what
Money I had got for Mrs. Seaton. &c
She told me Lord Stormont went yesterday
to Scotland & Lord & Lady Cathcart
Mr Graham & Colonel Cathcart -- that
her sister Mrs. Graham was to
come to her -- to be in the House on
Tuesday &c. Mrs. Vesey came.



Miss Clarke & I went with her & Mr.
Vesey to take a jumble. went to
Portman square -- set Mrs. Vesey
down at Mrs. Montagus -- we took
a drive for ½ an hour returned
for her -- I went in for ten
Minutes saw Mrs. Montagu &
Miss Gregory took leave of the
latter who goes next tuesday to
Scotland for some Months. we
then went to Mrs. Iremongers -- set
Mrs Vesey down -- went on to Lord
Dartreys -- enquired how they were
I called on Lady Mary Hume & left
word I would wait on her & Miss
Humes on tuesday Evening we
then went back for Mrs. Vesey &
came home at 3. Mr. Wake had
called -- I found Notes which I answered
-- Miss Hume could not go to the play --
Miss Glover & Miss Isabella Gunning
could. &c &c &c. at 4 had
Mr. Veseys Coach -- went to Mrs.
Walsinghams to dinner. Miss Jane
Vernon -- Lady Harriet Vernons daughter
(not the Maid of Honour) dined with us --
after dinner we looked over some



fine Coloured Drawing's & Prints --
of the Ornaments &c of the Vatican
after tea Miss Rice came
she & Miss Jane Vernon were going with
Mrs. Walsingham to the Concert. I like both
these young women -- they are
well bred & fashionable without
Airs. before 8 -- we set out.
I went in the Coach with them -- set
them down at Sir Watkin Williams Wynne in St.
James Square & went on in Mrs.
Walsingham Coach to Doctor Turtons in the
Adelphi -- met there Colonel & Miss
Goldsworthy -- Dr. Kaye -- the Duke
of Gordon. Mr. Vanburgh -- & Miss
Noseley who is upon a Visit to Mrs.
Turton -- we all supped at Dr. Turtons
a tolerably pleasant Evening --
at ½ past 11 I came home in a
Chair -- did not get home
till 12. Miss Clarke's were gone to
bed -- I had some little talk with
Anna Maria -- she had been to Mrs.
Jackson's & the Glovers -- a good
account of Mrs. Jackson & little Fanny



Monday 29th.. March 1784
A Cold Snowy Day. & high Wind.
Mrs. Carter came at 12 & sat sometime
with me she was but poorly. She told
me Miss Purdecy -- had been in town
but that she had not had time even
to come to her -- wrote abundance
of Notes & a few extracts out of
Mrs. Delanys letters. Mrs. Iremonger
sent to desire me to go to her in the
Evening as did Miss Asgill to come to
me but I was engaged. Anna Maria
came & sat a little with me. &
I went to her before she went out.
dressed at 2. Lord Dartrey called but
would not come in as I was dressing as
did Miss Jane Vernon. after I was
dressed saw Miss Clarke for a short time.
at ½ past 4 Lady Stormont sent her
Carriage for me -- went there to
dinner. Lord Stormont set out on Friday to
Scotland for the Election -- nobody but Mr..
Nicholson at dinner -- I asked him by Lady
Stormonts desire to go to the Play on thursday.
After dinner only the 2 youngest boys came
down Master Murray was in disgrace &c.
Lady Stormont & I had tête a tête from ½ past
5 till 8. she told me Lord & Lady Cathcart were
gone to Scotland for to remain there all
next Winter -- &c &c. Mrs. Graham was to
come to her on Tuesday or Wednesday for a



fortnight before she & Mr. Graham went
to Scotland. we talked of Mr. Fielding the
Royal Family &c &c. at 8 she took me in
her Carriage I set her down at Lady Warwicks
& went on in her Coach to Mrs. Hanburys
Assembly. it was so early that none of the
Company were come. I had a tête a tête
with her for a ¼ of an hour -- saw her eldest Son
a boy of 4 years old. Mrs. Hanbury told me she had
invited Miss Thursby to spend some time
with her in London but did not know
whether Mr Thursby would give her leave
to come &c. A great many people came that
I did not know & some I did. the Minchins
Bathursts. Tollemaches Miss Scawen
Mrs. Colt Hoare. Lady Beaumont &c &c. had
a good deal of Conversation with Lady Tryphena
Bathurst. she is a sensible pleasing Young
Woman. at 10 had Lady Wakes Coach went
there to supper -- only her & Mr. Wake.
Miss Clarkes called for me at 11 they came
in & sat ½ an hour. when we came home
went immediately to our rooms.

Tuesday 30th. March 1784. After I was dressed
had Anna Maria for some time we talked over
House affairs. Mr. Adam came & sat
an hour with me -- he gave me a description
of Lord Cassels place in Scotland (Airshire
& of the House he had built there for
him -- we talked of Mr. John Hope
Mr. Adam had known him intimately
for many years. At ½ past 1 o'Clock Lady Wake
called for me set me down at little
Burlington House -- Sir Charles Asgills.







I sat ½ an hour with Miss Asgill
we renewed our old acquaintance
which from some accident had been put
a stop to for four years. Lady Asgill
came in before I came away. Lady Wake
was so good to call for me I went away
pleased with my visit as I really have
always had an affection for Miss Asgill
-- she is beautiful -- elegant & I believe
very amiable. I went home with Lady
Wake -- Saw Miss Wakes. sat down to their
dinner & then went & sat with Lady
Wake whilst she dressed. a little after 4
we went down to dinner. Sir William & Mr.
Wake -- Mr. Baldwin Wake Sir Williams Brother
& Miss Wake Sir Williams Sister dined with us
-- I stayed till 7. had Lady Wake Coach went
to Lady Mary Humes. there was only
her & her youngest Daughter at home
Lady Mary was not well & has been
ill some time -- we worked & chatted talked
of economy. Scotch Relations &c.
at 10 I ran over the way to Lord Dartreys
-- supped with Dear Lord & Lady Dartrey.
Mr. Davies Mr. Dawsons former tutor
there -- at ½ past 11 came home in
a Chair. Our Man was ill & William Benn
came for me. found Miss Clarkes were gone
to bed. went immediately to my room
had some talk
with Anna Maria.



Wednesday 31st. March 1784
Read the 1st. part of the Morning. Anna Maria
came to me for some time. our Man
Servant Richard very ill with an Ague.
Miss Gunning sent to me at 12 I walked
with her Servant to attend me through the
Park. found her but poorly. her
Sister was with her      I sat till near
2. Sir Robert Gunning & Mrs. Lisle
came in -- they talked of Lord Napiers
Marriage, as I found it was now
generally known I wrote a note to
him to desire he would acquaint the
Stormonts & his other Relations
as they would take it ill to hear of
it first from others. went with
Miss Gunning Servant to Mrs. Delany. sat
20 Minutes with her. found her pretty
well. Miss Gunning & her Sister
came for me in the Coach. set me
down at Mrs. Walkinshaws. I sat
½ an hour with her -- Mrs. Mary
Moyston was there. Miss Gunning called
for me again & set me down at
Mrs. Glovers. she was ill & confined
to her Dressing room -- saw Mr. Glover
Mrs. Lenton & Miss Glover. I stayed
& dined tête a tête with Mrs. Glover in
her room. she told me some anecdotes
of Mr. Glover's sisters -- their behaviour
to her &c. a little before 6 had her
Coach which had brought Anna Maria to their



house -- came home dressed -- Miss Clarke
came to me for ¼ of an hour. after I
was dressed wrote in my Diary
Sir William Hamilton & Mr. Wake had called
when I was out. at ½ past 9 my
Uncle William came for me. we went
together to Mrs. Montagu's a large & fine
Assembly -- the French Ambassador
many foreigners -- &c &c. Lady
Bathurst told me that Lady Triphena
had desired her to give her Compliments to me --
introduced her 2d. Daughter to me &c.
had a good deal of conversation with
Lord Hartcourt. Lady Harriet Grey &c.
&c. a pleasant Evening, more so than a
great assembly generally is. about a ½
past 11. my Uncle & I came away he
set me down at home. saw at Mrs. Montagus
the new invented Lamp of which more hereafter
-- Miss Clarke's were gone to bed -- enquired
how our poor Servant did heard he was very
poorly -- went immediately to my Room.

Thursday 1st. April 1784 --
Miss Port came before I was dressed -- she
stayed only a few Minutes told me Mrs. Delany
wished to see me next Wednesday afternoon.
went to Anna Maria sat a little with her --
spent the Morning in reading writing &
working -- Betty's Sister Mrs. Harman came
at 2 & dressed my Hair. dined at home



with Miss Clarkes. at ½ past 5
Mr. Wake & Miss Glover came to
go to the Play -- Sir Robert Gunnings
Coach came for me & we set out
before 6. Mr: Wake Anna Maria &
Miss Glover went in Mr. Glovers
Coach. I went in Sir Roberts &
called for him & Miss Isabella Gunning
we got to the play before it began
-- Mrs. Siddons was very great in
the Character of Lady Randolph
in Douglass -- the other actors were all bad. Mr. Nicholson came to
the play -- he told me Mrs. Graham was
come to Lady Stormont &c. the play
was over before 9 -- Sir Robert Miss Isabella
Gunning & I came away went to
Mrs. Walsinghams Assembly -- saw most
of the People I met last night --
the French Ambassador &c. I do not like
the french Ambassador -- his manners
are not elegant nor does he look
like a Man of fashion. about 10 o'Clock
I came away with Sir Robert Miss Isabella & Mr.
Gunning -- set them down at Lord Bathursts
where there was another Assembly came
home in their coach -- undressed -- put on
my Robe de Chambre & went & sat with
Miss Clarke. Anna Maria did not come home
from the Play as she had stayed the entertainment



till ½ past 11 -- we chatted till 12
& then went to our Rooms. Miss Hannah More
Lord Napier & the Mrs. Adams had called when I was out.
                                                         in the morning


Friday 2d. April 1784
Mr. Wake came at 12 but I did not
let him stay as I was going to make
Visits. the Veseys were so good to lend me
their Coach & a Servant as ours was still
too ill to go out. went to Mrs. Boscowans,
wished her joy of son Lord Falmouths
intended marriage with Miss Crewe.
she told me she was going to send to invite
me for the Evening. I told her I had no Servant
as mine was ill. she promised to send
both her Coach & Servant &c. from her
went to Mrs.. Walkinshaws, only stayed
a few Minutes -- she was but poorly.
enquired at Mrs: Baker door to know
how she was -- heard but an indifferent
account of her -- left my Name for
her Sister Miss Julia Conyers.*
& went to Mrs. Glover -- she was rather better
-- saw Mrs. Lenton & Miss Glover -- sat an
hour & ½ -- Mr. Wake came to walk
home with me & was very happy to be
my beau. he came & stayed till 4
I dined at home & alone. went up
immediately after to dress -- at 7
ran over to the Vesey's to see Mrs. Handcock
who had been extremely Ill -- she let
me come into her bed room -- Mrs. Vesey



was sitting with her. I thought good Mrs.
Handcock was much altered with her
illness -- at ½ past 7 Mrs. Boscowans
Coach came for me -- went there
met her two Daughters -- viz the
young Duchess of Beaufort & Mrs.
Levenson -- Mrs. John Pitt, her sister Mrs. Iremonger
-- Dowager Lady Gore (Mother in law
to Mrs. Levenson) Countess Rothes
her husband Sir Lucas Pepys &
her Son (by her first husband who
was a Son of Mrs. Boscowans) --
Lord Leslie. & Mrs.. Price there
was one Card Table. Lady Middleton
was also there who is a very pleasing
Woman -- Elections & Politics were
the principal topics of Conversation.
at 10 had Mrs. Boscowans Coach she
insisted upon my making what use
I pleased with it, & if ever I was
in distress for a Carriage to send to her.
I went to Madame Saladin de Crans
assembly -- she has not long been
married -- was a Miss Egerton -- it was
too early for many people to be there
-- the Churchills the Humes &c &c
some Men I did not know -- Colonel
Hamilton of Geneva was there
he desired to be introduced to me



I did not recollect him but he did
me -- told me of having seen me
when very young at my Great Aunts
Lady Mary Colleys -- had some
conversation with him & Mrs. Walpole
& then came away was at home before
11 -- found Anna Maria in my Breakfast
room -- Miss Clarke gone to bed -- we chatted
for ½ an hour -- then went to our
rooms.

Saturday3d: April 1784.
At 11 the Glovers Coach came -- went there
with Anna Maria -- she, Mrs. Lenton & Miss
Glover went to the City --
Lord Napier was passing by as
I was at Mr. Glovers door -- he stopped &
spoke to me told me he had been to
his Grandmothers in Hertfordshire
-- Dowager Lady Cathcarts', &c I gave him a
note to send for me to my Uncle Williams
to desire him not to call for me to take
me to Mrs. Garricks to dinner as he
was to have done. & Anna Maria
took one for me to Mrs. Garricks to excuse
me to her -- I promised to be with her
before the Coffee was ready. the reason
of my putting off going was, that Lady
Stormont had sent a pressing invitation
for me to dine with her -- as I could have
no other opportunity of seeing her Sisters Mrs:
Graham & Miss Cathcart as they were



to set off tomorrow Morning for Scotland. I sat
with Mrs. Glover till 12 -- she was better --
Mr. Glover was not up & I paid him
a Visit in his bed room -- Lady Wake
called for me -- I went to introduce her to
Mrs. Newton as she wished to see her
Pictures -- we took up Lady Dartrey at
the Veseys' & then went for Lord Dartrey
& Master Dawson -- we proceeded to
Mrs. Newton's who received us with great
civility & took the trouble of showing
us her fine Collection of Pictures.
Mrs. Newton is Widow of the late Bishop
of Bristols who was a judge &
lover of the Art & had indulged
himself in making a collection of the
works of some of the first Masters -- it would
exceed the limits of my diary to
give a description of those Pictures
which pleased me the most -- neither do
I think I am equal to descriptions
of any kind -- at least not to such
as would well express or convey
any true idea. Lady Herries &
some other Company came in before we
came away which we did at 2 o'Clock --
Lady Dartrey &c set me down at home -- I
wrote for ½ an hour in my Journal
then dressed -- Miss Glover Miss Anna Maria
Clarke came into my room whilst I was
dressing -- told me of their mornings



excursions &c. at 5 Lady Stormonts
Carriage came for me went there -- met
Mr. & Mrs. Graham -- Miss Cathcart Lord Napier.
-- we were mutual in our congratulations on
his approaching Marriage -- Lady Stormont
said many kind & proper things & offered
to present Lady Napier at Court &c &c
Mrs. Veseys Coach came for me just as
we had dined -- I took leave of the Grahams
& Miss Cathcart. Mrs. Graham told me she
hoped to return to England in the Autumn.
When I got to Mrs. Garricks the Company
were still in the dining room I went in
to them -- & my excuses for not dining with
them were accepted. there were. Mrs.
Montagu -- her Nephew Mr. Montagu. Mr.
Vesey. Sir Joshua Reynolds. Abbé Grant.
Sir William Hamilton Mrs.. Carter Miss Hannah More Doctor
Turton -- who said he had been invited to
represent me. -- Mr. Horace Walpole came
soon after me & we left him with the
Gentlemen -- as the Company were
coming in we hurried into the Drawing
Room -- Dr & Miss Burney. Mrs. Walsingham
Mrs. Wilmot. Mrs. Morrice. Mr. Soame Jennings.
Mr. & Mrs. Pepys. Mrs. Ord. Lady & Miss Younge
Mrs. Henry Hoare. Lady Rothes. Bishop of St Asaph
his wife & oldest Daughter (Shipley) & several
others. I spent a very pleasant Evening
My Uncle William went away early to go to
see his Nieces Mrs. Graham & Miss Cathcart.
Mrs. Carter & I came home with Mr. Vesey
-- they set me down first. it was ¼ past



10 when I got home. sat with Miss Clarkes
till ½ past 11 -- they then went to their
rooms I sat up till 12 --

Sunday 4th. April 1784. Anna Maria
Miss Glover & I went to May fair Chapel
-- the Clergyman's Text was taken out
of Isaiah -- “For Israel will not
“hear, my People will not Consider.”

he censured the dissipations of the
fashionable world -- the evils arising from bad
example to inferiors. &c. &c. his
language was poor -- his delivery
bad -- upon the whole it was sad
common place stuff. After Chapel
we went & sat ½ an hour with Mrs.
Carter who lives near -- Miss Glover
parted from us & we went & paid
a visit to Mrs. Vesey
after Mrs. Handcock -- heard she was
better. Miss Shipley was sitting with
Mrs. Vesey -- Anna Maria & I came
home -- Mr. Wake came at 2 -- Lord
Napier soon followed & I sent Mr.
Wake away. Lord Napier & I had an
interesting conversation. we talked
over his future plans &c &c he
told me he hoped out friendship
would not be lessened by his Marriage
& that I would esteem his Wife as
my Sister &c &c.      Mrs. Newtons Coach
came for me -- & we parted with mutual
assurances of Affection & friendship.



-- I called for Mrs. Carter & we went together
to Mrs. Newtons -- we sat sometime together
before Mrs. Newton came we were well
amused in looking at some of the
Pictures. soon after Mrs. Newton joined
us -- Mrs. Hood came in who stayed
½ an hour -- the Westminster Election
was the Subject. as soon as Mrs. Hood
left us we went down to dinner.
Mrs. Hood is a little lively old Woman
Wife to Admiral Hood -- The late
Gilbert West was her Brother -- Mrs.
Newton told me that she was always
much admired by the Men & had
many offers which she refused as she
had no inclination to Marry -- her
attractions were, her sense, good humour
& vivacity -- for she never was handsome
& had not even a good Person.
Admiral Hood was in love with
her many Years & at last
gained her by dint of perseverance
-- she was 50 Years old when she
married, she is now near 80 &
20 Years Older than her Husband
-- his attachment to her is as
lively as ever & they are very
happy .



Mrs. Newton & Mrs. Carter entertained
me very much with descriptions of
the dresses of former times -- the Farthingales
-- &c. & the ladies riding on
Horseback with immense Hoops
& long lappets &c &c. Mrs. Newton
showed us the Catalogue of her pictures
which was written by the late Bishop
-- it is written in the style that the
French call a Catalogue raisonné
At ½ past 7 Mrs. Carter & I had Mrs.
Newtons Coach -- she set me down
at the Glovers. Mrs. Glover was so much
better that she was down stairs.
Mr. Glover was at home, Mr. John
Antrobus there for some time
Miss Clarkes came before Supper
Politics was the principal topic
of discourse. Miss Clarkes & I came
home at 11 -- went immediately
to our rooms

Monday 5th. April 1784
Anna Maria came & sat sometime in my
room before I was up -- we talked of
Lord Napiers Marriage &c. at 2
Mr. Wake came & stayed sometime
this is his Birthday -- he enters
into the 17th. Year of his age.



-- he had not left me long before Miss
Clavering came she stayed ½ an hour
-- I was very well pleased with her --
she told me she understood from Lord
Napier that a friendship had long subsisted
between us -- that she hoped I approved his
choice & that she might share in our
friendship in future. she spoke of him as
I believe she felt and as I know he
merited. I have every reason to hope
they will suit each other & be as happy
as the generality of Mankind are
who are good humoured, sensible &
prudent. The Dartrey's came for me
& Anna Maria to carry us to Lady Wakes
to dinner I was not quite ready Anna Maria
went with them & they sent the Coach back
for me. As I passed through
Piccadilly saw the Prince of Wales
on Horseback going into the Court of
Devonshire House he kissed his
hand to me -- I thought he looked
ill. Lord & Lady Dartrey Mr. Dawson
Miss Anna Maria Clarke Lady Wake Mr.
Wake & the 2 Miss Wakes were
the Company -- we congratulated
Lady Wake & her Son on the return of
this -- he showed me the presents he
had received. Sir William & Mr. Catton were



out of Town -- we spent the day
cheerfully -- Lord Dartrey left us
after Coffee -- Mr. Vesey came to tea
we played at Commerce to amuse the
Young People -- Mr. Vesey left us before
supper -- Lady Dartrey & her Son the moment
it was over. Anna Maria & I stayed & chatted
with Lady Wake & her Son till ½ past
11 -- when we came home Anna Maria & I
had a little conversation & then went
to bed.

Tuesday 6th.. April 1784
Received many notes & invitations, sent answers.
at 12 both the Miss Gunnings came they
stayed some time. Miss Gunning was got pretty well
again -- told me she had been at Mrs. Hobarts
Yesterday Evening for the 1st.. time of her going
out since her illness -- there was a Ball
the Prince of Wales was there.
After they went Mr. Wake came & sat
above an hour -- told me of some
uncomfortable things that had happened.
Lord Napier came & I sent him away.
Lord Napier & I talked over Miss Clavering
&c &c after he went Anna Maria came
to take leave of me as she was going
out -- I dined at home & alone --
read & wrote till near 8 when Lady Wake
came to sit the Evening with me, she told me



of her various distress's -- respecting
her uncertainties or rather Sr. William's
Miss Asgill came at ½ past 8 & stayed
till 10 -- she looked very pretty &
affected us much by telling us the
story of her Brothers imprisonment &
danger of losing his life in America --
the anxiety & misery of herself &
Parents -- & told her how well the
Queen of France had acted -- how
feelingly she received Lady Asgill her
Brother & herself when they went
to Paris this last summer to return
thanks -- all this I will endeavour
to recollect & write down at large.
-- Miss Asgill left us at 10 o'Clock --
Lady Wake & I went down to Supper
Miss Clarkes came home & joined
us -- After Supper Lady Wake received a
letter from Mr Edwards the person
who was to take the House she was
in some distress about it as she was not
prepared to quit it so soon -- sent to Lord
Dartrey's &c. we offered all the assistance
in our power -- She left us at ½ past 11 --
we soon went to our rooms



Wednesday 7th. April 1784 -- Mr. Wake came
early in the Morning to acquaint me
how affairs went on -- Anna Maria & I
both saw him -- After he left us
Anna Maria stayed some time with me. Mr.
Wake came again at 1 o'Clock sat an
hour with me & told me they had got
other Lodgings &c &c. when he left
me went to dress Lady Beaumont
& Mrs. Hamilton (my Uncle Frederick wife)
called, I did not see either. Lady
Wake, Lady Dartrey called I did not
see them -- they left messages -- after
I was dressed Anna Maria came & sat with me
Lord Napier came for me he came
up -- saw Anna Maria -- it was 5 o'Clock
he brought Lady Claverings Coach
for me, we went together to her House
I made him a present of a pair
of Sleeve Buttons -- & made him
give me his old ones. was introduced
to Lady Clavering -- she
appears to me to be a friendly
& good natured Woman -- without
pretensions -- she is Mother in
Law to her late Husbands Children
& I am told has ever treated
them as her own -- they are
all & justly much attached to her



I was also introduced to Mr. &
Mrs. Peachel -- Mrs: Pechell is sister
to Miss Clavering -- & appears to
be as sensible & good tempered
a Woman as Miss Clavering is --
before dinner Miss Clavering presented
me with a ring with hers
& Lord Napiers hair enclosed &
repeated her wishes to have an equal
share in my friendship with Lord
Napier. After dinner when the Servants
were withdrawn -- the conversation
turned upon the several necessary
arrangements respecting the marriage
-- we then left the Gentlemen
& went up to the Drawing room --
I came away before they rejoined
us -- the Duchess Dowager of Portlands
Coach came for me soon after 7.
I went to Mrs. Delany -- Mr. Barnard
Dewes was with her & her great niece Miss
Port -- I found her out of Spirits for
her Old friend Lady Mansfield is
dangerously Ill -- she was seized last
Sunday with a Paralytic Stroke -- her
friends must wish for her release
as she is I believe 81 & has not been
able to swallow any sustenance or speak



since she was taken. the Dowager Duchess
of Portland came soon after me --
Mr. Bernard Dewes stayed the whole time --
Lady Wallingford came & stayed
½ an hour. after she went I
took an opportunity of asking
the Duchess if she remembered Dr.
Sandys -- my friends grandfather
She & Mrs. Delany both told me
they had known him well -- the
Duchess told me many circumstances
relative to him -- & when she found
I knew his Granddaughter made
many kind enquiries after her.
She told me Dr. Sandys had often
spoken of her with the tenderest
Affection -- I spoke of my friend
as I felt. at 10 I had her Graces
Coach -- went to Miss Tryons Assembly
-- met there foreigners of
Distinction & fine folks -- had
the usual assembly conversation
with those of my acquaintance &
came away in ½ an hour -- there
were Card tables -- & in the 1st- Room
Music -- Miss Guest played a lesson
very finely whilst I was there --



I was at home before 11 -- sat with
Miss Clarkes for near an hour
& then we went to our Rooms

Thursday 8th. April 1784
Mr. Wake came to desire me to
be ready to go out with Lady Wake
-- After he left me had Anna Maria
for some time -- About 1 he came
to tell me his Mother was coming
that she was at the Vesey's -- I went
over the way with him to their house
saw Mr.. & Mrs- Vesey -- Mrs.. Vesey said Mrs..
Handcock was not so well as she
had been -- Mrs. Boscowan was there
with one of her granddaughters (the Duke
of Beauforts child.) -- she offered to take
me to Mrs. Delanys but I declined it
as I was going out with Lady Wake.
-- Lady Wake, her Son, & I went to
make Visits -- went to Miss Smith
found her at home sat ¼ of an
hour -- I set Lady Wake down at Lady
Mary Milbanke's -- William went on the Coach
with me -- I called on Lady Beaumont
Mrs. & Miss Orde -- & Dowager Lady Warwick
-- they were all out -- we returned
for Lady Wake & then went on together
we were let in at Mr. Burkes a



West Indian -- where Sir William Wakes
Sister is on a Visit -- we saw
only Miss Wake sat ½ an hour
with her -- Miss Wake is not at all
a mon gre nor ever was -- she
is a proud, -- mean, under-bred conceited
Miss. we called at a Shop or two
in our way home -- Mr. Isted of
Northamptonshire pass in the
Street -- Mr. Wake got out of the Coach
& ran after him to enquire what
news there was relative to the
Elections in that part of the World --
Lady Wake & I went on to the
Glovers -- only left a message at
the door -- she then brought me home
-- Mr. Wake returned to us as I was
getting out of the Coach -- I took
leave of them & came in -- met
Mr. Vesey going out of our house he
had been to visit Miss Clarke's --
At ½ past 3 Lord Dartrey called he
sat with me till past 4 o'Clock -- our
conversation was wholly relative to
Sir William Wake. we lamented the
alteration -- &c &c &c



Lord Dartry told me he heard
Mr. Farhill was married to a Miss
Wilson of a large fortune -- After
Lord Dartrey left me I went down to dinner
-- Miss Clarke & I dined tête a tête. Anna Maria
was out. I sat sometime with her after
dinner. Mr.. Fisher & Miss Egerton had
called when I was out in the Morning.
before 6 I went to my Breakfast room -- wrote
some advice on general subjects in
a Pocket Book Mr.. Wake had left with me
for that purpose -- he came at 6 for
it -- he stayed an hour -- told me his
Father was come to Town from Northamptonshire
& other Places where he had been -- that
he had dined with them at Lord
Dartreys -- he told me of the mortification
the Spencers had received by the People of
Northampton having rejected Lord Lucan
for their Member -- & having chosen
one in opposition to the interest
of that family. Mrs. Jackson came
& Mr. Wake left us -- Mr. Vesey paid
Miss Clarkes a visit below -- the comfortable
tête a tête Mrs. Jackson & I, had hoped
to have enjoyed was cruelly disturbed
by an unforeseen event -- .
About 11 Anna Maria came home she
came to us -- Mrs. Jackson left us about
½ past 11 -- Anna Maria & I sat up



for some time, I concealed what
had happened from her for fear
of agitating her Spirits &c &c
I sat up after she left me --
went to bed at 12.

Friday 9th. April 1784
Anna Maria was so very indifferent with
a bad Cold that we put off going to
Church. After we were dressed we spent
the Morning together -- we had a very
interesting conversation -- I was
obliged to pain her heart by a
communication of what I had heard
last night. Mr. Wake came with a
Message from his mother to desire
me to take an airing with her -- she
was to call in a ¼ of an hour -- I
promised to go & he left me.
Little Mary Jackson came -- I went
down to the Miss Clarkes till Lady Wake
called -- which she did at ½ past 1 o'Clock
Anna Maria took little Mary to the Coach -- after
they had paid their Compliments to Lady Wake
I set out with Lady Wake Mr. Wake
& the 2 Miss Wakes -- we saw Lord Dartry
he crossed the Street & spoke to us.
We went through Hyde Park to Kensington
there were a great many Carriages & Riders
it looked lively. we left Miss Wakes
at a Lady's House to pay a visit to a
young friend -- called at a Mrs. Cummings



she came to the Coach & talked sometime
with Lady Wake -- we then took an airing
for a ½ an hour -- Lady Wake read
some part of a discourse on the day
by the Bishop of Chester, Porteous.
we called for Miss Wakes --
Lady Wake & her daughters went
home. Mr. Wake went in the Coach with
me to Mr. Jackson's. I took leave
of him there. I sat with Mrs. Jackson
till she was summoned by Mr. Jackson to
dinner -- I sat by them whilst they
dined -- at ¼ past 5 Lady Stormont's
Carriage came for me -- went to
dine with her. Mr. Nicholson the Tutor dined
with us -- after dinner the Children for
some time. Lady Stormont & I had
a tête a tête from ½ past
6 till near 11. we talked of Lord
Napiers Marriage -- Lady Stormont desired me
to inform him that she would be happy to
be of use to him &c &c. she means to
present Lady Napier if poor Lady
Mansfield is soon released -- she still
continues in the same state. we talked
over our Childish days & our old
acquaintances -- our Parents &c &c
I left her before 11. had her Carriage
came home -- found Anna Maria alone
we conversed together for some time
& then went to our Rooms -- her
Cold was very indifferent --



Saturday 10th. April 1784. Anna Maria
came & sat with me for some time -- Mr. Wake
called I did not see him as I was dressing
he left a Note for me or rather a letter
I was amused in reading it for it was
nothing less than a description of myself
this he had written in the style of a
very partial friend. Mrs. Garrick
& Miss Hannah More came & sat sometime
with me. Mrs: Garrick was in
good spirits & it was an agreeable
Visit. -- After they went Lord Napier
came -- he stayed from 2 till 3 o'Clock -- he
showed me a Watch & Bracelets he
had got to present to Miss Clavering.
I told him of Lady Stormonts friendly
offers to him & her &c &c
gave him a little present to present
from me to Miss Clavering --
When he left me Mr. Wake came
& stayed till 4 o'Clock -- he talked to
me of his Tutor -- I was sorry to find
by what he said that he did not
love him -- he spoke however very
sensibly on the subject & promised
me to behave always towards him
with propriety -- & acquiesced in my
opinion of Mr. C's merits --
but it is not easy to turn aside
the prejudices of Young Men of his age --



I forgot to mention that
Miss Port called on me at 11 o'Clock
she brought me a Message from Mrs-
Delany -- stayed ¼ of an hour.
About 20 Minutes past 4 Mr. Glovers Coach
came for me -- as I was going out received
the long expected letter from my friend
from Mansfield -- it depressed my spirits
for it contained an uncomfortable account
of her health. I dined with
Mrs. Glover her Sister Mrs. Lenton &
Miss Glover -- Mr. Glover was out -- I stayed
with them till ½ past 7 when Mr. Glover came
home -- he was well -- I had only time
to pay my Compliments to him as his Coach
was waiting for me -- I went to Lord
Dartrey's. where I spent the Evening --
Lady Wake -- Lady Beaumont & Lady
Shelborne -- Dartrey & myself were
the party -- Lady Shelborne told us
a diverting anecdote of A Mans
going a few days ago to the Lord
Chancellors -- he told the Porter
that he had found & brought
the Seals which were lately stolen
& put a Basket carefully
tied up in his hands -- The
Porter flew to his Lordship who
eagerly assisted in
opening the Basket. -- when to



instead of the Seals a pretty
new born Infant was discovered
-- the Man who brought it did not
stay for his reward.
-- Lady Shelburne & Beaumont went away at
10 -- I saw at Lord Dartreys where
he is upon a visit to Mr. Dawson
Master George Clayton -- son to
Lady Louisa Clayton -- I thought him
grown -- we went down to Supper
found Lord Dartrey & Sir William Wake
in the room -- the Wakes
brought me home at 11 --
Miss Clarke's were gone to bed --
I went to my room.

Sunday 11th. April 1784
I went down to Breakfast with Miss
Clarke's. & Miss Glover came -- Anna Marias Cold
being very indifferent I proposed
our reading Prayers together at
home after I was dressed. I went
to dress soon after Breakfast -- Mr.
Wake called but was not let in --
After I was dressed Anna Maria & I were some
time together. Lady & Miss Clavering
came at 2 & stayed sometime -- Miss
Clavering thanked me for my little present --
Lady Clavering hoped our acquaintance would
improve & other very civil things passed



Lady Clavering invited me to come to her
House next friday Evening the day
the new married pair are to return to
Town -- they are to be married tomorrow
After they left me Mr. Wake came to
know whether I could dine at their house
I excused myself as I had promised
to dine at home -- he made me many
promises of future good conduct
-- & many professions of affection
gratitude & so forth. he stayed till
past 4 -- the Miss Clarke's & I dined
together -- I sat with them till
6 -- then went to my room for
½ an hour & read in the Scripture
returned & drank tea with Miss Clarke's
Miss Gunning came to me at 7
o'Clock & sat with me tête à tête
till ½ past 11 -- she opened her
heart to me -- told me the struggles
of her Mind with respect to her
attachment to the World -- how far
that interfered with her love
to God & duty towards him -- I
gave my opinion as well as I was
able -- I do not think we need retire
from the world to fulfill our duties -- for if we
are placed in the midst of temptations
our resisting them is an example to
our weaker brethren -- & we have certainly
a greater power of doing good & may often
influence others to admire &



follow Virtue --
She then told me of her acquaintance
with Rousseau whom she
saw at Paris about 7 years ago
-- how much she admired him
&c &c. &c.
After she left me Anna Maria came
to me for ½ an hour we talked
of Miss Clarke -- her opinions
&c -- & then went to our
Rooms




      Monday 12th. April

I hear Lady Mansfield died
this Morning



Monday 12 April 1784
Mr. Wake & Mrs. Carter called
when I was dressing -- I did not see
either -- Lord Napier came & stayed
½ an hour talked over his
Matrimonial arrangements --
seemed happy & in good spirits.
When he left me Anna Maria came to
me & Lady Wake called to take
leave of us as she goes into
the Country tomorrow -- she said
she hoped to be in Town (as she
is only for the present going to
Upshire farm in Essex which is
but 14 Miles from London) for
a few days in the Course of
the Week. Anna Maria left us together
Lady Wake told me how much
(& alas! I fear she has reason)
she was out of spirits.
After she went Miss Clarke came
to my room -- she stayed with me
from 2 till past 4 -- Anna Maria just
came in to take leave of us as
she was going out -- Miss Clarke &
I had a very interesting conversation
we dined together



I stayed with Miss Clarke till 8 o'Clock
-- When Mr. Mrs. Vesey came for me
went with them to Mrs. Ordes -- a
Bas Blue party. there were
Mrs. Montagu Mr. Walpole Mr. & Mrs.
Pepys. Sir Lucas Pepy's Lady Rothes
Mrs. Garrick -- Miss Hannah More -- Dr. &
Miss Burney -- Mrs. Wilmot Mrs.
Morrice -- Sir Joshua Reynolds Miss Palmer
Lord Monboddo -- Miss Orde & her Second
Brother who is in the Church. Mrs. Carter.
-- the Chief thing I heard was a
difference of opinion respecting Dryden
Mr. Walpole & Dr. Burney extolled him
above all our Poets.
Miss Palmer told me that my Uncle
William had been often at Sir
Joshua Reynolds lately -- that he escorted
my Cousin Charles Grevilles Mistress
in a Hackney Coach & that her Uncle
was painting this Woman's picture
for him to take to Naples -- I shall
make use of this intelligence to
have some entertainment in
plaguing Sir William About 10 o'Clock I came
away from Mrs. Ordes -- Mrs: Carter came
away also & the Veseys set us both down
Mrs. Carter at home & me at Sir William Wakes
I found Sir William Lady Wake & Mr. Wake at home
I supped with them & stayed till 11 -- came home
in a Chair -- Miss Clarke's were gone to bed &
I went to my room immediately --




Tuesday 13th. April 1784
Mr. Wake came before 11 to take leave
of me -- he stayed sometime. I gave
him all the advice I thought he
might stand in need of & he received
it gratefully -- & his affectionate
heart was so full that he wept
like a Child at parting, though
it is not improbable we may
meet again in a few days as his
father talks of coming again to
Town -- If this Youth is so happy
as to withstand the snares and
temptations of the world he will
be the comfort of his Parents
the delight of his friends & a
valuable Member of Society.
After he left me Anna Maria brought
her friend Mr. Harris to pay me
a Visit -- his Ship not sailing
so soon as was expected he is
returned to his friends for a few
days -- whilst they were with me
Lord Monboddo called -- he stayed
sometime -- he promised to bring
me some Manuscript Poems -- particularly
a Song Mrs. Hunter has lately
written. Lord Monboddo is quite a character



sometime or other I will attempt
to describe him. My Old Maid
Goodyar succeeded his Lordship -- she
told me she was married last week
to a Mr Johnstone -- was now settled
in business &c &c I promised to
use my endeavours to serve her
& gave her a Table Cloth & a
Breakfast Cloth towards her
house linen. Mrs.
Delany called
but did not come in neither
could I go down to her -- dined at
home with the Miss Clarkes -- read
to them till 6 o'Clock in Grays
odes -- then went to my room &
began a letter to my friend Miss Litchfield
wrote a note to my Uncle William
to remind him of his promise
to serve Wm. Benn -- at 7 the Duchess
Dowager of Portlands Coach came
for me went to Mrs. Delanys --
Lady Andover an old friend of hers
& the Duchess's came in -- she did not
stay -- soon after she went the Duchess
came -- both she & Mrs. Delany were
very low the death of their old
friend Lady Mansfield had much
afflicted them. orders were given
that no other company was to be
let in -- I esteemed it a mark of



their affection to wish to have
my Company in preference to
any other person -- I endeavoured
to amuse them & succeeded pretty
well -- In the course of conversation
I asked them whether they thought
Mr. Soame Jennings a real convert to
Christianity & whether he was an
Observer of Religious duties --
they told me he was both.
At ½ past 9 I left them -- had the
Duchess's Coach -- went to enquire how
our Vis a Vis Neighbour Mrs.
Handcock did -- heard she was so
much better that I went in -- she
was in her Bed room Mr. & Mrs.
Vesey were sitting with her -- they were
very glad to see me & good Mrs. Handcock
appeared much recovered I sat with
them till ½ past 10 -- when I came
home found Miss Clarke's were gone to
bed -- I ran up to enquire how
Anna Maria did she said her Cold was better
& had she known I should have come
home she would not have gone to bed
so early -- I came down again to finish
& sent my letter & Diary to my dear
friend at Mansfield then went to my
room.



Wednesday 14th. April 1784
Anna Maria sat with me the greatest
part of the Morning -- I employed
all my leisure till dinner time
in looking over & reading letters
some of which recalled very painful
Ideas of past events.
Mrs. & Miss Hamilton came &
sat sometime with me. Mrs. Hamilton
informed me she had had good
accounts of my Uncle Frederick
& her daughter Mrs. Stratford &
that my Uncle had sold his Villa
in Ireland & hoped to return to
England very soon. I dined at
home tête a tête with Miss Clarke
Anna Maria dined out. I sat with her
the whole afternoon -- except ½
an hour before tea when I went
to my room & wrote in my Diary.
we chatted & read & wrote.
Lady Cecilia Johnston visited
me this Evening for the 1st. time this
Compliment is owing to Lord Napiers
having married her Niece --
they were married yesterday Morning
received notes from Lady Stormont &c &c



Miss Clarke went to bed at 10 -- Anna Maria came
home before 11 -- we sent the
Servants to bed & sat up writing till
1 o'Clock

Thursday 15th. April 1784
The whole Morning I employed in
writing extracts from Mrs. Delanys
letters -- Anna Maria came & sat sometime
in my room & wrote & worked -- I sent excuses
for not going in the Evening to
Lord Dartreys & Mrs. Mansels
Dined at home Mr. & Mrs. Harris
Master Massey dined with us --
I left them soon after dinner
had tea sent up to me
& continued writing the extracts
till 12 o'Clock. Anna Maria
made me two or three flying
Visits in the Course of the Evening
received an invitation from Lady
Cecilia Johnston for next Sunday

Friday 16th. April 1784
Had my Hair Dressed for the day in the
Morning -- read in a Novel called Henrietta
which Mrs. Handcock sent me --
there were strokes of nature which
affected me. I employed my time
till dinner in writing extracts from



Dear Mrs. Delanys letters. wrote a
Note of congratulations to greet
Lord & Lady Napier when they
came to Town & to tell them what
Lady Stormont had desired me.
received an affectionate answer --
Anna Maria made me a short visit
-- Dined at home -- good old Mrs.
Russel dined with us -- came to
my Breakfast room soon after
dinner -- continued writing the
Extracts till near 7 -- then dressed
in my best bib & Tucker to
wait on the Bride & Bridegroom
at ½ past 7 Lord Napiers
Carriage & Servants -- I went to
Lady Claverings where I was
invited to meet them. notwithstanding
a Heavy shower of rain
& contrary to the custom in London
Lord Napier flew to hand me out of
the Carriage -- hailed me by the
accustomed name of Sister
& handed me up to the Drawing
where there were only Lady Clavering
Lady Napier & Mrs. Peachel her
Sister -- I saluted them & my
Brother took the same liberty with
me & then returned to the Gentlemen
in the dining room whom he had



left on my Arrival -- about ½ an
hour after I came the Gentlemen
who had dined there came up --
they were General Johntson (Lady Cecilia
Johntsons husband) Mr. Henry
Clavering -- (Lady Napiers Youngest
Brother) -- & Mr. Peachel. --
in the Course of the Evening there
were a good many People came
-- three Card Tables -- those I knew
& conversed with were Sir George &
Mr. Howard -- Mr. & Mrs. Peachey --
Lord & Lady Delawar Mrs. Lisle
(Lady Delawar's Mother). Lady Mary Hume
Miss Egerton. Mr: Jennings (Mrs.
Peacheys father) -- 2 foreigners from
Bruges a Comte & Comtesse
Paten -- Mrs. Anderson -- (General
Johnstons Daughter) & Lady Cecilia Johnston,
first Cousin to Lady Napier as
her Mother was sister to Lady
Cecilia Johnston -- & daughter of
Lord Delawar's Grandfather.
a Mrs. Morrice -- Lady Heathcote
a Mr. & Miss Godfrey -- I think that
was the name. two of Lord Napiers
half Uncles -- Mr. Napeir the elder
married to Lady Sarah Bunbury
that was -- now Lady Sarah Napier --



Sister to the Duke of Richmond --
she too was there & to my great
distress desired Lord Napier to
introduce me to her -- had she
been always good as she was & is
still handsome, good humoured --
engaging, & agreeable, I should
have been well pleased -- but
now her acquaintance
can do me no credit. I could
not avoid being civil on this
occasion but my principles &
hers are too opposite for me not
to avoid any further intimacy.
-- I was also introduced to a
Mr.. Francis by Lady Clavering
as an old friend & intimate
of their family -- he appears a
Clever man -- is Son to the
Mr. Francis who translated
Horace -- he was in India when
Sir -- Clavering was there -- a
Man of good character & esteemed.
Lord Napier introduced me to
Captain Patrick Napier the Younger
Brother of Lady Sarahs Husband
-- he is so like my late friend
Lord Napier that I quite loved
him at first sight -- he is in



the Navy -- Modest in his
Manners & a most good humoured
countenance -- he had for some
time the charge of Prince William
at Sea but that Youth not
behaving properly he with a
true spirit of independence
gave up the charge with credit
to himself. there were a few
other people I did not know --
When all the Company were gone
except. Mr. & Mrs. Peachel --
Lord & Lady Napier -- Lady --
Heathcote Mrs. Morrice --
Captain Patrick Napier -- & a
Clergyman who appeared an intimate
I was introduced to him his name is Wheeler
a Man of humour & Sense --
Lady Clavering ordered an impromptu
supper in the Drawing room --
we were lively with propriety
& the Evening closed agreeably --
at 12 I had Lord Napiers
Carriage & came home -- Miss Clarke's
gone to bed & I went directly to
my room




Saturday 17th.. April 1784
Employed myself all morning in
Writing extracts from Mrs. Delany letters
-- at ½ past 4 the Miss Clarkes &
I went to the Veseys to dinner --
Mrs. Handcock well enough recovered
to dine with us -- Mrs. Carter &
Mr. Richard Burke a Brother of
the celebrated Edmund Burke --
he appears a shrewd sensible Man
-- The conversation after dinner turned
on the trials for Murders -- those
of Miss Blaney -- Miss Jeffries &
Donnelnan -- Mr.. Burke displayed law
knowledge -- we sat long after dinner --
when we went into the Drawing Room
we made a comfortable circle round
a little table & worked & chatted -- the 2
Gentlemen Mr. Vesey & Mr. Burke joined us
for an hour -- Dreams & superstition
were the subjects of conversation.
Miss Clarkes & I came home before
10 -- we had supper in my Breakfast room.
Anna Maria & I wrote. I wrote a letter of
enquiry to Miss Planta after the
Queens Health as it was & had been
reported she was ill. -- I sat up
sometime after Miss Clarke's went to bed
at 12: Mrs. Vesey told me that when she was at
Avignon some years ago she saw the Duke
of Ormond -- that he paid great attentions to





Sunday 18th- April did not go
to Church -- had my Hair dressed
for the day -- read prayers in my
own room -- & then employed myself
in writing extracts from
the letters -- till dinner -- had
2 interruptions -- viz Lord Napier
& Mr. Fisher -- Lord Napier, did not
stay long Mr: Fisher a good
while -- Mr. Fisher told me
Mr. Farhill was not married
to Miss Wilson but was to be
in a fortnights time -- he told
me also that he did not imagine the
Queen had been so ill as was represented
at least they hardly mentioned it in
the family -- it was a Cold.
I dined at home & alone, therefore
made a hasty meal & returned to
my writing till past 8 o'Clock
I then dressed myself -- Lady Francis
Napier came to visit me, but was
not let in. at 9 Lord Napiers carriage
& Servant came for me -- our Servant not
yet being recovered enough to go out
in an Evening -- went Lady Cicilia
Johnstons -- met there most of the company
I had seen at Lady Claverings -- all the
Napiers &c. & many others -- Ambassadors
Maids of Honour -- Women of Honour &
women without Honour -- such as Lady Derby



&c. -- all
people of Rank & fashion but few
of Principle -- or real Virtue.
There were several Card Tables --
-- At some of which sat old Wrinkled Dowagers
-- such as Lady Greenwich &c.
It ws a fine scene for a moralizing
Mind -- I confined my conversation
-- to Lady Clavering -- Lord & Lady Napier
Mr. Wheeler the Clergyman -- for there were
2 at this assembly -- Sir Robert Gunning
Mr: Howard & my Uncle Sir William Hamilton
& Lord Delawarr. at 11 I came away
Lord Napier -- ever attentive to me
as to the Sister of his Heart attended &
handed me to his Carriage which I had
to bring me home. Miss Clarke's were
gone to Bed -- notwithstanding had some
talk with Anna Maria whilst I undressed -- as
we can hear one another very plain
as the partition of the rooms is but
a thin Wainscot. I read in my
Cordial the New Whole Duty of Man
which I always do Morning & Evening
this is a most excellent Book
adopted to all stations & capacities
Went to bed about 12.



Monday 19th. April 1784 --
Whilst my hair was dressing finished
the Novel of Henrietta -- this Novel
is above the common run of these
kind of writings -- there are strokes
of Nature & the facts are not all
beyond probability. Lady Dartrey
called to invite me for the Evening
but did not come in. Mr. Wake
came and made me a long
Visit -- he attended his Mother
to town this Morning from
Essex -- she only came on business
& returns to morrow -- he told me
his Eldest Sister was much better
but that Sir William was again
confined with the Gout. he
repeated & repeated his old
professions of Affection -- gratitude
&c &c. When he left me saw
Anna Maria for a little while, employed
myself with my Extracts & working
till near 5 -- when Mr. Glovers Coach came
for me -- went to Mr. Peregrine Custs
(Uncle to Lord Brownlow) to dinner --
Mr. & Mrs. Glover Mrs. Lenton 2 Miss
Clarkes Mr.. Pardo & Mr. Phipps were
the Company -- I was I believe the
Lady of the day and the party made on



My Account as this was the first
time of my visiting Mr. Cust -- my
inducement for accepting the invitation
was to please Dear Mr. Glover
who has for many years lived in
great friendship with this Gentleman
Mr. Cust is an Old Bachelor
of about 56 years of age -- is
possessed of a large independent
fortune which he lives up to in a
proper manner is, & has been in Parliament many years -- as far as I
can judge he has a benevolent
temper of mind & much good
humour -- I do not think him
a man of Parts he has
common plain sense & though he is
not brilliant he is by no means
dull. perfectly civil but not
refined. Mr. Pardo my wise
penetration could make nothing
of for neither his countenance
or manner or conversation
seem to be interesting enough
for me to dwell a moment
upon. Mr. Phipps is an old
friend of the Wakes -- a Bachelor
of some standing -- he bears a
most excellent Character -- his
manners are rather more polished
than Mr. Custs & without
knowing it was so, one would



say -- what a worthy good man
that appears. Mr. Cust gave
us a very handsome dinner
every thing rarest in the
Season -- well dressed -- such a
Dinner as English Men of
fortune used to have -- the
Dessert & Wines suitable.
After Mr. Cust had made
all the Ladies give their
toasts after dinner --
if a fine lady was peeping
over my Shoulder at this
moment & saw what I wrote
last -- how she would exclaim
at the Goth!
we Women went up into
the Drawing room where
we sat about an hour talking
Nonsense. we then returned
to the Gentlemen who sent
us word Coffee & tea was
ready -- Mr. Cust having the
Gout excused himself from
coming up stairs. we went



then to the men -- found the
Bottles & Glasses cleared away
& Tea & Coffee &c placed in
their Stead -- Mrs. Glover did
the Honours -- After tea the Card
Table was placed -- & a Work
Table -- I seated myself at
the latter as did those who could
not joined the Whist party the
1st Rubber. Mr. Cust Mrs. Glover
2 Miss Clarke's & I -- Mr. Cust gave
us Puzzles to find out &
riddles to explain at ¼ before
7 Miss Clarke's & I came away --
had Mr. Glovers Coach -- they
set me down at Lord Dartreys
-- Lady Wake Mr. Wake & Mr. Cowslade
were there -- spent an agreeable
Evening with the Dartreys -- supped & came
away at the same time Lady Wake
did -- came home in a Chair --
My Young friend Mr. Wake very
gallantly walked by the side
of mine till we
got to their House. found the



Miss Clarke's in the Parlour after
a little converse -- went to bed.

Tuesday 20th. April 1784 --
Before I was up received a Note
in Verse from Lord Napier
with a present of an elegant little bottle
filled with of Attar of Roses to hang to my
Watch from Lady Napier. a little
after 10 Lady Wake & Mr. Wake
came according to promise to
breakfast with me -- she, amiable
Woman was in tolerable spirits
considering every thing. they stayed
with me till 11 -- then went below
take leave of Miss Clarkes & we
parted not knowing when we
might meet again as Sir William Wake has
not settled his plans for the Summer
-- as soon as they were gone I
endeavoured to amuse myself
by setting down to writing my
Extracts from Mrs. Delanys letters
-- Mr.. Wake found an excuse to
return & stayed a considerable
time as he said Lady Dartrey was
with his Mother & they did not
set out for Essex till 1 o'Clock.
Miss Port came to his great mortification


-- however she did not
stay long -- brought me a Message
from her great Aunt Mrs. Delany
to desire my Company next
thursday. Mr. Wake expressed
such affliction & showed such
marks of sorrow by not being
able to refrain from tears that
I was obliged to reason with him
on the folly of indulging
such grief for a cause that
did not justify it -- he pleaded
that it arose from the uncertainty
of seeing me again for a long
time &c &c. Mrs. Iremonger
came to see me & he hurried
away not to expose himself
to her view with red-eyes -- the
uncommon attachment this
Youth has conceived for me
is no longer a subject
of entertainment which it was
at first to his Mother & family
& myself; I esteemed it a youthful
Vanity affecting the Man but it has lasted
too long & grows too serious











for me not to endeavour to
extinguish a Passion which if not
discouraged may mark his
future days with misery.
for how many have been made
wretched by a disappointment
in a first attachment -- as it
certainly is when real & the
Person possessed of great sensibility
the most difficult to
conquer & the most lasting.
Mrs. Iremonger did me the favour of
sitting with me a good while
her conversation is always interesting
-- I was
extremely flattered by her kindly
pressing me to make her a
Visit this Summer -- she wrote
down all the Stages & said when
ever it suited me to come for
a fortnight or 3 Weeks I should
acquaint her & she would her
Carriage & Servants a Stage to
fetch me -- if I go to Mr. Glovers
at Sunning Hill I shall be
44 Miles distant. in short
she endeavoured to make it



convenient -- & If I could
manage it I am sure it
would be highly agreeable. she
took leave of me as she said Mr.
Joshua Iremonger & herself thought
of going out of Town on friday
but if they did not she hoped
I would go to her on Saturday
Evening the acquaintance
& friendship of such a Woman
as Mrs.. Iremonger is an honour & advantage
to any one who is sensible
of the benefit of having really
virtuous acquaintances
-- Mrs. Garrick then
came & brought me a most
beautiful Nosegay which she had
just received from her Villa at
Hampton -- I had only time
to thank her as she was obliged
to run away immediately --
Anna Maria came & sat with me whilst
I filled my flower Glasses &
adorned my room -- I gave her
a few to wear & a Rose to present
to little Katherine Jackson as
it was her Birth day & she



was going to dine at her Sisters.
Mrs. Rowe (Miss Sorrel that was)
made me a Visit I congratulated
her on her marriage & she not
look as if she had repented what
she had done. Mrs. Newton
came before she left me &
brought her 2 Grandson's the
Master Hands -- Mrs. Rowe took
her leave & Mrs. Newton sat
an hour -- I was much pleased
with the Children -- they were so well
behaved -- the eldest 5 years old
a very Sensible boy -- not pretty
the Youngest about 3 a sweet Child.
Mrs. Newton was so obliging as
to ask me if I wanted to pay
any Visits & as it was a warm
fine day she should have no
objection to be out in the Coach
any time I chose, I accepted
her Offer -- we set out at 3 --
I called on Lady Napier to thank
her for the Attar of Roses &c &
took her a Nosegay for Mrs. Garrick
had brought me a profusion



did not find her at home, but
left the flowers -- called on
her Sister Mrs. Peachel --
Mrs. & Miss Tryon. Lady Frances
Harpur. Lady Caroline Peachey.
Mrs. Carter -- they were all
out. Mrs. Newton then brought
me home again -- I was out
only ½ an hour -- Saw Anna Maria
& Miss Clarke before they went
out -- sent an Excuse to Mrs:
Jackson.. dined alone therefore
made a short & hasty meal --
came to my Breakfast room & wrote the
Extracts till past 11 o'Clock without
interruptions. Received a letter from
Miss Planta which informed me
the Queen had not been so ill
as was represented & that she
was recovered. Miss Clarke's came
home soon after 11 -- sat with me
for a ¼ of an hour -- we then
went to our rooms



Wednesday 21st. April 1784
-- Received a Note early in the Morning
from Mrs. Walsingham to invite
me to go with her to the Pantheon at
12 o'Clock as she was a Subscriber
& had the liberty of taking her
friends -- to hear the Rehearsal
of the Concert which is to be performed
for the Memory of Handel -- she
said I should hear Signora Mara in
great perfection & that she would send
her Coach for me. I declined accepting this
obliging offer as Mrs. Jackson had
sent me word she would make me a
Visit in the Morning -- dressed for the
day when I got up -- was a long time
under Betty's hands as she combed
out my Hair. begun the Quarto
Edition of Francis Horace for
Hairdressing Reading. Read through
his Preface (which I think proves
him a Man of Sense & Modesty)
& several of the Odes & notes -- I
mean to read them all with attention
I admire Horace as a Satirist --
he is so well bred & good humoured
that even the reproved could
not I think be offended. what
is said in the preface I think very



just: viz. “There is a kind of Satire
of such malignity, as too surely proceeds
from a desire of gratifying a
constitutional cruelty of temper. the
Satirist does not appear like a magistrate
to give sentence on the Vices of
Mankind, but like an Executioner to
Slaughter the Criminal. He does not
love Mankind as he ought, who indulges
to his natural sagacity in a discernment
of their faults, & an ill natured plea --
sure of exposing them to public View.
“Horace was of another spirit; of a natural
Cheerfulness of temper; an easiness of
Manners, fashioned by the Politeness of
Courts, a good Understanding, improved
by conversing with Mankind; a quick
discernment of their frailties, but, in
general, so happy an Art of correcting
them, that he reproves without offending,
& instructs without an affectation of superiority.
He preserves a strength of reasoning necessary
to persuade, without the dogmatical seriousness,
which is apt to disgust or disoblige. He has this
advantage over the rigid Satirist, that we receive
him into our Bosoms, while he reasons with
Goodhumour & corrects in the language of friendship.
Nor will his Satires be less useful to the present
Age, than to that, in which they were written, since he does
not draw his Characters from particular persons, but
from Human Nature. which is invariably the same
in all Ages and Countries.
The Morals of Horace are drawn from the two
purest fountains of human Wisdom, a
good Heart & a well improved understanding




-- Lord Monboddo came at 12 o'Clock
-- he had forgotten his promise
of bringing me -- the letter which had
been addressed in one of the Papers
to the Prince of Wales which I have
heard commended & Mrs. Hunters
Poetry but promised to bring it
to me & likewise to add to my
Collection of Manuscript Poems.
Mr. Stanhope came in -- what
a pair of originals had I to
entertain! they talked of
the Duchess of Devonshires conduct
in respect to the Westminster
Election -- they spoke sensibly
when they reprobated it -- yet
showed their good nature in
speaking in milder terms of
this prostitution of female delicacy
than I had yet heard -- even
from her own Sex. Lord Monboddo
took his leave after he had been
with me ½ an hour -- Mr. Stanhope
remained -- Mrs.. Duck of Kew
(one of ye famous Stephen Duck's
daughters) came & made me
a Visit -- she is a good kind of



woman very civil & grateful to me
for some little attentions I paid to her
& her Sisters when I was at Kew with
the Royal family -- she told me her
motive for coming to Town was to
see her friend Mrs.. Franklin Widow
to Dr. Franklin who was one of the
Kings Chaplains & translator of
Sophocles Tragedies. She is left
in distress with a large family -- it
was a fortunate circumstance that
Mr. Stanhope was with me for as
Mrs. Duck said Mrs. Franklin was
going to publish her late husbands
Sermons by Subscription and that
she was going to endeavour to assist
her in getting Subscribers Mr. Stanhope
said he should be happy to
subscribe as Dr. Franklin had
formerly been private Tutor to
him at Westminster School &c.
he therefore put his name
down for 4 Sets -- one for himself
, one for his wife Lady
Catherine one for his Son in
Law Sir Hungerford Hodgkins &
the 4th. for his Daughter Lady Hodgkins.
Mr. Stanhope stayed with me
for an hour after Mrs. Caroline Duck &
renewed his old entreaty of











desiring me to feel as great &
sublime a friendship for him
as he did & had done so long
for me -- told me what a
pattern of perfection he
thought me &c &c I let him
run on till at last my head
quite ached with listening to
this voluble eccentric genius
& then I civilly dismissed him
with saying I had letters to
write.      Miss Finch (Lady Charlotte Finch's Daughter)
came after Mr. Stanhope sat near
an hour -- was in one of her most
agreeable humours -- when she
pleases no one can be more
pleasant & entertaining.      Anna Maria came & sat
with me for ½ an hour before
she went out -- I was taken
with a faintness which I fancy
was owing to the great change of
Weather as the Air was as
sultry as it is often in June
it soon went off by her being
so good to give me some Hartshorn
& Water -- Miss Clarke
came & though she was dressed
& going out to dinner pressed
me in the kindest manner
to let her remain at home to
attend to me -- this I would by no
means either allow her or Anna Maria
to do & before they went out



I was quite recovered.
I dined at home alone & came to
my Breakfast room the moment I had dined
-- received a note from Mr. Wake which
informed me Sir William Wake was
poorly -- that He & his Mother
had a safe journey & that he
was very miserable & unhappy
at having parted from me
&c &c. I was not quite well
& could not work or attend
to writing therefore amused
myself till ½ past 6 with reading
Warton on the Writings & Genius
of Pope. Received a letter from
my friend Miss Litchfield
which affected my Spirits too
much for me to reply to it
this Evening -- I sent her by
return of Post my Diary.
at ½ past 7 I went to our
Vis a Vis Neighbours the Veseys
Carried Mrs. Handcock the
Reverie to amuse her -- Mrs. & Mr.
Vesey carried me to Lord Dartreys
to enquire after Lady Dartrey as
she was not well the Servant
told us she was better & was



going to bed -- we set Mr. Vesey
down -- & Mrs. Vesey left me
at Mrs. William Egertons where
I was engaged -- there was one
Whist table. Mrs. Shuttleworth
General Balkeley Major & Mrs.
Master Miss Egerton &
Mrs. Egerton -- I sat & chatted
with Mrs. Master & her Sister
Miss Egerton -- &c till ½ past 10 when
Mrs. Vesey called for me &
brought me home -- I wrote
in my Diary till Miss Clarkes
came home which was ½ past 11 --
they came & sat with me ½ an
hour & then we went to our
rooms.

Thursday 22d. April 1784 --
I got up at 8 o'Clock unrefreshed
for want of Sleep for my Mind
was so occupied wth. my friend
Miss Litchfield & my heart so
pained about her, that it was
near Morning before I closed
my Eyes & then it was only to
dream of her -- & those dreams
were of the most melancholy



kind. I had my Hair
dressed for the day as soon
as I got up -- read the whole
time in the New whole duty
of Man which composed my
Spirits -- After my Head was
dressed went into the Parlour
Mrs. Lenton was come to spend
the day at our House -- I sat by
whilst she breakfasted -- read
the New's Papers to them. &
Master Dawson called he was
shown into my Breakfast Room -- I went
up immediately to him -- he
brought me an account that
Lady Dartrey was better -- he
stayed with me a good while &
I amused him & myself with
sorting Shells -- he brought
a bunch of Violets with roots
to them which I planted in a pot
of Earth -- when he left me --
I put on my Gown & dressed
for the day -- & then was a
considerable time in arranging
& sorting shells & putting



my boxes &c to rights. began
a letter to my friend Ms. Litchfield but was
not in spirits to go on with it.
Mrs. Lenton came & sat with me ½
an hour before dinner -- we dined
at 4 -- sat with her & Miss Clarkes
afterwards till near 6 -- then went
to my Breakfast room & wrote in my
Diary -- at 7 the Duchess Dowager of
Portlands Coach came -- I
took leave of Mrs. Lenton before I
went out -- called upon my old Cousin
Mrs. Walkinshaw for ten Minutes
found her very poorly she told me
she had suffered a good deal since
she saw me. -- from her, went to
Mrs. Delany to whom I was engaged
met there Mr. Horace Walpole
the Duchess Dowager of Portland & Lady
Weymouth. Paintings -- Vertú
& Beauty were the chief topics
of discourse -- the conversation
was agreeable -- informing and
entertaining. Mr. Walpole was in
good spirits & related some lively
anecdotes -- among other things
he told us that he had made a
small collection of the smart &



& witty things said by fools --
once in their lives -- for example
A Miss Fanny Russel who was
a granddaughter of Oliver Cromwell
& served the Princess Emily as
Woman of the Bedchamber being
one 30th. of January in waiting on the Princess
The Late Prince of Wales came in just as she
was pinning up the train of her Royal Highness Gown --
Oh Fanny says he are you not ashamed not
to be at Church to day -- it is quite extraordinary
that you are not mortifying fasting
& Prayer for the Sins of your Grandfather -- replied she I think it much
more extraordinary that the Granddaughter
of Oliver Cromwell should
be employed in pinning up the tail
of Your Sisters Gown.”
I stayed after Mr. Walpole & Lady Weymouth
-- The Duchess asked me when I heard of
my friend Miss Litchfield & this brought
on an interesting conversation -- a little
before 10 I left these amiable Women
came home in the Duchess Coach -- sat with Miss
Clarkes till ½ past 11 -- wrote a letter on
Business to our Landlord Sir Richard Rycroft.
before I went to bed

(consult diplomatic text or XML for annotations, deletions, clarifications, persons,
quotations,
spellings, uncorrected forms, split words, abbreviations, formatting)



 1. Where Fanny Jackson was recovering from smallpox inoculation less than a week earlier (see HAM/2/8 p.99).
 2. Jean Jacques Rousseau (1761) Julie; or, The New Heloise.
 3. See HAM/1/18/79 of 22 March.
 4. Anthony Hamilton, Mémoires du comte de Gramont (Cologne, 1713). Anthony Hamilton was a distant relative of Mary Hamilton via his grandfather James Hamilton, 1st Earl of Abercorn (1575-1618).
 5. See the footnote on Almack's in HAM/2/2 p.61, and further references in HAM/1/15/1/5(4), HAM/1/8/8/21, LWL Mss Vol. 75(69).
 6. The familiar noun jumble had a sense ‘shaking or jolting’, used colloquially for ‘a ride in a carriage (with reference to the shaking experienced)’ (OED s.v. jumble n.1, 2. Accessed 21-02-2023).
 7. Probably Maria Anne Hume (cf. Stephen Hyde Cassa, Lives and Memoirs of the Bishops of Sherborne and Salisbury from the Years 705 to 1824 (1824), p. 324-325).
 8. Perhaps did for dreſs'd, by dittography from the line above, unless the actual reading is dr'd, which is conceivable.
 9. A fragment of p.24, beneath, is visible on the image but it is not part of the text of this page and thus it is not transcribed here.
 10. This page is blank.
 11. Probably Lucy Hume (cf. Stephen Hyde Cassa, Lives and Memoirs of the Bishops of Sherborne and Salisbury from the Years 705 to 1824 (1824), p. 324-325).
 12. This faint annotation appears in the left margin, written vertically.
 13. No further mention has been found. More than likely Hamilton is referring here to the Argand (or Quinquet) lamp, a luxurious, bright lamp patented in Britain in 1784 by the Swiss physicist Aimé Argand. He had been associated with the Montgolfier brothers in Paris, came over to London and demonstrated to a royal audience both a hot-air balloon and his recently-invented lamp. See John E. Crowley, The invention of comfort: Sensibilities and design in early modern Britain and early America (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2001), pp.192-4.
 14. John Home's blank verse play Douglas, first performed in Edinburgh in 1756. The play was produced at both Covent Garden and Drury Lane theatres in 1784. Siddons performed in the Drury Lane cast.
 15. The rest of the cast were as follows: Mr. Brereton, Mr Farren, Mr Palmer, Mr Bensley, Mr Packer, Mr Phillimore, and Miss Wheeler. See Douglas, A tragedy, by Mr. Home [...] (London: T. Lowndes, 1784).
 16. Presumably more than one of Robert Adam's spinster sisters, Jenny, Betty and Margaret.
 17. Lady Rothes's first husband, George Raymond Evelyn, was Mrs. Boscawan's younger half-brother, not her son.
 18. Hamilton also criticises Dr Baker's sermon delivery in her diary entry for 16 May 1784 in HAM/2/10.
 19. This does not seem accurate.
 20. A kind of hooped underskirt popular in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.
 21. That is, it is his sixteenth birthday (William Wake, 9th Baronet, was born on 5 April 1768).
 22. That is, on William Wake's birthday.
 23. Not yet identified.
 24. Mother-in-law in the sense ‘stepmother’ was common up to the eighteenth century but is now marked as regional in the OED (s.v. n., 2. Accessed 05-03-2023).
 25. Elizabeth Murray, Countess of Mansfield, would die a few days later, on 10 April 1784.
 26. The Countess of Mansfield was born on 11 May 1704 and thus would have been 79 on this date and approaching her 80th birthday (or, in contemporary terms, entering her 81st year).
 27. Francis Sandys's will bequeathes his property to ‘my Grand-daughter Ann Litchfield’, her brothers Francis and John and her mother Elizabeth, respectively, leaving his midwifery practice and library to his son-in-law Edward Litchfield.
 28. Not yet identified.
 29. Either Elizabeth (11), Frances (10) or Harriet (9) Somerset.
 30. Hamilton uses the French phrase à mon gré ‘to my liking’ rather than its near-synonym à mon goût ‘to my taste’.
 31. For miss ‘used contemptuously [...] with implication of silliness or sentimentality’, see for example HAM/1/19/34 p.5.
 32. This wedding hadn't actually taken place yet: John Farhill would marry Mary Wilson on 7 July 1784 (that is according to parish records; the Eton College Register gives 8 July as the marriage date). Lord Dartrey had probably heard news of their engagement. Mary Wilson was the younger daughter of Sir Thomas Wilson of County Kent who in his will of 1775 had left her as a dowry a sum of £10,000 in trust and all subsequent profits accumulating from it.
 33. This mysterious event -- something Hamilton had heard -- is alluded to again twice on p.49 but apparently not explained further.
 34. The offer was first made a week earlier on 3 April (see p.36 above), but see now HAM/1/18/82, received 14 April 1784, where Lady Stormont says that she cannot possibly go to Court till the week after her family put on their mourning, which will be too late.
 35. The Great Seal had been stolen from his house on the night of 23-24 March 1784; see p.12 above.
 36. Part of this page is cut away and the image shows text from p.57, below, visible beneath.
 37. Part of this page is cut away and the image shows text from p.54, above, visible beneath.
 38. James Ord had graduated with his BA and was appointed curate of Beddington in September 1783 and would become Rector of Whitfield in July 1784.
 39. Mary Goodyar married Thomas Johnstone on 6 April 1784 in St James's, Westminster.
 40. The novel Henrietta (1758) is by Charlotte Lennox.
 41. See HAM/1/20/86.
 42. Philip Francis was appointed to the Supreme Court of Bengal in 1774, along with Sir John Clavering.
 43. This afterthought continues over the horizontal line with which Hamilton had already closed off the entry. The sentence is incomplete, probably missing the word ‘her’.
 44. See p.63 above.
 45. A blank sheet is inserted between here, as shown in the image. The partial text of p.79 is visible behind.
 46. Verso of blank sheet, as shown in the image. The partial text of p.76 is visible behind.
 47. Hamilton's use of the initial ‘J’ suggests that Mrs Iremonger means to travel with her son-in-law rather than her husband.
 48. Hamilton's generally faithful transcription is considerably abridged at this point. The original reads ‘It was the Saying of a great Man, that he, who hated Vice, hated Mankind; but certainly he does not love them as he ought, who indulges [...]’. She chooses to omit the 'great Man' and his implicit dispraise of those who hate vice, but whether this counts as bowdlerisation is a matter of judgement.
 49. Hamilton explicitly asserts on p.83 that she is reading ‘ye. Quarto Edition’. Francis's translation of the Satires first appeared in 1746. Although by 1784 it had gone through to an 8th edition (9th in Scotland), the 2nd and all after the 3rd were in smaller formats than quarto.
 50. The sense of original here is ‘a singular, odd, or eccentric person' (OED s.v., adj. and n. B.7.a. Accessed 26-08-2022).
 51. Lloyd Sanders lists 'three housekeepers, the three Miss Ducks, Stephen's daughters' amongst the staff who moved to the Dutch House (later the Prince's House) with the Prince of Wales and the Duke of York c.1771. Sanders, Old Kew, Chiswick and Kensington (London: Methuen, 1910).
 52. A sheet is inserted between p.86 and p.89. This side is blank, with the partial text of p.89 visible behind.
 53. The text on the inserted sheet has been moved to its logical position part-way down the next page. The partial text of p.87 is visible behind the inserted sheet.
 54. Moved this mention of Miss Finch's visit here from p.88.
 55. Joseph Warton, An essay on the writings and genius of Pope, vol.1 1756, vol.2 1782.
 56. There is no corresponding quotation mark at the start of this speech.

Metadata

Library References

Repository: John Rylands Research Institute and Library, University of Manchester

Archive: Mary Hamilton Papers

Item title: Diary of Mary Hamilton (20 March 1784 - 22 April 1784)

Shelfmark: HAM/2/9

Document Details

Author: Mary Hamilton

Date: from 20 March to 22 April 1784

Summary: The diary covers the period from 20 March to 22 April 1784 and details Hamilton’s daily life during this period.
    Hamilton describes a visit from Mr Stanhope, a married man who ‘plagued’ Hamilton with his attentions and many visits. He desired Hamilton ‘to feel as great & sublime a friendship for him as he did & had done so long for me – told me what a pattern of perfection he thought me etc. I let him run on till my head quite ach[e]d [...] [and told him I] had letters to write’. She also writes of a visit from one of her old maids who came to her for advice since she was getting married.
    Hamilton describes many of her visits to her friends including one to Elizabeth Vesey when she talked with Elizabeth Carter on murder trials and on dreams and superstition. She records her many visits to Mary Delany who on one occasion showed her some of Jonathan Swift’s letters to her; Hamilton comments that he had a ‘lively stile’. She writes of a visit from Lord Monboddo who brought some her manuscript poems and whom she describes as ‘quite a character’. She visited Lord and Lady Wake where the main topic of conversation was the dissolution of Parliament. Eva Maria Garrick inviting her to use her box at Drury Lane if she wanted to see Sarah Siddons. Hamilton did go to see Siddons play Lady Randolph in Douglass and she thought her ‘very great’ but the other actors were all bad. She also describes visits from friends from Court, who brought news of the Royal Family, and her attendance at a concert which greatly pleased her and where she saw many people that she knew. At an evening at Mrs Vesey’s she talked with Horace Walpole about a new work he had recently published. Hamilton describes attending two assemblies, the first of which was given by the Duchess of Chandos where there was a great deal of company ‘but not many of the 1st ton’. She then attended a more ‘elegant’ assembly at Lady Herries’s. She notes that there were not many men in attendance at either assembly as they were all ‘busy with politics & preparing for a new election’. She writes of Lady Wake’s happiness that her husband was not to stand in the election. Talk was of the American War amongst other things. Hamilton apologised to Mrs Pepys for not being able to attend her Bas Bleu assembly, but she describes attending many other assemblies including one given by Miss Tyson which was full of people of distinction, and her visits including to Frances Boscawen where the talk was of elections.
    Hamilton visited Mrs Garrick, whose other visitors included Frances Burney, Horace Walpole and Joshua Reynolds. Mrs [Charlotte] Walsingham invited her to the Pantheon to hear the rehearsal of the concert ‘which is to be performed in the memory of Handel’. She also records attending a Bas Bleu party with Elizabeth Montagu, Horace Walpole, Frances Burney, Hannah More, Elizabeth Carter and Eva Maria Garrick. Joshua Reynolds’s niece, Miss Palmer, told Hamilton that her uncle, Sir William Hamilton, was a frequent visitor at Sir Joshua’s and that he had ‘escorted my cousin Cha[rles] Greville’s Mistress [later Lady Emma Hamilton] in a Hackney Coach & that her uncle was painting this woman’s picture for him to take to Naples. I shall make use of this intelligence, & have some entertainment in plaguing Sir William’.
    Hamilton records the literature she has read including a novel sent to her by Mrs Handcock called Henrietta . She describes a visit from Lord Napier, who informed her that he had made an offer of marriage to Miss Clavering and had been accepted; he described Miss Clavering as a woman of good character and large fortune. Hamilton adds that he has not yet told his family and asked her not to mention it to anyone. Hamilton also writes with general news of her family: attending dinners with her various family members; the intention of her uncle, Frederick Hamilton, to return to Ireland for six weeks to ‘finish family affairs’; her Aunt Warwick’s purchase of a new carriage and her dislike of allowing her horses to go amidst crowds. Hamilton attended a party given for Lord Napier and Miss Clavering, wearing her ‘best bib & tucker’. The infamous Sarah Lennox was at the party and Hamilton (a relation by marriage to Lord Napier) found her to be ‘good-humoured & engaging [...] [and] could not avoid being civil on this occasion [...] but my principles & hers are exactly opposite for me not to avoid any further intimacy’.
    The diary also contains gossip and news of London society. She writes of Miss Gunning’s brother visiting her and telling her of the Great Seal being stolen from the Lord Chancellor’s house. Mr Stanhope and Lord Monboddo talked of the Duchess of Devonshire’s conduct in respect of the Westminster election. Hamilton notes that they ‘spoke sensibly when they reprobated it yet show’d their good nature in speaking in milder terms of this prostitution of female delicacy than I had yet heard even from her own Sex’. During a visit from Miss Argyle the conversation turned to the Queen of France and how she acted towards towards the Argyles when they were in Paris. She writes of seeing the Prince of Wales on horseback coming from Devonshire House and holding out his hand to her and notes that she thought he looked ill. She mentions that one of her friends attended a Ball which the Prince also attended.
    Hamilton writes of the mundane aspects of her daily life such as having her hair dressed which she dislikes: it can take up to two hours ‘to make me look smart’. Rather than just waste her time she spends these two hours reading (Plato on one occasion) and writing.
   

Length: 1 volume, 94 images, 45 folios , 16281 words

Transliteration Information

Editorial declaration: First edited in the project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers' (Hannah Barker, Sophie Coulombeau, David Denison, Tino Oudesluijs, Cassandra Ulph, Christine Wallis & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2019-2023).

All quotation marks are retained in the text and are represented by appropriate Unicode characters. Words split across two lines may have a hyphen on the first, the second or both fragments (reco-|ver, imperfect|-ly, satisfacti-|-on); or a double hyphen (pur=|port, dan|=ger, qua=|=litys); or none (respect|ing). Any point in abbreviations with superscripted letter(s) is placed last, regardless of relative left-right orientation in the original. Thus, Mrs. or Mrs may occur, but M.rs or Mr.s do not.

Acknowledgements: Transcription and XML version created as part of project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers', funded by the Arts & Humanities Research Council under grant AH/S007121/1.

Transliterator: Cassandra Ulph, editorial team (completed 25 January 2022)

Cataloguer: Lisa Crawley, Archivist, The John Rylands Library

Cataloguer: John Hodgson, Head of Special Collections, John Rylands Research Institute and Library

Copyright: Transcriptions, notes and TEI/XML © the editors

Revision date: 23 March 2023

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