Single Letter

HAM/2/12

Diary of Mary Hamilton (15 July 1784 - 2 August 1784)

Diplomatic Text


[1]15 July 1784
Mr: Glover return'd at ½ past 8 oClock
he & Mr.. D: recd. equal pleasure
in meeting -- Mr. D: went away
at ½ past 9 -- the ladies return'd from
their walk -- they had left Master
Sandford
at home. Mr. & Mrs. Glover
sup'd with us and staid till ½ past
11 -- ye. conversation turn'd wholly
on Miʃs Glovers character and
improvements -- after they went
A M & I had ¼ of an hours converse
& then went to our Rooms



[2]July 16th. Friday 1784 AMaria & I
together parts of ye. Morning -- Mrs.
Vesey
paid me a visit of ½ an
hour & would sit with me in my
Boudoir -- She shew'd me a very
clever letter she recd: Yesterday
from Mrs. Montagu -- it was quite
an elegant composition -- the
thoughts were new -- Mrs. M.
lamented Mrs. Thrales having
so lost herself in marrying
Piozzi ye. Italian Singer &c &c
After Mrs. V: left me I wrote
a long letter to ye. Ducheʃs Dowgr
of Portland
& Mrs. Delany. I



write to both in ye. same letter,
I fill'd 8 quarto pages. I had
just finish'd when Lady Stormont
came for me -- I was surprised
to see her but she told me she
thought it would do her good,
we din'd tête à tête. she told me
that Lord Stormont was gone to the
House of Commons to hear ye. debate on
ye. India busineʃs. & that he had
lefft left a meʃsage for me, wch.
was that he thought it would
be proper & what I owed my-
self
& family & also that it wd.
be right to put Mr. D: upon a
proper footing, wch. was, that we
should be presented at Court
soon after a certain event might
take place, Lady S: said that
she & Lord S. wd. present us &
that I should engage my other friends
& Relations to go to Court on that
Day. that neither I or Mr. D——
need apprehend that it wd.
occasion us any material
expence -- nor that there
wd. be, if we did not chuse it,



any neceʃsity to go any more
to Court -- but that if we did not, at that time
all my family, & ye. world wd.
suppose I had married some
person who was not approved
of by my Relations &c &c
-- I said little in reply to
this -- for I am detirmin'd
to be rul'd by wht. will be
most agreeable to my friend.
-- The two dear Boys were with us
as usual great part of the afternoon.
Lady Stormont told me how
her oldest boy (who is at Lord
Mansfield
s at Ken Wood) be-
haved
the other day to Mrs. Boscow-
an
& how properly Mrs. B. had
reproved him for his pertneʃs.
Lady S. told me that our Cousin
Coll. Greville desired her to in-
form
me that he had intended
calling on me this Morng. but
that he had been prevented as
he was obliged to set out with
the King to Windsor earlier
than he thought he should.



We spent a comfortable afternoon
together -- talk'd of ye. s. of Atholl
&c &c. I plan'd the drawing
Box for her & gave all the
particular directions to ye.
Cabinet maker. at 10 I left
Ldy. S -- I promised her not to
leave town till for more than
a day or two at a time till
she was able to return to
Wandsworth Hill, had her Coach
& Servts. home. Miʃs C's were
out sat in my Boudoir till
they came home wch. was ¼ past
11 -- wrote a note to Mr. Dickenson
wch. Mr. Dewes wasis to take to
Buxton -- by way of an introduc-
tion
to his acquaintance. wrote
a Note also to Mr. Dewes --
enclosed these Notes with my
letter for ye. s. of P & Mrs. D:
wch. he is so obliging to take to
Bullstrode tomorrow. had a
little chat wth. Anna Maria
went to bed at 12 oClock.



found a kind letter from the
Ducheʃs Dr. of Portland
at my
return home this Eveg.

[3]July 17th. Saturday. At ½ past
6 o'Clock this Morng. I was
much surprised & shock'd by
our Housemaid who came &
knelt down by my bedside
& acknowledged that she had
been guilty of stealing some
things wch. belong'd to me & Miʃs
C's
& yt. she had been a liar -- She gave me a Cambric
Handif. of mine of wch: she had pick'd
out ye. Mark. she implored
my forgiveneʃs and entreated
me to save her from losing her
character -- the motive of her
telling me all this was that
Betty our Maid had detected
& threatren'd her wth. acquain-
ting
us -- I was so much affect
ed
& so pain'd by finding how
much I had been deceived
in this Girls character -- that
I had only power to tell her
I would speak to her on the



Subject after I was up. I
breakfasted this Morng with A Mari[a]
I told her the whole story &
what I thought it would be
right to do -- she approved, but she
could not atʃsist me as she was
obliged to go out early -- ------ I
------ question'd Betty, who
told me of many things wch. she
was certain Hannah had stoln.
I call'd H: & acquainted her
that as B: alledged these things
against her I should expect
she wd. let B: see ye. contents
of her Boxes -- it was some
satisfaction to me to see that
She did not hesitate in complying
-- I went wth. them -- chargingto prevent
B. not to saying any thing harsh
as I wish'd to reclaim &
not to oppreʃs her. Betty
saw nothing but some old lace
edging of mine -- besides wht-
H: had before acknowledged
to me she had taken. Betty



charged her with stealing a
Muslin apron wch. ye. other in
ye. most solemn manner denied
& then bursting into an agony
of tears she told me that
she relied on my goodneʃs
for not being more prejudiced
against her by what Betty
said for that Betty had
wrong'd us as much & more
than she had done. as I
saw evidently marks of con-
fusion
in Bettys countenance
& was apprehensive of a
violent quarrel between
these women, I did not
seem to attend to what
H: said, but sent B: out of
ye. Room to get my things
ready for dreʃsing -- I then
made H—— acquaint me what
she meant by accusing B——
in that indirect manner --
She opened such a scenee of
fraud -- falseneʃs &c &c



that my astonishment was
great indeed -- I had the
most perfect confidence in
B—— & thought her a perfectly
honest & good young Woman
I had imagined her principles
were excellent & also thought
that she had a great Affection
for Anna Maria and me, we
both thought so, & treated her
accordingly. Anna Maria
came home at 11 -- I inform'd
her of what I had heard -- we
ask'd Betty if she could vindicate
herself & were both of us
shock'd to find she could not
-- As I thought it was best
to take ye mildest method &
endeavour if poʃsible to
work upon the minds of
these Women & try first



to rectlaim them by gentle
means -- I told A Maria that
as it would be utterly im-
poʃsible
for us to give them
a character we would not
turn them away but by a
generous forgiveneʃs &
good advice try to effect
a reformation in their minds
& excite their gratitude.
A Maria's thoughts on this sub-
ject
were the same with mine
-- we call'd them & told them
that we would not turn them
away &c &c, & that they might
not reproach one to another.[4]
I insisted upon their mutually
forgiving and made them promise
they would keep this affair a
secret from their acquaintances
-- After they had made this
promise & I had seen them
embrace each other with



real signs of forgiveneʃs I
gave them some advice -- they
seem'd penitent & so ended
this disagreeable affair. --
Mr: Dewes sent me a very
kind & friendly note wch. I
answer'd & sent the pacquet
I had got ready last night.
at 2 oClock Mrs. Elizabeth
Stainforth
paid me a Visit
I was obliged to go to Mr-
Glover
s so I took ye. liberty
of short'ning her visit, she
walk'd with me part of the
way. I got to Mr. G's at ½
past two o'Clock -- staid wth.
him & Mrs. Glover till 3 o'Clock
when they set out for their
House at Sunning Hill for
ye. Summer -- I promised to
come to them if poʃsible.
Return'd home immediately
A Maria & I sat together till



dinnertime. rec'd a charming
letter from Miʃs H More --
was disappointed in not receiving
one from D——shire. din'd
at home wth. Miʃs Clarkes --
Mr.. Richard Glover came in
& sat by whilst we dined, he
was going to dine at Lord
Carmarthen
s. he left us
at 5 o'Clock. -- A.M: play'd
me a leʃson -- we separated
till ½ past 7 -- I begun
Madme Genlis last work
les Veillées du Chateau[5]
wch. Lady Stormont lent me
yesterday. Miʃs C & I met
at tea. after wch. they went out
to take a Walk. -- at 9 o'Clock
Mrs. Garrick came to me (from
Hampton) she brought me fine
flowers & fruit -- we had an
interesting tête á tête till



10 o'Clock when she left me &
I went & join'd Miʃs Clarkes
at the Veseys -- I took the
fruit wth. me to present to
them. -- there was no other
Company -- We sat ½ an hour
after Supper. came home
at 12 -- y spirits were quite
worn out with the affair of
ye. Morng. & I was glad to retire
to my room. A. M. & I spoke to
Wm. Wilson[6] & forbid his coming
any more.[7]

Sunday 18th. July 1784 --
Breakfasted with A Maria we
talk'd over the disagreeable affair
of yesterday & were satisfied we
had at least done what was
most kind & charitable.
I went to May-fair Chapel
there was a stranger in the
Pulpit who preach'd the most
extravagant discourse I ever
heard -- it was a composition
of loose unconnected sentences
in Blank Verse or rather



Prose rund mad. I came home
immediately after Church -- I
had quite a levée -- the Miʃs
Clarkes
-- Mr. Stanhope Mrs.
Ord
Lady Mary Hume. Mrs.
Hamilton
& my Cousin --
Each seem'd to wish the
other's gone -- at 3 o'Clock
they left me. Anna Maria
kept my Cousin to dinner
she took her to ye. afternoon
service -- from 3 till 4 I
was quiet, & alone. I shut
myself up in my Boudoir
& wrote ye. Extracts from Dear
Mrs Delanys letters. Anna
Maria
& my Cousin came to
me when they return'd from
Church -- we were not together
above 10 Minutes -- Lady
Stormont
s Coach & Servs. came
for me -- I found her still
quite well. Lord Stormont &



my Cousin Charles Cathcart din'd
with us -- we had dumb waiters so
our conversation was not under
any restraint by ye. Servants
being in ye. room. Lord S——
amused me very much by his
conversation. he inform'd me
of the stile of living at Vienna
wch. was when he resided there
ye. most polished Court in
Europe. We talk'd a good deal
abt. the great difference of expence
in every article between living
abroad & in England. Lord S——
said that not only ye. society
was more agreeable but that
whatan income on wch. one could live on with
difficulty in England with bare comfort was
in Italy, France Germany
&c. able to support one in
an elegant & manner.
Lord S: & Mr. C: staid with
Lady S & me till 8 o'Clock.
Lord S: told me a conversation
that had paʃs'd between the King



& him after the negōciation
between ye. English French &
Ruʃsians -- when through Lord
Stormont
s prudence in con-
ducting
that affair we were saved
from a War with Russia.
When Lord S: return'd from
Paris the King said to him
that he hoped he never should
out live ye. rememberance
of what he & his Country
owed to Lord Stormont &
yt. he might depend upon[8]



his eternal gratitude.
Yet How has his Majesty ful-
fill'd
kept up to these profeʃs-
ions?
by turning out Lord
S——
wth. ye. last Ministry --
Alas! ye. promises of
Princes are little to be
relied on -- the K had certainly no
excuse -- no reason for
behaving as he has done
to Lord S——
Lady S: enquired into ye.
Distreʃs of a poor Woman in ye. Street
she had 4 young children & was with
Child -- she gave her 2d 6 & made Ld. S do ye. same
& gave her a letter to enable her to be taken
care of at home
for ye. Month of her lying in
&c &c[9]

[10]



Lady S: & I sat together till
10 o'Clock -- I gave her some
extracts to read & took up
L'amie des femmes[11] -- I will
get this book. we had some
talk about our Uncle Frederick.
*Lord S—— is to send to him*
I waited till Lord S came in -- had
Ldy. S—— Coach & Servts. Miʃs C's
were at ye.. Veseys -- they went for
me. went to them. they were at
Supper. we staid till near
12. Mrs. Tracy (one of ye.
Queen
s Bedchamber Women)
had call'd upon me when I was
out. Mrs. Scott was wth. me in ye
Morng.. I had some conversation wth. her abt
Hannah

Monday 19th. July 1784 Breakfasted
alone -- busy writing all Morng. --
several Visits from A. Maria. saw
Wm.. Benn -- ask'd him how my
Old maid Mrs. Johnston & her husband
went on -- he could not give
me a satisfactory account. they
are still unsettled &c --



Recd. a Note from Mrs. Walsingham
to intreat of me to return wth.
her to Thames Ditton & stay a
Week -- she was come to Town
on Busineʃs -- to tempt me
she inform'd me she was to
have Philosopher Walker &
that he & her Daughter Miʃs
Boyle
were to construct an
Air Balloon wch. was to be
let off -- I excused myself
as I had promised my
Cousin Stormont
to spend ye.
day with her & also that
I could not stay so long as a
Week on her account.
My Uncle Frederick paid me a
long visit -- the conversation turn'd
wholly on the present state of
affairs in Ireland -- my U. said
he thought there was every



reason to apprehend a Rebellion
there. Recd. a charming letter
from Miʃs H. More, a letter also
from Mr. Wiggins abt. ye. pay-
ment
of ye rent of ye. House
in James Street. no letter
from D——shire! at ½ past
4 Lady Stor—— Coach & Serts came
for me. we din'd tête á tête
Lord Stormont was gone to ye.
House of commons to hear ye.
debates on ye. India busineʃs.
Lady S & I paʃs'd a comfortable
afternoon together she humanely relieved a poor Woman who sent a letter I gave my mite. -- the conver-
sation
turn'd on ye. education
of Children particularly Girls
-- we agree'd in most points --
& both condemn'd Madme. de
Genlis
's method -- her writings
are ingenious & there are
many charming things in them
but they are not proper to be put



into ye. hands of Young people
on many accounts, I have not
now leisure to enter into all
the reasons why they are not.
Soon after ten Lady S's Coach
convey'd me home -- she wanted
me to dine wth. her tomorrow -- I
promised her to come in ye.
Afternoon but excused myself
dining as I had engaged my
self to A Maria. Lord Stormont
came to us at 67 o'Clock -- he made
Ldy. S very happy by informing
her how well her Brother
Chs. Cathcart had acquitted
himself -- he had spoke on ye.
affairs in India, -- after he had given
us an account of ye. Speech --
ye. fine manner &c &c he
went down to dinner. sent
us an excuse for not joyining
us again has he had letters to



write -- Miʃs C's were at home
but soon left me being engaged
to sup at ye. Veseys I sent an
Excuse. I employ'd myself
in writing out some Verses
Mrs. Vesey had given me. they
came home ½ past 11. A M &
I sat ½ an hour together went
to our Rooms at 12 oClock.
found a note from Mrs. Pepys
to invite me to dine & spend
a day with her this week.


Tuesday 20th- July 1784 Breakfasted
with Miʃs Clarkes -- the Cabinet
Maker
brought me Lady Stormonts
Drawing box -- he had executed
my directions very well &
copied ye. plan exactly. I sent him
with it to Portland Place. Recd. &
answerd a letter from Lady Stormont
-- Settled some busineʃs for A. Maria
had Mrs. Scott for an hour
look'd over my linnen & gave
her work to do for me.



at 12 Lord Stormont came
he sat wth. me ½ an hour --
I am quite proud of being a
favorite of his -- we talk'd of
my Uncles, Fredk. & William.
-- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --
of ye. Irish affairs -- Ld. S——
said he imagin'd things wd-
come to extremities there.
he laugh'd & said we must all
go & live abroad or in
Scotland for it wd. be impoʃsible
if things went on in this
manner to live in England.
Mrs: Delany call'd upon me, I
went & sat in ye. Coach with her
for 20 Min:. she told me that she
& ye. s. Dowg of Portland came to
Town last night, that they were
impatient to see me wanted
me to come to them in Eveg. this
I could not do nor tomorrow but
promised them Thursday
afternoon. this dear dear



Woman
was charming well.
After she left me, employ'd
myself in reading Madme Genlis
working & sorting letters till
dinner time. sent a note to
Mrs: Pepys informd her I could
not give her a day this week.
din'd wth. Miʃs Clarkes -- No
letter from D——shire! -- AMaria
playd two or three Leʃsons of Vento's
after dinner -- from 6 till 7 was
in my room Boudoir arranging
Papers -- Lady Stormonts Coach & Sr.
came for me. found Lady S—— very
well -- Lord Stormont was at home
& sat with us ye. greatest part of ye.
time -- Lady S—— was delighted with
ye. Drawing box. Lord S. paid me
Compts. upon it. Spent a pleasant
afternoon -- came home at ½ past
ten in Lord S—— Chariot -- Miʃs Clarkes
& I sat together till ½ past 11 -- I
sat up till ½ past one -- finish'd sorting
my letters recd. ye. last year.



Wednesday 21st. July 1784 Breakfasted wth.
A Maria -- dreʃs'd after. Read 2 hours
in Veillies du Chateau. arranged
all my loose papers -- wrote some
extracts. several agreeable little
Visits from A Maria -- one from Bell
to consult me about dreʃs -- Mrs. Delany
call'd -- I did not see her nor Mrs.
& Miʃs Ord -- I was dreʃsing -- Mrs.
Frederick Hamilton
came, I had
appointed her -- I poke to her abt.
ye Stormont affair. I hope I shall
succeed in making up the quarrel
Mrs. H promised to be guided by my
advice. at ½ past 4 Lady Stormonts
Coach -- I went out of spirits the
post brought no letter from D-shire
a thousand disagreeable apprehen
sions
made me feel quite miserable.
I found a French Gentleman wth. Lady
Stormont
-- a Compte Segur, Son to one
of ye. Secretaries of State of ye. French
Ministry
-- he is going Minister to Ruʃsia
-- he staid on till 5. Lady Stormont left me
to change her dreʃs -- she was not long absent
Our Cousin Coll. Greville dined with us
as did her Brother Charles -- we had
ye. dumb waiters as usual & an agreeable
conversation made ye. afternoon paʃs
pleasantly -- my Cousin Robert & I had
much talk abt. ye. Royal family &
its attendants -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --
-- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --



he told me he saw ye. Prince of Wales
yesterday who enquired much about
me & sent his Compliments to me.
he wonders that he has not seen
me this Winter -- & said ye. last time
he had that pleasure was when I was
at the Ball he invited me to &c
I paʃs'd his Royal Highneʃs in the Street
when I was goin to Lady Stormonts
to day -- he was in his Vis a Vis,[12] ye.
Carriages paʃs'd so fast that we had
hardly time to bow to each other.
Coll. Cathcart left us at 8 o'Clock.
Coll. Greville & I had some talk'd together
(whilst Lady S was writing a letter)
abt- our Uncle Fredk- he vindicated
himself, I gave him a gentle
lecture. at 10 oClock I left Ldy.
Stormont
, ye. Coll. staid on, as Lord
Stormont
was not return'd home
he din'd to day with Lord Thurlow
got home by ½ past 10 o'Clock. sat
with Miʃs Clarkes till ¼ past 11 AM
[&] I wrote & chatted. I copied some
verses Mrs.. Vesey had given me.
[W]ent to bed at 12. A:M: made
[so]me Italian verses upon me. &
laugh'd at my uneasineʃs. I hope
[I] may have an opportunity of
[be]ing revenged & that I may see
------some day as anxious upon a similair
                                                         occasion



WednesdayThursday 212stnd: July 1784 -- Breakfasted
wth. Dear A M sat with her till
10 oClock -- Kelly came gave orders
for a frame for Leonidas's picture
Read 2 hours in the Vielées du
Chateau, very busy till dinner
time, arranging my Boudoir &
putting every thing in perfect
order for the reception of my
Dear s & Mrs. Delany --
The post went by, no letter
from Derbyshire! I was so
extremely disappointed that
I could check the falling
tear, I reproach'd myself
for the weakneʃs for I could
not for a moment harbour
any doubts of the affection of
my friend -- I din'd with
Miʃs Clarkes & sat wth. them
till 6 oClock we then separated
I read for an hour in Madme.
Genlis
, I am to get through
thise 3 large Octv: as soon as poʃsible



as Lady Stormont has promised
them to another friend -- at 7 oClock
my two respectable friends came
they staid with me till ½ past
10 -- the time paʃs'd rapidly --
they made me tell them every
thing about my dearest &
beloved friend
-- they were very
highly satisfied, charm'd wth-
his Character & that of his
father
-- O how delightful
is virtuous praise! the s.
Dowgr. of Portland
said that
our conduct proved that we
poʃseʃsed the heigth of sentim-
ment
without being romantic
She & Mrs. Delany touch'd my
heart in the most sensible
manner by the tender and
delicate aʃsurances of their
love & esteem for me & in wch.
they aʃsured me Mr. Dickenson
should have his share. they
are both impatient to see
him, & the Ducheʃs told me



that she should depend upon his
spending some days at Bullstrode
this Autumn. I desired
ye. s. & Mrs. D: as I have done
my other friends not to men-
tion
any thing of this affair
at present. ye. s gave me a com-
miʃsion
to bespeak a Vici de poche
for her -- when they left me
read a long letter wch. came by this
Post from Miʃs Gunning (she
had inclosed to to her Sert at St. J——)
she says a great deal about ye.
disappointment of ye. whole
family
at my not coming
to Horton. the Veseys sent a preʃsing
meʃsage to invite Miʃs C's & me to
supper we went, Mrs. Vesey gave
us some picturesque descriptions
of places in Ireland -- we came home at
12 went immediately to our
rooms





Friday 23d July 1784 -- Breakfasted wth.
A Maria -- we had a long conversation
abt her Italian Friend --
Recd. a Note from Ldy.. Stormont to
desire me to inquire abt. ye. purchase
of some things for poor Mrs -- .[13]
My Cousin Robert Greville paid
me a long visit -- we went over
the whole affair of Our Uncle
Frederick
& ye.. S——'s, we both
lamented that Mr. H: was so apt
to see things in a prejudiced light
-- however as we have all our
failings we ought to make full
allowance for those of others
& where there are peculiarities
in the characters of our friends
we ought to be careful to
conceal them from ye. notice
of others if poʃsible: as my
Cousin
was going wth. ye. King to
Windsor I gave him meʃsages
to ye. Ladies in ye. Queens
family -- when he was gone
I sent for Mr. Jackson to



consult him abt. an answer
to Mr. Wiggins letter, he came
immediately & gave me his
advice. he sat an hour wth.
me, related some curious anec
dotes
of ye. Duke of --
Mrs. Handcock sent me some beautiful branches of orange tree in
flower by ye. little Swiʃs & Mary ye. Children stay'd sometime &c &c[14]
when he left me Mr. Stanhope
my old Torment, call'd he was
not let in -- Mrs. Ord made
me a friendly visit -- Mrs.
Vesey
join'd us -- Mrs. Ord
promised to enquire where I
could purchase ye. thing for poor
Mrs x & sent me a note this
Aft. to Portland place. they
had just left me when A Maria
ran upstairs & brought me
the expected letter -- the con-
tents
made me ample amends
for the anxiety I suffer'd for
the last 3 or 4 days. I wrote
my letter to Mr. Wiggins &
told him I expected him to



send me the money due for
ye ½ years rent -- wch. he has owed
these 3 years &c &c this
Money is due to Mr. Jackson
who paid it to me not doubting
Mr: Wiggins immediate payment.
I had just finishd writing this
letter wch. I order'd Richard to carry
this afternoon, when Ldy: Stormonts
Coach & Serts. came for me, I
I found her as well as she was
on Thursday -- Lord Stormont
din'd wth. us we sat long at
table -- no Servts- waiting -- he
was very open & communicative
told me some particulars relative
to -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --
-- -- -- -- -- -- -- --
little George & Charles came to
desert Lord S—— made them
repeat 2 Greek lines he had
taught them -- the eldest is
abt 4 ye youngest 3 years old.



Lady S—— & I had an hours
tête á tête we talk'd of my
D——shire friend. I gave her
the outlines of ye. letter I recd.
to day -- she was highly enter-
tain'd
wth. ye. account of ye.
reception of my Picture, &
made my promise to tell Mr.
Dickenson
that she should
take upon her to make me
sit to Saunders for a picture
for him & that she thought
I was very saucy & recom-
mended
to him to keep me
in better order. Lord Stormont
join'd us & our conversation
took another turn -- Madme-
Genlis
-- Mrs. & Miʃs Hamilton
were our topics & a little
Politics Lord S—— has no
opinion of Mr. P. as a
Financier. Mrs Ord sent



me a note according to her
promise -- Lady S & I gave
directions to Mrs. Justi abt-
getting the things --
At ¼ past 10 o'Clock I came away Lord S——
wanted to detain me but I
was anxious to send a few
lines by this nights post to
my friend so I would not
be persuaded. had my
Cousin
s Coach & Servts. as
usual. Lord Stormont
was so good to lend me
the ------ fine Edition of
Cooks Voyages 3 Vols. Quarto
& also the large Set of Prints
belonging to them, I am to
keep them till they go to
Wandsworth Hill. Had just
time after I got home to scribble
a few lines to my friend wch.
I sent by this nights Post inclos'd



a Packet of Diary -- Miʃs Clarkes
& their Brother in Law Mr-
Jackson
waited supper for me
join'd them as soon as I had
finish'd my dispatches --
Mr. J: staid till 12 o'Clock --
when he left us went Miʃs C. went
to her room we sent servts. to bed & then I & -- A. M. chatted
over my the contents of
mythe letter I recd. to day, some
parts of wch.. I communicated
to her -- the subject was too
interesting for me to feel
inclin'd to go to rest so we
sat talking till 1 in the Morng. AM.
to oblige me play'd a leʃson
of Handels & abt. ½ past 1 o'Clock
we retired to our rooms.



Saturday 24th: July 1784 Clarges Street
Breakfasted wth. Dear Anna Maria
sat & work'd wth. her till past 10 o'Clock
then dreʃs'd for ye. day -- read an
affecting Story in les Veillées du
Chateau whilst my Hair was
dreʃsing -- as Betty generally is
an hour, & sometimes longer & as I read always, I get
through a good many Volumes

my hair dresʃing is never lost
time, I most commonly also
take part of that time to scribble in my
Diary. wrote an Answer to my
Dearest Friend
's letter of yesterday
wch. I gave Wm. Benn to put in the
Post office. I sent him 2 packets of
Diary under two covers.
Read & wrote & work'd till dinner
time -- din'd at home with Miʃs
Clarkes
-- A M ever obliging play'd
at my request some leʃsons after
dinner. we separated at ½ past
5. I read in Madme Genlis for an
hour. Miʃs C's join'd me. we had
tea early. at 7 the s Dowgr. of Portlands



Coach came for me. went to her
Grace
at Whitehall. Dear Mrs. Delany
was wth. her. we had one uninterrup
ted
hour. I made the two dear
friends very happy by telling ym..
of Mr- Dickensons generous
aʃsurance that he did not intend
to separate me from ye. society of
my friends &c. &c.
Mrs. Vesey -- Lady Weymouth (one of
ye. s's daughters) & her two eldest
unmarried daughters Miʃs Thynne
& Miʃs Sophia Thynne came ¼ after
8 -- The conversation was general
& agreeable -- I came away wth. Mrs.
Vesey
at 10 o'Clock. the Ducheʃs goes to
Margate tomorrow. Mrs. Delany on Monday
to Mrs. Boscowans. Mrs. V—— invited me
to go in wth her to supper I excused
myself came home sat wth. Miʃs C's
till 11 -- we then went to our Rooms
A M came & chatted wth. me whilst I
undreʃs'd. I had a little headach &
did not set up to read -- as I generally
do




Mem:[15]
      sent Opie ye. Painter 4L:4s -- being
      ye remainder of ye. Money for Mr. Glovers
      Portrait -- wch. he gives me. This Money
left with given to me by Mr. Glover for ye Picture.



[16]



[17]Sunday 25th. July 1784. Br with A M
we had a tête á tête till near 11. I
aʃsisted her in writing a letter on buʃineʃs
She went to Church -- I could not not
being dreʃs'd -- after I was, read the
Service of ye. day &c &c in my own
room when A. M. return'd from C—— settled
some accounts wth. her. She shew'd me ye.
Answer she had recd. to her letter of ye.
Morng -- it was a satisfactory one, we were
together ½ an hour. I employ'd myself
in writing -- extracts from Mrs. Delanys
letters wch. Mr. Dewes has been so obliging
to lend me till my Cousin Stormonts
Coach came for me wch. was at ¼ before
5 o'Clock -- Coll. Cathcart & Lord Stormont
din'd & was with us the greatest part
of ye. Afternoon. heard that Mr. Fox
had greatly offended his friends
by his late absence from the
House of Commons -- They wrote
to remonstrate to him the folly
& impropriety of it -- he sent for
Answer that he was very happy
& quiet at St. Anns Hill with
Mrs. Armstead -- that he thought
he should stay sometime longer
& concluded his letter by saying
that Mrs. A wonder'd they did not



come & see her. The Gentlemen
talk'd Politics -- I listen'd & from what
I heard could only draw ye. melan-
choly
conclusion that we were a
ruin'd People & that ye. Glory of
the English Nation was set for
ever. I left Lady Stormont before
10 as I had promised Mrs. Vesey to
go to her house to meet Dowgr. Lady
Barrymore
, however I lost ye.
pleasure of meeting her Ladyship
as she was getting into her Coach
when I drove up to ye. door. I
found ye. Veseys alone we sent
for ye. Miʃs Clarkes -- we sup'd -- A M——
wickedly took notice of a blunder
I made by calling Mrs. V—— Mr. D——
& then gave him for her toast.
We spent ye. Eveg in innocent
Mirth & came home at ½ past
11 -- we went immediately to our
Rooms. I found a Note from
Dear Mrs. Delany wch. inform'd she
was pretty well & wishd to see me
tomorrow before she set out.



[18]Monday 26th. July 1784
Read two hours in Madme. Genlis went
down at 9 breakfasted tête á tête
with A: Maria -- we had a long con-
versation
upon The improvement
of ye. Mind -- the characters of
Mrs. J:'s Children -- ye. method she
follow'd in bringing them up, & I
condemn'd it[19] & at last brought
A. M. over to my way of thinking.
at 10 dreʃs'd for ye. day -- sent a
Note to excuse myself to Mrs. Delany
it rain'd so hard -- besides I had
promised Lady S. to execute a
commiʃsion for her. at 12 the Veseys
& Mrs. Handcock came for me we
went to ye. late Dgr. Lady Harringtons
where there was an Auction. I saw
ye. Japan[20] Lady Stormont wish'd to
have -- but the Room was so crouded
& ye. heat so great that after suffering
for an hour I detirmind to come
away -- I was near fainting -- a gentleman a stranger
to me very politely handed me through
ye. Croud Mrs. Handcock & I would not
wait for ye. return of ye. Veseys &
ye. Coach, & as it was near Clarges
Street & veryfair we walk'd home



This is ye. first Auction I ever was
at in London & I think will be ye.
last -- I saw Lady Payne Lady Irwin
Lady Mry.Churchill &c at Lady
H:
's -- I took leave of good Mrs.
Handcock
& came home.
A M & Bell sat wth. me till 2 o'Clock
then took leave of me for ye. day
they went to Mrs. Harris. I wrote
three Letters, one to Lady Wake one
to Miʃs Burney & one to Miʃs Palmer.
Was much surprised to see the
Prince of Wales
paʃs by -- as he
went to Brighthelmstone but 3 or 4
days ago. his Horses & Grooms
were at Mrs. Armsteads door for
two hours -- by this Mr. Fox I
suppose is return'd &c &c &c &cc
Lady Stormont's Carriage came for
me ½ past 4 o'Clock -- she was quite
well Lord Stormont & her Brother
Coll. Cathcart din'd with us -- they
staid with us till after 8 o'Clock -- Lord S——
told me that ye. french iswere certainly
taking infinite pains to addopt our
Manners & learn our language -- that
it was astonishing what a rapid
progreʃs they made in both. he
entertained me very much by



describing the different stiles of
of manners in foreign Countries
& particularly the bon ton etiquette
in France. After ye. Gentlemen left
us Lady S—— shew'd me all the
pretty things Madme. Justi had
arranged -- we then work'd & conversd
till 10 o'Clock -- the s: Devonshire
Lady Payne Lady Duncannon were
our topics -- not forgetting Lady S——s
three Sons
who always afford her
ample matter for converse & forin our
tête à têtes. got home at ½ past
ten -- sat wth. Miʃs Clarkes for an hour
read & wrote -- went to bed at 12.

Tuesday 27th. July 1784 -- at 9 went
down to AM -- Breakfasted tête á
tête -- she read me some paʃsages she
had selected from Akensides pleasures
of ye. imagination,[21] what genius &
imagination fancy & how many
fine images of Providence & Nature
there are in this beautiful Poem
though I must confeʃs that there
are parts of it which are to me



obscure -- but that is more likely
to be a defect owing owing to my want of
comprehension.
These are among my favorite lines --
“There let thy Soul acknowledge its-
                                                         complaint
How blind, how impious! there behold ye-
                                                         ways
Of Heav'n's eternal destiny to Man
For ever just, benevolent, & wise,
That Virtue's awful steps, howe'er pursue'd
By vexing fortune & intrusive pain,
Should never be divided from her chaste,
Her fair attendant pleasure, need I urge
Thy tardy thought thro' all ye. various round
Of this existence, that thy soft'ning soul
At length may learn what energy ye hand
Of Virtue mingles in ye bitter tide
Of Paʃsion swelling wth. distreʃs & pain,
To mitigate ye. sharp with gracious drops
Of cordial pleasure? “Ask ye faithful Youth
“Why ye. cold Urn of her whom long he lov'd
“So often fills his arms, so often draws
“His lonely footsteps at ye. silent hour
“To pay ye. mournful tribute of his tears?
                                                         O! he



“O! he will tell thee; that ye wealth of
                                                         worlds
“Should ne'er seduce his bosom to forego
“That sacred hour, when, stealing from the
                                                         noise
“Of care & envy, sweet remembrance sooths
“With Virtue's kindest looks his aking
                                                         breast,
“And turns his tears to rapture.” --

-- After I was dreʃs'd AMaria sat
with me some time, we read, work'd, &
conversed. I wrote letters -- to Miʃs
Gunning
& to Miʃs Litchfield -- gave
them to Wm. Benn to put into ye post. ¼
before 5 Lady Stormonts Coach came
for me (recd. a note from Lady Dartrey
to desire me to come to Chelsea wth. ye.
Vesey
this afternoon, I could not being
engaged to ye. Stormonts) Lord Stormont
din'd at home, his friend Mr Langlois
& Coll. Cathcart din'd wth. us as did
Master William Murray (Lord S eldest Son a boy
of 7 Years old)[22] -- we had as usual our
comfortable dumb-waiters & no Servts.
to restrain conversation. I heard
that the Scotch were much discontented



with the Taxes on linnens Gauses
& Ribbons -- as it would quite ruin
the manufacturers of PerthshireGlasʃcow &
Paisley -- that ye.. Irish grew every
day more violent, & that a Mr-
Pemberton
had call'd out in the
Theatre at Dublin when Duke of
Rutland
[23] came in & they had begun
playing “God Save ye. King” “no more
of that &c &c God save Louis ye 16th
King of France & Friend of the
oppreʃsed. Mr. Langlois told us
that the French Court had but too
good intelligence of every thing
that paʃs'd both in Ireland &
England -- & it was but too true
that they were now upon an
equality wth. us wth.. respect to
Navy affairs. when we came up
stairs after dinner the three little
boys
engroʃs'd attention & Politics
were drop'd -- Wm. returns to his
Uncle Lord Mansfields at Ken Wood



tomorrow. Lord S: laugh'd a news
paper lie wch. inform'd ye Public
that he had join'd Lord Thurlow
& was coming in as Secretary of
State -- this arose from his dining
wth. him Last Week -- there were
6 in Company & not a single word
was utter'd concerning Politics.
The Gentlemen left Lady Stormont
& me at ½ past 8 oClock. we workd
& conversed till ¼ past 10.
Lady Stormont told me how ill the
-- had used her late father (Lord
Cathcart
) & how he had forgot &
broken promises to all our family
to whom he lay under great obligations.
we talk'd of our deceased Parents --
of my fathers behaviour when a
Volounnteer in ye Ruʃsian Service.
of ye. Queen -- characters of ye. P——ʃs
&c &c -- when I came home I found
a Note from A Maria to beg me to
join her & Miʃs C—— at ye. Veseys
I went they were at supper. Mrs.
Vesey
brought a Note fromor
Dear Lady Dartrey to beg I would dine



with her on Saturday -- the five or
6 run awat Matches & the several
imprudent ones lately made were
talk'd of -- however there was no
illnatured censure, only a few
animadversions on the folly of
people plunging themselves into
certain misery or Unhappineʃs.
we came home at ¾ past 11 -- went
immediately to our rooms --
Mrs. Boughton (one of ye Queens Women
of ye. bedchamber) call'd when I
was out this afternoon.

[24]July 28th. 1784 Wednesday
Read in Madme. de Genlis from
6 till 8 -- breakfasted with Anna
Maria
-- sat wth. her till near 10 --
dreʃs'd -- look'd over my drawers
gave orders abt- notable things --
I hope I may aʃsure myself
that Hannah & Betty are become
very sensible of their faults for
they have conducted themselves
extremely well ever since
the day I gave them advice
& pardon'd them. I am persuaded



that in general mild reproof
& good advice effects a more lasting reform
where ye. heart is not utterly
depraved thatn harsh reproaches
& severe treatment. My Old
Maid Mrs. Johnston came to see
me she told me that & she &
her husband were now settled
in a Shop -- I promised to procure
her all ye. custom I could get.
& I gave her some advice, wch. she
took very gratefully and promised
to follow -- had several visits
from AMaria -- wrote an Answer
to Mr. Wakes letter -- sent him
a gentle Lecture upon his
general conduct &c &c as Lady
Wake
had given me a hint in her last
letter that my young friend had forgot
some of my admonitions. A Maria & I
sat & work'd together from 3 till 4 -- she left
me to go to dinner. recd. a very kind, polite,
& friendly letter from Mrs. Boscawen.
she inform[s] me yt. dear Mrs. Delany was
wth. her & very well &c ¼ before 5 Lady --



Stormont
's Coach came for me, we
din'd tête á tête, Lord Stormont was
gone to hear ye: debates in ye. House
of Commons -- George & Charles were
wth. us longer in ye. Afternoon than
usual -- Lady S—— gave them a reading leʃson --
her method is very proper, she does
not tire them, & makes it a reward for
good behaviour when she instructs ym..
-- we work'd & conversed till ½ past 9 --
when Lord Stormont came home.
he gave us some account of ye. debates
but as they will be better told in ye.
News papers than I can recollect, I
shall not note ym. down. came home
in Lord Stormonts Char̄iot at 10
Miʃs Clarkes & I sat together till ½
past 11 -- we wrote and talk'd. I contin
ued
my employment, wch. was writing
Extracts from Mrs. Delanys letters
till ½ past 12.
Mrs: Scott came to me after I
came home -- I gave her
                             more work again[25]

Thursday 29th. July 1784 -- at 9 went
down to B: with A. M. sat wth. her till
10. our conversation turn'd on the
use of a learned education for
Women. we were of different opinions
I was against it, however we
left our argument unfinish'd.



I dreʃs'd immediately after B. sent
Betty to Church -- ye. Thanksgiving day[26]
A.M: went also, I staid at home
fill'd up my time wth. reading writing
& working -- recd. a Note from my
Cousin Chs. Cathcart to inform me
when ye Tax on franking takes
place -- wch.. will be abt. a fortnight
after this date.[27] Mrs Garrick came
from her Villa at Hampton to make me a visit
she sat wth. me an hour, she open'd
her honest Heart to me, -- it was
an interesting conversation -- I
endeavour'd to restore tranquility to
her wounded breast & clear XXXX
from appearances wch. Mrs. G: thought
were against her -- this I could do wth-
a safe conscience for I am firmly
persuaded XXXX's affection for Mrs.
G: is pure & unalterable. Mrs. G.
feelings are too exquisite for her
ever to enjoy tranquil happineʃs.
I know how to pity her, for the
greatest part of my life I have
suffer'd exquisitely from allowing
my sensibility to get the better



of my reason -- I trust I am now
a more reasonable being. & as I
think I am sensible of all my faults
& weakneʃs's I hope to conquer them
& by that means not only insure my
own happineʃs -- but contribute to
the happineʃs of my D—— & preserve
his love, his confidence, & esteem.
Mrs. Garrick told me she was going
to Mrs Montagus at Sandleford on Saty.
that she was to meet our dear friend
Miʃs H. More there & stay a fortnight.
She insisted upon my telling Mr. D——
that she should expect him to meet
me at Hampton in the Autumn &
that she long'd to aʃsure him of her
affection. Mrs. Garrick is one of the
most sincere characters I ever met
with -- her profeʃsions are all from
the heart, & a valuable one it is.
AMaria sat wth.. an hour, she read me a letter from ye. Glovers & gave me
an Account of ye. poor Woman she had
relieved &c -- At ½ past 4 Lady Stormonts
Coach came for me
-- A Woman came to
ye. house enquired for me, but neither wd.
leave her name or busineʃs -- said she wd.
call again -- she seemed to be a stranger to
London -- my torment Mr. Stanhope call'd



he was not let in. At ½ past 4 Lady Stormonts
Coach came for me -- Her Brother Charles
Cathcart
Mr Langlois & Lord Stormont
din'd with us. we had as usual Dumb-
waiters
& sat long at table -- but we
neer set long after dinner -- the Gentle-
men
were deep in Politics -- Lord S——
seems to me to be an impartial
Politician -- yet I have been told there
never existed one -- he does not
appear to me to be bias̄'d by party
-- for example, he both censured &
admired Mr. Pit. The Gentlemen
staid wth. us till ½ past 8 -- Lady S——
& I had tête a tête till 10, we
work'd & chatted on indifferent subjects
When Lord Stormont came home I
took my leave & had his Chariot.
was at home ¼ past 10. the Veseys sent
for me to meet Miʃs Clarkes, I sent
an excuse as I wish'd to write in my
Extracts from Mrs. Delanys letters, wch
Mr Dewes has been so kind to let
me have.
as I did not go, Miʃs C's
came to me. we sat together till near
12 -- I sat up, scribbling till 1 o'Clock



[28]



Friday 30th: July 1784 Clarges Street
Finish'd Madme de Genlis's Veillées du
Chatteau[29] -- went down at 9. breakfasted
tête a tête with AMaria we talkd
of Mr: D—— -- of his father -- of hislate Mother
A M was charm'd wth. their characters.
-- I was busy in notable Work till
12 -- wrote a short letter & enclosed
a Pacquet of D: for Derbyshire wch. I
sent to ye. Post. Recd. a smart note
& some franks from my Cousin Challes
Cathcart
-- Lord Dartrey came to
run away with me to his Villa, but
I could not go being engaged to
Lady Stormont. Lady Dartrey wanted
me to sleep there & return tomorrow
Eveg. -- Lord D: said she was not very
well. Mr. Stanhope call'd again
nit was not let in -- he left word
to my great joy that he was going
into the Country in a day or two.
Lady S—— Coach came for me ½ past
4. I recd. a letter just before I set
out from Mr. Dickenson Senr: I
had ye. pleasure of reading it twice
over before I got to Portland
Place -- what liberal sentiments



& what a Heart has this amiable
Man
! -- how happy shall I be to
call him by the endearing name
of father. -- I found Lady S——
well we din'd tête á tête. just as
we had done dinner & ye. desert was over Lord Stormont
came home from ye. house of Lords -- as Lady S—— could not
bear the smell of a second dinner we
left him to eat a solitary meal --
he did not join us till ½ past 7. we
had the 2 dear little boys -- & I told
My Cousin of ye. agreeable letter I
had recd. she seems as sensible of
Mr. D: Sen:'s merit & amiableneʃs
as myself. Lord S—— acquainted
us wth. the subject of ye. debate in
the House of Lords -- he was provoked
wth. Lord Carlisle for dividing & said
it was a very foolish measure, as
there were but 20 Lords -- & there
were but 4 on their side. &c &c
he sat with us till near 9 o'Clock --
before he went out I made him
give me a frank for my dear
Father
. Lady Stormont told me
ye. Duke de Chatres arrived in Town



yesterday -- he has a House in Portland
place a few doors from Lord Stormonts
wch. he has purchased -- she was vext he
was come as it will be inconvenient
for her in her present situation to
receive his Visits. we had much
conversation abt. Lady Charlotte Finch
& the management of ye. Royal Nursery
at 10 I had her Coach & came home
The Miʃs C's were at home we sat
together. I immediately sat down to
answer Mr.. D: Senr. letter -- but I
could not finish it before the
last Bell went its round. A M &
Isabella left me at ½ past 11. I
sat up till near 1 o'Clock thinking
over the goodneʃs of Providence
in granting me the wish of me
heart -- viz: the being beloved by
A virtuous Man. & the desire
I felt of so doing my duty in this
life that I may look forward to
his & my being happy hereafter.
God Grant we may so live here



that in the world to come we
may still be inseparably united.

[30]Saty. 31st. July 1784. Joind dear Anna Maria
at 9 o'Clock -- sat wth. her till near 11 --
finish'd my letter to my worthy father
wch. I sent to ye. Post -- wrote a Note to
my friend Lady Dartrey wch. I sent
to Mrs. Vesey to take for me to Chelsea
I excusd myself for not going wth.
the Veseys to dine there as Lady
Stormont
wish'd me to dine with
her, & sick friends must claim ye.
first right to ones attentions. as A: M:
had a bad Cold I walk'd out to pur-
chase
presents we (the Miʃs Cs & I) meant to give
the Veseys Servants -- they had
been very civil & as Vails were
not allowed we wish'd to shew some
acknowledgement for their civil
behaviour & attention to us.
Met Mr: Powis Member for Northamptonshire. he enquired
much after ye. Wakes desired me to inform Sr. Wm. that he ought to go to Buxton &c. &c
[31]
I bought presents for the Butler
& 3 footmen -- in returning home
met my Uncle Frederick -- he said
he had been to make me a visit
he walk'd home wth. me & sat a ¼
of an hour. Isabella & A Maria were
satisfied with the things I had



bought -- we paid equally for them.
I went to ye. Vesey's I gave Louis
& John ye. presents -- they were
grateful & pleased -- I gave the
Coachman
Money as he was not
a hired servt. -- as Mrs. V was
dreʃsing I did not stay to make
her a Visit -- I left word for Edward
to come to me when he came home
he did so -- I gave him his present,
& the one for ye. Butler. I dreʃs'd
-- & had just time to make my
Compts. to Miʃs Morrel who dined
wth. Miʃs C's when Lady S. Coach
came for me -- recd: a letter from my
poor friend Miʃs L—— -- a melancholy acct.
of her health & spirits -- Lady S—— was
not quite so well and had had a bad night
Lord Stormont din'd with us & soon joind
us after we got in the Drawing Room
Lord Stormont was so good to repeat
to me what he cld. recollect of many parts of his speeches
Yesterday -- they are by no means
done justice to in the News papers.
& many things left out What Lord S—— told me on the Subject
of ye. India Bill was too difuse



& it is too complicated a Subject for
me to render any clear acct. of, therefor[e]
I wont attempt it --
I was obliged to leave Lord & Lady S——
at 8 o'Clock -- as my most dear &
excellent friend Mrs. Delany was
come to Town -- she had been taken
ill at Mrs. Boscowans & being appre-
hensive
she should grow worse she left
her sooner than she intended. She sent
to beg I wd. be with her as much
as poʃsible -- & the s. Dowg. of Portland
left Mrs. Delany in my Charge whilst
she was absent -- had Lady S. Coach
found my worthy friend better
than I had dared to hope -- I sat with
her an hour & ½. She talk'd of nothing
but my future prospect of happineʃs
& she told me she was in such admir-
ation
of Mr. D:'s father that she
should be tempted to Marry him
tho' she was only in her 85th. Year
&c &c. this dear Woman has all
the chearfulneʃs & sensibility
of wch. ye.she had when young. & none of her
faculties are ye. least impaired -- he[r]



eye sight only excepted. I do not
think there ever was, or ever will
be any Person superiour to Mrs. Delany
-- She is as perfect as human
Nature can be -- my admiration
of her is so great that I could
not singular -- for this most excellent
of Woman
is adored by all who are
bleʃs'd wth. knowing her. I shall
ever esteem myself happy in
having enjoy'd ye. honor -- advantage,
& privilege of having such frequent
opportunities of enjoying her
charming society. As the s. has
left a Coach in Town for the use of
her friend -- Mrs. Delany ordered it
for me I came home at ¼ before
10 -- AMaria had a terrible cold, I
made her take Whey & go to bed before
11 -- Miʃs C & I sat together till yt. time.
I sat up late scribbling & reading.
As Mrs. Delany has now resolved to
stay in Town till ye. s. returns from
Margate (when they will then go to Bullstrode)
I have promised her to remain in London
& be wth. her as much as poʃsible. I wd.



give up every thing -- but wht. relates
to my D—— -- for ye. happineʃs of
being wth. her. How flattering to
me is the affection of such a Woman.
I must contrive to divide my
time between her and Ldy. Stormont
till ye. confinement of ye. latter is
over. I heard to day that my Uncle William
is not to come till ye. end of next Month.
Miʃs Asgill sent me a meʃsage
from Richmond this Morng.
[32]

Sunday 1st. August 1784
Breakfasted wth. A M. her Cold rather
better -- she shew'd me letters from
ye. Glovers & her Sister Jackson in wch.
there was most kind mention made
of me. Went to May fair Chapel
was but just return'd when Mrs. Delany
sent ye. Coach for me. I found her
better -- I sat ½for an hour wth. her
I was forced to leave her as my
Uncle Frederick was to be with me
at 1 o'Clock -- when I came home
found him & A Maria sitting together
he sat wth. us till 3 o'Clock. I wd.
let A M leave us. we talk'd
of Paintings -- Italy &c &c.
Mrs. Garrick agreeably surprised me



by a Visit -- she had put of for a
day or two going to Mrs. Montagu
she sat a ¼ of an hour wth- us, I
took her into my Boudoir &
we had ten minutes tête á tête, she
them left me & I return'd to my
Uncle
& A:M: from 3 till 4 was
alone -- read some letters -- ------------------------
scribbled in my Diary -- then
alter'd my dreʃs & was ready when
Lady S's Coach came at ½ past 4 -- I found
her the same as many days past -- Lord
Stormont
-- Coll. Cathcart & Mr. Langlois din'd
wth.. us -- Politics all dinner time
Lady S & I did not sit long together after we
left ye. Gentlemen as they soon join'd us in
ye. Drawing room (we had ye. 2 dear boys for
some time as usual) Mr. Langlois inform'd
me that he dined wth.. Sr. Joshua Reynolds yester
day
-- that very handsome mention was made
of me by the Company &c &c. the conversation
was lively & agreeable. the Duke de Chartres
is gone to meet ye. Prince of Wales at Bright
helmstone
-- was please'd to hear Lord S &
Mr. L. mention my friend & acquaintance
Monsieur Batin in a manner that proved
they liked him. -- heard that ye. King of
France
was become a great drinker, that



he was very indifferent to ye. Queen &c
&c. Sr Joseph & Lady Yorke & a Niece
of Lady Yorke's
call'd at 8 they were sent
away as Lady Stormont does not let in
any Company -- but as she thought it
wd. be right to see them she went after
& invited them -- they staid ½ an
hour. Sr: Josheph Yorke is a lively
pleasant Man -- much polished &
quite a Man of ye: World. his Lady
is a Dutch Woman -- polite, well bred
but not easy in her Manner -- the
Young lady
is her Niece, a Girl of
12 or 13 -- an intelligent countenance
& sensible -- Lady Stormont & I
was left alone at 9 o'Clock, I staid
with her till 10 o'Clock -- we talk'd
of ye late Lady Hamilton her affection
for our Uncle William -- She was
Married 24 Years & her paʃsion for
him, for it could be call'd by no other
name was as lively to ye. last moment
of her life as it was when she first
knew him -- she had no object in
life but him & only regretted dring
because she left him behind &c
when I came home, I ran over to
ye. Veseys for 5 Minutes to enquire



after Mrs. Delany as, Mrs Vesey was to
be wth her this Afternoon, had ye.
Comfort of hearing she was charming
well -- Miʃs C——'s & I sat together till
½ past 11 -- A:M——s Cold better -- to prevent
her talking as she was still very hoarse
I read aloud one of Blairs Sermons
(On the Union of Piety & Morality)
I think Blair one of ye. most elegant
writers we have -- he interests and
persuades -- I went to my room at 12

[33]Monday 2std: August 1784 -- went down at 9
Breakfasted with dear A Maria -- she was
much better. sat & chatted wth. her & read
curious Anecdotes in ye. Morng Herald till ½
past 10 -- then dreʃs'd for ye. day -- work'd
an hour -- Notable work. repaird my finest
Screen &c began Cooks Voyages --
Recd. a Meʃsage from Mrs. Delany to say she
was prevented coming to me, as she had
proposed, to take an Airing as ye. Miʃs
Murrays
were come from Ken Wood to
make her a visit -- Wm. Benn left
a Meʃsage wch. affected me very much
it was to inform me my Old former
Maid (who lived wth. me all ye. time I
was at Court) Mrs. Johnston had been
dangerously Ill, she was taken last friday



I sent Hannah immediately -- who brought
me word -- that she was now out of danger
but that she kept her bed & lookd wretch
edly
-- had visits from Isabella & A M——
during ye. Morng. -- at ------ had ye. pleasure of
receiving a letter from my D——shire friend
-- Recd: also a letter from Mrs. Murray
from Dunkeld -- at ½ past 4 Lady S's
Coach came for me -- she was pretty well
Our Cousin Coll. Greville din'd with us
Lord Stormont was at ye. House of Lords
he iswas to speak to day on ye. India Bill.
Coll. Greville gave me several Compts-
wch. he brought from Windsor from
ye. ladies in ye. Queens family.
I staid till 8 went to Mrs. Delany
she was better -- Lady Bute & Lady
Wallingford
were with her but they
did not stay long -- I read to Mrs.
D:
the letter I had recd. from Mrs.
Murray
as it gave an account of
what she had seen in Scotland
& how that she had seen my Uncle
William
-- at ye. Duke of Atholls
&c &c &c.



I sat with her till 10 there was a
mistake abt ye. Coach -- I came
home in a Chair -- theOne of the
Chairmen happen'd to be one I
used to employ at St James's -- he
made me so many fine speeches
of his happineʃs in seeing me
&c that my fare cost me ½
a Crown instead of a Shilling --
The Veseys sent for me to meet
Miʃs Clarkes as I thought it
wd. be wrong not to go to them ye.
last Eveg. -- as they were to set
out for Margate tomorrow I
put off answering my D——
letter till tomorrows Post -- we
supd & sat with the Veseys till ¼
past 11 -- went to our Rooms as
soon as we came home.
I found a letter from Mr. Wiggins
& a day appointed to settle ye.
busineʃs



[34]


[35]


[36]

(hover over blue text or annotations for clarification;
red text is normalised and/or unformatted in other panel)


Notes


 1. This entry was first transcribed by Jens Nordlund.
 2. This entry was first transcribed by Jens Nordlund.
 3. This entry was first transcribed by Julianna Wretman Werner until the bottom of p.9 in this diary.
 4. The student transcript ends here. The remainder of this entry has been transcribed by Cassandra Ulph (PDRA in the Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers project).
 5. Stephanie de Genlis, Les Veillées du château, ou Cours de morale à l'usage des enfants, 2v (Paris: Lambert, 1784).
 6. Presumably in some way related to 'the affair of the morning', i.e. Betty's transgressions.
 7. This last line appears in the top-right corner of the next entry, thus this sentence was probably added later.
 8. The page is cut away here, with the text of p.17 visible beneath. No text appears to have been lost, suggesting the page was cut before the entry was written.
 9. This annotation has been added in the space to the left of 'Lord S-' and the last two lines are written vertically in the right margin. They have been moved here to their logical reading order.
 10. The rest of this page is cut away, leaving the text of the bottom of p.14 visible beneath.
 11. Pierre-Joseph Boudier de Villemert (1758), L'ami des femmes; or possibly, Boudier (1779), Le nouvel ami des femmes; ou, La philosophie du sexe.
 12. A vis-à-vis is a type of carriage in which the passengers sit face to face.
 13. Presumably, the woman whom Lady Stormont had 'humanely relieved' in Hamilton's entry of Monday 19 July, p.17ff.
 14. Moved these two lines here from the right margin of the page.
 15. The image shows a note in the left margin with the rest of the page cut away. The text visible beneath appears in full on p.39 and is therefore not transcribed here.
 16. The image shows the blank verso of a note in the right margin, with the rest of the page cut away. The text visible beneath appears in full on p.36 and is therefore not transcribed here.
 17. This entry was first transcribed by Réka Barabási.
 18. This entry was first transcribed by Réka Barabási.
 19. Hamilton links ‘it’ with ‘method’ a couple of lines above.
 20. Either Japanese porcelain or a Japanese silk (OED s.v. Japan n. 4.a or b. Accessed 02-07-2021).
 21. Mark Akenside, The Pleasures of the Imagination, 3 vols. (London: R. Dodsley, 1744).
 22. Lord Stormont's first wife, Henrietta, had died in 1766 and he did not marry Louisa Cathcart until May 1776. Given that Lady Stormont gave birth to David William in March 1777, it seems fairly conclusive that this older child is not hers, but was born around the time of her marriage.
 23. Charles Manners, 4th Duke of Rutland, had been appointed Lord Lieutentant of Ireland in February 1784.
 24. This entry was first transcribed by Ulrika Stark.
 25. These three lines are squeezed in to the right.
 26. 26 July 1784 was 'the day appointed for a General Thanksgiving on the ending of the American War'. A pamphlet containing the form of prayer used for this day can be seen in the archive of the Royal Collection Trust.
 27. This probably refers to the Act of Parliament passed in 1784 that required 'free' parliamentary franks to be endorsed not only with the name and address of the frank signatory but also the date and place of posting, in order to reduce the abuse of the franking system, in which it was moderately successful. See J. C. Hemmeon, The History of the British Post Office (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1912), p.167.
 28. This page is left blank.
 29. Les Veillées du château, ou, Cours de morale à l'usage des enfans (1784)
 30. This entry was first transcribed by Dolores Kawale.
 31. These lines appear in the right margin of the page.
 32. These two lines appear in the right margin of the page.
 33. This entry was first transcribed by Ulrika Stark.
 34. This page is left blank.
 35. This page is left blank.
 36. This page is left blank.

Normalised Text



Mr: Glover returned at ½ past 8 o'Clock
he & Mr.. Dickenson received equal pleasure
in meeting -- Mr. Dickenson went away
at ½ past 9 -- the ladies returned from
their walk -- they had left Master
Sandford at home. Mr. & Mrs. Glover
supped with us and stayed till ½ past
11 -- the conversation turned wholly
on Miss Glovers character and
improvements -- after they went
Anna Maria & I had ¼ of an hours converse
& then went to our Rooms



July 16th. Friday 1784 Anna Maria & I
together parts of the Morning -- Mrs.
Vesey paid me a visit of ½ an
hour & would sit with me in my
Boudoir -- She showed me a very
clever letter she received Yesterday
from Mrs. Montagu -- it was quite
an elegant composition -- the
thoughts were new -- Mrs. Montagu
lamented Mrs. Thrales having
so lost herself in marrying
Piozzi the Italian Singer &c &c
After Mrs. Vesey left me I wrote
a long letter to the Duchess Dowager
of Portland & Mrs. Delany. I



write to both in the same letter,
I filled 8 quarto pages. I had
just finished when Lady Stormont
came for me -- I was surprised
to see her but she told me she
thought it would do her good,
we dined tête à tête. she told me
that Lord Stormont was gone to the
House of Commons to hear the debate on
the India business. & that he had
left a message for me, which
was that he thought it would
be proper & what I owed myself
& family & also that it would
be right to put Mr. Dickenson upon a
proper footing, which was, that we
should be presented at Court
soon after a certain event might
take place, Lady Stormont said that
she & Lord Stormont would present us &
that I should engage my other friends
& Relations to go to Court on that
Day. that neither I or Mr. Dickenson
need apprehend that it would
occasion us any material
expense -- nor that there
would be, if we did not choose it,



any necessity to go any more
to Court -- but that if we did not, at that time
all my family, & the world would
suppose I had married some
person who was not approved
of by my Relations &c &c
-- I said little in reply to
this -- for I am determined
to be ruled by what will be
most agreeable to my friend.
-- The two dear Boys were with us
as usual great part of the afternoon.
Lady Stormont told me how
her oldest boy (who is at Lord
Mansfields at Ken Wood) behaved
the other day to Mrs. Boscowan
& how properly Mrs. Boscawen had
reproved him for his pertness.
Lady Stormont told me that our Cousin
Colonel Greville desired her to inform
me that he had intended
calling on me this Morning but
that he had been prevented as
he was obliged to set out with
the King to Windsor earlier
than he thought he should.



We spent a comfortable afternoon
together -- talked of the Duchess of Atholl
&c &c. I planed the drawing
Box for her & gave all the
particular directions to the
Cabinet maker. at 10 I left
Lady Stormont -- I promised her not to
leave town for more than
a day or two at a time till
she was able to return to
Wandsworth Hill, had her Coach
& Servants home. Miss Clarke's were
out sat in my Boudoir till
they came home which was ¼ past
11 -- wrote a note to Mr. Dickenson
which Mr. Dewes is to take to
Buxton -- by way of an introduction
to his acquaintance. wrote
a Note also to Mr. Dewes --
enclosed these Notes with my
letter for the Duchess of Portland & Mrs. Delany
which he is so obliging to take to
Bullstrode tomorrow. had a
little chat with Anna Maria
went to bed at 12 o'clock.



found a kind letter from the
Duchess Dowager of Portland at my
return home this Evening

July 17th. Saturday. At ½ past
6 o'Clock this Morning I was
much surprised & shocked by
our Housemaid who came &
knelt down by my bedside
& acknowledged that she had
been guilty of stealing some
things which belonged to me & Miss
Clarke's & that she had been a liar -- She gave me a Cambric
Handkerchief of mine of which she had picked
out the Mark. she implored
my forgiveness and entreated
me to save her from losing her
character -- the motive of her
telling me all this was that
Betty our Maid had detected
& threatened her with acquainting
us -- I was so much affected
& so pained by finding how
much I had been deceived
in this Girls character -- that
I had only power to tell her
I would speak to her on the



Subject after I was up. I
breakfasted this Morning with Anna Maria
I told her the whole story &
what I thought it would be
right to do -- she approved, but she
could not assist me as she was
obliged to go out early -- I
questioned Betty, who
told me of many things which she
was certain Hannah had stolen.
I called Hannah & acquainted her
that as Betty alleged these things
against her I should expect
she would let Betty see the contents
of her Boxes -- it was some
satisfaction to me to see that
She did not hesitate in complying
-- I went with them -- to prevent
Betty saying any thing harsh
as I wished to reclaim &
not to oppress her. Betty
saw nothing but some old lace
edging of mine -- besides what
Hannah had before acknowledged
to me she had taken. Betty



charged her with stealing a
Muslin apron which the other in
the most solemn manner denied
& then bursting into an agony
of tears she told me that
she relied on my goodness
for not being more prejudiced
against her by what Betty
said for that Betty had
wronged us as much & more
than she had done. as I
saw evidently marks of confusion
in Bettys countenance
& was apprehensive of a
violent quarrel between
these women, I did not
seem to attend to what
Hannah said, but sent Betty out of
the Room to get my things
ready for dressing -- I then
made Hannah acquaint me what
she meant by accusing Betty
in that manner --
She opened such a scene of
fraud -- falseness &c &c



that my astonishment was
great indeed -- I had the
most perfect confidence in
Betty & thought her a perfectly
honest & good young Woman
I had imagined her principles
were excellent & also thought
that she had a great Affection
for Anna Maria and me, we
both thought so, & treated her
accordingly. Anna Maria
came home at 11 -- I informed
her of what I had heard -- we
asked Betty if she could vindicate
herself & were both of us
shocked to find she could not
-- As I thought it was best
to take the mildest method &
endeavour if possible to
work upon the minds of
these Women & try first



to reclaim them by gentle
means -- I told Anna Maria that
as it would be utterly impossible
for us to give them
a character we would not
turn them away but by a
generous forgiveness &
good advice try to effect
a reformation in their minds
& excite their gratitude.
Anna Maria's thoughts on this subject
were the same with mine
-- we called them & told them
that we would not turn them
away &c &c, & that they might
not reproach one to another.
I insisted upon their mutually
forgiving and made them promise
they would keep this affair a
secret from their acquaintances
-- After they had made this
promise & I had seen them
embrace each other with



real signs of forgiveness I
gave them some advice -- they
seemed penitent & so ended
this disagreeable affair. --
Mr: Dewes sent me a very
kind & friendly note which I
answered & sent the packet
I had got ready last night.
at 2 o'Clock Mrs. Elizabeth
Stainforth paid me a Visit
I was obliged to go to Mr-
Glovers so I took the liberty
of shortening her visit, she
walked with me part of the
way. I got to Mr. Glover's at ½
past two o'Clock -- stayed with
him & Mrs. Glover till 3 o'Clock
when they set out for their
House at Sunning Hill for
the Summer -- I promised to
come to them if possible.
Returned home immediately
Anna Maria & I sat together till



dinnertime. received a charming
letter from Miss Hannah More --
was disappointed in not receiving
one from Derbyshire. dined
at home with Miss Clarkes --
Mr.. Richard Glover came in
& sat by whilst we dined, he
was going to dine at Lord
Carmarthens. he left us
at 5 o'Clock. -- Anna Maria played
me a lesson -- we separated
till ½ past 7 -- I began
Madame Genlis last work
les Veillées du Chateau
which Lady Stormont lent me
yesterday. Miss Clarkes & I met
at tea. after which they went out
to take a Walk. -- at 9 o'Clock
Mrs. Garrick came to me (from
Hampton) she brought me fine
flowers & fruit -- we had an
interesting tête á tête till



10 o'Clock when she left me &
I went & joined Miss Clarkes
at the Veseys -- I took the
fruit with me to present to
them. -- there was no other
Company -- We sat an hour
after Supper. came home
at 12 -- y spirits were quite
worn out with the affair of
the Morning & I was glad to retire
to my room. Anna Maria & I spoke to
William Wilson & forbid his coming
any more.

Sunday 18th. July 1784 --
Breakfasted with Anna Maria we
talked over the disagreeable affair
of yesterday & were satisfied we
had at least done what was
most kind & charitable.
I went to May-fair Chapel
there was a stranger in the
Pulpit who preached the most
extravagant discourse I ever
heard -- it was a composition
of loose sentences
in Blank Verse or rather



Prose run mad. I came home
immediately after Church -- I
had quite a levée -- the Miss
Clarkes -- Mr. Stanhope Mrs.
Ord Lady Mary Hume. Mrs.
Hamilton & my Cousin --
Each seemed to wish the
other's gone -- at 3 o'Clock
they left me. Anna Maria
kept my Cousin to dinner
she took her to the afternoon
service -- from 3 till 4 I
was quiet, & alone. I shut
myself up in my Boudoir
& wrote the Extracts from Dear
Mrs Delanys letters. Anna
Maria & my Cousin came to
me when they returned from
Church -- we were not together
above 10 Minutes -- Lady
Stormonts Coach & Servants came
for me -- I found her still
quite well. Lord Stormont &



my Cousin Charles Cathcart dined
with us -- we had dumb waiters so
our conversation was not under
any restraint by the Servants
being in the room. Lord Stormont
amused me very much by his
conversation. he informed me
of the style of living at Vienna
which was when he resided there
the most polished Court in
Europe. We talked a good deal
about the great difference of expense
in every article between living
abroad & in England. Lord Stormont
said that not only the society
was more agreeable but that
an income on which one could live on with
difficulty in England with bare comfort was
in Italy, France Germany
&c. able to support one in
an elegant manner.
Lord Stormont & Mr. Cathcart stayed with
Lady Stormont & me till 8 o'Clock.
Lord Stormont told me a conversation
that had passed between the King



& him after the negotiation
between the English French &
Russians -- when through Lord
Stormonts prudence in conducting
that affair we were saved
from a War with Russia.
When Lord Stormont returned from
Paris the King said to him
that he hoped he never should
out live the rememberance
of what he & his Country
owed to Lord Stormont &
about he might depend upon



his eternal gratitude.
How has his Majesty fulfilled
kept up to these professions?
by turning out Lord
Stormont with the last Ministry --
Alas! the promises of
Princes are little to be
relied on -- the King had certainly no
excuse -- no reason for
behaving as he has done
to Lord Stormont
Lady Stormont enquired into the
Distress of a poor Woman in the Street
she had 4 young children & was with
Child -- she gave her 2d 6 & made Ld. Stormont do the same
& gave her a letter to enable her to be taken
care of at home
for the Month of her lying in
&c &c





Lady Stormont & I sat together till
10 o'Clock -- I gave her some
extracts to read & took up
L'amie des femmes -- I will
get this book. we had some
talk about our Uncle Frederick.
*Lord Stormont is to send to him*
I waited till Lord Stormont came in -- had
Lady Stormont Coach & Servants Miss Clarke's
were at the Veseys -- they went for
me. went to them. they were at
Supper. we stayed till near
12. Mrs. Tracy (one of the
Queens Bedchamber Women)
had called upon me when I was
out. Mrs. Scott was with me in the
Morning. I had some conversation with her about
Hannah

Monday 19th. July 1784 Breakfasted
alone -- busy writing all Morning --
several Visits from Anna Maria. saw
William Benn -- asked him how my
Old maid Mrs. Johnston & her husband
went on -- he could not give
me a satisfactory account. they
are still unsettled &c --



Received a Note from Mrs. Walsingham
to entreat of me to return with
her to Thames Ditton & stay a
Week -- she was come to Town
on Business -- to tempt me
she informed me she was to
have Philosopher Walker &
that he & her Daughter Miss
Boyle were to construct an
Air Balloon which was to be
let off -- I excused myself
as I had promised my
Cousin Stormont to spend the
day with her & also that
I could not stay so long as a
Week on her account.
My Uncle Frederick paid me a
long visit -- the conversation turned
wholly on the present state of
affairs in Ireland -- my Uncle said
he thought there was every



reason to apprehend a Rebellion
there. Received a charming letter
from Miss Hannah More, a letter also
from Mr. Wiggins about the payment
of the rent of the House
in James Street. no letter
from Derbyshire! at ½ past
4 Lady Stormont Coach & Servants came
for me. we dined tête á tête
Lord Stormont was gone to the
House of commons to hear the
debates on the India business.
Lady Stormont & I passed a comfortable
afternoon together she humanely relieved a poor Woman who sent a letter I gave my mite. -- the conversation
turned on the education
of Children particularly Girls
-- we agreed in most points --
& both condemned Madame de
Genlis's method -- her writings
are ingenious & there are
many charming things in them
but they are not proper to put



into the hands of Young people
on many accounts, I have not
now leisure to enter into all
the reasons why they are not.
Soon after ten Lady Stormont's Coach
conveyed me home -- she wanted
me to dine with her tomorrow -- I
promised her to come in the
Afternoon but excused myself
dining as I had engaged my
self to Anna Maria. Lord Stormont
came to us at 7 o'Clock -- he made
Lady Stormont very happy by informing
her how well her Brother
Charles Cathcart had acquitted
himself -- he had spoken on the
affairs in India, -- after he had given
us an account of the Speech --
the fine manner &c &c he
went down to dinner. sent
us an excuse for not joining
us again as he had letters to



write -- Miss Clarke's were at home
but soon left me being engaged
to sup at the Veseys I sent an
Excuse. I employed myself
in writing out some Verses
Mrs. Vesey had given me. they
came home ½ past 11. Anna Maria &
I sat ½ an hour together went
to our Rooms at 12 o'Clock.
found a note from Mrs. Pepys
to invite me to dine & spend
a day with her this week.


Tuesday 20th- July 1784 Breakfasted
with Miss Clarkes -- the Cabinet
Maker brought me Lady Stormonts
Drawing box -- he had executed
my directions very well &
copied the plan exactly. I sent him
with it to Portland Place. Received &
answered a letter from Lady Stormont
-- Settled some business for Anna Maria
had Mrs. Scott for an hour
looked over my linen & gave
her work to do for me.



at 12 Lord Stormont came
he sat with me ½ an hour --
I am quite proud of being a
favourite of his -- we talked of
my Uncles, Frederick & William.
-- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --
of the Irish affairs -- Lord Stormont
said he imagined things would
come to extremities there.
he laughed & said we must all
go & live abroad or in
Scotland for it would be impossible
if things went on in this
manner to live in England.
Mrs: Delany called upon me, I
went & sat in the Coach with her
for 20 Minutes. she told me that she
& the Duchess Dowager of Portland came to
Town last night, that they were
impatient to see me wanted
me to come to them in Evening this
I could not do nor tomorrow but
promised them Thursday
afternoon. this dear dear



Woman was charming well.
After she left me, employed
myself in reading Madame Genlis
working & sorting letters till
dinner time. sent a note to
Mrs: Pepys informed her I could
not give her a day this week.
dined with Miss Clarkes -- No
letter from Derbyshire! -- Anna Maria
played two or three Lessons of Vento's
after dinner -- from 6 till 7 was
in my Boudoir arranging
Papers -- Lady Stormonts Coach & Servants
came for me. found Lady Stormont very
well -- Lord Stormont was at home
& sat with us the greatest part of the
time -- Lady Stormont was delighted with
the Drawing box. Lord Stormont paid me
Compliments upon it. Spent a pleasant
afternoon -- came home at ½ past
ten in Lord Stormont Chariot -- Miss Clarkes
& I sat together till ½ past 11 -- I
sat up till ½ past one -- finished sorting
my letters received the last year.



Wednesday 21st. July 1784 Breakfasted with
Anna Maria -- dressed after. Read 2 hours
in Veillies du Chateau. arranged
all my loose papers -- wrote some
extracts. several agreeable little
Visits from Anna Maria -- one from Bell
to consult me about dress -- Mrs. Delany
called -- I did not see her nor Mrs.
& Miss Ord -- I was dressing -- Mrs.
Frederick Hamilton came, I had
appointed her -- I poke to her about
the Stormont affair. I hope I shall
succeed in making up the quarrel
Mrs. Hamilton promised to be guided by my
advice. at ½ past 4 Lady Stormonts
Coach -- I went out of spirits the
post brought no letter from D-shire
a thousand disagreeable apprehensions
made me feel quite miserable.
I found a French Gentleman with Lady
Stormont -- a Compte Segur, Son to one
of the Secretaries of State of the French
Ministry -- he is going Minister to Russia
-- he stayed on till 5. Lady Stormont left me
to change her dress -- she was not long absent
Our Cousin Colonel Greville dined with us
as did her Brother Charles -- we had
the dumb waiters as usual & an agreeable
conversation made the afternoon pass
pleasantly -- my Cousin Robert & I had
much talk about the Royal family &
its attendants -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --
-- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --



he told me he saw the Prince of Wales
yesterday who enquired much about
me & sent his Compliments to me.
he wonders that he has not seen
me this Winter -- & said the last time
he had that pleasure was when I was
at the Ball he invited me to &c
I passed his Royal Highness in the Street
when I was goin to Lady Stormonts
to day -- he was in his Vis-à-Vis, the
Carriages passed so fast that we had
hardly time to bow to each other.
Colonel Cathcart left us at 8 o'Clock.
Colonel Greville & I had some talk together
(whilst Lady Stormont was writing a letter)
about our Uncle Frederick he vindicated
himself, I gave him a gentle
lecture. at 10 o'Clock I left Lady
Stormont, the Colonel stayed on, as Lord
Stormont was not returned home
he dined to day with Lord Thurlow
got home by ½ past 10 o'Clock. sat
with Miss Clarkes Anna Maria
& I wrote & chatted. I copied some
verses Mrs.. Vesey had given me.
Went to bed at 12. Anna Maria made
some Italian verses upon me. &
laughed at my uneasiness. I hope
I may have an opportunity of
being revenged & that I may see
------some day as anxious upon a similar
                                                         occasion



Thursday 22nd: July 1784 -- Breakfasted
with Dear Anna Maria sat with her till
10 o'Clock -- Kelly came gave orders
for a frame for Leonidas's picture
Read 2 hours in the Vielées du
Chateau, very busy till dinner
time, arranging my Boudoir &
putting every thing in perfect
order for the reception of my
Dear Duchess & Mrs. Delany --
The post went by, no letter
from Derbyshire! I was so
extremely disappointed that
I could check the falling
tear, I reproached myself
for the weakness for I could
not for a moment harbour
any doubts of the affection of
my friend -- I dined with
Miss Clarkes & sat with them
till 6 o'Clock we then separated
I read for an hour in Madame
Genlis, I am to get through
these 3 large Octavo as soon as possible



as Lady Stormont has promised
them to another friend -- at 7 o'Clock
my two respectable friends came
they stayed with me till ½ past
10 -- the time passed rapidly --
they made me tell them every
thing about my dearest &
beloved friend -- they were very
highly satisfied, charmed with
his Character & that of his
father -- O how delightful
is virtuous praise! the Duchess
Dowager of Portland said that
our conduct proved that we
possessed the height of sentiment
without being romantic
She & Mrs. Delany touched my
heart in the most sensible
manner by the tender and
delicate assurances of their
love & esteem for me & in which
they assured me Mr. Dickenson
should have his share. they
are both impatient to see
him, & the Duchess told me



that she should depend upon his
spending some days at Bullstrode
this Autumn. I desired
the Duchess & Mrs. Delany as I have done
my other friends not to mention
any thing of this affair
at present. the Duchess gave me a commission
to bespeak a Vici de poche
for her -- when they left me
read a long letter which came by this
Post from Miss Gunning (she
had enclosed to to her Servant at St. James's)
she says a great deal about the
disappointment of the whole
family at my not coming
to Horton. the Veseys sent a pressing
message to invite Miss Clarke's & me to
supper we went, Mrs. Vesey gave
us some picturesque descriptions
of places in Ireland -- we came home at
12 went immediately to our
rooms





Friday 23d July 1784 -- Breakfasted with
Anna Maria -- we had a long conversation
about her Italian Friend --
Received a Note from Lady Stormont to
desire me to inquire about the purchase
of some things for poor Mrs -- .
My Cousin Robert Greville paid
me a long visit -- we went over
the whole affair of Our Uncle
Frederick & the Stormonts, we both
lamented that Mr. Hamilton was so apt
to see things in a prejudiced light
-- however as we have all our
failings we ought to make full
allowance for those of others
& where there are peculiarities
in the characters of our friends
we ought to be careful to
conceal them from the notice
of others if possible: as my
Cousin was going with the King to
Windsor I gave him messages
to the Ladies in the Queens
family -- when he was gone
I sent for Mr. Jackson to



consult him about an answer
to Mr. Wiggins letter, he came
immediately & gave me his
advice. he sat an hour with
me, related some curious anecdotes
of the Duke of --
Mrs. Handcock sent me some beautiful branches of orange tree in
flower by the little Swiss & Mary the Children stayed sometime &c &c
when he left me Mr. Stanhope
my old Torment, called he was
not let in -- Mrs. Ord made
me a friendly visit -- Mrs.
Vesey joined us -- Mrs. Ord
promised to enquire where I
could purchase the thing for poor
Mrs x & sent me a note this
Afternoon to Portland place. they
had just left me when Anna Maria
ran upstairs & brought me
the expected letter -- the contents
made me ample amends
for the anxiety I suffered for
the last 3 or 4 days. I wrote
my letter to Mr. Wiggins &
told him I expected him to



send me the money due for
the ½ years rent -- which he has owed
these 3 years &c &c this
Money is due to Mr. Jackson
who paid it to me not doubting
Mr: Wiggins immediate payment.
I had just finished writing this
letter which I ordered Richard to carry
this afternoon, when Lady Stormonts
Coach & Servants came for me, I
I found her as well as she was
on Thursday -- Lord Stormont
dined with us we sat long at
table -- no Servants waiting -- he
was very open & communicative
told me some particulars relative
to -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --
-- -- -- -- -- -- -- --
little George & Charles came to
dessert Lord Stormont made them
repeat 2 Greek lines he had
taught them -- the eldest is
about 4 the youngest 3 years old.



Lady Stormont & I had an hours
tête á tête we talked of my
Derbyshire friend. I gave her
the outlines of the letter I received
to day -- she was highly entertained
with the account of the
reception of my Picture, &
made my promise to tell Mr.
Dickenson that she should
take upon her to make me
sit to Saunders for a picture
for him & that she thought
I was very saucy & recommended
to him to keep me
in better order. Lord Stormont
joined us & our conversation
took another turn -- Madme-
Genlis -- Mrs. & Miss Hamilton
were our topics & a little
Politics Lord Stormont has no
opinion of Mr. Pitt as a
Financier. Mrs Ord sent



me a note according to her
promise -- Lady Stormont & I gave
directions to Mrs. Justi about
getting the things --
At ¼ past 10 o'Clock I came away Lord Stormont
wanted to detain me but I
was anxious to send a few
lines by this nights post to
my friend so I would not
be persuaded. had my
Cousins Coach & Servants as
usual. Lord Stormont
was so good to lend me
the fine Edition of
Cooks Voyages 3 Volumes Quarto
& also the Set of Prints
belonging to them, I am to
keep them till they go to
Wandsworth Hill. Had just
time after I got home to scribble
a few lines to my friend which
I sent by this nights Post enclosed



a Packet of Diary -- Miss Clarkes
& their Brother in Law Mr-
Jackson waited supper for me
joined them as soon as I had
finished my dispatches --
Mr. Jackson stayed till 12 o'Clock --
when he left us Miss Clarke went
to her room we sent the servants to bed & then I & -- Anna Maria chatted
over the contents of
the letter I received to day, some
parts of which I communicated
to her -- the subject was too
interesting for me to feel
inclined to go to rest so we
sat talking till 1 in the Morning Anna Maria
to oblige me played a lesson
of Handels & about ½ past 1 o'Clock
we retired to our rooms.



Saturday 24th: July 1784 Clarges Street
Breakfasted with Dear Anna Maria
sat & worked with her till past 10 o'Clock
then dressed for the day -- read an
affecting Story in les Veillées du
Chateau whilst my Hair was
dressing -- as Betty generally is
an hour, & sometimes longer & as I read always,
my hair dressing is never lost
time, I most commonly also
take part of that time to scribble in my
Diary. wrote an Answer to my
Dearest Friend's letter of yesterday
which I gave William Benn to put in the
Post office. I sent him 2 packets of
Diary under two covers.
Read & wrote & worked till dinner
time -- dined at home with Miss
Clarkes -- Anna Maria ever obliging played
at my request some lessons after
dinner. we separated at ½ past
5. I read in Madame Genlis for an
hour. Miss Clarke's joined me. we had
tea early. at 7 the Duchess Dowager of Portlands



Coach came for me. went to her
Grace at Whitehall. Dear Mrs. Delany
was with her. we had one uninterrupted
hour. I made the two dear
friends very happy by telling them
of Mr- Dickensons generous
assurance that he did not intend
to separate me from the society of
my friends &c. &c.
Mrs. Vesey -- Lady Weymouth (one of
the Duchess's daughters) & her two eldest
unmarried daughters Miss Thynne
& Miss Sophia Thynne came ¼ after
8 -- The conversation was general
& agreeable -- I came away with Mrs.
Vesey at 10 o'Clock. the Duchess goes to
Margate tomorrow. Mrs. Delany on Monday
to Mrs. Boscowans. Mrs. Vesey invited me
to go in with her to supper I excused
myself came home sat with Miss Clarke's
till 11 -- we then went to our Rooms
Anna Maria came & chatted with me whilst I
undressed. I had a little headache &
did not sit up to read -- as I generally
do




Memorandum
      sent Opie the Painter 4L:4s -- being
      the remainder of the Money for Mr. Glovers
      Portrait -- which he gives me. This Money
left with me by Mr. Glover for the Picture.







Sunday 25th. July 1784. Breakfasted with Anna Maria
we had a tête á tête till near 11. I
assisted her in writing a letter on business
She went to Church -- I could not not
being dressed -- after I was, read the
Service of the day &c &c in my own
room when Anna Maria returned from Church settled
some accounts with her. She showed me the
Answer she had received to her letter of the
Morning -- it was a satisfactory one, we were
together ½ an hour. I employed myself
in writing -- extracts from Mrs. Delanys
letters which Mr. Dewes has been so obliging
to lend me till my Cousin Stormonts
Coach came for me which was at ¼ before
5 o'Clock -- Colonel Cathcart & Lord Stormont
dined & was with us the greatest part
of the Afternoon. heard that Mr. Fox
had greatly offended his friends
by his late absence from the
House of Commons -- They wrote
to remonstrate to him the folly
& impropriety of it -- he sent for
Answer that he was very happy
& quiet at St. Anns Hill with
Mrs. Armstead -- that he thought
he should stay sometime longer
& concluded his letter by saying
that Mrs. Armistead wondered they did not



come & see her. The Gentlemen
talked Politics -- I listened & from what
I heard could only draw the melancholy
conclusion that we were a
ruined People & that the Glory of
the English Nation was set for
ever. I left Lady Stormont before
10 as I had promised Mrs. Vesey to
go to her house to meet Dowager Lady
Barrymore, however I lost the
pleasure of meeting her Ladyship
as she was getting into her Coach
when I drove up to the door. I
found the Veseys alone we sent
for the Miss Clarkes -- we supped -- Anna Maria
wickedly took notice of a blunder
I made by calling Mr. Vesey Mr. Dickenson
& then gave him for her toast.
We spent the Evening in innocent
Mirth & came home at ½ past
11 -- we went immediately to our
Rooms. I found a Note from
Dear Mrs. Delany which informed she
was pretty well & wished to see me
tomorrow before she set out.



Monday 26th. July 1784
Read two hours in Madame Genlis went
down at 9 breakfasted tête á tête
with Anna Maria -- we had a long conversation
upon The improvement
of the Mind -- the characters of
Mrs. Jackson's Children -- the method she
followed in bringing them up, & I
condemned it & at last brought
Anna Maria over to my way of thinking.
at 10 dressed for the day -- sent a
Note to excuse myself to Mrs. Delany
it rained so hard -- besides I had
promised Lady Stormont to execute a
commission for her. at 12 the Veseys
& Mrs. Handcock came for me we
went to the late Dowager Lady Harringtons
where there was an Auction. I saw
the Japan Lady Stormont wished to
have -- but the Room was so crowded
& the heat so great that after suffering
for an hour I determined to come
away -- I was near fainting -- a gentleman a stranger
to me very politely handed me through
the Crowd Mrs. Handcock & I would not
wait for the return of the Veseys &
the Coach, & as it was near Clarges
Street & fair we walked home



This is the first Auction I ever was
at in London & I think will be the
last -- I saw Lady Payne Lady Irwin
Lady MaryChurchill &c at Lady
Handcock's -- I took leave of good Mrs.
Handcock & came home.
Anna Maria & Bell sat with me till 2 o'Clock
then took leave of me for the day
they went to Mrs. Harris. I wrote
three Letters, one to Lady Wake one
to Miss Burney & one to Miss Palmer.
Was much surprised to see the
Prince of Wales pass by -- as he
went to Brighthelmstone but 3 or 4
days ago. his Horses & Grooms
were at Mrs. Armsteads door for
two hours -- by this Mr. Fox I
suppose is returned &c &c &c &cc
Lady Stormont's Carriage came for
me ½ past 4 o'Clock -- she was quite
well Lord Stormont & her Brother
Colonel Cathcart dined with us -- they
stayed with us till after 8 o'Clock -- Lord Stormont
told me that the french were certainly
taking infinite pains to adopt our
Manners & learn our language -- that
it was astonishing what a rapid
progress they made in both. he
entertained me very much by



describing the different styles of
manners in foreign Countries
& particularly the bon ton etiquette
in France. After the Gentlemen left
us Lady Stormont showed me all the
pretty things Madame Justi had
arranged -- we then worked & conversed
till 10 o'Clock -- the Duchess Devonshire
Lady Payne Lady Duncannon were
our topics -- not forgetting Lady Stormonts
three Sons who always afford her
ample matter for converse in our
tête à têtes. got home at ½ past
ten -- sat with Miss Clarkes for an hour
read & wrote -- went to bed at 12.

Tuesday 27th. July 1784 -- at 9 went
down to Anna Maria -- Breakfasted tête á
tête -- she read me some passages she
had selected from Akensides pleasures
of the imagination, what genius &
fancy & how many
fine images of Providence & Nature
there are in this beautiful Poem
though I must confess that there
are parts of it which are to me



obscure -- but that is more likely
to be a defect owing to my want of
comprehension.
These are among my favourite lines --
“There let thy Soul acknowledge its-
                                                         complaint
How blind, how impious! there behold the
                                                         ways
Of Heav'n's eternal destiny to Man
For ever just, benevolent, & wise,
That Virtue's awful steps, howe'er pursu'd
By vexing fortune & intrusive pain,
Should never be divided from her chaste,
Her fair attendant pleasure, need I urge
Thy tardy thought through all the various round
Of this existence, that thy soft'ning soul
At length may learn what energy the hand
Of Virtue mingles in the bitter tide
Of Passion swelling with distress & pain,
To mitigate the sharp with gracious drops
Of cordial pleasure? “Ask the faithful Youth
“Why the cold Urn of her whom long he lov'd
“So often fills his arms, so often draws
“His lonely footsteps at the silent hour
“To pay the mournful tribute of his tears?
                                                        



“O! he will tell thee; that ye wealth of
                                                         worlds
“Should ne'er seduce his bosom to forego
“That sacred hour, when, stealing from the
                                                         noise
“Of care & envy, sweet remembrance soothes
“With Virtue's kindest looks his aching
                                                         breast,
“And turns his tears to rapture.” --

-- After I was dressed Anna Maria sat
with me some time, we read, worked, &
conversed. I wrote letters -- to Miss
Gunning & to Miss Litchfield -- gave
them to William Benn to put into the post. ¼
before 5 Lady Stormonts Coach came
for me (received a note from Lady Dartrey
to desire me to come to Chelsea with the
Vesey this afternoon, I could not being
engaged to the Stormonts) Lord Stormont
dined at home, his friend Mr Langlois
& Colonel Cathcart dined with us as did
William Murray (Lord Stormont eldest Son a boy
of 7 Years old) -- we had as usual our
comfortable dumb-waiters & no Servants
to restrain conversation. I heard
that the Scotch were much discontented



with the Taxes on linens Gauzes
& Ribbons -- as it would quite ruin
the manufacturers of Glasgow &
Paisley -- that the Irish grew every
day more violent, & that a Mr-
Pemberton had called out in the
Theatre at Dublin when the Duke of
Rutland came in & they had begun
playing “God Save the King” “no more
of that &c &c God save Louis the 16th
King of France & Friend of the
oppressed. Mr. Langlois told us
that the French Court had but too
good intelligence of every thing
that passed both in Ireland &
England -- & it was but too true
that they were now upon an
equality with us with respect to
Navy affairs. when we came up
stairs after dinner the three little
boys engrossed attention & Politics
were dropped -- William returns to his
Uncle Lord Mansfields at Ken Wood



tomorrow. Lord Stormont laughed a news
paper lie which informed the Public
that he had joined Lord Thurlow
& was coming in as Secretary of
State -- this arose from his dining
with him Last Week -- there were
6 in Company & not a single word
was uttered concerning Politics.
The Gentlemen left Lady Stormont
& me at ½ past 8 o'Clock. we worked
& conversed till ¼ past 10.
Lady Stormont told me how ill the
-- had used her late father (Lord
Cathcart) & how he had forgot &
broken promises to all our family
to whom he lay under great obligations.
we talked of our deceased Parents --
of my fathers behaviour when a
Volunteer in the Russian Service.
of the Queen -- characters of the Princess
&c &c -- when I came home I found
a Note from Anna Maria to beg me to
join her & Miss Clarke at the Veseys
I went they were at supper. Mrs.
Vesey brought a Note for
Dear Lady Dartrey to beg I would dine



with her on Saturday -- the five or
6 run awat Matches & the several
imprudent ones lately made were
talked of -- however there was no
ill-natured censure, only a few
animadversions on the folly of
people plunging themselves into
certain misery or Unhappiness.
we came home at ¾ past 11 -- went
immediately to our rooms --
Mrs. Boughton (one of the Queens Women
of the bedchamber) called when I
was out this afternoon.

July 28th. 1784 Wednesday
Read in Madame de Genlis from
6 till 8 -- breakfasted with Anna
Maria -- sat with her till near 10 --
dressed -- looked over my drawers
gave orders about notable things --
I hope I may assure myself
that Hannah & Betty are become
very sensible of their faults for
they have conducted themselves
extremely well ever since
the day I gave them advice
& pardoned them. I am persuaded



that in general mild reproof
& good advice effects a more lasting reform
where the heart is not utterly
depraved than harsh reproaches
& severe treatment. My Old
Maid Mrs. Johnston came to see
me she told me that & she &
her husband were now settled
in a Shop -- I promised to procure
her all the custom I could get.
& I gave her some advice, which she
took very gratefully and promised
to follow -- had several visits
from Anna Maria -- wrote an Answer
to Mr. Wakes letter -- sent him
a gentle Lecture upon his
general conduct &c &c as Lady
Wake had given me a hint in her last
letter that my young friend had forgotten
some of my admonitions. Anna Maria & I
sat & worked together from 3 till 4 -- she left
me to go to dinner. received a very kind, polite,
& friendly letter from Mrs. Boscawen.
she informs me that dear Mrs. Delany was
with her & very well &c ¼ before 5 Lady --



Stormont's Coach came for me, we
dined tête á tête, Lord Stormont was
gone to hear the debates in the House
of Commons -- George & Charles were
with us longer in the Afternoon than
usual -- Lady Stormont gave them a reading lesson --
her method is very proper, she does
not tire them, & makes it a reward for
good behaviour when she instructs them.
-- we worked & conversed till ½ past 9 --
when Lord Stormont came home.
he gave us some account of the debates
but as they will be better told in the
News papers than I can recollect, I
shall not note them down. came home
in Lord Stormonts Chariot at 10
Miss Clarkes & I sat together till ½
past 11 -- we wrote and talked. I continued
my employment, which was writing
Extracts from Mrs. Delanys letters
till ½ past 12.
Mrs: Scott came to me after I
came home -- I gave her
                             more work again

Thursday 29th. July 1784 -- at 9 went
down to Breakfast with Anna Maria sat with her till
10. our conversation turned on the
use of a learned education for
Women. we were of different opinions
I was against it, however we
left our argument unfinished.



I dressed immediately after B. sent
Betty to Church -- the Thanksgiving day
Anna Maria went also, I stayed at home
filled up my time with reading writing
& working -- received a Note from my
Cousin Charles Cathcart to inform me
when the Tax on franking takes
place -- which will be which a fortnight
after this date. Mrs Garrick came
from her Villa at Hampton to make me a visit
she sat with me an hour, she opened
her honest Heart to me, -- it was
an interesting conversation -- I
endeavoured to restore tranquility to
her wounded breast & clear
from appearances which Mrs. Garrick thought
were against her -- this I could do with
a safe conscience for I am firmly
persuaded 's affection for Mrs.
Garrick is pure & unalterable. Mrs. Garrick
feelings are too exquisite for her
ever to enjoy tranquil happiness.
I know how to pity her, for the
greatest part of my life I have
suffered exquisitely from allowing
my sensibility to get the better



of my reason -- I trust I am now
a more reasonable being. & as I
think I am sensible of all my faults
& weaknesses I hope to conquer them
& by that means not only ensure my
own happiness -- but contribute to
the happiness of my Dickenson & preserve
his love, his confidence, & esteem.
Mrs. Garrick told me she was going
to Mrs Montagus at Sandleford on Saturday
that she was to meet our dear friend
Miss Hannah More there & stay a fortnight.
She insisted upon my telling Mr. Dickenson
that she should expect him to meet
me at Hampton in the Autumn &
that she longed to assure him of her
affection. Mrs. Garrick is one of the
most sincere characters I ever met
with -- her professions are all from
the heart, & a valuable one it is.
Anna Maria sat with an hour, read me a letter from the Glovers & gave me
an Account of the poor Woman she had
relieved &c -- -- A Woman came to
the house enquired for me, but neither would
leave her name or business -- said she would
call again -- she seemed to be a stranger to
London -- my torment Mr. Stanhope called



he was not let in. At ½ past 4 Lady Stormonts
Coach came for me -- Her Brother Charles
Cathcart Mr Langlois & Lord Stormont
dined with us. we had as usual Dumbwaiters
& sat long at table -- but we
neer set long after dinner -- the Gentlemen
were deep in Politics -- Lord Stanhope
seems to me to be an impartial
Politician -- yet I have been told there
never existed one -- he does not
appear to me to be biassed by party
-- for example, he both censured &
admired Mr. Pit. The Gentlemen
stayed with us till ½ past 8 -- Lady Stormont
& I had tête a tête till 10, we
worked & chatted on indifferent subjects
When Lord Stormont came home I
took my leave & had his Chariot.
was at home ¼ past 10. the Veseys sent
for me to meet Miss Clarkes, I sent
an excuse as I wished to write in my
Extracts from Mrs. Delanys letters, as I did not go, Miss Clarke's
came to me. we sat together till near
12 -- I sat up, scribbling till 1 o'Clock







Friday 30th: July 1784 Clarges Street
Finished Madame de Genlis's Veillées du
Chatteau -- went down at 9. breakfasted
tête a tête with Anna Maria we talked
of Mr: Dickenson -- of his father -- of hislate Mother
Anna Maria was charmed with their characters.
-- I was busy in notable Work till
12 -- wrote a short letter & enclosed
a Packet of Diary for Derbyshire which I
sent to the Post. Received a smart note
& some franks from my Cousin Challes
Cathcart -- Lord Dartrey came to
run away with me to his Villa, but
I could not go being engaged to
Lady Stormont. Lady Dartrey wanted
me to sleep there & return tomorrow
Evening -- Lord Dartrey said she was not very
well. Mr. Stanhope called again
nit was not let in -- he left word
to my great joy that he was going
into the Country in a day or two.
Lady Stormont Coach came for me ½ past
4. I received a letter just before I set
out from Mr. Dickenson Senior I
had the pleasure of reading it twice
over before I got to Portland
Place -- what liberal sentiments



& what a Heart has this amiable
Man! -- how happy shall I be to
call him by the endearing name
of father. -- I found Lady pretty
well we dined tête á tête. just as
we had done dinner & the dessert was over Lord Stormont
came home from the house of Lords -- as Lady Stormont could not
bear the smell of a second dinner we
left him to eat a solitary meal --
he did not join us till ½ past 7. we
had the 2 dear little boys -- & I told
My Cousin of the agreeable letter I
had received she seems as sensible of
Mr. Dickenson Senior's merit & amiableness
as myself. Lord Stormont acquainted
us with the subject of the debate in
the House of Lords -- he was provoked
with Lord Carlisle for dividing & said
it was a very foolish measure, as
there were but 20 Lords -- & there
were but 4 on their side. &c &c
he sat with us till near 9 o'Clock --
before he went out I made him
give me a frank for my dear
Father. Lady Stormont told me
the Duke de Chatres arrived in Town



yesterday -- he has a House in Portland
place a few doors from Lord Stormonts
which he has purchased -- she was vexed he
was come as it will be inconvenient
for her in her present situation to
receive his Visits. we had much
conversation about Lady Charlotte Finch
& the management of the Royal Nursery
at 10 I had her Coach
The Miss Clarke's were at home we sat
together. I immediately sat down to
answer Mr.. Dickenson Senior letter -- but I
could not finish it before the
last Bell went its round. Anna Maria &
Isabella left me at ½ past 11. I
sat up till near 1 o'Clock thinking
over the goodness of Providence
in granting me the wish of me
heart -- viz: the being beloved by
A virtuous Man. & the desire
I felt of so doing my duty in this
life that I may look forward to
his & my being happy hereafter.
God Grant we may so live here



that in the world to come we
may still be inseparably united.

Saturday 31st. July 1784. Joined dear Anna Maria
at 9 o'Clock -- sat with her till near 11 --
finished my letter to my worthy father
which I sent to the Post -- wrote a Note to
my friend Lady Dartrey which I sent
to Mrs. Vesey to take for me to Chelsea
I excused myself for not going with
the Veseys to dine there as Lady
Stormont wished me to dine with
her, & sick friends must claim the
first right to ones attentions. as Anna Maria
had a bad Cold I walked out to purchase
presents we (the Miss Clarkes & I) meant to give
the Veseys Servants -- they had
been very civil & as Vails were
not allowed we wished to show some
acknowledgement for their civil
behaviour & attention to us.
Met Mr: Powis Member for Northamptonshire. he enquired
much after the Wakes desired me to inform Sir William that he ought to go to Buxton &c. &c

I bought presents for the Butler
& 3 footmen -- in returning home
met my Uncle Frederick -- he said
he had been to make me a visit
he walked home with me & sat a ¼
of an hour. Isabella & Anna Maria were
satisfied with the things I had



bought -- we paid equally for them.
I went to the Vesey's I gave Louis
& John the presents -- they were
grateful & pleased -- I gave the
Coachman Money as he was not
a hired servant -- as Mrs. Vesey was
dressing I did not stay to make
her a Visit -- I left word for Edward
to come to me when he came home
he did so -- I gave him his present,
& the one for the Butler. I dressed
-- & had just time to make my
Compliments to Miss Morrel who dined
with Miss Clarke's when Lady Stormont Coach
came for me -- received a letter from my
poor friend Miss Litchfield -- a melancholy account
of her health & spirits -- Lady Stormont was
not quite so well and had had a bad night
Lord Stormont dined with us & soon joined
us after we got in the Drawing Room
Lord Stormont was so good to repeat
to me what he could recollect of many parts of his speeches
Yesterday -- they are by no means
done justice to in the News papers.
& many things left out What Lord Stormont told me on the Subject
of the India Bill was too diffuse



& it is too complicated a Subject for
me to render any clear account of, therefore
I won't attempt it --
I was obliged to leave Lord & Lady Stormont
at 8 o'Clock -- as my most dear &
excellent friend Mrs. Delany was
come to Town -- she had been taken
ill at Mrs. Boscowans & being apprehensive
she should grow worse she left
her sooner than she intended. She sent
to beg I would be with her as much
as possible -- & the Duchess Dowager of Portland
left Mrs. Delany in my Charge whilst
she was absent -- had Lady Stormont Coach
found my worthy friend better
than I had dared to hope -- I sat with
her an hour & ½. She talked of nothing
but my future prospect of happiness
& she told me she was in such admiration
of Mr. Dickenson's father that she
should be tempted to Marry him
though she was only in her 85th. Year
&c &c. this dear Woman has all
the cheerfulness & sensibility
which she had when young. & none of her
faculties are the least impaired -- her



eye sight only excepted. I do not
think there ever was, or ever will
be any Person superior to Mrs. Delany
-- She is as perfect as human
Nature can be -- my admiration
of her is
not singular -- for this most excellent
of Woman is adored by all who are
blessed with knowing her. I shall
ever esteem myself happy in
having enjoyed the honour -- advantage,
& privilege of having such frequent
opportunities of enjoying her
charming society. As the Duchess has
left a Coach in Town for the use of
her friend -- Mrs. Delany ordered it
for me I came home at ¼ before
10 -- Anna Maria had a terrible cold, I
made her take Whey & go to bed before
11 -- Miss Clarke & I sat together till that time.
I sat up late scribbling & reading.
As Mrs. Delany has now resolved to
stay in Town till the Duchess returns from
Margate (when they will then go to Bullstrode)
I have promised her to remain in London
& be with her as much as possible. I would



give up every thing -- but what relates
to my Dickenson -- for the happiness of
being with her. How flattering to
me is the affection of such a Woman.
I must contrive to divide my
time between her and Lady Stormont
till the confinement of the latter is
over. I heard to day that my Uncle William
is not to come till the end of next Month.
Miss Asgill sent me a message
from Richmond this Morning


Sunday 1st. August 1784
Breakfasted with Anna Maria. her Cold rather
better -- she showed me letters from
the Glovers & her Sister Jackson in which
there was most kind mention made
of me. Went to May fair Chapel
was but just returned when Mrs. Delany
sent the Coach for me. I found her
better -- I sat for an hour with her
I was forced to leave her as my
Uncle Frederick was to be with me
at 1 o'Clock -- when I came home
found him & Anna Maria sitting together
he sat with us till 3 o'Clock. I would
let Anna Maria leave us. we talked
of Paintings -- Italy &c &c.
Mrs. Garrick agreeably surprised me



by a Visit -- she had put of for a
day or two going to Mrs. Montagu
she sat a ¼ of an hour with us, I
took her into my Boudoir &
we had ten minutes tête á tête, she
them left me & I returned to my
Uncle & AnnaMaria from 3 till 4 was
alone -- read some letters --
scribbled in my Diary -- then
altered my dress & was ready when
Lady Stormont's Coach came at ½ past 4 -- I found
her the same as many days past -- Lord
Stormont -- Colonel Cathcart & Mr. Langlois dined
with us -- Politics all dinner time
Lady Stormont & I did not sit long together after we
left the Gentlemen as they soon joined us in
the Drawing room (we had the 2 dear boys for
some time as usual) Mr. Langlois informed
me that he dined with Sir Joshua Reynolds yesterday
-- that very handsome mention was made
of me by the Company &c &c. the conversation
was lively & agreeable. the Duke de Chartres
is gone to meet the Prince of Wales at Brighthelmstone
-- was pleased to hear Lord Stormont &
Mr. Langlois mention my friend & acquaintance
Monsieur Batin in a manner that proved
they liked him. -- heard that the King of
France was become a great drinker, that



he was very indifferent to the Queen &c
&c. Sir Joseph & Lady Yorke & a Niece
of Lady Yorke's called at 8 they were sent
away as Lady Stormont does not let in
any Company -- but as she thought it
would be right to see them she went after
& invited them -- they stayed ½ an
hour. Sir Joseph Yorke is a lively
pleasant Man -- much polished &
quite a Man of the World. his Lady
is a Dutch Woman -- polite, well bred
but not easy in her Manner -- the
Young lady is her Niece, a Girl of
12 or 13 -- an intelligent countenance
& sensible -- Lady Stormont & I
was left alone at 9 o'Clock, I stayed
with her till 10 o'Clock -- we talked
of the late Lady Hamilton her affection
for our Uncle William -- She was
Married 24 Years & her passion for
him, for it could be called by no other
name was as lively to the last moment
of her life as it was when she first
knew him -- she had no object in
life but him & only regretted dring
because she left him behind &c
when I came home, I ran over to
the Veseys for 5 Minutes to enquire



after Mrs. Delany as, Mrs Vesey was to
be with her this Afternoon, had the
Comfort of hearing she was charming
well -- Miss Clarke's & I sat together till
½ past 11 -- Anna Marias Cold better -- to prevent
her talking as she was still very hoarse
I read aloud one of Blairs Sermons
(On the Union of Piety & Morality)
I think Blair one of the most elegant
writers we have -- he interests and
persuades -- I went to my room at 12

Monday 2d: August 1784 -- went down at 9
Breakfasted with dear Anna Maria -- she was
much better. sat & chatted with her & read
curious Anecdotes in the Morning Herald till ½
past 10 -- then dressed for the day -- worked
an hour -- Notable work. repaired my finest
Screen &c began Cooks Voyages --
Received a Message from Mrs. Delany to say she
was prevented coming to me, as she had
proposed, to take an Airing as the Miss
Murrays were come from Ken Wood to
make her a visit -- William Benn left
a Message which affected me very much
it was to inform me my former
Maid (who lived with me all the time I
was at Court) Mrs. Johnston had been
dangerously Ill, she was taken last friday



I sent Hannah immediately -- who brought
me word -- that she was now out of danger
but that she kept her bed & looked wretchedly
-- had visits from Isabella & Anna Maria
during the Morning -- had the pleasure of
receiving a letter from my Derbyshire friend
-- Received also a letter from Mrs. Murray
from Dunkeld -- at ½ past 4 Lady Stormont's
Coach came for me -- she was pretty well
Our Cousin Colonel Greville dined with us
Lord Stormont was at the House of Lords
he was to speak to day on the India Bill.
Colonel Greville gave me several Compliments
which he brought from Windsor from
the ladies in the Queens family.
I stayed till 8 went to Mrs. Delany
she was better -- Lady Bute & Lady
Wallingford were with her but they
did not stay long -- I read to Mrs.
Delany the letter I had received from Mrs.
Murray as it gave an account of
what she had seen in Scotland
that she had seen my Uncle
William -- at the Duke of Atholls
&c &c &c.



I sat with her till 10 there was a
mistake about the Coach -- I came
home in a Chair -- One of the
Chairmen happened to be one I
used to employ at St James's -- he
made me so many fine speeches
of his happiness in seeing me
&c that my fare cost me ½
a Crown instead of a Shilling --
The Veseys sent for me to meet
Miss Clarkes as I thought it
would be wrong not to go to them the
last Evening -- as they were to set
out for Margate tomorrow I
put off answering my Dickenson
letter till tomorrows Post -- we
supped & sat with the Veseys till ¼
past 11 -- went to our Rooms as
soon as we came home.
I found a letter from Mr. Wiggins
& a day appointed to settle the
business









(consult diplomatic text or XML for annotations, deletions, clarifications, persons,
quotations,
spellings, uncorrected forms, split words, abbreviations, formatting)



 1. This entry was first transcribed by Jens Nordlund.
 2. This entry was first transcribed by Jens Nordlund.
 3. This entry was first transcribed by Julianna Wretman Werner until the bottom of p.9 in this diary.
 4. The student transcript ends here. The remainder of this entry has been transcribed by Cassandra Ulph (PDRA in the Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers project).
 5. Stephanie de Genlis, Les Veillées du château, ou Cours de morale à l'usage des enfants, 2v (Paris: Lambert, 1784).
 6. Presumably in some way related to 'the affair of the morning', i.e. Betty's transgressions.
 7. This last line appears in the top-right corner of the next entry, thus this sentence was probably added later.
 8. The page is cut away here, with the text of p.17 visible beneath. No text appears to have been lost, suggesting the page was cut before the entry was written.
 9. This annotation has been added in the space to the left of 'Lord S-' and the last two lines are written vertically in the right margin. They have been moved here to their logical reading order.
 10. The rest of this page is cut away, leaving the text of the bottom of p.14 visible beneath.
 11. Pierre-Joseph Boudier de Villemert (1758), L'ami des femmes; or possibly, Boudier (1779), Le nouvel ami des femmes; ou, La philosophie du sexe.
 12. A vis-à-vis is a type of carriage in which the passengers sit face to face.
 13. Presumably, the woman whom Lady Stormont had 'humanely relieved' in Hamilton's entry of Monday 19 July, p.17ff.
 14. Moved these two lines here from the right margin of the page.
 15. The image shows a note in the left margin with the rest of the page cut away. The text visible beneath appears in full on p.39 and is therefore not transcribed here.
 16. The image shows the blank verso of a note in the right margin, with the rest of the page cut away. The text visible beneath appears in full on p.36 and is therefore not transcribed here.
 17. This entry was first transcribed by Réka Barabási.
 18. This entry was first transcribed by Réka Barabási.
 19. Hamilton links ‘it’ with ‘method’ a couple of lines above.
 20. Either Japanese porcelain or a Japanese silk (OED s.v. Japan n. 4.a or b. Accessed 02-07-2021).
 21. Mark Akenside, The Pleasures of the Imagination, 3 vols. (London: R. Dodsley, 1744).
 22. Lord Stormont's first wife, Henrietta, had died in 1766 and he did not marry Louisa Cathcart until May 1776. Given that Lady Stormont gave birth to David William in March 1777, it seems fairly conclusive that this older child is not hers, but was born around the time of her marriage.
 23. Charles Manners, 4th Duke of Rutland, had been appointed Lord Lieutentant of Ireland in February 1784.
 24. This entry was first transcribed by Ulrika Stark.
 25. These three lines are squeezed in to the right.
 26. 26 July 1784 was 'the day appointed for a General Thanksgiving on the ending of the American War'. A pamphlet containing the form of prayer used for this day can be seen in the archive of the Royal Collection Trust.
 27. This probably refers to the Act of Parliament passed in 1784 that required 'free' parliamentary franks to be endorsed not only with the name and address of the frank signatory but also the date and place of posting, in order to reduce the abuse of the franking system, in which it was moderately successful. See J. C. Hemmeon, The History of the British Post Office (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1912), p.167.
 28. This page is left blank.
 29. Les Veillées du château, ou, Cours de morale à l'usage des enfans (1784)
 30. This entry was first transcribed by Dolores Kawale.
 31. These lines appear in the right margin of the page.
 32. These two lines appear in the right margin of the page.
 33. This entry was first transcribed by Ulrika Stark.
 34. This page is left blank.
 35. This page is left blank.
 36. This page is left blank.

Metadata

Library References

Repository: John Rylands Research Institute and Library, University of Manchester

Archive: Mary Hamilton Papers

Item title: Diary of Mary Hamilton (15 July 1784 - 2 August 1784)

Shelfmark: HAM/2/12

Document Details

Author: Mary Hamilton

Date: from 15 July to 2 August 1784

Summary: The diary covers the period from 15 July 1784 to 2 August 1784 and details Mary Hamilton’s day-to-day life including her numerous social engagements.
    Hamilton describes in detail an incident when one of her servants, Betty, accused a housemaid of stealing. The housemaid, Hannah, tearfully confessed to the crime and asked for forgiveness. Hannah in turn accused Betty of stealing as much if not more than she had and, as Betty was unable to defend herself, Hamilton concluded that Betty was also involved. She and the Clarkes decided that as she could not give them ‘characters’ they would not turn them away but by ‘a generous forgiveness & good advice to try to affect a reformation in their mind & excite their gratitude’. Hamilton made the two women embrace each other and promise to keep the affair secret from their acquaintances. The Clarkes and Hamilton agreed that they had done what was most ‘kind & charitable’. The diary also records Hamilton’s relations with other servants including a Mrs Johnston, an old maid of hers, with whom she kept in contact after she left. She bought presents for Mrs Vesey’s servants who ‘had been very civil’. On taking a chair to visit Mrs Delany, one of the chairmen recognised her from her time at Court and ‘he made so many speeches of his happiness in seeing me &c that my fare cost me ½ a Crown instead of a shilling’.
    The diary also includes information on Hamilton’s Bas Bleu friends. Hamilton records that Elizabeth Vesey showed her a ‘clever letter’ written by Elizabeth Montagu who ‘lamented Mrs Thrales [Hester Thrale Piozzi] having so lost herself in marrying Piozzi the Italian Singer’. She describes the many visits from women such as Hannah More and Eva Maria Garrick. She received an invitation to the home of Mrs [Charlotte] Walsingham where the Philosopher Walker [perhaps Adam Walker (1730/31-1821)] was to be present, and Mrs Walsingham and her daughter, Mrs Boyle, were to construct an air balloon which was then to be let off.
    Hamilton records the congratulations and advice she received from her friends and relations over her forthcoming marriage to John Dickenson. Lord Stormont, for instance, advised her that it would be proper to get ‘Mr D upon a proper footing, w[hi]ch was that we should be presented at Court’ after her marriage. If this was not done, ‘all my family & the world w[ou]ld suppose I married a person who was not approved of by my Relations etc’. Hamilton admits that she said little in reply to Stormont’s advice, as she wished to do what John Dickenson ‘found to be agreeable’. Mary Delany told Hamilton that she had much admiration for Dickenson, so much so ‘that she should be tempted to marry him th[ou]gh she was only in her 85th year’. Dickenson made Delany and the Duchess of Portland happy by saying that he would not separate Hamilton from the society of her friends.
    The diary is full of information on Hamilton’s daily life and her social engagements. She attended church where a ‘stranger’ was taking the service who ‘preach[e]d the most extravagant discourse I ever heard [...] a composition of loose sentences in Blank Verse or rather Prose run mad’. When she dined with Lord and Lady Stormont, they often used dumb-waiters which meant their conversation was not constrained by the attendance of servants. They discussed the style of living and the Court in Vienna which, in Lord Stormont’s view, was the most ‘polished’ in Europe. They talked too of the cost of living, both in England and abroad. Stormont said that ‘you could live in an elegant manner abroad where you would do so with difficulty in England’. He also noted that the French were taking ‘infinite pains to adopt our manners and learn our language’. Stormont reported a conversation he had had with the King ‘after the negotiation between the English, French & Republicans [...] when through Lord Stormonts prudence in conducting that affair we were saved from a war with Russia’. The King said that he hoped he would not ‘out live the remembrance of what he & this Country owed to Lord Stormont’. During visits by her uncle, Frederick Hamilton, they talked of the situation in Ireland where her uncle feared there would be a revolution.
    Other topics of conversations with friends and relations included the Royal family, the education of girls and Hamilton’s views on Madame de Genlis’s methods of teaching, and politics. Hamilton notes that ‘Mr Fox had greatly offended his friends by his late absence from the House of Commons – they wrote to remonstrate to him the folly & impropriety of it’. She reports Fox’s reply: he was ‘very happy & quiet at St Anns Hill with Mrs Armstead [Elizabeth Armitstead, mistress of Charles Fox], that he thought he should stay some time longer & concluded his letter by saying that Mrs A wonder’d they did not come & see her’. From this discussion of politics, Hamilton concluded that ‘we were a ruin’d People & that the Glory of the English Nation was set for ever’. Her cousin Colonel Greville, an equerry to the King, reported that the Prince of Wales paid his compliments to Hamilton and expressed his wonderment at not seeing Hamilton all winter; Hamilton notes that the last time ‘he had that pleasure was when I was at the Ball he invited me to’. Later Hamilton speaks of her surprise at seeing the Prince of Wales’s groom and horses outside Mrs Armitstead’s house for over two hours; ‘by this Mr Fox I suppose is return’d’. Hamilton discusses growing discontent in society, for instance in Scotland ‘with the Taxes on linnens Gauses & Ribbons as it would quite ruin the Manufacturers of Glasgow & Paisley – that the Irish grow every day more violent, & that a Mr Pemberton had call’d out in the Theatre in Dublin when the Duke of Portland came in & they had begun playing “God Save the King” No more of that &c &c God save Louis 16th King of France & friend of the oppressed’.
    Hamilton describes the acquaintances who had a ‘fondness’ for her, including the numerous visits she received from the married Mr Stanhope, whom she calls ‘my old torment’. She records the books she read including Madame de Genlis’s Veillées du Château and James Cook’s Voyages . The diary records Hamilton’s commissioning a portrait of Richard Glover from John Opie; she sends the balance due to Opie of four pounds four shillings. Hamilton also writes of attending her first ever auction in London, although she thinks it will also be her last, as the room was so crowded and hot that she almost fainted.
   

Length: 1 volume, 70 images, 33 folios (33 + i) , 10161 words

Transliteration Information

Editorial declaration: First edited in the project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers' (Hannah Barker, Sophie Coulombeau, David Denison, Tino Oudesluijs, Cassandra Ulph, Christine Wallis & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2019-2023).

All quotation marks are retained in the text and are represented by appropriate Unicode characters. Words split across two lines may have a hyphen on the first, the second or both fragments (reco-|ver, imperfect|-ly, satisfacti-|-on); or a double hyphen (pur=|port, dan|=ger, qua=|=litys); or none (respect|ing). Any point in abbreviations with superscripted letter(s) is placed last, regardless of relative left-right orientation in the original. Thus, Mrs. or Mrs may occur, but M.rs or Mr.s do not.

Acknowledgements: Transcription and XML version created as part of project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers', funded by the Arts & Humanities Research Council under grant AH/S007121/1.

Transliterator: Erik Smitterberg, Senior Lecturer, Uppsala University (Revised transliteration submitted 28 June 2021)

Transliterator: Réka Barabási, MA student, Uppsala University (Partial transliteration submitted June 2021)

Transliterator: Dolores Kawalec, MA student, Uppsala University (Partial transliteration submitted June 2021)

Transliterator: Jens Nordlund, MA student, Uppsala University (Partial transliteration submitted June 2021)

Transliterator: Julianna Wretman Werner, MA student, Uppsala University (Partial transliteration submitted June 2021)

Transliterator: Ulrika Stark, MA student, Uppsala University (Partial transliteration submitted June 2021)

Transliterator: Cassandra Ulph, editorial team (completed 15 September 2021)

Cataloguer: Lisa Crawley, Archivist, The John Rylands Library

Cataloguer: John Hodgson, Head of Special Collections, John Rylands Research Institute and Library

Copyright: Transcriptions, notes and TEI/XML © the editors

Revision date: 3 November 2021

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