Single Letter

HAM/2/11

Diary of Mary Hamilton (21 June 1784 - 15 July 1784)

Diplomatic Text

[1]
                                                         X
June 21st. 1784 -- (longest day)
Sent a Note to Mr. R: Glover to inform
him he need not be at ye. trouble to go
into ye. City -- sent my diary to my friend
Note of excuse for not going to Mrs. Pepys -- &c
&c. made Miʃs Clarke a Visit -- at ½
past 12 set out wth. Mr. & Mrs. Ves[e]y &
Mrs. Handcock for Strawberry Hill.[2]
We arrived there at ¼ before 3 -- Mr-
Walpole
came out to receive us, I
told him it was not my fault we did
not come earlier -- he had desired us
to be with him at 2 o'Clock -- but Mr
V:
is never punctual -- Mrs: Garrick
came immediately after us -- Mr. Wal-
pole
was so obliging to take us through
most of ye. rooms & opened the
Cabinets (wch. are not opened to the
Company who come to see ye. house)
wch. contain fine Miniatures &
various fine & curious things
both Modern & Antique -- I have
not time to ennumerate -- the
whole stile of this House is true
Gothic -- every Room -- closet --
Boudoir Gallery &c. has painted Glaʃs
Windows -- it is ye. most perfect
thing of ye. kind in England I
believe I may say in Europe &
still further in ye. lands
-- one ought
to live in this house at least
a Month to see every thing



-- It is fill'd with Vertu,[3] Mr. W.
was particularly attentive to
me & gave himself much
trouble as he saw I enjoy'd
real pleasure, in looking at ye-
Pictures & other curious &
beautiful works of Art. he
was also so obliging to show me
again (for I was here last year)
ye. beautiful drawings of Lady
Dia: Beauclerk
wch. are in a
Closet built on purpose &
wch. he only opens for his most
particular friends -- these
Drawings are tak subjects taken
from a Play he wrote of the
Mysterious Mother[4] -- a Tragedy
I once heard read by Mr. Tyghe
the Story is ye. most horrid to
be conceived -- but these drawings
tho'. they recall to mind ye.
horrid Subject are most affecting
ly
interesting ye countenances are very expreʃsive. At 4 oClock
we went down to dinner
wch. was a very elegant one
incomparably well served --



it shewed yt ye. Master of the House
to bewas a Man of fortune & taste
accustom'd to elegancies. there
was no other company but those
I have mention'd -- I sat next
Mr. W. & he honor'd me wth. ye.
greatest show of his attention
we did not sit long after dinner
the 2 gentlemen rose when we
did & Mr. Walpole carried us
to a China Closet fill'd with
Modern & old China after we
had amused ourselves there for
sometime -- we went upstairs --
& spent ye. remainder of our
time after Coffee & Tea in very
agreeable converse. I had an
opportunity of ½ an hours
private conversation wth. Mrs.
Garrick
-- she loves me with
a most lively affection. I
communicated to her my
present prospect of future
happineʃs -- she shed tears of
joy & aʃsured me she should
from my representation receive
Mr. D: with open arms -- I do



not know a more warm or
friendly heart than Mrs. G——'s
she poʃseʃses a truly great
Soul. a little before 8 we
reluctantly took our leave
of Mr. W—— we had not been
able to walk in his beautiful
Grounds as it ha rain'd ye.
whole afternoon. Mr. W. gave
to my charge a letter for his
Neice Lady Maria Waldgrave
wch. I was to send to Glocester
House.[5] My head ach'd so
bad I could ill join'd in conver
sation
in returning home, I
did not however complain, we
talk'd of Mrs. Montagu & Miʃs
Gregory
-- ye. latter is going to be
married to a Clergyman of very
Small fortune
& her friends
apprehend Mrs. M. will be dissatisfied
with ye. Match. I declined going
in to sup with ye. Veseys came home
abt. 10 o'Clock we were 2 hours
coming from Twickenham --
I found Miʃs C at home I



21st. June Monday
Recd.. a kind letter from The s: Dr: of Portland
good accounts of herself & Mrs. Delany
ye. s's- invites me to go to Bullstrode
in ye.. Autumn -- or when she
Returns from Margate --



[6]



sat wth. her ½ an hour, I felt so
ill I was obliged to go to bed -- Betty
gave me some hot peppermint
water -- her prescription did me
good -- for though I had a good deal
of fever I slept more than I
had done for since Thursday --
sent Mr W.'s letter to G. House.

June 22d. 1784 -- I felt this
Morning as if just recovering out
of an illneʃs -- I had some tea be
fore
I got up wch. was not till near
10 o'Clock -- ye. habit maker came
I bespoke a new Riding habit --
wrote & recd. a note from Miʃs
Asgill
-- dreʃs'd -- then settled
accounts wth. Betty & Richard --
Recd. letters from Mrs. Jackson &
AMaria answere'd them & sent
ym. to Mr. J: who was only come
to town for a few hours -- din'd
wth. Miʃs C -- we sat together till
½ past 5 -- I was much better
but not able to employ myself
-- wrote a little in my diary &
begun a letter to my friend Miʃs
Litchfield
. Was interrupted by
Mrs. Ord who made a friendly un-



expected
visit -- she sat with me X
till ½ past 8 oClock -- I heard from
her that Mr. & Mrs. Smelt were
gone -- they were to set out from
Windsor (where they had been wth.
Mr their Majesties for 3 or 4 days)
to day for Oxford & from there
on home. Mrs. Ord told me the
whole affair of Miʃs Gregorys Marriage
wch. I was sorry to hear was a very
imprudent one in every respect
except that ye. Gentleman had a
good character -- she has not I
think behaved gratefully and
openly towards her best friend
Mrs. Montagu. Mrs. Ord said many
pleasing & flattering things to me X
& what was most grateful to me
to hear, was, the repetition of
kind things ye. Smelts & Mrs.
Carter
had said of me to her --
When Mrs. Ord left me I went to
Miʃs Clarke -- she seem'd inclined
to walk -- we made haste wth. our tea
& set out she went with me as far
as St. James Place -- through ye. Park
as I wish'd to call on Mrs. Delany's
friend Mrs. Sandford -- she was at



home, Miss C -- left me & promised
to call again in ½ an hour -- There
were two ladies with Mrs. Sandford
they soon went away -- I spent ½
an hour very agreeable with this
very excellent pleasing & amiable
Woman
-- she did me ye. favor
to aʃsure me she was extremely
happy to have had an opportunity
of being personally acquainted with
me -- & as she now intended to re-
side
in London she hoped to see
me often -- communicated to me
her plans respecting her 4 Sons
&c. &c. sometime or other I should
speak more at large of Mrs. S——
character -- it is such a one
as every good mind must ad
mire
-- she is very estimable
Miʃs C—— came for me -- we walk'd
on to ye. Glovers who were just
Return'd from ye. Country -- Mr. &
Mrs. G: preʃs'd us to stay supper
Mr. G: drank Mr. D health -- &
kind enquiries were made after
him -- at 11 Miʃs C & I came
home -- I was quite recover'd



this Eveg. -- Lady Dartrey
sent me a letter from Lady
Wake
wch. had been enclosed
in one to her it was dated
ye. 17th but as Lady D -- had
been to Oxford therefore she
cld. not send it sooner -- this
letter contain'd very good ac-
counts
-- Lady W & her family
are comfortably settled once
more at Courteenhall.
Miʃs C & I went to our Rooms
as soon as we came home

June 24th3rd 1784 Wednesday[7] -- Bettys sister
Mrs. Harman came at ½ past 9 she cut
& dreʃs'd my hair -- This was a long
affair -- ½ past 12 set out wth Mr &
Mrs. Vesey for Richmond Hill -- it
was a rainy day -- we have not had
quite a fair one for some time --
paʃs'd Mr. Fisher Mr. Gray & Saordy on
ye. Road -- as I went over Kew
Bridge for ye. first time since
I left Court -- how happy I felt
when I compared my present liberty
to that life of restraint. we got
to Sr. J: Reynolds at ½ past two --
As ------ of ye. Party were not to aʃsemble



till ½ past 4 -- ye. Veseys
left me & went & paid a
Visit to ye. Duke of Mountagu
& ye. Ducheʃs of Buccleugh --
I was quite alone in ye.
House -- I ask'd for Pen ink
& Paper & wrote an answer
to Lady Wakes letter -- The
Veseys
return'd in an hour
Sr. J: R: rode from
Town -- he came a little
before 4 -- he never
sleeps here & only
comes ------ once or
twice a Week to dine
-- ye. House is on ye. top
of R: Hill & commands
ye.. whole of the most
beautiful Views in
ye. World -- at least Lord
Palmerston
says so,
who Sr. J: Reynolds told
me had been a Prospect
Hunter all his life, &
had often expressed this
------------------
has
seen all ye. Views in
Switzerland &c. &c.
Miʃs Palmer join'd us
at 4 -- she came from
Town contrary to ye. ad-
vice
of her Physician
Sr- George Baker -- she has
had a slow fever for a



great while -- I like
Miʃs Palmer, she is
a pretty woman, lively
& unaffected.
At ½ past 4 all the Party
were aʃsembled wch. con-
sisted
of Lord & Lady
Spencer
Miʃs Bingham[8]
Miʃs Molesworth -- the
Bishop of St Asaph

his Wife Mrs Shipley &
Miʃs Georgiana Shipley
& Gell. Mordant.
The Company were
all lively & good
humour'd & ye. time
paʃs'd cheerfully.
Ait rain'd ye. whole
---Afternoon therefore
we could not walk out.
There are some fine
Pictures by old
Masters -- Pouʃsin &c
both in ye. dining &
Drawing Room. wch. are
two large Rooms one
one ye. Ground Floor & one
above -- ye. drawing Room
Commands ye. View.
they are of ye. Same size
& have a large Window.



These seem to be ye. principle Rooms
in ye. House -- wch. is not a large one
at 8 oClock we all separated --
I came home with ye. Veseys we
got to Town at 10 oClock -- we
conversed abt. Miʃs Gregory's
Marriage -- & Miʃs Laura Kepples
& Mr. Fitzroys running away
Yesterday to Scotland &c. &c.
they preʃs'd me to go home to
sup wth.. them I excused myself.
Miʃs C -- was at home we sat
together till 11 o'Clock -- I sent
my letter by this Post to Lady
Wake
, & one to my friend Miʃs
Litchfield
wth. some of my diary.

June 24th. 1784 Thursday -- recd.
& answer'd notes to Miʃs Agill &
Miʃs Gunning -- had ye. Shoemaker
&c. Miʃs Bloʃset paid me a very
long visit -- began a long letter
to Lord Napier -- din'd with
Miʃs C—— after dinner finish'd
my letter to Lord Napier wh.
I sent this Post -- at 7 went to
ye. Veseys -- met there Mrs.
Garrick
& Mr. Walpole who came



for a day to Town -- Mr. Mrs.
Pepys
& Dr. Higgins were ye.
others of ye. company -- an
agreeable afternoon -- at 10
they were all gone -- ye. Veseys
sent for Miʃs Clarke we staid
tillsupper & came home at 12 oClock
-- I had a share of some fine
flowers Mrs. Garrick brought
from Hampton

June 25th. 1784 Thursd Friday
Miʃs Glover came & sat with me about
an hour -- she told me Mr. & Mrs.
Glover
were gone for a few days
to Sunning-Hill -- that they had
din'd at Mr Bourdieus on Wedn. &
he was told both by Mr. & Mrs. G. that
he must now give up all thoughts
of prevailing on me & accept his
hand -- he still persisted in saying
It was ipmpoʃsible for him to relin
quish
his hopes -- his happineʃs
was too ---ly deeply concern'd
in it -- they then told him of
my engagement to Mr. D: he
was extremely affected by this



intelligence, & said I must in
deed
then give her up -- he
wish'd me every happiness &c.
&c. I was was really concern'd
to find by Miʃs Glover that
he appear'd very unhappy &
miserable -- I did not ima-
gine
that a Man who had
lived & did live so much in
ye.. World -- who was advanced
in life & had Children ------of
whom he was fondattach'd could
have felt so much attach'd
to a Woman he had had so
few opportunities of seeing.
Mrs. Garrick came to me at
1 oClock -- Miʃs Glover left me.
Mrs. G: sat with me till 3 oClock
we had much interesting con
versation
-- she open'd her heart
to me -- alas her heart is
a broken one -- she will never
recover ye. loʃs of Mr. G: they
lived together 34 years in ye.
utmost harmony -- he died her



lover as well as Husband
& friend -- it seem'd. a relief
to her to shed tears in the
presence of one who sym-
pathised
with her -- we talkd
of Miʃs H More.
I din'd wth. Miʃs C -- she left
me at 5. I wrote a letter
of Congratulation to Mrs. Alison
(Miʃs Gregory that was) Mrs.
Vesey
had sent me a Cover --
Recd. a letter from Mrs. Rogers --
a few lines, to thank me for
the Turbot I had sent her --
she informd me she had a-
gain
been ill -- recd. a very
grateful letter from Mrs. Beet
-- Miss Gunning's Servt. brought
me a Note she left this Morng.
before she set out for Horton.
at ½ past 6 Mrs. Lenton & Miʃs
Glover
came to invite me to
walk -- I excused myself as



I expected Amaria home -- Ms
Clarke
went wth. them. Betty
came & told me that a relation
of hers was come from Kettleston[9]
in Derbyshire, who inform'd
her that Mr. D: had been
so good to call (in his way)
upon her Father & Mother.
to tell them she was well &c
this was on Wed—— Morng.
I imagine therefore that
Mr. D could not arrive
at home before Thursday
or late on Wedy. Eveg. --
I wrote a letter to Mrs. Walsing
ham
wch. I sent by this post
to enquire after her & Miʃs
Boyle
who I had heard they
were much frighten'd abt. 10
days ago -- by a Highwayman
who whilst he rob'd them held
a pistol close to Miʃs Boyles



heart threatning to shoot her
if she did not make haste &
deliver her money.
Mrs. Lenton &c. return'd we
drank tea together & as I
gave up all hopes of AM coming
to Town to day -- Miʃs Clarke &
I accompanied Mrs. L & Miʃs G:
home -- Mr.. Richard Glover join'd
us -- we sup'd & staid till 11 --
the conversation was trifling
& lively -- ye. Eveg was so fine I
proposed walking home wch. Miʃs
C
agreed to as Sthere could be
no danger wth. Mr. R. Glover &
our Man Servt. to guard us --
As soon as we came home
we retired to our rooms

Saturday 26th- 1784 June. My
Uncle Frederick
paid me a very long
visit -- I communicated to him
my engagement wth.. Mr. D——
he said I certainly was ye. best
judge of what wd. contribute
to my happineʃs -- & gave me



such advice as it was natural
for a prudent man who had
seen much of ye. world to give, I
listen'd to him, but my heart
was averse to many things he
said. I know how neceʃsary
prudence is -- but I --- took
the---e
I will suppreʃs what I what[10]
going to say -- & only add that I
really believe my Uncle has a
sincere regard for me. We
talk'd a great deal of my Grand-
father
Lord Archibald of his
Brother Lord Orkney -- of family
disappointments -- of ye. ingratitude
of Kings &c. &c. &c. he also gave
me an account of Mrs. Hamiltons
Family -- ye. characters of her
Brothers
&c. when my Uncle
left me I wrote a letter to Lady
Stormont
wch. I should have done
long ago -- Miʃs C & I din'd together
she sat wth. me till ½ past 5 -- I
Work'd & she read a few pages of
a foolish Novel wch.. was in too bad
a stile to continue, it was not
indelicate but sad poor stuff.



-- I finish'd reading a book I
begun Yesterday -- Remarks on
ye. french & English Ladies by
Andrews[11] -- I do not much like
ye. Author's stile of writing but
he seems to have a thorough
knowledge of ye. Characters of
ye. french women -- at leat it
agrees wth. what I have heard
from those who have lived
in their society. I recd. a
letter by this post from A.M.
wch. inform'd me she should come
to Town on Monday -- that she
was gone from Harewood to Sun-
ning
Hill -- &c. I wrote a letter
to Mrs. Jackson -- had Wm Benn
came to inform me abt. ye.
Penny Post hours &c at 8 oClock
Mrs. Vesey came for me we
went together to Mr. Pepys where
we met -- Mr. & Mrs.. Mulso Mrs.
Chapone
. Mrs. & Miʃs Ord -- Mr.
Cambridge
s eldest son
. the con-



versation
was in general sen-
sible
& informing -- Mr. Cambridge
seems a Young man of very
good parts -- his language is
correct & he converses wth.
ease & vivacity. Mrs. V. brought
me home at 11 -- we set Mr
Cambridge
down at his house.
Miʃs C sat with me till ½ past
11 -- when she left me I
begun & finish'd Voltaires
Mémoires wch. has not been
long published[12] -- & wch: is the
present rage -- I was curious
to read it as I heard there
was not any doubt of ye. book,
being really written by this
great tho' wicked author
, &
that it contain'd a just char-
acter
of ye. King of Pruʃsia, .&
a faithful account of what
his friend & enemy Voltaire
thought of him. after I had
finish'd ye. book I repented having



endulged my curiosity -- why
should one wish to become acquain
ted
wth. vicious & wicked people
No woman ought to read a book
wch. she wd. be ashamed to own
she has read -- I reproach my-
self
for having read this.
Mr. Stanhope & Vesey call'd. but were not let
                             in -- in ye. Morning

Sunday 27th. June 1784 -- Recd. &
Answer'd a note from Lady Stormont
-- She is come to Town to lay in --
It pour'd such deluges of Rain
it was impoʃsible to go out
After I was dreʃs'd I read prayers
&c &c. Mr. Dewes call'd -- I did
not know he was come to Town.
& was sorry he was not let in.
began a letter to Mrs. Carter. --
abt. 4 o'Clock Sr: J: Reynolds Carriage
came for me -- went to his house
to dinner[13] -- Miʃs Palmer & I had:
½ an hour to ourselves -- Sr:
J: R
Dr. Beattie & his Son a boy of
abt. 14 join'd us -- before dinner
Miʃs Palmer & I went into ye.



Gallery & painting Room -- this was
a great treat to me -- at 5 oClock
all ye. Company were met.
There were no other ladies besides
Miʃs Palmer & me -- the Men were
ye. celebrated Dr. Beattie & his Son
Genl. Paoli -- & his friend whose
Name I always forget -- Mr. Boswell
Lord Elliot -- a foreigner whom
I did not know & who did not
speak a word -- ye. great Dr.
Johnston
. I was introduced
by Miss Palmer to her first
favorite Lord Elliot -- I sat next
him at dinner & we were soon
acquainted -- he is a Man of a
very respectable character & I
have heard his Wife his Children[14]
Sisters are all excellent people.
I was much obliged to hear
ye. railliry of all ye. Company
upon Mr. Boswell's profeʃsd
attachment to me. Genl. Paoli
aʃsured me he had raved abt.
me ever since he was of the



Party to ye. Abbey where he saw &
conversed wth. me for ye. first time.
Nothing could be more lively
or agreeable than ye. conversation
Miʃs P: & I were obliged to set
long after dinner -- we left
ye. Gentlemen at 7 o'Clock.
Miʃs Palmer shew'd me a head
of her painting wch. is quite in
Sr. J:'s stile -- she never had any
instruction but observing
her Uncle -- & after she had fin-
ish'd
any thing shewing it to
him & he paints out ye. faults.
She play'd & sang to me, she has
great sweetneʃs of voice, this ac-
complishment
too is self-taught.
Lady Stormonts Coach came for
me at ½ past 7. I was obliged
to quit ye. agreeable Miʃs Palmer.
I found Lady S: pretty well we
had a tête à tête till ½ past 9, I
told her abt. Mr. B: but I reserved
my information abt. Mr. D: for
another time. Lord Stormont then
join'd us he had been at Lord



Mansfield
s at Ken Wood[15] --
he told us Lord M: was much
better & in good spirits -- I ask'd
him if there was any truth in
ye. report of his intention of
giving over busineʃs he aʃsured
me there was not. Lord S &
I conversed abt. ye. P: of W: ye.
Court &c. he gave me franks
for Mrs. Carter. I had Lady S.
Coach at 10 came home, it
was too late for me to fulfill
my promise of going to ye. Veseys
Miʃs C & I sat together till past
11 oClock -- Dr. Jackson had call'd
to inform me his Wife was
brought to bed last Monday of
a daughter -- Mr. Wm. Sandford
also had call'd.

Monday 28th. June 1784 -- ye. habit
Maker
came brought home my new
habit -- I paid him £ 4.14 6. A Maria
came to Town abt. 11. I was rejoiced
to see her looking so much better -- we
had so much to say to each other yt. we
were together ye. greatest part of ye. Morng.



-- At ½ past 3 Miʃs Glover came in
my Uncles Coach to fetch me -- I just
stop'd for letters ye. Post coming in --
had letters from Lady Wake Mrs:
Jackson
& Mr. Dickenson -- wch. I read en
chemin faisant. There was no other
Company at my Uncles -- Miʃs Hamilton
sung & play'd after dinner -- at 8 o'Clock
Miʃs G. & I came away -- had my Uncles
Coach & she set me down at Mrs. Chapones
-- met there -- Mr. Browne an old Spa
acquaintance of mine.[16] Mr. & Mrs. Pepys
Mrs. Ord Mrs. Vesey Mrs. Handcock. I was
well entertain'd in listening to Mr: B:
& Mr. P. Mr. Browne. is one of my great
favorites -- he is a very uncommon
character -- I mean by his superiour
excellence. Mrs. Vesey brought me
home abt. 11 -- The ClarksMrs. C's were gone to
their Rooms -- I went & conversed wth. A
M
for ½. of an hour -- sent Mrs. Carters
letter by this post -- wrote an answer
to Mr. Dick—— letter before I went to bed
-- Mrs. Newton & Mr. Wm. Sandford
had call'd when I was out. found a
Note from Lady Stormont




                                                         X
Tuesday -- 29th. June 1784 -- A Maria
came & sat with an hour before
I dreʃs'd -- after I was dreʃs'd we
settled some accounts together
-- I sent to enquire after Mrs.. Jackson
of H sheet she & ye. Child well
Mrs. Sandford sent me word Mrs she
had heard from Mrs. Delany yt.
she was well &c. &c.
Mr. Jackson came at 1 oClock
& sat wth. us till ½ past 3 -- Mrs.
Chapman
& Mrs. Ord & her
Grandson Master Bigg. a boy
of 11 or 12 years old who is at West
Minster School came in did
not make long visits.
Recd. another from Mrs.. Jackson.
-- din'd at home -- A.M. play'd on
ye. Harpsciord -- we separated
from ½ past 5 till 7 met in
ye. Drawing Room -- Mr. Dewes
came to Tea -- Mrs. Lenton
Miʃs Glover, Miʃs J Hamilton.
& her Brother came in unexpec
tedly
-- as I knew Mr. Dewes



was fond of Music -- I prevailed
on my Cousin to sing we adjoined
to ye. Parlour where ye. harpsicord
was -- She sang two fine
Italian Songs -- after wch..
she Mrs Lenton &c. left us --
we return'd to ye. drawing Room
Mr. Dewes was surprised
at my Cousins Singing -- he
sat with us till 10 o'Clock We
work'd -- he took impreʃsion
of seals -- we talk'd of Prospects
Lord Melcombes diary[17] -- Mrs.
Delany
ye. Dʃs. of Portland &c &c.
when he seem'd to enjoy his
quiet evening -- he had been
So well satisfied wth his reception that he gave
up going to ye. Opera to see ye.
famous Dance of le Deserteur[18]
. After he went I answer'd Mrs.
Jackson
's 2 letters -- sent that &
Mr. D's by this nights Post
Bell left us at 11 -- A M & I
sat up talking till past 12
o.Clock



Wednesday 30th. June 1784. Miʃs
Glover
came at 9 to Breakfast. I breakfas[ted]
below with Miʃs C's & her -- I left
ym. at 10 as Mr. R. Glover came to
Breakfast & I was en Robe de
Chambre & did not chuse to
be seen -- I went to dreʃs -- he
sent me up two Notes to beg
I wd.. either come down or admit
à my toilet -- some laughable
meʃsages paʃs'd from above to
below &c. but he was forced
to go away without seeing me --
I return'd to ye. Parlour when
I was dreʃs'd -- Miʃs Glover staid
till ½ past 12. I sat ye.
whole Morng. with A. M --
we amused ourselves in making
Nonsense Verses -- Recd. a a
Note from Mr. Dewes wth. an ex-
tract
from a letter of Mrs.
Delany
wch. concern'd me. A
Note from Lady Clavering wch. I
answer'd -- Recd. a letter by
ye. post from Miʃs Gunning
Lady Storments Coach came
for me ¼ before 5. went to



dine with her -- we din'd tête à
tête -- little George & Charles
join'd us at desert & were wth us
great part of ye. Afternoon --
I had a long uninterrupted conversation
wth. Lady Stormont, I com-
municated
to her the whole
story of Mr. Dickensons attach
ment
to me &c &c &c. She
did not make a single ob-
jection
& aʃsured me she
should be impatient to see him
& shd shew him every attention
for my sake, & indeed for his own
from ye. favorable impreʃsionIdea she
had conceived of him -- she advised
me to inform my Aunt Warwick
my Uncles & other near Relations
she said she was sure they had all
so good an opinion that of my
judgment that they would be well
satisfied wth. the choice I made
in a husband -- &c &c. Lord Stormont
came home at ½ past 9 -- he always
seems happy to see me -- we had
some confidential discourse abt. his
eldest Son
. I show'd him Miʃs H.
More
's prose Epistle to Mrs. D.[19] wth.



wch. he was very much pleased. he
gave me some franks for Miʃs H:
Mre
: a little before 10 I had
Lady Stormonts Coach & Servts
as usual // I went to Mr. Glovers
where I had promised to meet
Miʃs Clarkes -- there were only
ym- & Mr.. R: Glover besides ye. family -- they had
just finish'd Supper but ye
table was cover'd wth. fruit from
Mr- G—— Villa -- at 11 o'Clock
Miʃs Cs & I came home went
immediately to our Rooms
I felt my Spirits tried.

Thursday 1st. Junely 1784 AM.
went out very early this morng.
I breakfasted in my Room -- then
dreʃs'd for ye. day -- recd. a Note in
French from Mr. Richard Glover wth.
his Manuscript Journal written when in france
& Italy -- Mrs.. Vesey came & made
me a little Visit wanted me to dine
there -- I excused myself -- AM
came home at 1 o'Clock, sat & work'd
with me till dinner time --
Mrs. Hamilton (my Uncles Wife)



made us a Visit -- she talk'd away
for ½ an hour -- she gave us
an account of ye. very diʃsipated
life ye. people of fashion leded
led in Dublin. Din'd at home
wth. Miʃs C -- they left me as soon
as dinner was over to go to ye.
Veseys
-- who had sent for us
to a fine desert of fruit
-- I did not go as I wish to
be to myself a little before
I went out at 7 o'Clock Mrs:
Chapone
came for me in Mrs.
Ord
s Coach -- we went to her
house -- we talk'd of Miʃs Smith
I was happy to hear Mrs. Chapone
speak of her in ye. most favorable
manner -- ye.. Company at Mrs. Ords
were Mr.. & Mrs.. Pepys -- her 2d. Son ye.
Clergyman
& Mrs. Vesey Mrs. Chapone
& Miʃs Ord -- ye. new Taxes were
spoke of & approved & Miʃs Gregorys
Marriage was talk'd of -- we were
all of opinion that she wd. be very
happy as Mr. Alison bore a very
good character & tho' they



had not much to begin ye World
with that he would by being
well known & esteem'd get good
preferment in ye. Church --
Mr. Ord said he was quite a
popular Preacher at Edinburgh
Mr. Poultney has just given him
a living of 150 P. An: at Sudbro[20]
Thrapston, Northamptonshire
I believe near Peterborough
the afternoon paʃs'd agreeably
I came away with Mrs. Vesey
at 10 oClock -- we set Mrs. Chapone
down at her House, she was
so obliging to answer my enquiries
relative to Mrs. Ord whom she has
known many years -- her Husband
was a Gentleman of large fortunes
he had been dead 12 years[21] she
lost him & 3 daughters in ye.
space of 2 years -- ye. eldest daughter
was 20 years of age -- handsome
& very amiable -- ye. 2d. 16 -- ye. 3d.
14 all 3 were charming young
women -- she also lost a Son[22] a
fine youth who was in ye. Army



he died in America during ye.
last War -- She has now five child
ren
. The Eldest lives on his
Estate is married he lives at
his own Place in Northumberland
ye. 2d. in ye. Church -- ye. 3d. in
ye. East Indies -- ye. eldest daugh
ter
Married to a Man of fortune
Mr. Bigg in Cornwall -- ye.
youngest Daughter
unmarried
a modest well accomplished
young woman lives with her
Mother
-- Mrs Ord is a sensible
friendly agreeable Woman
She lives in a very handsome
stile without parade.
Mrs. Vesey made me go in wth.
her Mr. V: Mrs. Handcock were
at home we were just going to
set down to Supper when I rcd. a
Note from A Maria to beg I would
stop at home as Mr. Jackson
was to sup at our house, I
excused myself to ye. Veseys



& came home -- Mr. Jackson
staid till ½ past 12 oClock
AMaria & I had some con-
versation
wch. l in my Room
after he left us -- did not
go to bed till past 1 oClock
Mrs. Garrick had call'd this Eveg when I was out &

                                                         left me a very
                                                         fine Nosegay. Mr
                                                         W. Sandford
also call'd

Friday 2d. July 1784
Did not get up early, as soon
as I had breakfasted dreʃs'd for
ye. day -- arranged some papers
&c. Mr. Stanhope made me a
very long Visit -- he took occasion
to tell me what a very high
opinion he had of my character
&c &c &c &c I insisted
upon knowing what he had paid
for ye. Bell glaʃs for ye. flowers
& return'd him ye. Money.
Lady Clavering came & he left
me. She staid an hour we
had much conversation abt.
Lord & Lady Napier &c she
quite opened her heart to
me, said how happy she had



been during ye. life of her
husband
&c. &c. when
she went which was abt. near
3 o'Clock -- I envited Miʃs Clarkes
to walk with me through ye. Green
Park to Mrs. Sandfords. I left ym.
in ye. Park & went to her. I sat
½ an hour wth. her -- found her
pretty well. We conversed abt. ye.
Veseys
& Mr. Dewes's -- she ------
I saw her son William who is a
clever boy -- he was 14 Yesterday
is to be brought up to ye. Law
he inform'd me that he had
breakfasted with Mrs. Digby (ye.
Queen
s Vice Chamberlain)[23]
this Morng who said the report
of ye. prince of Wales being again
ill was true, that H.R.H: went
to ye. Q: Yesterday to excuse
his being at Court & yt. he had
so great an op̄reʃsion of breath
he could hardly speak to her --
When ye. Servt. came for me
Mrs. Sandford sent to beg Miʃs
Clarkes
woud come & sent her



Son
into ye.. Park for them A M:
came, Bell was gone home to
dreʃs -- I introduced her to Mrs.
Sandford
-- we came home ¼ before
4 -- Recd & answerd a Note from
Mrs. Lady Stormont. Recd. a
letter by ye. Post from Miʃs H.
More
-- to reproach me for
not having written an answer
to her last &c. din'd at home
with Miʃs Clarkes -- after din
ner
A M -- play'd a few leʃsons
we separated at ½ past
5 o'Clock -- I wrote in my
Diary -- at 7 we met to tea
after tea Miʃs C's left me to take
a Walk -- I wrote a long letter to
Miʃs Gunning wch.. I sent by this
Post -- Miʃs C's came home abt.
10 we sup'd -- after Supper A M.
read aloud some of Mr. R Glovers
Diary & I work'd till ½ past 11 --
Sat up till 12 Began a letter
to Lady Wake




Saturday 3d. July 1784 -- Mr. R. Glover
came I was dreʃsing did not see him
-- A Maria came & sat wth.. me at
12 my Uncle Frederick came he
sat with us some time the house
Taxes were ye. Subject -- ye. distreʃs's
of ye.. Nation &c -- Lady Frances
Harpur
came in -- A M left us --
my Uncle did not stay long
he told Lady Frances & me that
his Nephew & our cousin Coll
Cathcart
brother of Lady Stormont -- spoke in ye. house of com-
mons
yesterday for ye. 1st. time that
the subject was on ye. present state
of ye. affairs in India on wch.
he was well qualified to speak he hashaving
Coolneʃs, sense, a fine tone of
Voice & an engaging Countenance,
he is in my opinion a charming
Young Man & will make a
distinguish'd figure in ye. World
he hads already gain'd great
credit for his bravery & is
universally & deservedly
beloved. he is very handsome



prepoʃsing & engaging -- modest
& elegant. Lady F: Harpur
& I had a tête á tête from
1 o'Clock till 3 -- She inform'd
me that her Son was to go
abroad next week & told me
many confidential things.
As I know I have her love &
I hope her esteem, I thought it
right to inform her of my
engagement wth. Mr. D—— she
was much satisfied wth. ye.
prospect I had of future
happineʃs & greatly approved
my choice &c &c. when she
left me A Maria & I sat together
till ------ four o'Clock -- Lady Dartrey
had sent for me to dine wth.
her at Chelsea to meet ye. Veseys
I excused myself. Lady Stormont
sent her Carriage for me went
to dine with her. I found her
pretty well considering -- she com-



plain'd
however of a Nervous deafneʃs
we din'd tête a tête -- we had
ye. Company of dear little George
& Charles for some time after
dinner -- Lady Stormont & I
talk'd of Lord & Lady Cathcart
Mr & Mrs. Graham's ye Napiers
&c. &c. Her 2 Brothers Lord
Cathcart
& Coll. Cathcart came
in for ½ an hour -- Lord C. is
come to attend his duty at ye.
Tower Guard -- we complimented
Coll. Cathcart on his succeʃs
Yesterday in ye. house &c
After they left us we talk'd
over Coll. Cathcarts character
Lord Stormont came to us
at ½ past 9 -- he had been
at Ken Wood he said Lord
Mansfield
was not so well
to day -- told us how well Master
Murray
had behaved (he wth. his
tutor
) is at present with Lord
Masfield
-- I had Lady S. ca---
came away at 10 -- Lord S said



he was sorry to be deprived of
seeing so much of me as he wishd
&c &c.
Lady Stormont in ye. course of
Conversation this Afternoon
inform'd me, that as she knew
how much interest Lord S——
took in my happineʃs she
had communicated to him
my engagement &c with Mr. D——
that Lord S—— was perfectly
satisfied wth. ye. choice I had
made & that he had said
I was about ye. only ------person
he had met with of who
poʃseʃsed sentiment without
acting imprudently or being
Romantic -- &c &c. I heard to
day yt. ye.. Prince of Wales was
very ill of a pain in his side
I sent Lady Stormont a little
Box in a present, as she wanted
one to put some herb snuf in
wch. she had been orderd to take



Miʃs came in at ye. same time We
sat together till past 11 oClock --
I found a Nosegay Lady Dartrey
had sent me -- Mrs. Vesey had call'd
to make me a Visit after her
return from Chelsea. found a
letter from ye. Dʃs. Dowgr. of Portland
to tell me how uneasy she & Mrs
Delany
were at not having
heard from me -- I had just
time to write a few lines to
her Grace before ye. post went
out, & promised to write a longer
letter by Mondays Post --
After A M left me wrote in my
Diary went to bed abt. 12 o'Clock




Sunday 4th. July 1784 Went to day
with Mrs.. & Miʃs Ord Master Bigg &
Mr. Pepys -- to Mr. Agar's to see
some very capital Pictures
-- Mr. Agar recd. us very politely
I had ye. good fortune to make
Some proper observations abt.
ye. Pictures -- he was so pleased
that he has invited me to go
again -- he expects 5 Pictures
from Rome every day & he
is well acquainted with My Uncle
William
-- therefore I will go
wth. him when he comes to Town
I will then attempt some
description of them as I have
not leisure at present. After
when we left Mr. A's . Mr. Pepys
parted from us -- Mrs. O. her daughter
& I went to pay a Visit to Mrs.
Stainforth
& Mrs. Elizabeth S——
at ye. Queens House. I made
my peace wth. them for not
having been ye. whole Winter



-- here we heard ye.. Prince of
Wales
was better & was to go
out tomorrow. -- Mrs.. O brought
me home at ¼ past 3 -- AM &
I were together a little while
she went to dine at ye. Glovers
Ball & I excused ourselves
we din'd tête á tête -- at 5
we separated I read & drew
till 9 -- walk'd to ye. Glovers.
Ball went there to tea. --
sup'd there only ye. family
Miʃs Clarkes & I walk'd home
at 11 ye. Moon shone bright
& it was a real Summers
Eveg.

Monday 5th. July 1784. Lord
Dartrey
call'd early, brought me
a Note from Lady Dartrey -- to beg
I would dine at Chelsea to meet
Lady Frances Tollemache & sleep
there. I could not go as I was
engaged. Lord Dartrey left me
return'd in a few minutes but
return'd again -- I told him
abt. Mr. D: he was very happy



to hear things were in so good a train
I desired I would let him inform
Lady Dartrey, this I could not
have any objection to. I sat
writing in my dreʃsing Room
all Morng: A.M. sat with me
wrote a long letter to Lady
Wake
& one to Mrs. Delany &
begun one to ye. Dʃs. Dowgr. of
Portland
. at 4 Lady Stormonts
Carriage came went there to din-
ner
-- we din'd tête á tête -- had
ye. 2 dear boys after dinner.
in ye. afternoon Richard brought
me two letters -- one from Mrs.
Carter
& one from Lord Napier
-- both, kind friendly & Affectionate
Lady Stormont & I had a great
deal of conversation abt. my
Uncle Frederick. I did all in
my power to promote a recon-
ciliation
-- & I believe gain'd
some ground.[24] Lady Frances
Harpur
join'd us at ½ past
8. -- she show'd us a small
Miniature by Saunders



of her Son, a good likeneʃs
& prettily painted -- ye. price
5 Guineas -- ye. size for a
Ring -- Saunders lives in
Bond Street -- Lady S. & Lady
F: H:
said I must positively
set to him for my picture
& make a present of it to
Mr. D: Lord Stormont came in ¼
of an hour before I came away, gave
me franks for Mr.. D -- he had been to
dine at Lord Mansfields at Ken Wood
-- Lord M is but indifferent -- his
complaints are Nervous & he can-
not
sleep well. Lord S—— told me
that ye. Coal Tax nor ye. Horse
Tax would take place -- that they
Thought Superfine Sugars wd. be
tax'd -- had Lady Stormonts Coach Came
home at 10¼ past 10 o'Clock -- Miʃs C's at
home finished my letter to ye. Dʃs Dʃowr.
of Portland
-- sent 3 letters by this post
one to ye. Dʃs. one to Mrs. Delany one to
Lady Wake --



Tuesday 6th. July 1784 Mr.. Dewes came
abt. 12 I was dreʃsing -- A.M. went & sat
wth ½ an our till I went down. he
sat with me till past 1,o'Clock -- I show'd
him ye. extracts I was making of
the letters he lent me of Mrs. Delany
-- he paid me some Compliments upon
My industry -- & not only approved of
what I had done but made me
happy by saying I might keep them
that I need not be in haste to
return ye. letters, & that when I
had finish'd ye. present Packet
I should have the rest of her
letters wch... he had in his poʃseʃsion
& also that he wd. endeavour to
procure all those inthat Mrs Ports
(his Sisters) poʃseʃsion had. Mr
D——
inform'd me he should be in
Derbyshire this Summer. I told
him I should introduce a friend
of mine
to him when he was in
yt. part of ye. World. I wish Mr.
D——
to be acquainted wth. so good



& respectable a Man -- I did not
however open say anything to
Mr. Dewes of ye. nature of my
friendship wth. Mr D.
As I had said I was going to
Mrs.. Sandford Mr. Dewes desired
he might accompany me, we
walk'd together through ye. broiling
Heat. Mrs.. Sandford was happy
to see me -- Mr. D: staid sometime
I sat in wth. Mrs. Sandford her
Son Wm. was of -Home -- Mrs. S——
told me many things wch. con-
firm'd
ye. opinion I before had
of Mr. Dewes's Character -- at
2 o'Clock I left Mrs. Sandford --
I met Lady Dartrey in her Coach
she stop'd & made me come in
she had been to my House --
she told me she came to Town
on purpose to see me, to talk
wth. me abt Mr. Dickenson &c



as Lord Dartrey had communicated
wth I told him Yesterday, we cld-
not converse upon this subject as
Vesey Dawson was in ye. Coach --
I went wth. Ldy. D: to several
places -- & sat in ye. Coach whilst
she made a Visit to Lady Dacre[25]
-- she set me down at home at 3
oClock. I promised to go to Chelsea
in ye. course of next Week. I was
so fatigued wth. ye. heat I had not
ye power of doing any thing but
conversed wth. A: M: till she went
down to dinner -- ¼ before 5 o'Clock
walk'd to Lady Clavering -- where I din'd there
was only Miʃs Goring who is come
to stay wth. her sometime -- after
dinner -- Miʃs Goring play & sang to
me -- she has been well taught
& sings wth. judgment & has a
good Voice. Lady C: & I settled a
plan for going to Horton together
-- she entertain'd me very much
by an account of ye. Offers Miʃs
C's
had had -- the stile of life



she led in India &c &c. I walked
home at 9 o'Clock wrote & sent
a letter to Miss H: More. Miʃs
C's
came home at 10 -- Mr. Jackson
- sup'd wth.. us & staid till 12 o'Clock

Wednesday 7th. July 1784 -- a Note X
from Mr. Pepys to preʃs me to go on
Saturday to Thames Ditton, he sent
me a Note he had recd. from Mrs.
Walsingham
in wch. she desires he
will persuade me. I wrote an
answer to say I wd. go. / after I was
dreʃs'd sat ye. whole Morng. wth. A Maria
I drew she word'd -- din'd at home with
Miʃs C's after dinner AM play'd
some leʃsons we separated from ½
past 5 till 76. Miʃs Glover came at
6 -- sat wth. us -- a Mrs. Bridges came
in to visit Miʃs C——'s after tea
A M went to her friend Mrs. Harris
where she was to sleep. Mrs. B—— sat
on till past 8 -- Miss G—— staid till
9 -- I drew ye. whole Eveg. Miʃs C



[26]



[27]




& I sat together till near 12 --
I went to bed at 1 oClock


Recd. a Note from Mrs. Jackson of H Street to tell me
she was recover'd from her lyaying in & hoped to see me
ye. Glovers had call'd[28]

Recd. a kind friendly letter from Mrs. Alison in reply
to my congratulations upon her Marriage[29][30]

Thursday 8th. July 1784 X Mr P: Note
As soon as I was dreʃs'd sat down
to my drawing -- got Blairs Sermons
wch. I sent to Mr. Jackson to send
to my friend Miʃs K: as he had told
me he had an opportunity of
sending them. Mr.. Jackson
came to me at wth. a meʃsage
from ye. Duke of Newcastle to
desire I would inform what
sort of Mourning he should go
in to Court for ye. late Dowgr.
Harrington
-- I was not a little
entertain'd to think he should
apply to me for this important
information -- I sent his Grace
my opinion. AM. returnd frm
Lambeth. I sat wth. her in her
Room for some time. at ½
past 4 went to ye. Veseys, met
there Lord & Lady Dartrey. Sr. Robt
& Lady Harries. Sr. John Parnel



Mr.. Watts -- Mr.. Knox (Lord Well's son)[31]
-- a pleasant party! Lord &
Lady D: Mr. W: left us at ½ past
7: Miʃs Clarkes join'd us at 7 --
in ye. Eveg. Mr. Burke & Mr. King
came in. I have not time to
enter on ye. different Topics of
conversation -- at ½ past 9 I
came home -- wrote in my diary
wch- had been neglected at 10
oClock Mr. Jackson came to supper
I sent for Miʃs C's Mr J: staid
till 12 with us.
Recd. another letter from ye.
miserable good for nothing Mr.
Copeland
-- Mr. R. Glover had
call'd -- a Note from Lady Stormont
to beg me to go to her tomorrow

Friday 9th. July 1784 -- Recd. a Note
from Lady Clavering wch. inform'd
me -- Mrs. Peachell was brought to
bed of a fine Boy -- & that she in
tended
to go to Horton on Tuesday



wish'd me to Breakfast wth. her
tomorrow or come to her this Evg..
&c I wrote an Answer, told her I
fear'd I could not go to Horton as
My Uncles busiʃs busineʃs is
not yet settled -- indeed it is
not yet put in any train so
as to leave me at liberty to
fulfil my Country engagements
-- Recd. a very kind letter from
Mrs. Walsingham fill'd wth. entreaties
for me to meet Mr. Walpole
Pepys & Mrs. Garrick on Sunday
&c &c &c. My Uncle Frederick
came at Charles Prices Brother[32]
came at 11 he was an hour wth.
me talking over his distreʃs
on his Brothers account, I gave
ye- poor Man my opinion &
advice -- &c. -- My Uncle
F:
from 12 til past 1 -- he
inform'd me of ye. new plan
he had adopted for his Son.
Miʃs Glover came in ye. Morng



to spend ye. day wth. A Maria saw
them both at different times
during ye. Morng.. wrote an
Answer to Mrs. Walsingham -- ye.
Post came in before I went out
Recd. a very affectionate from
Mr.. Dickenson wth. agreeable
aʃsurances of his Fathers ap
probation
&c &c recd. also a
letter from Miʃs Gunning. in
wch. she expreʃses much impatience
for my coming to Horton --
Lady Stormonts Coach & Servts.
came for me before 4 o'Clock
I went for her to our Cousin
Mrs.. Walkinshaw -- we sat ½ an
hour with her -- she seem'd
happy to have us -- she really
is a friendly good Creature.
Lady S—— & I then proceeded
to Portland Place. we sat wth.
Lord Stormont in his fine
Library till dinner, he din'd
wth. us & we din'd in one of



his Rooms -- he was with
us theat home for the whole afternoon
except ½ an hour when he
went to Visit Mrs. Legge.
we had as usual ye. two
Dr. Boys -- Lord S—— was
very entertaining &
agreeable -- when Lady
S
& I were alone, I again
attempted to bring about
ye. reconcialiation I have
at heart between ye. Uncle
& Niece, & think I gain'd
a little ground. saw two
Pictures of my Grandmother
Hamilton
-- one of wch. Lord
Cathcart
is to let his Sister[33]
have -- by these pictures
& from what I have heard
Lady Archibald must have
been a Hvery elegant pretty
Woman. at 10 oClock I came



away. Had Lady S's Coach. call'd
on ye. Glovers -- they were gone
to bed. came home sat wth.
Miʃs Clarkes till ½ past 11.
A M. told me ye. Glovers had
been to our house & ye. reasons
of our not meeting them
this Eveg. I sat up till 2
oClock in ye. Morng. wrote a
long letter for tomorrows post
for to Mr. D:

Dʃs. Argyll has resign'd
her Place as Lady of ye. Bed-
chamber
-- on account of
her very declining health.
Lady Harcourt kiss'd hands
on Thursday Yesterday on
being appointed in her Room.
Typed partially ------



Saturday 10th. July 1784
Wrote to Lady Clavering & Mrs. --
Garrick
. settled some important
triffles, w---th Anna Maria, took
leave of her & Isabella at 1 o'Clock
when Mr. Pepys came for me. Mrs.
Pepys
Mrs. Walsingham &c had aʃsured
me of their approbation & that I
I had their sanction for going with
an old acquaintance, and a married Man of perfect
good character
without a Chaperon.
We had a pleasant airing to
Thames Ditton where we arrived
at 3 oClock. Mr.. P: amused me
by relating a number of curious
Anecdotes. I cannot boast of
recollecting them for my thoughts
were too often wandering into
Ds shire for me to pay the atten-
tion
-this conversation merited.
I make no doubt yt.. he was
perfectly well satisfied with me
as a fellow travēler -- for people
that love to talk themselves
require nothing more from one
than a look of attention -- the
words yes & no, a well tim'd



smile -- a grave face &c. &c.
It is a much easier matter to
please than some will allow.
Sometime or other I will write
down my thoughts on this
subject -- I detest art of every
kind but it is a duty we owe
society to ---tappear perfectly attentive to every one.
Mrs. Walsingham expreʃs'd so much
joy at seeing me that I believe
it was sincere. She shew'd us
ye. improvements in the house
before dinner -- & in ye. most
flattering manner surprised me
by shewing me ye. elegant deco-
ation
& new furniture of ye.
Dreʃsing Room to a Bedchamber
wch.. is always call'd Miʃs H——'s[34]
as is also a seat in ye. shruberry
wch. commands a View of ye.
Thames.[35] There was no other
Company at Dinner than Miʃs



Boyle
(her only daughter who is at ye.
age of 14 one of ye. most accomplishd
Young Person I ever met with
-- She is mistreʃs of Music -- &
painting -- Models in a surprising
Manner -- knows perfectly Modern & Ancient History French, Italian --
Geography, Mathematics --
Astronomy ye. English Claʃsics -- is learning Spanish
& Latin &c. though I think Miʃs
B:
will reap many advantages
from having received so very
superiour an education, I fear
it will prevent her enjoying
the innocent pleasure of society
for every other female will not
only envy but be afraid of her, &
the Men in general are so jealous
of our being as wise as themselves
that they will shun her,
None will aʃsociate wth- her
but Colledge Pedants or rigid
Philosophers or pretended Femmes
Savantes -- & an affected Femme
Savante is in my opinion a most



disagreeable animal -- the reason
of this is that they always pre-
tend
to more knowledge than
than they have, that they are
ignorant of what they ought
to know, are part affected
& useleʃs members of society
the only Woman that I know
whose talents deserved the
highest cultivation is Mrs:
Carter
-- she is I imagine
ye. most learned female
that ever lived -- hers is
not a mere superficial know-
ledge
-- & she is, most wise
& Good -- I must not now
indulge myself with writing
an eloge on this Dear Woman
the subject would carry me
too far.     Miʃs More &
Mrs.. Chapone & two or three



others I could name whom I
likewise would except out of ye.
list of what I call Femmes
Savantes. for their talents
& amiable precepts have
been of great service to
society.
After dinner we went to ye.
Medaillion Seat[36] ------, where we
had our Coffee. & sat till tea
time, we also drank tea here,
the paʃsing objects such as
pleasure boats, Barges &c --
on the River & the Carriages
on the opposite shore made
an agreeable variety. this
Villa is on the Surry Side
immediately opposite Ham-
pton
Court Palace 2 of ye. Pavilions
are ye. principle object ye.
Palace is hid behind the



Trees, the Terrace of ye. Palace
Garden is so high that wth.
thea Telescope from this
Seat one can easily distinguish
who are walking there if one
is acquainted wth. them. After
Tea we walk'd in the Shruberry
& round the Ferme orné wch.
is laid out with as much
taste as 42 Acres of flat
ground can well be. Mrs-
Walsingham
has just begun
to build a conservertory wch.
will be an agreeable addition
to ye. House as it will open
into a China Closet wch. opens
into ye. largest drawing Room.
We came in at 9 o'Clock. Mrs.
Walsingham
treated us with
Reading Paʃsages from some
of ye. Manuscripts she has



in her poʃseʃsion -- one in par
ticular
was a curious account
of transactions in Ruʃsia
wch. Mrs. W: had taken down in
Short hand from a relation
Mrs. Vigo[37] had given her
who was in Russia when
ye. Czar was murder'd by
the orders of ye present Empreʃs. as this
is now so generally known I
shall not enter into ye. detail.
at 10 o'Clock we went to Supper
Miʃs Boyle retired as soon
as ye. Cloth was removed. Mrs.
W:
Mr P: & I sat up till
1 o'Clock -- ye. conversation was
so interesting that Mrs. W.
forgot the hour as ye. rule
of her House is to separate
at 11 oClock -- she accompanied
me to my Room where she



repeated her kind profeʃsing
Mrs. W: is a Widow & daughter of the
very celebrated Mr. Charles
Hanbury Williams
, & Lady
Frances Coningsby
-- she has
a great portion of her fathers
Wit -- is more inform'd than
most women & is very highly
accomplish'd -- she is esteem'd
by ye. judges to be first Lady
Painter. Mrs. W. must be
admired for her talents --
& if she made more allow-
ances
for those who had
not so strong a mind &c. &c.
as herself she would be more
loved. She is keen & some-
times
severe & wants a
certain softneʃs, without
wch. no female can appear
truly amiable. Was I to



make my opinion of her pub-
lic
I should be very ungrateful
for she has from myour first
acquaintance been perfectly
equal to me & I believe
has as great a share of affect-
ion
for me as she is capable
of feeling for any one.
tho' I think we should be
careful not to censure the
failings of others or get into
habits of detraction yet it
is of great use to investigate
every character that falls
under our own observation --
Reading the characters of ye.
living often affords better
instruction than reading
whole volumes of ye. obser-
vations
of others
&c &c.
&c



Mrs. W. has a very large fortune
in her own power, I have been
told 5 or 6 Thousand pr. An:
besides Money -- she has
every thing in stile, lives
like a person of fashion &
She is a good œconomist, &
tho she lives expensively not
extragavantly.

Sunday 11th. July 1784 Thames Ditton
I got up soon after 6 when
I was dreʃs'd went into ye.
Garden, I took a book wth-
me, but I could not engage
my thoughts to its contents
I read some letters I had
in my pocket. I enjoy'd
ye. thoughts that perhaps
the writer of them was



then thinking of me -- I
also endulged ye. hopes that
ye.. time would arrive when
we should together enjoy every
pleasing scene -- that we
might sometime or other together admire ye.
beauties of Nature & adore
that Being who has so
---bountifuly stredwd his bleʃsings
over this World. if it
should not be permitted yt.
we shall enjoy this hap-
pineʃs
-- that same Being
will I doubt not support
our minds to bear the
disappointment properly.
Miʃs Boyle join'd me ¼ before
9 in ye. Garden, she shew'd
me her Birds & ye. Nests she
had found -- we fed those



that were become tame.
At 9 we all met at Breakfast
after wch. Mr. P: Miʃs B: &
I strolld about ye. Garden --
Mrs. W—— join'd us at 11 -- we
went to Church -- after wch.
Mrs.. W: said we should not
separate as we were to make
so short a stay. we sat together
in ye. Medaillion Seat &
amused ourselves with
conversing & looking through
the Telescopes till 3 -- at
1 we had an elegant little
Repast brought of fruits
Cakes & Ice Water. I left
Mrs. W & Mr. P: at 3 Mrs.
W:
Maid
attended me



& dreʃs'd my hair -- as I did not
take my own Maid --
At 4 oClock I join'd them
in ye. Garden -- Mrs. Garrick
was arrived -- but alas!
no Mr.. Walpole he had
sent his excuse being ill.
Mr. Boyle (Mrs. W: only
Son) came from London
to dine & sleep stay till
tomorrow -- I had not seen
him these 3 years -- he
having been in Ireland
wth. his Uncle Lord Shan-
non
(his fathers Brother)
Mr. B: is in his three & twentieth year
a handsome lively well-
bred
& I believe sensible Young Man, he



is in ye. Guards -- I have
heard that he is diʃsipated &
extravagant -- but how few
how very few Young Men are
otherwise! -- the Ducheʃs of
Bolton
& her Eldest daughter
Lady Catherine Pawlet also came
to dinner -- Lady Catherine is
a great favorite of mine
she is natural lively and
unaffected -- She is about 16
in all ye. bloom of youth! &
though I do not agree wth.
others that she is a very
great beauty, I think her
a handsome Young Woman
she is above ye. common
size is well form'd & has a
good air . . . as we waited for
ye. s. we did not set down to
dinner till near 5 -- the Ducheʃs



of Argyle
s resignation and Lady
Harcourt
s appointment as Lady
of ye. Bedchamber to ye. Queen was
ye. principle topic with other
tattle of the day -- such as
the run away Match of Mr.
Fritzroy
& Miʃs Laura Keppel
ye. Prince of Wales &c. &c
I could not help laughing at the
very pathetic letter ye. s. of
B——
told us wch. Mrs. Keppel
wrote to ye. Prince when she
found her Daughter was run
away -- “My Child, my Child
Oh I have lost my Child -- what
is become of my Child -- Oh
come & comfort & tell me where
is my Child” -- the Prince went
& comforted ye. distreʃs'd Mother &
sat with her till 2 in ye. Morng.
Mrs.. Keppel had sat tête a



tête with her Daughter the
whole afternoon -- Miʃs Laura
having refused to go wth. her
Sisters
to Ranelagh ... her
eyes were red with weeping as
Mrs. K: had refused to give her
consent to her marrying Mr.
F:
Mrs. K: endeavour'd to com-
fort
her daughter and to
amuse her read the very
Moral & instructive Novel
of the Sorrows of Werter.[38]
They separated at 11 -- Mrs..
K:
this tender judicious
sensible Mother charged her
other Daughters
when they
came home not to make a
Noise or laugh quite so loud
as usual for that ye. poor
afflicted Laura was gone
to try by sleep to forget her



Sorrows & those of Werters.
but to their great surprise
when they paʃs'd her Chambers
door it was open & Laura
was fled.
As soon as we rose from table we
went to the M: Seat after Coffee
we separated walk'd about, conversd
without form or restraint, I had
ye. pleasure of enjoying some priv-
ate
conversations with my dear
& agreeable friend Mrs.. Garrick
she shoew'd me a letter of our
friend Miʃs Mores. I really
do not know a more pleasing
Woman than Mrs. G: She is a
model of perfect grace & good
breeding -- there is a propriety
in her manners & conduct
wch. convince you she is a Woman
of sense & she is so open so
candid so engenuous so free
from affectation & Art that
is impoʃsible to be ½ an hour



in her company without loving
her. She made me promise
to introduce a certain friend
of mine
to her & said she shd.
invite us to Hampton -- & that
she should invite my Uncle
William
(wth. whom she has been
many years acquainted) to meet
us &c &c &c Mrs. G: ye. Dʃs.. &
Lady Catherine left us at ½
past 8 -- we saw ye. Prince of W——
on ye. opposite Shore who went
to pay a Visit to ye. beautiful
Lady Waldgraves who lodge in
ye. Summer in the Pavilions.
before supper we amused our-
selves
in looking over the
Prints belonging to Cooks
Voyage, Mrs.. W: entertain'd us
at ye. same time by reading
ye. descriptions &c



Mrs. W: Mr. Boyle Mr. Pepys
& I sat up till near 1 o'Clock
Mr Coombes ye.. Late Provost
of Eaton[39] &c &c were the
persons whose characters
afforded us ample matter
for conversation. Mrs. Garrick &
the Ducheʃs Dowgr. of Portland were
spoke of by Mrs. W: as they merited
some other time I will amuse
myself in making memorandums
of the strange anecdotes relative
to Coomes: Mrs.. W: would attend
me to my Room. She preʃs'd me
to fix a time for make her a
longer Visit -- this I could not
do but I promised to let
her know as soon as poʃsible
She inform'd me my Cousin
Miʃs Hamilton (Lord Abercorns
Niece)[40] was to come to her on
Wednesday & to stay some time
as she is a most amiable



& accomplished woman I shall
endeavour to go to Mrs. W: before
she leaves her.

Monday 12th. July 1784
I join'd Miʃs Boyle before break-
fast
-- & got her to play a leʃson
to me -- she plays as if she
waswas perfectly well grounded
& understood what she play'd
but I do not think she has
much taste or feeling.
We met at 8 o'Clock to break-
fast
-- we breakfasted an hour
earlier as Mr. Pepys was
obliged to set out at 9 o'Clock
Mr Boyle gain'd great credit
for joining us so early.
Mrs.. W: charged me to rem-
ember
my promise of
paying her a longer Visit
& told me how many plans



she had of going to see places
&c wch. she & her daughter
should not enjoy if I was
not of ye. party. at 9 o'Clock
Mr. Pepys & I set out, we
had an interesting conversation
he quite gain'd my heart by
the manner in wch. he spoke
of his Wife & children.
Mrs. Pepys is an excellent
Woman & merits the praises
he bestow'd on her.
We got to Town at 11 oClock
Mr.. Pepy's staid ½ an hour
as he waited for answers
to meʃsages. I found Miʃs
C's
at home -- introduced
Anna Maria to Mr.. P——
when he went away A:M:
& I sat together till 3 o'Clock
-- I then wrote a letter to
Miʃs Gunning wch. I sent to



Lady Clavering to take to Horton
tomorrow -- sent to enquire
after Mrs.. Peachell, she & ye.
Child
very well. Miʃs C's &
I din'd at Mr.. Veseys, I came
home as soon as we rose from
Table -- Received letters from
the Ducheʃs Dowgr. of Portland
Miʃs Burney (ye. authoreʃs
of Cecilia &c.) My friend Miʃs Litchfield & a note from
my Cousin Stormont. I had
only time to read my letters
& write in my diary a little
before Mr. & Mrs. Vesey came
for me. We went to book-
sellers
to enquire for Madme-
Genlis
last publication --
Viellé du Chateau[41] -- after
jumbling in the Coach for
½ an hour by way of
exercise for ye old folks



we went to the Glovers where
we met Miʃs Clarkes -- Mr
Glover
was in charming
spirits & happy to see us --
we sup'd there, Mr. & Mrs. V.
brought Miʃs C's & me home
½ past 12 oClock

Tuesday 13th: July 1784
Amaria sat with me ye. early part of ye.
Morng.: at 12 o'Clock Caprianne
& another Man brought my Uncles fine Vase
to deposit it in my Care.
he shew'd me the drawings he
had made from it wch. are indeed
inimitably executed -- I pro-
mised
him to write to Sr.
Wm..
&c &c. he desired me
to inform him why he not
obeyed his orders in carrying
ye. Vase to shew ye. Queen &c



As soon as C: left me I sent
for J--- a Person to make
a Box to contain this
precious work of Art.
Miʃs Clarke paid me a Visit
for ½ an hour. at 2 o'Clock
A Maria return'd home, her
Sister Mrs.. Jackson came to
Town to make me a Visit
we had much to say to each
other. ------------------------ Mr. E——
call'd, I was denied.
had ye. great satisfaction of
receiving a most kind &
affectionate letter from Mr.
Dickenson
's Father
recd.. also --
long letters from Lady Wake
& Mr. Wake (her Son). at 4
o'Clock Lady Stormonts Coach came for
me, I found her pretty well --
Lord Stormont din'd with us
we had as usual dumb



Waiters, & no Servts.. wch.. is
one of the most comfortable
methods of dining as it lays
no restraint on conversation.
I spent an agreeable dayafternoon Lord
S——
with us ye. greatest part
of ye. time. Lady Stor: gave
me a long meʃsage from my Cousin
Lady Frances & another from
Lord Cathcart -- their Reasons
for not having call'd. &c --
I brought home a drawing box
wch. I promised Lady S—— to
arrange & give orders about
to her Cabinet Maker --
had Lord Stormonts Chariot
at 10 -- came home. sat wth.
Miʃs Clarkes till 11 o'Clock.
I sat up after them & wrote
an answer to Mr. Dickenson
Sen:
to be ready for tomorrows
Post.



Wednesday 14th. July 1784 -- had
My Uncles Vase ------ &
safely placed in a 2d. Box. --
My tormenting Mr. Stanhope
came to pay me a Visit, I got
rid of him by promising to see
him on Saturday & then AMaria
& I set out -- she was so good to
accompany me to White-Hall --
there we separated -- I went to
ye. Ducheʃs Dowg of Portland -- had
a conference with her Porter
&I went into her apartments
& gave those orders she had
requested me in her letter of
Yesterday -- I return'd home
at 12 -- Lady Dartrey had call'd
during my absence & left word
she should come for me at ½
past 1 o'Clock -- I wrote a letter
to the Ducheʃs Dr. of Portland
& one to Sr.. Wm. Hamilton --
left ym., & ye. one for Mr.. D—— Sen.
to be sent by to days Post.



Lady Dartrey came before 2 o'Clock
we call'd at their house in Stanhope
Street for Lord Dartrey & then proceeded
to ye.. Villa wch.. is situated on the banks
of ye. Thames -- between Bātersea &
Chelsea. Lady Dartrey left her sweet
little Julia to my care whilst she
went to dreʃs -- Master Dawon &
his Cousin Vesey Dawson Julia &
I were much occupied in atten-
ding
to a Hen & her chickens
wch. Lady Dartrey had made a pre
sent
of to Julia. There was no
company at Dinner -- only ye. 2
boys
-- Mr Antrobus ye. Tutor was
gone to Town -- After dinner
Lord & Lady D & I strolled about
ye garden ye. Shruberry -- Lady
D:
made me tell her every thing
about Mr. D—— she & Lord D——y
made me very happy by aʃsuring
me of their warmest approbation
& said such things as their
warmkind friendship for me dictated
Nothing could be more agreeable
than the manner in wch. I spent
this day. In ye. Eveg Lord Dartrey
shew'd us a collection of Medals he



had purchased -- Gold & Silver
all English -- Queens Anns Wars
Oliver Cromwell &c &c
Went to our Rooms at 11 one of
Lady D:'s Maid's
attended to undreʃs
me: we distiled Rose & Mint Water to
                             remember to set a still

Thursday 15th.. July 1784. I got up
before 6 & enjoy'd the freshneʃs
of the Morning air & the beauty
of the Thames -- I could not go into
ye. Garden as Mrs. Mary had taken
my Habit out of my Room to
get it brush'd -- I wrote & work'd
till ½ past 8 when she came &
aʃsisted me to finish dreʃsing --
Lady Dartrey came to me, en
Robe de Chambre, she beg'd me
to go down & make Breakfast for
Lord D -- & that she would soon
join us -- I went down ¼ before
9 -- Lord D: & Vesey Dawon join'd
me in ye.. breakfast Room -- Mr.
D——
always breakfasts wth. his tutor.
Lord Longford came from
Town to Breakfast he was wth-



us by 9 o'Clock. after B: Lady
Dartry
& I walk'd tête á tête
in ye. Garden, she repeated to
me how happy she was about
me & how much she approved
my future preference in
chusing a Man of Mr. Ds character
She wanted me to stay another
day but I could not as I had
promised Lady Stormont not
to be absent above a Night from
Town till she was brought to bed.
I left this dear & most
amiable friend
at '½ past 10 o'Clock
Lord Dartrey & Lord Longford
came in the Coach with me
I was at home before 11 o'Clock
Miʃs C's were at breakfast I
gave them flowers I had brought
from Chelsea -- & carried some
to Mrs. Handcock. but did not go
in. Mr. Dewes had call'd yesterday



at 12 o'Clock I engaged both the
Miʃs Clarkes
to go wth. me to
Mrs. Sandford -- we found her at
home & made her a long Visit
her Son Wm. was at home. Mr.
Dewes
was there, told me he
should leave Town on Saturday
& ask'd permiʃsion to wait on
me on Friday Morng. Left Mrs.
S——
at 1: call'd in at Virgmans
brought a small gold Pin for Wm.
we met Mr. R. Glover he turn'd
& accompanied us -- I call'd at
the Bloʃsets they were gone out of
Town. we then walk'd on to
Hanover Street where I went
to pay a Visit to Dr. Jacksons
Wife
(Mr. E's Sister) Miʃs C's &
Mr. R: G: walk'd in the Street
whilst I paid my Visit. I found
Mrs: J: quite recover'd , & saw the
Little Child
, wch. is a very pretty
Girl -- it was christen'd last



Tuesday by ye. name of Harriet,
Augusta, Ernst, Jackson
. Mrs. J:
ask'd me if I had heard that her
Brother
had calld upon me. Mrs. Js
Sister
& another lady was there after
sitting 20 Minutes I took my leave
& join'd my party -- we met Mr.
Devaynes
I stop'd his Chariot &
charged him to go to Lord Dartreys
as Lady D: wanted to consult him
abt. Julia who had been terribly bit
by ye. Knatts. Mr.. R.G. took an oppor
tunity
of telling me he had had
another letter from his Nun[42] -- he
left us when we got home.
I sat quietly in my Room for
½ an hour to recover the fatigue
of the Walk & heat. Mrs. Glover
came to me at ¼ before 3 -- we had
a tête á tête till ½ past 3 when
Dr. Mr. Glover came. I had some
particular conversation with him
before dinner -- he was satisfied
wth. every thing I told him respecting



Mr. D & his father & was much struck
with their characters wch. he highly
admired. Mr. Glover & I joind Miʃs
Clarkes
Mrs.. Glover & Mr Richard Glover
at 4 o'Clock we had a cheerful
dinner, & sat below till ½ past 6
A M. play'd a leʃson on ye. Harpsicord.
Mr. Glover left us to pay a Visit
to his sick friend Mr.Cust. Miʃs
C's
& Mr.s G: work'd, I drew, & Mr.
R: Glover
began to read aloud to
us in J: de Roubigné[43] -- we were
interrupted by Mr.. Dewes who came
uninvited to tea -- after tea Mr. R. Glover
took his leave. Mr.Master Wm. Sandford came in
at 8 o'Clock -- a walk was proposed I excused
myself & ask'd Mr. D: to keep me com-
pany
as I wanted to have an opportuni
ty
of speaking to him, I had a tête á
tête of ½ an hour -- I inform'd him
of ye. nature of my Correspondence wth.
Mr. D (I had particular reasons for
entrusting him wth. my confidence on
this subject) & I desired him to make
acquaintance wth. him when he went
to Buxton where is to be next Monday
Sen'night -- it was quite a relief to
my mind when I had done this
-- Mr. D: said many friendly things
                                                         to me.

(hover over blue text or annotations for clarification;
red text is normalised and/or unformatted in other panel)


Notes


 1. Parts of the following entries from 21 and 24 June 1784 have been transcribed in Archibald Edward Harbord Anson's ‘About others and myself 1745 to 1920’ (1920: 19-20). Various other parts of this diary have furthermore been transcribed in Anson & Anson (1925: 208-224). The red pencil marks found throughout this volume are likely by members of the Anson family given how closely the marked sections correspond to what was eventually published in Anson & Anson (1925).
 2. Strawberry Hill House (referred to here) was the Gothic Revival villa built by Horace Walpole in Twickenham.
 3. ‘Objects of art considered collectively; antiques; curios. Now historical’ (OED s.v. virtu n. 1c. Accessed 17-08-2021).
 4. A tragedy in blank verse by Horace Walpole, printed at Strawberry Hill in 1768.
 5. Lady (Charlotte) Maria Waldgrave's mother (also known as lady Maria Waldegrave until 1766) was the Duchess of Gloucester at this point.
 6. This page is blank.
 7. The original date has at a later point in time been corrected from 24 June to 23 June (possibly by a member of the Anson family), as the former was a Thursday and not a Wednesday. Furthermore, Mary Hamilton describes the events of 'June 24th 1784 Thursday' on p.13.
 8. This is likely an unmarried sister of Lady Spencer (née Bingham), either Lady Margaret Bingham (d. 1839), who would marry Thomas Lindsey later in 1784 (see also HAM/2/13), or Lady Anne Bingham.
 9. Present-day Kedleston, Derbyshire.
 10. Presumably Mary Hamilton meant to write 'was' here.
 11. John Andrews published his Remarks on the French and English Ladies in 1783.
 12. Mémoires de M. De Voltaire was published in 1784.
 13. James Boswell also describes this dinner in his The Life of Samuel Johnson, LL.D. (2nd Vol. pp.523-525), published in 1791.
 14. At this point, Lord Eliot had three sons: Edward James (b. 1757), John (b. 1761), and William (b. 1767).
 15. Also known as Caen Wood, an estate and the seat of the Earl of Mansfield in Hampstead, London.
 16. This is likely 'Lord Westport' from HAM/2/1, as John Denis Browne was the Viscount Westport from 1771 until 1780. Mary Hamilton is likely not referring to Mr Hawkins Brown here (also an 'old Spa' acquaintance), as she did not take to him when in Spa, and she describes 'Mr. Browne' as 'one of my great favorites' a few lines down.
 17. George Dodington's diary, which covered the years 1749-1761, was first published in 1784 by Henry Penruddocke Wyndham.
 18. The French opera 'Le déserteur' (first performed on 6 march 1769) was adopted multiple times as a pantomime ballet, once by Jean Bercher Dauberval at the King's Theatre in London in 1784.
 19. 'A Sapphic Epistle to Mrs D' was published in 1782. Not much else is know about this work by Hannah More.
 20. Present-day Sudborough, just north-west of Thrapston, Northamptonshire.
 21. This seems to be incorrect, as many sources state that William Ord (b. 1715) died in January 1768, not c.1772.
 22. It is unclear as to who this was, as the accounts on the family of William Ord and Anna Dillingham only list eight children (three sons and five daughters), whereas Mary Hamilton here lists nine children in total.
 23. Stephen Digby was vice-chamberlain to Queen Charlotte between 1782 and 1792, so this 'Mrs Digby' Mary Hamilton mentions here could refer to his wife at the time, Lucy Fox (1748-1787).
 24. The relationship between Frederick Hamilton and the Stormonts appears to have been somewhat shaky in the early 1780s (see HAM/1/4/1/14, HAM/1/4/1/16, HAM/1/4/1/17, HAM/1/4/1/18 and HAM/1/4/1/21).
 25. The title of 'Baron(ess) Dacre of Gillesland' was included in the third creation of the Earldom of Carlisle in 1660.
 26. The text on this page (which has been moved to p.53) is written vertically. The image has been rotated to be more legible.
 27. The text on this page (which has been moved to p.53) is written vertically. The image has been rotated to be more legible.
 28. Moved this section here from p.51.
 29. Dorothea Gregory had married Rev. Archibald Alison on 16 June 1784.
 30. Moved this section here from p.51.
 31. Lord Welles (Thomas Knox) had seven sons: Thomas (1st Earl of Ranfurly), John, Vesey, William, George, Charles and Edmund. It is unclear which one is referred to here by Mary Hamilton.
 32. This is possibly Charles Price (1747/8-1818), a London merchant who became MP of London in 1802, and Mayor of London the following year. He was then created a Baronet on 2 February 1804 and became known as Sir Charles Price. His brother was Ralph Price (1745-1811).
 33. Seeing as Mary Hamilton consistently refers to Louisa Murray (née Cathcart) as Lady Stormont, this likely refers to either Jane Cathcart (the Duchess of Atholl) or Mary Graham (née Cathcart).
 34. Mrs Walsingham probably started calling this bedchamber 'Miss Hamilton's' because Mary Hamilton probably stayed there during visits (see for example HAM/2/3/1 p.9, from 29 June until 1 July).
 35. Similarly, this seat is probably referred to as such because Mary Hamilton enjoyed spending time in a similar one during her visit in 1783 (see HAM/2/3/1 p.12 and p.19, 2 and 6 July), often referring to a seat in the garden as 'my seat'.
 36. See also HAM/2/3/1 p.8 etc. for more on the medallion seat.
 37. This is likely Jane Vigor (née Goodwin), who had lived in Russia from July 1728 until 1740. After returning to England, however, she lived a relatively quiet life in London, Taplow and Windsor respectively, and it is not known if she travelled back to Russia at any point, or when Peter III died in July 1762.
 38. The Sorrows of Young Werther is a novel by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, first published in 1774.
 39. Probably a former vice-provost rather than a provost of Eton, as no provost of Eton is known under this name.
 40. This refers to one of Mary Hamilton's cousin through the brother of her grandmother Lady Jane Hamilton (d. 1753): James Hamilton, 7th Earl of Abercorn (1685/6-1743/4). James Hamilton's son, the Rev. George Hamilton (1718-1787) had nine daughters, and this reference could refer to any one them at the point of writing: Anne (1755-1795), Mary (b. 1756), Harriot (1760-1788), Catherine (b. 1763), Elizabeth (1765-1843), Rachel (b. 1766), Jane (1768-1831), Lady Cecil (1770-1819), or Isabella (b. 1772).
 41. Les Veillées du château, ou Cours de morale à l'usage des enfants was published in multiple volumes in 1784.
 42. This nun has been previously mentioned at some length in HAM/2/10 p.143.
 43. Henry Mackenzie (1777) Julia de Roubigné: A Sentimental Novel. In a Series of Letters.

Normalised Text


                                                        
June 21st. 1784 -- (longest day)
Sent a Note to Mr. Richard Glover to inform
him he need not be at the trouble to go
into the City -- sent my diary to my friend
Note of excuse for not going to Mrs. Pepys -- &c
&c. made Miss Clarke a Visit -- at ½
past 12 set out with Mr. & Mrs. Vesey &
Mrs. Handcock for Strawberry Hill.
We arrived there at ¼ before 3 -- Mr-
Walpole came out to receive us, I
told him it was not my fault we did
not come earlier -- he had desired us
to be with him at 2 o'Clock -- but Mr
Vesey is never punctual -- Mrs: Garrick
came immediately after us -- Mr. Walpole
was so obliging to take us through
most of the rooms & opened the
Cabinets (which are not opened to the
Company who come to see the house)
which contain Miniatures &
various fine & curious things
both Modern & Antique -- I have
not time to enumerate -- the
whole style of this House is true
Gothic -- every Room -- closet --
Boudoir Gallery &c. has painted Glass
Windows -- it is the most perfect
thing of the kind in England I
believe I may say in Europe -- one ought
to live in this house at least
a Month to see every thing



-- It is filled with Vertu, Mr. Walpole
was particularly attentive to
me & gave himself much
trouble as he saw I enjoyed
real pleasure, in looking at the
Pictures & other curious &
beautiful works of Art. he
was also so obliging to show me
again (for I was here last year)
the beautiful drawings of Lady
Diana Beauclerk which are in a
Closet built on purpose &
which he only opens for his most
particular friends -- these
Drawings are subjects taken
from a Play he wrote of the
Mysterious Mother -- a Tragedy
I once heard read by Mr. Tyghe
the Story is the most horrid to
be conceived -- but these drawings
though they recall to mind the
horrid Subject are most affectingly
interesting the countenances are very expressive. At 4 o'Clock
we went down to dinner
which was a very elegant one
incomparably well served --



it showed that the Master of the House
was a Man of fortune & taste
accustomed to elegancies. there
was no other company but those
I have mentioned -- I sat next
Mr. Walpole & he honoured me with the
greatest show of his attention
we did not sit long after dinner
the 2 gentlemen rose when we
did & Mr. Walpole carried us
to a China Closet filled with
Modern & old China after we
had amused ourselves there for
sometime -- we went upstairs --
& spent the remainder of our
time after Coffee & Tea in very
agreeable converse. I had an
opportunity of ½ an hours
private conversation with Mrs.
Garrick -- she loves me with
a most lively affection. I
communicated to her my
present prospect of future
happiness -- she shed tears of
joy & assured me she should
from my representation receive
Mr. Dickenson with open arms -- I do



not know a more warm or
friendly heart than Mrs. Garrick's
she possesses a truly great
Soul. a little before 8 we
reluctantly took our leave
of Mr. Walpole we had not been
able to walk in his beautiful
Grounds as it rained the
whole afternoon. Mr. Walpole gave
to my charge a letter for his
Niece Lady Maria Waldgrave
which I was to send to Glocester
House. My head ached so
bad I could ill joined in conversation
in returning home, I
did not however complain, we
talked of Mrs. Montagu & Miss
Gregory -- the latter is going to be
married to a Clergyman of very
Small fortune & her friends
apprehend Mrs. Montagu will be dissatisfied
with the Match. I declined going
in to sup with the Veseys came home
about 10 o'Clock we were 2 hours
coming from Twickenham --
I found Miss Clarke at home I



21st. June Monday
Received a kind letter from The Duchess Dowager of Portland
good accounts of herself & Mrs. Delany
the Duchess invites me to go to Bullstrode
in the Autumn -- or when she
Returns from Margate --







sat with her ½ an hour, I felt so
ill I was obliged to go to bed -- Betty
gave me some hot peppermint
water -- her prescription did me
good -- for though I had a good deal
of fever I slept more than I
had done for since Thursday --
sent Mr Walpole's letter to Gloucester House.

June 22d. 1784 -- I felt this
Morning as if just recovering out
of an illness -- I had some tea before
I got up which was not till near
10 o'Clock -- the habit maker came
I bespoke a new Riding habit --
wrote & received a note from Miss
Asgill -- dressed -- then settled
accounts with Betty & Richard --
Received letters from Mrs. Jackson &
Anna Maria answered them & sent
them to Mr. jackson who was only come
to town for a few hours -- dined
with Miss Clarke -- we sat together till
½ past 5 -- I was much better
but not able to employ myself
-- wrote a little in my diary &
begun a letter to my friend Miss
Litchfield. Was interrupted by
Mrs. Ord who made a friendly unexpected



visit -- she sat with me
till ½ past 8 o'Clock -- I heard from
her that Mr. & Mrs. Smelt were
gone -- they were to set out from
Windsor (where they had been with
their Majesties for 3 or 4 days)
to day for Oxford & from there
on home. Mrs. Ord told me the
whole affair of Miss Gregorys Marriage
which I was sorry to hear was a very
imprudent one in every respect
except that the Gentleman had a
good character -- she has not I
think behaved gratefully and
openly towards her best friend
Mrs. Montagu. Mrs. Ord said many
pleasing & flattering things to me
& what was most grateful to me
to hear, was, the repetition of
kind things the Smelts & Mrs.
Carter had said of me to her --
When Mrs. Ord left me I went to
Miss Clarke -- she seemed inclined
to walk -- we made haste with our tea
& set out she went with me as far
as St. James Place -- through the Park
as I wished to call on Mrs. Delany's
friend Mrs. Sandford -- she was at



home, Miss Clarke -- left me & promised
to call again in ½ an hour -- There
were two ladies with Mrs. Sandford
they soon went away -- I spent ½
an hour very agreeable with this
very excellent pleasing & amiable
Woman -- she did me the favour
to assure me she was extremely
happy to have had an opportunity
of being personally acquainted with
me -- & as she now intended to reside
in London she hoped to see
me often -- communicated to me
her plans respecting her 4 Sons
&c. &c. sometime or other I should
speak more at large of Mrs. Sandford
character -- it is such a one
as every good mind must admire
-- she is very estimable
Miss Clarke came for me -- we walked
on to the Glovers who were just
Returned from the Country -- Mr. &
Mrs. Glover pressed us to stay supper
Mr. Glover drank Mr. Dickenson health -- &
kind enquiries were made after
him -- at 11 Miss Clarke & I came
home -- I was quite recovered



this Evening -- Lady Dartrey
sent me a letter from Lady
Wake which had been enclosed
in one to her it was dated
the 17th Lady Dartrey -- had
been to Oxford therefore she
could not send it sooner -- this
letter contained very good accounts
-- Lady Wake & her family
are comfortably settled once
more at Courteenhall.
Miss Clarke & I went to our Rooms
as soon as we came home

June 24th 1784 Wednesday -- Bettys sister
Mrs. Harman came at ½ past 9 she cut
& dressed my hair -- This was a long
affair -- ½ past 12 set out with Mr &
Mrs. Vesey for Richmond Hill -- it
was a rainy day -- we have not had
quite a fair one for some time --
passed Mr. Fisher Mr. Gray & Saordy on
the Road -- I went over Kew
Bridge for the first time since
I left Court -- how happy I felt
when I compared my present liberty
to that life of restraint. we got
to Sir Joshua Reynolds at ½ past two --
As the Party were not to assemble



till ½ past 4 -- the Veseys
left me & went & paid a
Visit to the Duke of Mountagu
& the Duchess of Buccleugh --
I was quite alone in the
House -- I asked for Pen ink
& Paper & wrote an answer
to Lady Wakes letter -- The
Veseys returned in an hour
Sir Joshua Reynolds rode from
Town -- he came a little
before 4 -- he never
sleeps here & only
comes once or
twice a Week to dine
-- the House is on the top
of Richmond Hill & commands
the whole of the most
beautiful Views in
the World -- at least Lord
Palmerston says so,
who Sir Joshua Reynolds told
me had been a Prospect
Hunter all his life, &
has
seen all the Views in
Switzerland &c. &c.
Miss Palmer joined us
at 4 -- she came from
Town contrary to the advice
of her Physician
Sir George Baker -- she has
had a slow fever for a



great while -- I like
Miss Palmer, she is
a pretty woman, lively
& unaffected.
At ½ past 4 all the Party
were assembled which consisted
of Lord & Lady
Spencer Miss Bingham
Miss Molesworth -- the
Bishop of St Asaph
his Wife Mrs Shipley &
Miss Georgiana Shipley
& General Mordant.
The Company were
all lively & good
humoured & the time
passed cheerfully.
it rained the whole
Afternoon therefore
we could not walk out.
There are some fine
Pictures by old
Masters -- Poussin &c
both in the dining &
Drawing Room. which are
two large Rooms one
on the Ground Floor & one
above -- the drawing Room
Commands the View.
they are of the Same size
& have a large Window.



These seem to be the principle Rooms
in the House -- which is not a large one
at 8 o'Clock we all separated --
I came home with the Veseys we
got to Town at 10 o'Clock -- we
conversed about Miss Gregory's
Marriage -- & Miss Laura Kepples
& Mr. Fitzroys running away
Yesterday to Scotland &c. &c.
they pressed me to go home to
sup with them I excused myself.
Miss Clarke -- was at home we sat
together till 11 o'Clock -- I sent
my letter by this Post to Lady
Wake, & one to my friend Miss
Litchfield with some of my diary.

June 24th. 1784 Thursday -- received
& answered notes to Miss Agill &
Miss Gunning -- had the Shoemaker
&c. Miss Blosset paid me a very
long visit -- began a long letter
to Lord Napier -- dined with
Miss Clarke after dinner finished
my letter to Lord Napier which
I sent this Post -- at 7 went to
the Veseys -- met there Mrs.
Garrick & Mr. Walpole who came



for a day to Town -- Mr. Mrs.
Pepys & Dr. Higgins were the
others of the company -- an
agreeable afternoon -- at 10
they were all gone -- the Veseys
sent for Miss Clarke we stayed
supper & came home at 12 o'Clock
-- I had a share of some fine
flowers Mrs. Garrick brought
from Hampton

June 25th. 1784 Friday
Miss Glover came & sat with me about
an hour -- she told me Mr. & Mrs.
Glover were gone for a few days
to Sunning-Hill -- that they had
dined at Mr Bourdieus on Wednesday. &
he was told both by Mr. & Mrs. Glover that
he must now give up all thoughts
of prevailing on me & accept his
hand -- he still persisted in saying
It was impossible for him to relinquish
his hopes -- his happiness
was too deeply concerned
in it -- they then told him of
my engagement to Mr. Dickenson he
was extremely affected by this



intelligence, & said I must indeed
then give her up -- he
wished me every happiness &c.
&c. I was really concerned
to find by Miss Glover that
he appeared very unhappy &
miserable -- I did not imagine
that a Man who had
lived & did live so much in
the World -- who was advanced
in life & had Children of
whom he was fond could
have felt so much attached
to a Woman he had had so
few opportunities of seeing.
Mrs. Garrick came to me at
1 o'Clock -- Miss Glover left me.
Mrs. Garrick sat with me till 3 o'Clock
we had much interesting conversation
-- she opened her heart
to me -- alas her heart is
a broken one -- she will never
recover the loss of Mr. Garrick they
lived together 34 years in the
utmost harmony -- he died her



lover as well as Husband
& friend -- it seemed. a relief
to her to shed tears in the
presence of one who sympathised
with her -- we talked
of Miss Hannah More.
I dined with Miss Clarke -- she left
me at 5. I wrote a letter
of Congratulation to Mrs. Alison
(Miss Gregory that was) Mrs.
Vesey had sent me a Cover --
Received a letter from Mrs. Rogers --
a few lines, to thank me for
the Turbot I had sent her --
she informed me she had again
been ill -- received a very
grateful letter from Mrs. Beet
-- Miss Gunning's Servant brought
me a Note she left this Morning
before she set out for Horton.
at ½ past 6 Mrs. Lenton & Miss
Glover came to invite me to
walk -- I excused myself as



I expected Anna maria home -- Ms
Clarke went with them. Betty
came & told me that a relation
of hers was come from Kettleston
in Derbyshire, who informed
her that Mr. Dickenson had been
so good to call (in his way)
upon her Father & Mother.
to tell them she was well &c
this was on Wednesday Morning
I imagine therefore that
Mr. Dickenson could not arrive
at home before Thursday
or late on Wednesday Evening --
I wrote a letter to Mrs. Walsingham
which I sent by this post
to enquire after her & Miss
Boyle I had heard they
were much frightened about 10
days ago -- by a Highwayman
who whilst he robbed them held
a pistol close to Miss Boyles



heart threatening to shoot her
if she did not make haste &
deliver her money.
Mrs. Lenton &c. returned we
drank tea together & as I
gave up all hopes of Anna Maria coming
to Town to day -- Miss Clarke &
I accompanied Mrs. Lenton & Miss Glover
home -- Mr.. Richard Glover joined
us -- we supped & stayed till 11 --
the conversation was trifling
& lively -- the Evening was so fine I
proposed walking home which Miss
Clarke agreed to as there could be
no danger with Mr. Richard Glover &
our Man Servant to guard us --
As soon as we came home
we retired to our rooms

Saturday 26th- 1784 June. My
Uncle Frederick paid me a very long
visit -- I communicated to him
my engagement with Mr. Dickenson
he said I certainly was the best
judge of what would contribute
to my happiness -- & gave me



such advice as it was natural
for a prudent man who had
seen much of the world to give, I
listened to him, but my heart
was averse to many things he
said. I know how necessary
prudence is -- I will suppress what I what
going to say -- & only add that I
really believe my Uncle has a
sincere regard for me. We
talked a great deal of my Grandfather
Lord Archibald of his
Brother Lord Orkney -- of family
disappointments -- of the ingratitude
of Kings &c. &c. &c. he also gave
me an account of Mrs. Hamiltons
Family -- the characters of her
Brothers &c. when my Uncle
left me I wrote a letter to Lady
Stormont which I should have done
long ago -- Miss Clarke & I dined together
she sat with me till ½ past 5 -- I
Worked & she read a few pages of
a foolish Novel which was in too bad
a style to continue, it was not
indelicate but sad poor stuff.



-- I finished reading a book I
began Yesterday -- Remarks on
the french & English Ladies by
Andrews -- I do not much like
the Author's style of writing but
he seems to have a thorough
knowledge of the Characters of
the french women -- at leat it
agrees with what I have heard
from those who have lived
in their society. I received a
letter by this post from Anna Maria
which informed me she should come
to Town on Monday -- that she
was gone from Harewood to Sunning
Hill -- &c. I wrote a letter
to Mrs. Jackson -- William Benn
came to inform me about the
Penny Post hours &c at 8 o'Clock
Mrs. Vesey came for me we
went together to Mr. Pepys where
we met -- Mr. & Mrs.. Mulso Mrs.
Chapone. Mrs. & Miss Ord -- Mr.
Cambridges eldest son. the conversation



was in general sensible
& informing -- Mr. Cambridge
seems a Young man of very
good parts -- his language is
correct & he converses with
ease & vivacity. Mrs. Vesey brought
me home at 11 -- we set Mr
Cambridge down at his house.
Miss Clarke sat with me till ½ past
11 -- when she left me I
begun & finished Voltaires
Mémoires which has not been
long published -- & which is the
present rage -- I was curious
to read it as I heard there
was not any doubt of the book,
being really written by this
great though wicked author, &
that it contained a just character
of the King of Prussia, .&
a faithful account of what
his friend & enemy Voltaire
thought of him. after I had
finished the book I repented having



indulged my curiosity -- why
should one wish to become acquainted
with vicious & wicked people
No woman ought to read a book
which she would be ashamed to own
she has read -- I reproach myself
for having read this.
Mr. Stanhope & Vesey called. but were not let
                             in -- in the Morning

Sunday 27th. June 1784 -- Received &
Answered a note from Lady Stormont
-- She is come to Town to lay in --
It poured such deluges of Rain
it was impossible to go out
After I was dressed I read prayers
&c &c. Mr. Dewes called -- I did
not know he was come to Town.
& was sorry he was not let in.
began a letter to Mrs. Carter. --
about 4 o'Clock Sir Joshua Reynolds Carriage
came for me -- went to his house
to dinner -- Miss Palmer & I had:
½ an hour to ourselves -- Sir
Joshua Reynolds Dr. Beattie & his Son a boy of
about 14 joined us -- before dinner
Miss Palmer & I went into the



Gallery & painting Room -- this was
a great treat to me -- at 5 o'Clock
all the Company were met.
There were no other ladies besides
Miss Palmer & me -- the Men were
the celebrated Dr. Beattie & his Son
General Paoli -- & his friend whose
Name I always forget -- Mr. Boswell
Lord Elliot -- a foreigner whom
I did not know & who did not
speak a word -- the great Dr.
Johnston. I was introduced
by Miss Palmer to her first
favourite Lord Elliot -- I sat next
him at dinner & we were soon
acquainted -- he is a Man of a
very respectable character & I
have heard his Wife his Children
Sisters are all excellent people.
I was much obliged to hear
the raillery of all the Company
upon Mr. Boswell's professed
attachment to me. General Paoli
assured me he had raved about
me ever since he was of the



Party to the Abbey where he saw &
conversed with me for the first time.
Nothing could be more lively
or agreeable than the conversation
Miss Palmer & I were obliged to set
long after dinner -- we left
the Gentlemen at 7 o'Clock.
Miss Palmer showed me a head
of her painting which is quite in
Sir Joshua's style -- she never had any
instruction but observing
her Uncle -- & after she had finished
any thing showing it to
him & he paints out the faults.
She played & sang to me, she has
great sweetness of voice, this accomplishment
too is self-taught.
Lady Stormonts Coach came for
me at ½ past 7. I was obliged
to quit the agreeable Miss Palmer.
I found Lady Stormont pretty well we
had a tête à tête till ½ past 9, I
told her about Mr. B: but I reserved
my information about Mr. Dickenson for
another time. Lord Stormont then
joined us he had been at Lord



Mansfields at Ken Wood --
he told us Lord Mansfield was much
better & in good spirits -- I asked
him if there was any truth in
the report of his intention of
giving over business he assured
me there was not. Lord Stormont &
I conversed about the Prince of Wales the
Court &c. he gave me franks
for Mrs. Carter. I had Lady Stormont
Coach at 10 came home, it
was too late for me to fulfill
my promise of going to the Veseys
Miss Clarke & I sat together till past
11 o'Clock -- Dr. Jackson had called
to inform me his Wife was
brought to bed last Monday of
a daughter -- Mr. William Sandford
also had called.

Monday 28th. June 1784 -- the habit
Maker came brought home my new
habit -- I paid him £ 4.14 6. Anna Maria
came to Town about 11. I was rejoiced
to see her looking so much better -- we
had so much to say to each other that we
were together the greatest part of the Morning



-- At ½ past 3 Miss Glover came in
my Uncles Coach to fetch me -- I just
stopped for letters the Post coming in --
had letters from Lady Wake Mrs:
Jackson & Mr. Dickenson -- which I read en
chemin faisant. There was no other
Company at my Uncles -- Miss Hamilton
sang & played after dinner -- at 8 o'Clock
Miss Glover & I came away -- had my Uncles
Coach & she set me down at Mrs. Chapones
-- met there -- Mr. Browne an old Spa
acquaintance of mine. Mr. & Mrs. Pepys
Mrs. Ord Mrs. Vesey Mrs. Handcock. I was
well entertained in listening to Mr: Browne
& Mr. Pepys Mr. Browne. is one of my great
favourites -- he is a very uncommon
character -- I mean by his superior
excellence. Mrs. Vesey brought me
home about 11 -- Mrs. Clarke's were gone to
their Rooms -- I went & conversed with Anna
Maria for ½. of an hour -- sent Mrs. Carters
letter by this post -- wrote an answer
to Mr. Dickenson letter before I went to bed
-- Mrs. Newton & Mr. William Sandford
had called when I was out. found a
Note from Lady Stormont




                                                        
Tuesday -- 29th. June 1784 -- Anna Maria
came & sat with an hour before
I dressed -- after I was dressed we
settled some accounts together
-- I sent to enquire after Mrs.. Jackson
of H sheet she & the Child well
Mrs. Sandford sent me word she
had heard from Mrs. Delany that
she was well &c. &c.
Mr. Jackson came at 1 o'Clock
& sat with us till ½ past 3 -- Mrs.
Chapman & Mrs. Ord & her
Grandson Master Bigg. a boy
of 11 or 12 years old who is at West
Minster School came in did
not make long visits.
Received another from Mrs.. Jackson.
-- dined at home -- Anna Maria played on
the Harpsichord -- we separated
from ½ past 5 till 7 met in
the Drawing Room -- Mr. Dewes
came to Tea -- Mrs. Lenton
Miss Glover, Miss Jane Hamilton.
& her Brother came in unexpectedly
-- as I knew Mr. Dewes



was fond of Music -- I prevailed
on my Cousin to sing we adjoined
to the Parlour where the harpsichord
was -- She sang two fine
Italian Songs -- after which
she Mrs Lenton &c. left us --
we returned to the drawing Room
Mr. Dewes was surprised
at my Cousins Singing -- he
sat with us till 10 o'Clock We
worked -- he took impression
of seals -- we talked of Prospects
Lord Melcombes diary -- Mrs.
Delany the Duchess of Portland &c &c.
he seemed to enjoy his
quiet evening -- he had been
So well satisfied with his reception he gave
up going to the Opera to see the
famous Dance of le Deserteur
. After he went I answered Mrs.
Jackson's 2 letters -- sent that &
Mr. Dickenson's by this nights Post
Bell left us at 11 -- Anna Maria & I
sat up talking till past 12
o'Clock



Wednesday 30th. June 1784. Miss
Glover came at 9 to Breakfast. I breakfasted
below with Miss Clarke's & her -- I left
them at 10 as Mr. Richard Glover came to
Breakfast & I was en Robe de
Chambre & did not choose to
be seen -- I went to dress -- he
sent me up two Notes to beg
I would either come down or admit
à my toilet -- some laughable
messages passed from above to
below &c. but he was forced
to go away without seeing me --
I returned to the Parlour when
I was dressed -- Miss Glover stayed
till ½ past 12. I sat the
whole Morning with Anna Maria --
we amused ourselves in making
Nonsense Verses -- Received a
Note from Mr. Dewes with an extract
from a letter of Mrs.
Delany which concerned me. A
Note from Lady Clavering which I
answered -- Received a letter by
the post from Miss Gunning
Lady Storments Coach came
for me ¼ before 5. went to



dine with her -- we dined tête à
tête -- little George & Charles
joined us at dessert & were with us
great part of the Afternoon --
I had a long uninterrupted conversation
with Lady Stormont, I communicated
to her the whole
story of Mr. Dickensons attachment
to me &c &c &c. She
did not make a single objection
& assured me she
should be impatient to see him
& should show him every attention
for my sake, & indeed for his own
from the favourable Idea she
had conceived of him -- she advised
me to inform my Aunt Warwick
my Uncles & other near Relations
she said she was sure they had all
so good an opinion of my
judgement that they would be well
satisfied with the choice I made
in a husband -- &c &c. Lord Stormont
came home at ½ past 9 -- he always
seems happy to see me -- we had
some confidential discourse about his
eldest Son. I showed him Miss Hannah
More's prose Epistle to Mrs. D. with



which he was very much pleased. he
gave me some franks for Miss Hannah
Mre : a little before 10 I had
Lady Stormonts Coach & Servants
as usual // I went to Mr. Glovers
where I had promised to meet
Miss Clarkes -- there were only
them & Mr.. Richard Glover besides the family -- they had
just finished Supper but the
table was covered with fruit from
Mr- Glover Villa -- at 11 o'Clock
Miss Clarkes & I came home went
immediately to our Rooms
I felt my Spirits tried.

Thursday 1st. July 1784 Anna Maria
went out very early this morning
I breakfasted in my Room -- then
dressed for the day -- received a Note in
French from Mr. Richard Glover with
his Manuscript Journal written when in france
& Italy -- Mrs.. Vesey came & made
me a little Visit wanted me to dine
there -- I excused myself -- Anna Maria
came home at 1 o'Clock, sat & worked
with me till dinner time --
Mrs. Hamilton (my Uncles Wife)



made us a Visit -- she talked away
for ½ an hour -- she gave us
an account of the very dissipated
life the people of fashion
led in Dublin. Dined at home
with Miss Clarke -- they left me as soon
as dinner was over to go to the
Veseys -- who had sent for us
to a fine dessert of fruit
-- I did not go as I wish to
be to myself a little before
I went out at 7 o'Clock Mrs:
Chapone came for me in Mrs.
Ords Coach -- we went to her
house -- we talked of Miss Smith
I was happy to hear Mrs. Chapone
speak of her in the most favourable
manner -- the Company at Mrs. Ords
were Mr.. & Mrs.. Pepys -- her 2d. Son the
Clergyman & Mrs. Vesey Mrs. Chapone
& Miss Ord -- the new Taxes were
spoken of & approved & Miss Gregorys
Marriage was talked of -- we were
all of opinion that she would be very
happy as Mr. Alison bore a very
good character & though they



had not much to begin the World
with that he would by being
well known & esteemed get good
preferment in the Church --
Mr. Ord said he was quite a
popular Preacher at Edinburgh
Mr. Poultney has just given him
a living of 150 Per Annum at Sudbro
Thrapston, Northamptonshire
I believe near Peterborough
the afternoon passed agreeably
I came away with Mrs. Vesey
at 10 o'Clock -- we set Mrs. Chapone
down at her House, she was
so obliging to answer my enquiries
relative to Mrs. Ord whom she has
known many years -- her Husband
was a Gentleman of large fortunes
he had been dead 12 years she
lost him & 3 daughters in the
space of 2 years -- the eldest daughter
was 20 years of age -- handsome
& very amiable -- the 2d. 16 -- the 3d.
14 all 3 were charming young
women -- she also lost a Son a
fine youth who was in the Army



he died in America during the
last War -- She has now five Children
. The Eldest lives on his
Estate is married he lives at
his own Place in Northumberland
the 2d. in the Church -- the 3d. in
the East Indies -- the eldest daughter
Married to a Man of fortune
Mr. Bigg in Cornwall -- the
youngest Daughter unmarried
a modest well accomplished
young woman lives with her
Mother -- Mrs Ord is a sensible
friendly agreeable Woman
She lives in a very handsome
style without parade.
Mrs. Vesey made me go in with
her Mr. Vesey Mrs. Handcock were
at home we were just going to
set down to Supper when I recevied a
Note from Anna Maria to beg I would
stop at home as Mr. Jackson
was to sup at our house, I
excused myself to the Veseys



& came home -- Mr. Jackson
stayed till ½ past 12 o'Clock
Anna Maria & I had some conversation
in my Room
after he left us -- did not
go to bed till past 1 o'Clock
Mrs. Garrick had called this Evening when I was out &

                                                         left me a very
                                                         fine Nosegay. Mr
                                                         William Sandford also called

Friday 2d. July 1784
Did not get up early, as soon
as I had breakfasted dressed for
the day -- arranged some papers
&c. Mr. Stanhope made me a
very long Visit -- he took occasion
to tell me what a very high
opinion he had of my character
&c &c &c &c I insisted
upon knowing what he had paid
for the Bell glass for the flowers
& returned him the Money.
Lady Clavering came & he left
me. She stayed an hour we
had much conversation about
Lord & Lady Napier &c she
quite opened her heart to
me, said how happy she had



been during the life of her
husband &c. &c. when
she went which was near
3 o'Clock -- I invited Miss Clarkes
to walk with me through the Green
Park to Mrs. Sandfords. I left them
in the Park & went to her. I sat
½ an hour with her -- found her
pretty well. We conversed about the
Veseys & Mr. Dewes's --
I saw her son William who is a
clever boy -- he was 14 Yesterday
is to be brought up to the Law
he informed me that he had
breakfasted with Mrs. Digby (the
Queens Vice Chamberlain)
this Morning who said the report
of the prince of Wales being again
ill was true, that His Royal Highness went
to the Queen Yesterday to excuse
his being at Court & that he had
so great an oppression of breath
he could hardly speak to her --
When the Servant came for me
Mrs. Sandford sent to beg Miss
Clarkes would come & sent her



Son into the Park for them Anna Maria
came, Bell was gone home to
dress -- I introduced her to Mrs.
Sandford -- we came home ¼ before
4 -- Received & answered a Note from
Lady Stormont. Received a
letter by the Post from Miss Hannah
More -- to reproach me for
not having written an answer
to her last &c. dined at home
with Miss Clarkes -- after dinner
Anna Maria -- played a few lessons
we separated at ½ past
5 o'Clock -- I wrote in my
Diary -- at 7 we met to tea
after tea Miss Clarke's left me to take
a Walk -- I wrote a long letter to
Miss Gunning which. I sent by this
Post -- Miss Clarke's came home about
10 we supped -- after Supper Anna Maria
read aloud some of Mr. Richard Glovers
Diary & I worked till ½ past 11 --
Sat up till 12 Began a letter
to Lady Wake




Saturday 3d. July 1784 -- Mr. Richard Glover
came I was dressing did not see him
-- Anna Maria came & sat with. me at
12 my Uncle Frederick came he
sat with us some time the house
Taxes were the Subject -- the distress's
of the Nation &c -- Lady Frances
Harpur came in -- Anna Maria left us --
my Uncle did not stay long
he told Lady Frances & me that
his Nephew & our cousin Colonel
Cathcart -- spoke in the house of commons
yesterday for the 1st. time that
the subject was on the present state
of the affairs in India on which
he was well qualified to speak he has
Coolness, sense, a fine tone of
Voice & an engaging Countenance,
he is in my opinion a charming
Young Man & will make a
distinguished figure in the World
he has already gained great
credit for his bravery & is
universally & deservedly
beloved. he is very handsome



prepossessing & engaging -- modest
& elegant. Lady Frances Harpur
& I had a tête á tête from
1 o'Clock till 3 -- She informed
me that her Son was to go
abroad next week & told me
many confidential things.
As I know I have her love &
I hope her esteem, I thought it
right to inform her of my
engagement with Mr. Dickenson she
was much satisfied with the
prospect I had of future
happiness & greatly approved
my choice &c &c. when she
left me Anna Maria & I sat together
till four o'Clock -- Lady Dartrey
had sent for me to dine with
her at Chelsea to meet the Veseys
I excused myself. Lady Stormont
sent her Carriage for me went
to dine with her. I found her
pretty well considering -- she complained



however of a Nervous deafness
we dined tête a tête -- we had
the Company of dear little George
& Charles for some time after
dinner -- Lady Stormont & I
talked of Lord & Lady Cathcart
Mr & Mrs. Graham's the Napiers
&c. &c. Her 2 Brothers Lord
Cathcart & Colonel Cathcart came
in for ½ an hour -- Lord Cathcart is
come to attend his duty at the
Tower Guard -- we complimented
Colonel Cathcart on his success
Yesterday in the house &c
After they left us we talked
over Colonel Cathcarts character
Lord Stormont came to us
at ½ past 9 -- he had been
at Ken Wood he said Lord
Mansfield was not so well
to day -- told us how well Master
Murray had behaved (he with his
tutor) is at present with Lord
Masfield -- I had Lady Stormont ca---
came away at 10 -- Lord Stormont said



he was sorry to be deprived of
seeing so much of me as he wished
&c &c.
Lady Stormont in the course of
Conversation this Afternoon
informed me, that as she knew
how much interest Lord Stormont
took in my happiness she
had communicated to him
my engagement &c with Mr. Dickenson
that Lord Stormont was perfectly
satisfied with the choice I had
made & that he had said
I was the only person
he had met with who
possessed sentiment without
acting imprudently or being
Romantic -- &c &c. I heard to
day that the Prince of Wales was
very ill of a pain in his side
I sent Lady Stormont a little
Box in a present, as she wanted
one to put some herb snuff in
which she had been ordered to take



Miss came in at the same time We
sat together till past 11 o'Clock --
I found a Nosegay Lady Dartrey
had sent me -- Mrs. Vesey had called
to make me a Visit after her
return from Chelsea. found a
letter from the Duchess Dowager of Portland
to tell me how uneasy she & Mrs
Delany were at not having
heard from me -- I had just
time to write a few lines to
her Grace before the post went
out, & promised to write a longer
letter by Mondays Post --
After Anna Maria left me wrote in my
Diary went to bed about 12 o'Clock




Sunday 4th. July 1784 Went to day
with Mrs.. & Miss Ord Master Bigg &
Mr. Pepys -- to Mr. Agar's to see
some very capital Pictures
-- Mr. Agar received us very politely
I had the good fortune to make
Some proper observations about
the Pictures -- he was so pleased
that he has invited me to go
again -- he expects 5 Pictures
from Rome every day & he
is well acquainted with My Uncle
William -- therefore I will go
with him when he comes to Town
I will then attempt some
description of them as I have
not leisure at present.
when we left Mr. Agar's . Mr. Pepys
parted from us -- Mrs. Ord her daughter
& I went to pay a Visit to Mrs.
Stainforth & Mrs. Elizabeth Stainforth
at the Queens House. I made
my peace with them for not
having been the whole Winter



-- here we heard the Prince of
Wales was better & was to go
out tomorrow. -- Mrs.. Ord brought
me home at ¼ past 3 -- Anna Maria &
I were together a little while
she went to dine at the Glovers
Ball & I excused ourselves
we dined tête á tête -- at 5
we separated I read & drew
till 9 -- walked to the Glovers.
Ball went there to tea. --
supped there only the family
Miss Clarkes & I walked home
at 11 the Moon shone bright
& it was a real Summers
Evening

Monday 5th. July 1784. Lord
Dartrey called early, brought me
a Note from Lady Dartrey -- to beg
I would dine at Chelsea to meet
Lady Frances Tollemache & sleep
there. I could not go as I was
engaged. Lord Dartrey left me
in a few minutes but
returned again -- I told him
about Mr. Dickenson he was very happy



to hear things were in so good a train
I desired I would let him inform
Lady Dartrey, this I could not
have any objection to. I sat
writing in my dressing Room
all Morning Anna Maria sat with me
wrote a long letter to Lady
Wake & one to Mrs. Delany &
begun one to the Duchess Dowager of
Portland. at 4 Lady Stormonts
Carriage came went there to dinner
-- we dined tête á tête -- had
the 2 dear boys after dinner.
in the afternoon Richard brought
me two letters -- one from Mrs.
Carter & one from Lord Napier
-- both, kind friendly & Affectionate
Lady Stormont & I had a great
deal of conversation about my
Uncle Frederick. I did all in
my power to promote a reconciliation
-- & I believe gained
some ground. Lady Frances
Harpur joined us at ½ past
8. -- she showed us a small
Miniature by Saunders



of her Son, a good likeness
& prettily painted -- the price
5 Guineas -- the size for a
Ring -- Saunders lives in
Bond Street -- Lady Stormont & Lady
Frances Harpur said I must positively
set to him for my picture
& make a present of it to
Mr. Dickenson Lord Stormont came in ¼
of an hour before I came away, gave
me franks for Mr.. Dickenson -- he had been to
dine at Lord Mansfields at Ken Wood
-- Lord Mansfield is but indifferent -- his
complaints are Nervous & he cannot
sleep well. Lord Stormont told me
that the Coal Tax nor the Horse
Tax would take place -- that they
Thought Superfine Sugars would be
taxed -- had Lady Stormonts Coach Came
home at ¼ past 10 o'Clock -- Miss Clarke's at
home finished my letter to the Duchess Dowager
of Portland -- sent 3 letters by this post
one to the Duchess one to Mrs. Delany one to
Lady Wake --



Tuesday 6th. July 1784 Mr.. Dewes came
about 12 I was dressing -- Anna Maria went & sat
with ½ an our till I went down. he
sat with me till past 1,o'Clock -- I showed
him the extracts I was making of
the letters he lent me of Mrs. Delany
-- he paid me some Compliments upon
My industry -- & not only approved of
what I had done but made me
happy by saying I might keep them
that I need not be in haste to
return the letters, & that when I
had finished the present Packet
I should have the rest of her
letters which. he had in his possession
& also that he would endeavour to
procure all those that Mrs Port
(his Sister) had. Mr
Dickenson informed me he should be in
Derbyshire this Summer. I told
him I should introduce a friend
of mine to him when he was in
that part of the World. I wish Mr.
Dickenson to be acquainted with so good



& respectable a Man -- I did not
however say anything to
Mr. Dewes of the nature of my
friendship with Mr Dickenson
As I had said I was going to
Mrs.. Sandford Mr. Dewes desired
he might accompany me, we
walked together through the broiling
Heat. Mrs.. Sandford was happy
to see me -- Mr. Dewes stayed sometime
I sat in with Mrs. Sandford her
Son William was of Home -- Mrs. Sandford
told me many things which confirmed
the opinion I before had
of Mr. Dewes's Character -- at
2 o'Clock I left Mrs. Sandford --
I met Lady Dartrey in her Coach
she stopped & made me come in
she had been to my House --
she told me she came to Town
on purpose to see me, to talk
with me about Mr. Dickenson &c



as Lord Dartrey had communicated
what I told him Yesterday, we could
not converse upon this subject as
Vesey Dawson was in the Coach --
I went with Lady Dartrey to several
places -- & sat in the Coach whilst
she made a Visit to Lady Dacre
-- she set me down at home at 3
o'Clock. I promised to go to Chelsea
in the course of next Week. I was
so fatigued with the heat I had not
the power of doing any thing
conversed with Anna Maria till she went
down to dinner -- ¼ before 5 o'Clock
walked to Lady Clavering -- where I dined there
was only Miss Goring who is come
to stay with her sometime -- after
dinner -- Miss Goring play & sang to
me -- she has been well taught
& sings with judgement & has a
good Voice. Lady Clavering & I settled a
plan for going to Horton together
-- she entertained me very much
by an account of the Offers Miss
Clarke's had had -- the style of life



she led in India &c &c. I walked
home at 9 o'Clock wrote & sent
a letter to Miss Hannah More. Miss
Clarke's came home at 10 -- Mr. Jackson
supped with us & stayed till 12 o'Clock

Wednesday 7th. July 1784 -- a Note X
from Mr. Pepys to press me to go on
Saturday to Thames Ditton, he sent
me a Note he had received from Mrs.
Walsingham in which she desires he
will persuade me. I wrote an
answer to say I would go. / after I was
dressed sat the whole Morning with Anna Maria
I drew she worded -- dined at home with
Miss Clarke's after dinner Anna Maria played
some lessons we separated from ½
past 5 till 6. Miss Glover came at
6 -- sat with us -- a Mrs. Bridges came
in to visit Miss Clarkes after tea
Anna Maria went to her friend Mrs. Harris
where she was to sleep. Mrs. Bridges sat
on till past 8 -- Miss Glover stayed till
9 -- I drew the whole Evening Miss Clarke












& I sat together till near 12 --
I went to bed at 1 o'Clock


Received a Note from Mrs. Jackson of Hanover Street to tell me
she was recovered from her laying in & hoped to see me
the Glovers had called

Received a kind friendly letter from Mrs. Alison in reply
to my congratulations upon her Marriage

Thursday 8th. July 1784 X Mr Pepys Note
As soon as I was dressed sat down
to my drawing -- got Blairs Sermons
which I sent to Mr. Jackson to send
to my friend Miss K: as he had told
me he had an opportunity of
sending them. Mr.. Jackson
came to me with a message
from the Duke of Newcastle to
desire I would inform what
sort of Mourning he should go
in to Court for the late Dowager
Harrington -- I was not a little
entertained to think he should
apply to me for this important
information -- I sent his Grace
my opinion. Anna Maria returned from
Lambeth. I sat with her in her
Room for some time. at ½
past 4 went to the Veseys, met
there Lord & Lady Dartrey. Sir Robert
& Lady Harries. Sir John Parnel



Mr.. Watts -- Mr.. Knox (Lord Well's son)
-- a pleasant party! Lord &
Lady Dartrey Mr. Watts left us at ½ past
7: Miss Clarkes joined us at 7 --
in the Evening Mr. Burke & Mr. King
came in. I have not time to
enter on the different Topics of
conversation -- at ½ past 9 I
came home -- wrote in my diary
which had been neglected at 10
o'Clock Mr. Jackson came to supper
I sent for Miss Clarke's Mr Jackson stayed
till 12 with us.
Received another letter from the
miserable good for nothing Mr.
Copland -- Mr. Richard Glover had
called -- a Note from Lady Stormont
to beg me to go to her tomorrow

Friday 9th. July 1784 -- Received a Note
from Lady Clavering which informed
me -- Mrs. Peachell was brought to
bed of a fine Boy -- & that she intended
to go to Horton on Tuesday



wished me to Breakfast with her
tomorrow or come to her this Evening
&c I wrote an Answer, told her I
feared I could not go to Horton as
My Uncles business is
not yet settled -- indeed it is
not yet put in any train so
as to leave me at liberty to
fulfil my Country engagements
-- Received a very kind letter from
Mrs. Walsingham filled with entreaties
for me to meet Mr. Walpole
Pepys & Mrs. Garrick on Sunday
&c &c &c.
Charles Prices Brother
came at 11 he was an hour with
me talking over his distress
on his Brothers account, I gave
the poor Man my opinion &
advice -- &c. -- My Uncle
Frederick from 12 til past 1 -- he
informed me of the new plan
he had adopted for his Son.
Miss Glover came in the Morning



to spend the day with Anna Maria saw
them both at different times
during the Morning wrote an
Answer to Mrs. Walsingham -- the
Post came in before I went out
Received a very affectionate from
Mr.. Dickenson with agreeable
assurances of his Fathers approbation
&c &c received also a
letter from Miss Gunning. in
which she expresses much impatience
for my coming to Horton --
Lady Stormonts Coach & Servants
came for me before 4 o'Clock
I went for her to our Cousin
Mrs.. Walkinshaw -- we sat ½ an
hour with her -- she seemed
happy to have us -- she really
is a friendly good Creature.
Lady Stormont & I then proceeded
to Portland Place. we sat with
Lord Stormont in his fine
Library till dinner, he dined
with us & we dined in one of



his Rooms -- he was with
at home for the whole afternoon
except ½ an hour when he
went to Visit Mrs. Legge.
we had as usual the two
Dr. Boys -- Lord Stormont was
very entertaining &
agreeable -- when Lady
Stormont & I were alone, I again
attempted to bring about
the reconciliation I have
at heart between the Uncle
& Niece, & think I gained
a little ground. saw two
Pictures of my Grandmother
Hamilton -- one of which Lord
Cathcart is to let his Sister
have -- by these pictures
& from what I have heard
Lady Archibald must have
been a very elegant pretty
Woman. at 10 o'Clock I came



away. Had Lady Stormont's Coach. called
on the Glovers -- they were gone
to bed. came home sat with
Miss Clarkes till ½ past 11.
Anna Maria told me the Glovers had
been to our house & the reasons
of our not meeting them
this Evening I sat up till 2
o'Clock in the Morning wrote a
long letter for tomorrows post
to Mr. Dickenson

Duchess Argyll has resigned
her Place as Lady of the Bedchamber
-- on account of
her very declining health.
Lady Harcourt kissed hands
Yesterday on
being appointed in her Room.




Saturday 10th. July 1784
Wrote to Lady Clavering & Mrs. --
Garrick. settled some important
trifles, with Anna Maria, took
leave of her & Isabella at 1 o'Clock
when Mr. Pepys came for me. Mrs.
Pepys Mrs. Walsingham &c had assured
me of their approbation & that I
had their sanction for going with
an old acquaintance, and a married Man of perfect
good character without a Chaperone.
We had a pleasant airing to
Thames Ditton where we arrived
at 3 o'Clock. Mr.. Pepys amused me
by relating a number of curious
Anecdotes. I cannot boast of
recollecting them for my thoughts
were too often wandering into
Ds shire for me to pay the attention
this conversation merited.
I make no doubt that he was
perfectly well satisfied with me
as a fellow traveller -- for people
that love to talk themselves
require nothing more from one
than a look of attention -- the
words yes & no, a well timed



smile -- a grave face &c. &c.
It is a much easier matter to
please than some will allow.
Sometime or other I will write
down my thoughts on this
subject -- I detest art of every
kind but it is a duty we owe
society to appear perfectly attentive to every one.
Mrs. Walsingham expressed so much
joy at seeing me that I believe
it was sincere. She showed us
the improvements in the house
before dinner -- & in the most
flattering manner surprised me
by showing me the elegant & new furniture of the
Dressing Room to a Bedchamber
which is always called Miss Hamilton's
as is also a seat in the shrubbery
which commands a View of the
Thames. There was no other
Company at Dinner than Miss



Boyle (her only daughter who is at the
age of 14 the most accomplished
Young Person I ever met with
-- She is mistress of Music -- &
painting -- Models in a surprising
Manner -- knows perfectly Modern & Ancient History French, Italian --
Geography, Mathematics --
Astronomy the English Classics -- is learning Spanish
& Latin &c. though I think Miss
Boyle will reap many advantages
from having received so very
superior an education, I fear
it will prevent her enjoying
the innocent pleasure of society
for every other female will not
only envy but be afraid of her, &
the Men in general are so jealous
of our being as wise as themselves
that they will shun her,
None will associate with her
but College Pedants rigid
Philosophers or pretended Femmes
Savantes -- & an affected Femme
Savante is in my opinion a most



disagreeable animal -- the reason
of this is that they always pretend
to more knowledge than
they have, that they are
ignorant of what they ought
to know, are part affected
& useless members of society
the only Woman that I know
whose talents deserved the
highest cultivation is Mrs:
Carter -- she is I imagine
the most learned female
that ever lived -- hers is
not a mere superficial knowledge
-- & she is, most wise
& Good -- I must not now
indulge myself with writing
an eloge on this Dear Woman
the subject would carry me
too far.     Miss More &
Mrs.. Chapone & two or three



others I could name whom I
likewise would except out of the
list of what I call Femmes
Savantes. for their talents
& amiable precepts have
been of great service to
society.
After dinner we went to the
Medallion Seat , where we
had our Coffee. & sat till tea
time, we also drank tea here,
the passing objects such as
pleasure boats, Barges &c --
on the River & the Carriages
on the opposite shore made
an agreeable variety. this
Villa is on the Surry Side
immediately opposite Hampton
Court Palace 2 of the Pavilions
are the principle object the
Palace is hidden behind the



Trees, the Terrace of the Palace
Garden is so high that with
a Telescope from this
Seat one can easily distinguish
who are walking there if one
is acquainted with them. After
Tea we walked in the Shrubbery
& round the Ferme orné which
is laid out with as much
taste as 42 Acres of flat
ground can well be. Mrs-
Walsingham has just begun
to build a conservatory which
will be an agreeable addition
to the House as it will open
into a China Closet which opens
into the largest drawing Room.
We came in at 9 o'Clock. Mrs.
Walsingham treated us with
Reading Passages from some
of the Manuscripts she has



in her possession -- one in particular
was a curious account
of transactions in Russia
which Mrs. Walsingham had taken down in
Short hand from a relation
Mrs. Vigo had given her
who was in Russia when
the Czar was murdered by
the orders of the present Empress. as this
is now so generally known I
shall not enter into the detail.
at 10 o'Clock we went to Supper
Miss Boyle retired as soon
as the Cloth was removed. Mrs.
Walsingham Mr Pepys & I sat up till
1 o'Clock -- the conversation was
so interesting that Mrs. Walsingham
forgot the hour as the rule
of her House is to separate
at 11 o'Clock -- she accompanied
me to my Room where she



repeated her kind professing
Mrs. Walsingham is a Widow & daughter of the
very celebrated Mr. Charles
Hanbury Williams, & Lady
Frances Coningsby -- she has
a great portion of her fathers
Wit -- is more informed than
most women & is very highly
accomplished -- she is esteemed
by the judges to be first Lady
Painter. Mrs. Walsingham must be
admired for her talents --
& if she made more allowances
for those who had
not so strong a mind &c. &c.
as herself she would be more
loved. She is keen & sometimes
severe & wants a
certain softness, without
which no female can appear
truly amiable. Was I to



make my opinion of her public
I should be very ungrateful
for she has from our first
acquaintance been perfectly
equal to me & I believe
has as great a share of affection
for me as she is capable
of feeling for any one.
though I think we should be
careful not to censure the
failings of others or get into
habits of detraction yet it
is of great use to investigate
every character that falls
under our own observation --
Reading the characters of the
living often affords better
instruction than reading
whole volumes of the observations
of others
&c &c.
&c



Mrs. Walsingham has a very large fortune
in her own power, I have been
told 5 or 6 Thousand per Annum
besides Money -- she has
every thing in style, lives
like a person of fashion
She is a good economist, &
though she lives expensively not
extravagantly.

Sunday 11th. July 1784 Thames Ditton
I got up soon after 6 when
I was dressed went into the
Garden, I took a book with
me, but I could not engage
my thoughts to its contents
I read some letters I had
in my pocket. I enjoyed
the thoughts that perhaps
the writer of them was



then thinking of me -- I
also indulged the hopes that
the time would arrive when
we should together enjoy every
pleasing scene -- that we
might sometime or other together admire the
beauties of Nature & adore
that Being who has so
bountifully strewed his blessings
over this World. if it
should not be permitted that
we shall enjoy this happiness
-- that same Being
will I doubt not support
our minds to bear the
disappointment properly.
Miss Boyle joined me ¼ before
9 in the Garden, she showed
me her Birds & the Nests she
had found -- we fed those



that were become tame.
At 9 we all met at Breakfast
after which Mr. Pepys Miss Boyle &
I strolled about the Garden --
Mrs. Walsingham joined us at 11 -- we
went to Church -- after which
Mrs.. Walsingham said we should not
separate as we were to make
so short a stay. we sat together
in the Medallion Seat &
amused ourselves with
conversing & looking through
the Telescopes till 3 -- at
1 we had an elegant little
Repast brought of fruits
Cakes & Ice Water. I left
Mrs. Walsingham & Mr. Pepys at 3 Mrs.
Walsingham Maid attended me



& dressed my hair -- as I did not
take my own Maid --
At 4 o'Clock I joined them
in the Garden -- Mrs. Garrick
was arrived -- but alas!
no Mr.. Walpole he had
sent his excuse being ill.
Mr. Boyle (Mrs. Walsingham only
Son) came from London
to dine & stay till
tomorrow -- I had not seen
him these 3 years -- he
having been in Ireland
with his Uncle Lord Shannon
(his fathers Brother)
Mr. Boyle is in his three & twentieth year
a handsome lively wellbred
& I believe sensible Young Man, he



is in the Guards -- I have
heard that he is dissipated &
extravagant -- but how few
how very few Young Men are
otherwise! -- the Duchess of
Bolton & her Eldest daughter
Lady Catherine Pawlet also came
to dinner -- Lady Catherine is
a great favourite of mine
she is natural lively and
unaffected -- She is about 16
in all the bloom of youth! &
though I do not agree with
others that she is a very
great beauty, I think her
a handsome Young Woman
she is above the common
size is well formed & has a
good air . . . as we waited for
the Duchess we did not set down to
dinner till near 5 -- the Duchess



of Argyles resignation and Lady
Harcourts appointment as Lady
of the Bedchamber to the Queen was
the principle topic with other
tattle of the day -- such as
the run away Match of Mr.
Fritzroy & Miss Laura Keppel
the Prince of Wales &c. &c
I could not help laughing at the
very pathetic letter the Duchess of
Bolton told us which Mrs. Keppel
wrote to the Prince when she
found her Daughter was run
away -- “My Child, my Child
Oh I have lost my Child -- what
is become of my Child -- Oh
come & comfort & tell me where
is my Child” -- the Prince went
& comforted the distressed Mother &
sat with her till 2 in the Morning
Mrs.. Keppel had sat tête a



tête with her Daughter the
whole afternoon -- Miss Laura
having refused to go with her
Sisters to Ranelagh ... her
eyes were red with weeping as
Mrs. Keppel had refused to give her
consent to her marrying Mr.
Fitzroy Mrs. Keppel endeavoured to comfort
her daughter and to
amuse her read the very
Moral & instructive Novel
of the Sorrows of Werter.
They separated at 11 -- Mrs..
Keppel this tender judicious
sensible Mother charged her
other Daughters when they
came home not to make a
Noise or laugh quite so loud
as usual for that the poor
afflicted Laura was gone
to try by sleep to forget her



Sorrows & those of Werters.
but to their great surprise
when they passed her Chambers
door it was open & Laura
was fled.
As soon as we rose from table we
went to the Medallion Seat after Coffee
we walked about, conversed
without form or restraint, I had
the pleasure of enjoying some private
conversations with my dear
& agreeable friend Mrs.. Garrick
she showed me a letter of our
friend Miss Mores. I really
do not know a more pleasing
Woman than Mrs. Garrick She is a
model of perfect grace & good
breeding -- there is a propriety
in her manners & conduct
which convince you she is a Woman
of sense & she is so open so
candid so ingenuous so free
from affectation & Art that
is impossible to be ½ an hour



in her company without loving
her. She made me promise
to introduce a certain friend
of mine to her & said she should
invite us to Hampton -- & that
she should invite my Uncle
William (with whom she has been
many years acquainted) to meet
us &c &c &c Mrs. Garrick the Duchess &
Lady Catherine left us at ½
past 8 -- we saw the Prince of Wales
on the opposite Shore who went
to pay a Visit to the beautiful
Lady Waldgraves who lodge in
the Summer in the Pavilions.
before supper we amused ourselves
in looking over the
Prints belonging to Cooks
Voyage, Mrs.. Walsingham entertained us
at the same time by reading
the descriptions &c



Mrs. Walsingham Mr. Boyle Mr. Pepys
& I sat up till near 1 o'Clock
Mr Coombes the Late Provost
of Eaton &c &c were the
persons whose characters
afforded us ample matter
for conversation. Mrs. Garrick &
the Duchess Dowager of Portland were
spoke of by Mrs. Walsingham as they merited
some other time I will amuse
myself in making memorandums
of the strange anecdotes relative
to Coomes: Mrs.. Walsingham would attend
me to my Room. She pressed me
to fix a time for make her a
longer Visit -- this I could not
do but I promised to let
her know as soon as possible
She informed me my Cousin
Miss Hamilton (Lord Abercorns
Niece) was to come to her on
Wednesday & to stay some time
as she is a most amiable



& accomplished woman I shall
endeavour to go to Mrs. Walsingham before
she leaves her.

Monday 12th. July 1784
I joined Miss Boyle before breakfast
-- & got her to play a lesson
to me -- she plays as if she
was perfectly well grounded
& understood what she played
but I do not think she has
much taste or feeling.
We met at 8 o'Clock to breakfast
-- we breakfasted an hour
earlier as Mr. Pepys was
obliged to set out at 9 o'Clock
Mr Boyle gained great credit
for joining us so early.
Mrs.. Walsingham charged me to remember
my promise of
paying her a longer Visit
& told me how many plans



she had of going to see places
&c which she & her daughter
should not enjoy if I was
not of the party. at 9 o'Clock
Mr. Pepys & I set out, we
had an interesting conversation
he quite gained my heart by
the manner in which he spoke
of his Wife & children.
Mrs. Pepys is an excellent
Woman & merits the praises
he bestowed on her.
We got to Town at 11 o'Clock
Mr.. Pepy's stayed ½ an hour
as he waited for answers
to messages. I found Miss
Clarke's at home -- introduced
Anna Maria to Mr.. Pepys
when he went away Anna Maria
& I sat together till 3 o'Clock
-- I then wrote a letter to
Miss Gunning which I sent to



Lady Clavering to take to Horton
tomorrow -- sent to enquire
after Mrs.. Peachell, she & the
Child very well. Miss Clarke's &
I dined at Mr.. Veseys, I came
home as soon as we rose from
Table -- Received letters from
the Duchess Dowager of Portland
Miss Burney (the authoress
of Cecilia &c.) My friend Miss Litchfield & a note from
my Cousin Stormont. I had
only time to read my letters
& write in my diary a little
before Mr. & Mrs. Vesey came
for me. We went to booksellers
to enquire for Madame
Genlis last publication --
Viellé du Chateau -- after
jumbling in the Coach for
½ an hour by way of
exercise for the old folks



we went to the Glovers where
we met Miss Clarkes -- Mr
Glover was in charming
spirits & happy to see us --
we supped there, Mr. & Mrs. Vesey
brought Miss Clarke's & me home
½ past 12 o'Clock

Tuesday 13th: July 1784
Anna maria sat with me the early part of the
Morning at 12 o'Clock Caprianne
& another Man brought my Uncles fine Vase
to deposit it in my Care.
he showed me the drawings he
had made from it which are indeed
inimitably executed -- I promised
him to write to Sir
William &c &c. he desired me
to inform him why he not
obeyed his orders in carrying
the Vase to show the Queen &c



As soon as Caprianne left me I sent
for J--- a Person to make
a Box to contain this
precious work of Art.
Miss Clarke paid me a Visit
for ½ an hour. at 2 o'Clock
Anna Maria returned home, her
Sister Mrs.. Jackson came to
Town to make me a Visit
we had much to say to each
other. Mr. E——
called, I was denied.
had the great satisfaction of
receiving a most kind &
affectionate letter from Mr.
Dickenson's Father received also --
long letters from Lady Wake
& Mr. Wake (her Son). at 4
o'Clock Lady Stormonts Coach came for
me, I found her pretty well --
Lord Stormont dined with us
we had as usual dumb



Waiters, & no Servants which is
one of the most comfortable
methods of dining as it lays
no restraint on conversation.
I spent an agreeable afternoon Lord
Stormont with us the greatest part
of the time. Lady Stormont gave
me a long message from my Cousin
Lady Frances & another from
Lord Cathcart -- their Reasons
for not having called. &c --
I brought home a drawing box
which I promised Lady Stormont to
arrange & give orders about
to her Cabinet Maker --
had Lord Stormonts Chariot
at 10 -- came home. sat with
Miss Clarkes till 11 o'Clock.
I sat up after them & wrote
an answer to Mr. Dickenson
Senior to be ready for tomorrows
Post.



Wednesday 14th. July 1784 -- had
My Uncles Vase
safely placed in a 2d. Box. --
My tormenting Mr. Stanhope
came to pay me a Visit, I got
rid of him by promising to see
him on Saturday & then Anna Maria
& I set out -- she was so good to
accompany me to White-Hall --
there we separated -- I went to
the Duchess Dowager of Portland -- had
a conference with her Porter
I went into her apartments
& gave those orders she had
requested me in her letter of
Yesterday -- I returned home
at 12 -- Lady Dartrey had called
during my absence & left word
she should come for me at ½
past 1 o'Clock -- I wrote a letter
to the Duchess Dowager of Portland
& one to Sir William Hamilton --
left them, & the one for Mr.. Dickenson Senior
to be sent by to days Post.



Lady Dartrey came before 2 o'Clock
we called at their house in Stanhope
Street for Lord Dartrey & then proceeded
to the Villa which is situated on the banks
of the Thames -- between Battersea &
Chelsea. Lady Dartrey left her sweet
little Julia to my care whilst she
went to dress -- Master Dawon &
his Cousin Vesey Dawson Julia &
I were much occupied in attending
to a Hen & her chickens
which Lady Dartrey had made a present
of to Julia. There was no
company at Dinner -- only the 2
boys -- Mr Antrobus the Tutor was
gone to Town -- After dinner
Lord & Lady Dartrey & I strolled about
the Shrubbery -- Lady
Dartrey made me tell her every thing
about Mr. Dickenson she & Lord Dartrey
made me very happy by assuring
me of their warmest approbation
& said such things as their
kind friendship for me dictated
Nothing could be more agreeable
than the manner in which I spent
this day. In the Evening Lord Dartrey
showed us a collection of Medals he



had purchased -- Gold & Silver
all English -- Queens Anns Wars
Oliver Cromwell &c &c
Went to our Rooms at 11 one of
Lady Dartrey's Maid's attended to undress
me: we distilled Rose & Mint Water to
                             remember to set a still

Thursday 15th.. July 1784. I got up
before 6 & enjoyed the freshness
of the Morning air & the beauty
of the Thames -- I could not go into
the Garden as Mrs. Mary had taken
my Habit out of my Room to
get it brushed -- I wrote & worked
till ½ past 8 when she came &
assisted me to finish dressing --
Lady Dartrey came to me, en
Robe de Chambre, she begged me
to go down & make Breakfast for
Lord Dartrey -- & that she would soon
join us -- I went down ¼ before
9 -- Lord Dartrey & Vesey Dawon joined
me in the. breakfast Room -- Mr.
Dawson always breakfasts with his tutor.
Lord Longford came from
Town to Breakfast he was with



us by 9 o'Clock. after Breakfast Lady
Dartry & I walked tête á tête
in the Garden, she repeated to
me how happy she was about
me & how much she approved
my preference in
choosing a Man of Mr. Dickensons character
She wanted me to stay another
day but I could not as I had
promised Lady Stormont not
to be absent above a Night from
Town till she was brought to bed.
I left this dear & most
amiable friend at '½ past 10 o'Clock
Lord Dartrey & Lord Longford
came in the Coach with me
I was at home before 11 o'Clock
Miss Clarke's were at breakfast I
gave them flowers I had brought
from Chelsea -- & carried some
to Mrs. Handcock. but did not go
in. Mr. Dewes had called yesterday



at 12 o'Clock I engaged both the
Miss Clarkes to go with me to
Mrs. Sandford -- we found her at
home & made her a long Visit
her Son William was at home. Mr.
Dewes was there, told me he
should leave Town on Saturday
& asked permission to wait on
me on Friday Morning Left Mrs.
Sandford at 1: called in at Virgmans
brought a small gold Pin for William
we met Mr. Richard Glover he turned
& accompanied us -- I called at
the Blossets they were gone out of
Town. we then walked on to
Hanover Street where I went
to pay a Visit to Dr. Jacksons
Wife (Mr. Ernst's Sister) Miss Clarke's &
Mr. Richard Glover walked in the Street
whilst I paid my Visit. I found
Mrs: Jackson quite recovered , & saw the
Little Child, which is a very pretty
Girl -- it was christened last



Tuesday by the name of Harriet,
Augusta, Ernst, Jackson. Mrs. Jackson
asked me if I had heard that her
Brother had called upon me. Mrs. Jacksons
Sister & another lady was there after
sitting 20 Minutes I took my leave
& joined my party -- we met Mr.
Devaynes I stopped his Chariot &
charged him to go to Lord Dartreys
as Lady Dartrey wanted to consult him
about Julia who had been terribly bitten
by the Gnats. Mr.. Richard Glover took an opportunity
of telling me he had had
another letter from his Nun -- he
left us when we got home.
I sat quietly in my Room for
½ an hour to recover the fatigue
of the Walk & heat. Mrs. Glover
came to me at ¼ before 3 -- we had
a tête á tête till ½ past 3 when
Dear Mr. Glover came. I had some
particular conversation with him
before dinner -- he was satisfied
with every thing I told him respecting



Mr. Dickenson & his father & was much struck
with their characters which he highly
admired. Mr. Glover & I joined Miss
Clarkes Mrs.. Glover & Mr Richard Glover
at 4 o'Clock we had a cheerful
dinner, & sat below till ½ past 6
Anna Maria played a lesson on the Harpsichord.
Mr. Glover left us to pay a Visit
to his sick friend Mr.Cust. Miss
Clarke's & Mr.s Glover worked, I drew, & Mr.
Richard Glover began to read aloud to
us in Julia de Roubigné -- we were
interrupted by Mr.. Dewes who came
uninvited to tea -- after tea Mr. Richard Glover
took his leave. Master William Sandford came in
at 8 o'Clock -- a walk was proposed I excused
myself & asked Mr. Dewes to keep me company
as I wanted to have an opportunity
of speaking to him, I had a tête á
tête of ½ an hour -- I informed him
of the nature of my Correspondence with
Mr. Dickenson (I had particular reasons for
entrusting him with my confidence on
this subject) & I desired him to make
acquaintance with him when he went
to Buxton where is to be next Monday
Sennight -- it was quite a relief to
my mind when I had done this
-- Mr. Dewes said many friendly things
                                                         to me.

(consult diplomatic text or XML for annotations, deletions, clarifications, persons,
quotations,
spellings, uncorrected forms, split words, abbreviations, formatting)



 1. Parts of the following entries from 21 and 24 June 1784 have been transcribed in Archibald Edward Harbord Anson's ‘About others and myself 1745 to 1920’ (1920: 19-20). Various other parts of this diary have furthermore been transcribed in Anson & Anson (1925: 208-224). The red pencil marks found throughout this volume are likely by members of the Anson family given how closely the marked sections correspond to what was eventually published in Anson & Anson (1925).
 2. Strawberry Hill House (referred to here) was the Gothic Revival villa built by Horace Walpole in Twickenham.
 3. ‘Objects of art considered collectively; antiques; curios. Now historical’ (OED s.v. virtu n. 1c. Accessed 17-08-2021).
 4. A tragedy in blank verse by Horace Walpole, printed at Strawberry Hill in 1768.
 5. Lady (Charlotte) Maria Waldgrave's mother (also known as lady Maria Waldegrave until 1766) was the Duchess of Gloucester at this point.
 6. This page is blank.
 7. The original date has at a later point in time been corrected from 24 June to 23 June (possibly by a member of the Anson family), as the former was a Thursday and not a Wednesday. Furthermore, Mary Hamilton describes the events of 'June 24th 1784 Thursday' on p.13.
 8. This is likely an unmarried sister of Lady Spencer (née Bingham), either Lady Margaret Bingham (d. 1839), who would marry Thomas Lindsey later in 1784 (see also HAM/2/13), or Lady Anne Bingham.
 9. Present-day Kedleston, Derbyshire.
 10. Presumably Mary Hamilton meant to write 'was' here.
 11. John Andrews published his Remarks on the French and English Ladies in 1783.
 12. Mémoires de M. De Voltaire was published in 1784.
 13. James Boswell also describes this dinner in his The Life of Samuel Johnson, LL.D. (2nd Vol. pp.523-525), published in 1791.
 14. At this point, Lord Eliot had three sons: Edward James (b. 1757), John (b. 1761), and William (b. 1767).
 15. Also known as Caen Wood, an estate and the seat of the Earl of Mansfield in Hampstead, London.
 16. This is likely 'Lord Westport' from HAM/2/1, as John Denis Browne was the Viscount Westport from 1771 until 1780. Mary Hamilton is likely not referring to Mr Hawkins Brown here (also an 'old Spa' acquaintance), as she did not take to him when in Spa, and she describes 'Mr. Browne' as 'one of my great favorites' a few lines down.
 17. George Dodington's diary, which covered the years 1749-1761, was first published in 1784 by Henry Penruddocke Wyndham.
 18. The French opera 'Le déserteur' (first performed on 6 march 1769) was adopted multiple times as a pantomime ballet, once by Jean Bercher Dauberval at the King's Theatre in London in 1784.
 19. 'A Sapphic Epistle to Mrs D' was published in 1782. Not much else is know about this work by Hannah More.
 20. Present-day Sudborough, just north-west of Thrapston, Northamptonshire.
 21. This seems to be incorrect, as many sources state that William Ord (b. 1715) died in January 1768, not c.1772.
 22. It is unclear as to who this was, as the accounts on the family of William Ord and Anna Dillingham only list eight children (three sons and five daughters), whereas Mary Hamilton here lists nine children in total.
 23. Stephen Digby was vice-chamberlain to Queen Charlotte between 1782 and 1792, so this 'Mrs Digby' Mary Hamilton mentions here could refer to his wife at the time, Lucy Fox (1748-1787).
 24. The relationship between Frederick Hamilton and the Stormonts appears to have been somewhat shaky in the early 1780s (see HAM/1/4/1/14, HAM/1/4/1/16, HAM/1/4/1/17, HAM/1/4/1/18 and HAM/1/4/1/21).
 25. The title of 'Baron(ess) Dacre of Gillesland' was included in the third creation of the Earldom of Carlisle in 1660.
 26. The text on this page (which has been moved to p.53) is written vertically. The image has been rotated to be more legible.
 27. The text on this page (which has been moved to p.53) is written vertically. The image has been rotated to be more legible.
 28. Moved this section here from p.51.
 29. Dorothea Gregory had married Rev. Archibald Alison on 16 June 1784.
 30. Moved this section here from p.51.
 31. Lord Welles (Thomas Knox) had seven sons: Thomas (1st Earl of Ranfurly), John, Vesey, William, George, Charles and Edmund. It is unclear which one is referred to here by Mary Hamilton.
 32. This is possibly Charles Price (1747/8-1818), a London merchant who became MP of London in 1802, and Mayor of London the following year. He was then created a Baronet on 2 February 1804 and became known as Sir Charles Price. His brother was Ralph Price (1745-1811).
 33. Seeing as Mary Hamilton consistently refers to Louisa Murray (née Cathcart) as Lady Stormont, this likely refers to either Jane Cathcart (the Duchess of Atholl) or Mary Graham (née Cathcart).
 34. Mrs Walsingham probably started calling this bedchamber 'Miss Hamilton's' because Mary Hamilton probably stayed there during visits (see for example HAM/2/3/1 p.9, from 29 June until 1 July).
 35. Similarly, this seat is probably referred to as such because Mary Hamilton enjoyed spending time in a similar one during her visit in 1783 (see HAM/2/3/1 p.12 and p.19, 2 and 6 July), often referring to a seat in the garden as 'my seat'.
 36. See also HAM/2/3/1 p.8 etc. for more on the medallion seat.
 37. This is likely Jane Vigor (née Goodwin), who had lived in Russia from July 1728 until 1740. After returning to England, however, she lived a relatively quiet life in London, Taplow and Windsor respectively, and it is not known if she travelled back to Russia at any point, or when Peter III died in July 1762.
 38. The Sorrows of Young Werther is a novel by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, first published in 1774.
 39. Probably a former vice-provost rather than a provost of Eton, as no provost of Eton is known under this name.
 40. This refers to one of Mary Hamilton's cousin through the brother of her grandmother Lady Jane Hamilton (d. 1753): James Hamilton, 7th Earl of Abercorn (1685/6-1743/4). James Hamilton's son, the Rev. George Hamilton (1718-1787) had nine daughters, and this reference could refer to any one them at the point of writing: Anne (1755-1795), Mary (b. 1756), Harriot (1760-1788), Catherine (b. 1763), Elizabeth (1765-1843), Rachel (b. 1766), Jane (1768-1831), Lady Cecil (1770-1819), or Isabella (b. 1772).
 41. Les Veillées du château, ou Cours de morale à l'usage des enfants was published in multiple volumes in 1784.
 42. This nun has been previously mentioned at some length in HAM/2/10 p.143.
 43. Henry Mackenzie (1777) Julia de Roubigné: A Sentimental Novel. In a Series of Letters.

Metadata

Library References

Repository: John Rylands Research Institute and Library, University of Manchester

Archive: Mary Hamilton Papers

Item title: Diary of Mary Hamilton (21 June 1784 - 15 July 1784)

Shelfmark: HAM/2/11

Document Details

Author: Mary Hamilton

Date: from 21 June to 15 July 1784

Summary: The diary covers the period from 21 June to 15 July 1784 and details Mary Hamilton’s many visits and engagements with friends such as Hester Chapone, Mary Delany, the Dowager Duchess of Portland, Elizabeth Vesey and Horace Walpole. She also details her day-to-day life, her writing and reading, her relationships with her servants, and the news and gossip of the day.
    Hamilton records her many social engagements including a detailed description of a visit to Horace Walpole at Strawberry Hill, when Hamilton’s party was late. She assured Walpole that this was not her fault as ‘Mr V[esey] is never punctual’. Eva Garrick arrived immediately afterwards. Hamilton notes that Walpole showed them through his house and opened the cabinets ‘w[hi]ch are not opened to the company that come to see the house’. The cabinets contain ‘miniatures & various fine & curious things both Modern & Antique’. She describes the house as ‘true Gothic – every Room, closet, Gallery, Boudoir &c has painted Glass Windows’. To Hamilton the house was the ‘most perfect thing of the kind in England I believe I may say in Europe – one must live in this house at least a Month to see every thing’. Hamilton notes that Walpole was particularly attentive to her and that she took real pleasure in viewing the house and the art it contained. She details the works that he showed her, noting that some of the art and curiosities he showed only to ‘particular friends’. She details the dinner Walpole gave which was elegant and served well and ‘showed that the master of the House was a man of fortune & taste accustomed to elegance’. Hamilton clearly delights in the attention that Walpole paid her. Hamilton details the evening and writes that she took Mrs Garrick aside and told her of her engagement to John Dickenson. Mrs Garrick ‘shed tears of joy & assured’ her that she would receive Dickenson with open arms. Hamilton also writes of the conversations she had with Garrick who told her that she has never recovered from the loss of her husband. She writes that they lived together for 34 years in the utmost harmony; he died her lover as well as her husband and friend. Before she left, Walpole passed Hamilton a letter to give to his niece Lady Maria Waldergrave.
    On another occasion, crossing Kew Bridge on her way to Sir Joshua Reynolds’s house with Mr and Mrs Vesey, she notes how ‘happy I felt when I compared my present Liberty to that life of restraint’. (This was the first time she had crossed the bridge since she had left Court.) She describes and lists the company with her at Reynolds’s, as well as the house and the many portraits there. On the same evening she attended another engagement at Mrs Vesey’s whose guests included Horace Walpole and Eva Garrick. Another time, she attended a dinner with Sir Joshua Reynolds, James Boswell and Miss Palmer and she writes of Mr Boswell’s ‘professed attachment’ to her. Miss Parmer showed her one of her own paintings which she thought similar in style to Reynolds. In her own home, Mrs Delany’s nephew, Court Dewes was so taken by the singing of Hamilton’s cousin, Jane Hamilton, that he cancelled going to the Opera. On a visit to Mrs [Charlotte] Walsingham she sought assurance over the propriety of travelling alone with Mr Pepys. She describes her evening, Walsingham’s house and possessions, and the company which included Mrs Garrick and the Duchess of Bolton. Hamilton also writes of Walsingham’s daughter, Miss Boyle, who was about fourteen years old and whom Hamilton describes as the ‘most accomplished young Person I ever met with’. She outlines her educational abilities but notes her fears that such an education will ‘prevent her enjoying the innocent pleasure of society for every other female will not only envy but be afraid of her & the men in general are so jealous of our being as wise as themselves that they will shun her none will associate with her but [...] pretended Femmes Savantes & an affect Femme Savante is in my opinion a most disagreeable animal’ as they pretend more information than they know ‘are pert affected & useless members of society’. She continues on the subject of knowledgeable women; the most learned in her opinion is Elizabeth Carter.
    Hamilton writes about her family and the advice they give with regards to her engagement. She records the conversations she had with her family including one in which her aunt Mrs Frederick Hamilton ‘talked away’ for an hour on such things as the ‘disappointed lives people of fashion led in Dublin’, whilst her uncle Frederick talked about taxes and the state of the nation and about her relation, Colonel Cathcart speaking in the House of Commons. She writes of family disputes, particularly one involving her cousin Lady Stormont and her uncle, Frederick Hamilton.
    Hamilton records the news and gossip of society. Of the gossip amongst her friends, Elizabeth Vesey for instance gave Hamilton a detailed history of Mrs Ord, including information on the death of her husband in the ‘last American war’ She writes of the reactions of the various Bas Bleu members to the news of Miss Gregory’s marriage to a clergyman, Archibald Alison, without fortune (he had a living of only £150 a year); Elizabeth Montagu ‘was dissatisfied by the match’. Hamilton was saddened that the marriage was thought to be unwise ‘in every respect except that the gentleman had a good character’, commenting that Miss Gregory ‘has not behaved gratefully and openly towards her best friend Mrs Montagu’. The diary also contains gossip and news concerning members if the Royal Family.
    The diary also documents the books and pamphlets that Hamilton reads which include Blair’s Sermons and Remarks on the French and English Ladies . Hamilton does not like the author’s style, but she does agree with his views on French women ‘as she has heard from people who have lived in France’. Hamilton also begins an unnamed ‘foolish novel’ of which she could only read a few pages before putting it down as the ‘stile’ was to poor to continue with. The novel was not ‘indelicate but poor sad stuff’. She also notes reading Voltaire’s Memoirs ; she describes him as a ‘great though wicked author’ and says that ‘no woman ought to read a book w[hi]ch she w[ou]ld be ashamed to own she has read – I reproach myself for having read this’. Hamilton also read much of her friends’ writings including letters and journals. She notes that Richard Glover gave her his manuscript journal, written when he was in France and Italy, to read. Mr Dewes had sent her the letters which his aunt, Mrs Delany, had written to his mother. Hamilton was making extracts from them (see HAM/3/3). She writes that he approved of her industry and made her happy by saying that she could keep the letters and that when she had copied the packet she had he would send her the remainder in his possession. He also offered to ask his sister Mrs Port if she had any letters. Hamilton also discusses on art and a visit to Mr Agars where she impressed him with her comments on the paintings and was invited to return with her uncle, Sir William Hamilton. Her cousin, Lady Frances Harper showed her a miniature by Saunders of her son, of a size suitable for a ring, which cost five guineas. Lady Frances suggested that Hamilton should have her portrait painted by him.
    Hamilton writes of a visit from Miss Glover who told her that at dinner at her home, M. Bourdieu was told to give up hopes of Hamilton’s accepting his offer of marriage but that he still insisted saying that it was impossible for him to give up hope (see HAM/2/10). Mr Glover then informed him of Hamilton’s engagement to John Dickenson and M. Bourdieu was much affected by this news. Hamilton also records the continual visits from one of her other admirers, Mr Stanhope, a married man who ‘plagued’ her. She writes that in one visit he said that she was a ‘pattern of perfection [...] I let him run on till at last my head quite ach[e]d’. He was not put off and called again the following day.
    The diary also includes information on everyday life such as Hamilton’s maid preparing her hot peppermint water as a remedy for a headache, and having her hair dressed which she notes was ‘a long affair’. She writes of receiving a ‘begging’ letter from the ‘miserable good for nothing Mr Copeland’. She notes that her friends Mrs Walsingham and Miss Boyle were held up by a highwayman and she records general topics of the day including the possible increase of tax on super fine sugars. Hamilton comments on an odd request she received from the Duke of Newcastle who wrote asking ‘what sort of mourning he should go in to Court for the late Dowager [Lady] Harrington. I was not a little entertain[e]d to think he should apply to me for this important information – I sent his Grace my opinion’. Hamilton also writes on the subject of servants and of her pleasure in dining at Lord and Lady Stormont’s who on occasions are served by a dumb waiter ‘which is the most comfortable methods of dining as it lays no restraint on conversation’.
   

Length: 1 volume, 90 images, 43 folios , 12383 words

Transliteration Information

Editorial declaration: First edited in the project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers' (Hannah Barker, Sophie Coulombeau, David Denison, Tino Oudesluijs, Cassandra Ulph, Christine Wallis & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2019-2023).

All quotation marks are retained in the text and are represented by appropriate Unicode characters. Words split across two lines may have a hyphen on the first, the second or both fragments (reco-|ver, imperfect|-ly, satisfacti-|-on); or a double hyphen (pur=|port, dan|=ger, qua=|=litys); or none (respect|ing). Any point in abbreviations with superscripted letter(s) is placed last, regardless of relative left-right orientation in the original. Thus, Mrs. or Mrs may occur, but M.rs or Mr.s do not.

Acknowledgements: Transcription and XML version created as part of project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers', funded by the Arts & Humanities Research Council under grant AH/S007121/1.

Transliterator: , editorial team (completed 11 August 2021)

Cataloguer: Lisa Crawley, Archivist, The John Rylands Library

Cataloguer: John Hodgson, Head of Special Collections, John Rylands Research Institute and Library

Copyright: Transcriptions, notes and TEI/XML © the editors

Revision date: 3 November 2021

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