Single Letter

HAM/2/13

Diary of Mary Hamilton (3 August 1784 - 17 August 1784)

Diplomatic Text


Tuesday 3d. August 1784 Clarges Street
Breakfasted in my own room -- paid AMaria
a short Visit -- her Cold much better. at
9 o'Clock set out to visit Mrs. Johnston
I found her more recover'd than I ex-
pected
-- I sat an hour by her bed side
she seem much pleased wth. seeing me &c.
I was vastly glad to find her so comfort-
able
settled, & well situated for business,
I went into ye. Shop -- saw her husband
who did not appear very alert -- I
order'd home a loaf of Sugar. I ask'd
poor Johnston what she wish'd for
she said some Lavender Water & White
Wine wch. I sent her. from her went
to Bond Street to buy Lavender Water
& recollecting Mr. Saunders ye. Painter
lived in ye. Street went to him -- I settld
with him about a Miniature picture
for a Ring for Mr. D -- he promised
to begin it next Monday Morng at
10 o'Clock -- wth. some persuasion he
agreed to come to my house instead of
my going to his wch. as I have no
carriage wd. have been very incon-
venient
as he lives a good way off
& I could not go in ye. day time
in Hackney Coach & a Chair hire is
expensive. I then came home



pass'd Mr. Conway -- he bow'd I did not
stop to speak to him -- answer'd Mr D——sons
letter -- wch. I sent to ye. Post. I enclosed my
Diary -- Message from Lady Dartey to
beg me to dine & sleep at their Villa
I could not accept ye. agreeable in-
vitation
being engaged to Lady Stormont.
AMaria & I sat together for two
hours I decorated two small fine
screens for her with prints & Verses
Mrs. Vesey made us a little Visit as
did Miʃs Clarke -- I continued my
employment till ½ past 4 when
Lady Stormonts Coach came for me.
-- she was not quite so well to day --
Lord Stormont, Mr. Langlois & Coll.
Cathcart
dined with us -- politics
ye. reigning topic -- after dinner Col.
C -- look over ye.3 Papers to find wch-
had given Lord Stormonts speech
in ye. House of Lords yesterday most accurately
(for he was there). Woodfalls was
ye. best but he had, as well as ye. others
mis-stated -- mis-represented, &
mis-placed ye. order of words, as
well as added & omitted things.
heard that ye. Prince of Wales rode on
Horseback from Brighthelmstone



Yesterto day -- he set out at 4 in ye.
Morng -- attended only by Coll. Lake &
2 grooms he had relays of horses --
-- after he arrived in London he walk'd
8 miles -- & rodd rode back to B——
in ye. Afternoon -- B—— is above 60
miles from London. -- some people
say he came to meet Charles Fox
at Mrs. Armsteads, -- some, that
he came to purchase a fan for a
Lady -- & others that it was to
invite ye. D: de Chartres to B——
Lord St: & Col: C: left us at 8
Mr. Langlois sat on for sometime
wth. Ldy. S & me -- he gave us an
Account of wht. alterations had
been made by Gobert at Chatswoth
worth. how rapidly he was going
on (till ye. Dke. of Devonshires Agent
remonstrated). to spoil ye. house,
he -- laid out 1500 in new
furnishing ye. Drawing Room
& all that he did was putting
new Chairs & Sophas & a little
alteration to ye. Chimney piece



this Gobert was a Cook -- & is
now employ'd by ye. fine people
to decorated their houses instead
of their tables -- he has been ye.
principal person employ'd in
fitting up Carelton House. &c.
I came home abt. 10 -- sat wth. Miʃs
Clarkes
till past 11. I wrote extracts
from Mrs: Delanys letters till ½
past 12


Wednesday 4 th. August. 84
Breakfasted wth: AMaria -- Isabella join'd
us -- I sat chatting wth. them till
10 -- then dreʃs'd for ye. day -- work'd &
at ½ past 11 walk'd to Mrs. Delany, she
was pretty well, but had had an indifferent
night. from 12 till 3 I was very busy
arranging some curious old China in
a Cabinet -- this dear Woman wd. not
trust any hands but mine to do it
-- I wash'd ------------------ it, & she wiped
it -- Mr. Jerningham came in & found
us at our work -- he sat by us ½ an
an hour. he brought Mrs. D: one
of ye. prints of ye. great Air Baloon
wch. is to be let off next. tuesday, he



told us there were but 6 come out
& sent Mrs. D: -- Servt. for one immediately
to send to my dearest friend. ye. eldest
Mrs. Sanford came in -- I left Mrs.
D:
at 3 oClock walk'd home, she
gave me three or 4 small specimens
of ye. Egg Shell China -- wch. I shall
ever value for ye. sake of ye. Donor
-- I enclosed ye. print in a frank &
sent it to ye. Post. AMaria sat wth.
me till 4 -- I was not quite well -- ye.
walking thro' a broiling Sun & having
fatigued myself in standing &c
at Mrs-. Delanys I believe was ye.
occasion -- Lady S. Coach came at
½ past 4 I went to Portland Place
Lord Stor: Coll. Greville & Cathcart
din'd with us -- my Cousin Charles
promised his Sister to sit for his
Picture to Romney -- we consulted
together after dinner wch. would be the
best manner for him to be taken &c
he is a beautiful Young Man &
will make a charming interesting
Picture. we had ye. 2 dear Boys as
usual -- & Politics -- ye. Gentlemen
said that Wl Pitt had acted in an
unfair manner abt. ye. Navy Bills &



India affairs -- Lord S: & C.C: left us
at 8 -- I staid till 9 -- left Col Greville
to keep Lady S -- company -- I was
not quite well & came home -- had
Lady S -- Coach as usual. sat with
the Miʃs Clarkes till ½ past 10 --
begun a letter to Mrs: Carter --
heard to day that Sr. George Howards
Daughter Mrs. Vise died at Stoke
in Childbed -- I sincerely pity her
poor father -- she was his only
Child. I went to bed before 11
she has left 2 Children. I went to
bed before 11 o'clock
that good for nothing being Mr.
Coupland
came again this Eveg.
he sent another letter a few days ago.
he is so wicked, that it would be
wrong to give him any thing as he
wd. make an improper use of any money
one could give him & he wd. accept of
no other relief . -- had a good account of
Mrs. Johnston, that one of my old Chairman who look'd dying &c &c.


Thursday5th. August 1784 -- I breakfasted
in my own Room. A Maria made me
a Visit -- I was quite well again. at 11
oClock Lady Dartrey came -- she did not stay
long as I promised to follow her to
Stanhope Street & sit wth. her whilst



she dreʃs'd for ye. Drawing Room as
she was going there to take leave
before she went to Tunbridge where
she & Lord Dartrey go in a short time
for 6 Weeks. Mr- Jackson came to
see Miʃs Clarkes & me. -- he walk'd wth.
me as far as Lord Dartreys -- I saw ye. Prince
of Wales
who paʃs'd by to go to Mrs. Arm
stead
s -- fortunately he did not see me.
this is another flying excursion
from Brighthelmstone -- I had ye.
happineʃs of spending an hour & half
with my most engaging & most amiable
Friend -- she was very solicitous to
know if I really felt happy in the
prospect of Mr being united to my
D——son -- & was satisfied with my
aʃsurances in the affirmative -- she desired
I would allow her in (some time hence)
to write to Lady C Finch & her Sister Lady
Louisa Clayton to inform them of my en-
gagement
-- she wish'd all those friends
who were at a distance should know that
what I intended doing wth. the
warmest approbation of all those who
were already acquainted with it & who were
interested in my happineʃs. How
shall I ever repay the goodneʃs of so many
kind friends as I am bleʃs'd with?
I think myself the most fortunate
of human beings -- those to whom I



give the Title of dear Friends are people of
the most excellent characters & best
principles -- I am by their example
encouraged to persevere in Virtue &
------ guard myself from folly & vice. &c.
I poʃseʃs the heart of an amiable Man
whom I love, & whom I have ever pre-
fer'd
to every other -- I not only ought
to be but I can truly say I am most
grateful to Providence. it is a duty
these beautiful lines of Addison better
express my gratitude than any thing I
can say --
Thy bounteous hand wth. worldly bliss
      Has made my Cup run o'er
And in a kind & faithful friend
      Had doubled all my store
Ten thousand thousand precious gifts
      My daily thanks employ;
Nor is the least, a cheerful heart,
      That tastes those gifts wth. joy.
Through every period of my life
      Thy goodneʃs I'll pursue
And after death in distant Worlds
      The glorious theme renew.

the rest of this beautiful ode is
(I believe) in No. 453 of ye. Spectator.



I saw dear Lord Dartrey for a few Minutes
I promised to spend one day at Chelsea
before they went to Tunbridge. I went
in ye Coach wth. my good friends as far as
St. James's Place where I took leave of them
& went to Mrs. Delany -- I found her
charming well & in high spirits for
Lady Weymouth had been to communicate
to her that her 3d. Daughter Miʃs Sophia Thynne had
received proposals from Lord St. Asaph
-- that Miʃs S -- & herself & Lord Weymouth
approved very much &c. Lord St. Asaph
is a Young Man of very good character
it is a suitable match in every Respect.
Lord Ashburnham his father is also
pleased wth. his choice. I sat an hour
wth. Mrs. D -- walk'd home through ye.
Park -- met Mr. Houghman & spoke to him.
The Man brought home Mr. Glovers
Picture -- it is not a pleasing likeneʃs
but I ought not to find fault as he
would not have sat for any body but me
& he was ill when ye. picture was taken.
I had not time to walk so far as Mrs.
Johnston
I sent & had very good
accounts of her -- finish'd a long letter
to dear Mrs. Carter wch. I sent by to days post.
Recd. a letter from Lady Wake. she
kindly regrets my not being able to
Visit them this Summer &c&c&c



sat ½ an hour wth. A Maria -- ¼ before
5 Lady S—— Coach came for me -- only
Lord & Lady S. & me -- Lord S: join'd
very soon after we got went into ye Dr:
Room after dinner -- general topics --
heard that Lady C Bertie was to
marry Mr. Lenox (ye. Duke of Richmonds
Nephew & heir) -- Lady Sutherland
Lord Strathaven (Lord Aboynes Son)
Mr. North (Lord Norths eldest Son) it is
said is to marry one of ye. Miʃs Hobarts
(one of ye Twins) this is not thought likely to take place, as
she has not sixpence & he is ruined
& it is not likely his Grandfather
Lord Guilford will part with any Money.
whilst he lives. Lord Euston has
made proposals & is accepted by Lady
Maria Waldgrave
-- but his father
ye.. Duke of Grafton will not give consent
wch: is thought very cruel & unreasonable
&c &c. Lord Stormont left us at
8 he promised me to make Mrs. Delany
a Visit -- Lady S & I had a tête á tête
we talk'd of the neceʃsity of œconomy in
every situation. I was pleased to
hear a Young Woman in so brilliant
a stile of life -- married to a Man of
large fortune & very great expectations
as all Lord Mansfeilds fortune
will be his -- speak so sensibly



on a subject wch. I hardly imagined
she had thought on -- Lord Stormonts
household establishment is a very
large one -- 4 men out of livery
4 footmen -- Under Butler -- Porter.
2 Coachmen under Coachman -- 2 Postilion, 3 or 4 Grooms
&c. &c. Lord S is so good a Manager
that he has always kept ye. same num-
ber
of Servts. both as when he was in
Office -- no other Minister can say ye.
same -- & he has not a Shilling debt
      I came home abt. 10 -- left Lady S
much better than last Night -- she was
not so fatigued -- the Veseys sent
for me to join Miʃs Clarkes -- I went
we sup'd wth. our kind Neighbours --
-- ye. Conversation turn'd on Ireland --
lost Ireland! -- they Veseys have
again put off their Journey to Margate
came home ½ past 11 -- went immediately
to our Rooms


Friday76th: August 1784 At ½ past 8. went
down to breakfast wth. A Maria -- sat wth. her
an hour -- then dreʃs'd for ye. day -- sent to
enquire after Mrs. Johnstone -- she was
getting well very fast -- received a Note
from my cousin Stormont -- she told
me I should not come to her to day
but that she was in very good Spirits
&c. &c. if she was at I wrote an Answer



-- walk'd at 11 to Mrs. Delany staid wth. her
till 1 o'Clock arranged a Glaʃs Cabinet
of foʃsils Spars & Minerals for her, she
gave me a few specimens -- I saw some
from Cornwall wch. I had not seen before
there were some fine ones from
Derbyshire & Lancashire. the dear
old Woman dreʃs'd herself & left me to
pay her Compts. of congratulations to
Lord & Lady Weymouth -- I desired
her to present mine wch. would save me
a Visit & fine speeches. When I
came home found a Present from good
Mrs: Handcock of some valuable small tea
cups & Saucers of Egg shell China wch. she bought
in Holland many years ago & knowing I was
beginning a collection. she kindly sent me. I went over
immediately to thank her. She was in
------ her own Room -- I sat wth. her ½ an
hour -- when I came away she insisted
upon my acceptance of a little Silver lamp
wch. she had in a Cabinet -- I was obliged to
accept it -- She shew'd me some fine
Old Chinas & her darling Pidgeons &c.
I coud not stay to see ye. Veseys. employ'd
myself till dinner time in hanging
up Mr. Glovers Picture & other jobs of ye.
same kind -- Miʃs C's & I din'd together
sat & chatted till 6 -- separated till 7 --
met in ye. Drawing Room -- read & wrote
& work'd & were together ye. whole Eveg.



at 9 recd. a letter from Lord Stormont
to inform me Lady Stormont was
safely brought to bed at a little after
6 o'Clock this Afternoon of a Son
that tho' she wish'd much to have a
Daughter yet she bore her disappoint
perfectly well, & was quite comforted
at ye. sight of her fine boy. -- This is
her 6th. Son -- she never had a Girl --
she has now 4 boys.
The Veseys sent for us but we
excused ourselves.
Went to our Rooms soon after 11 --


Saturday 7th: August 1784
Dreʃs'd at 7 for ye. day at 8 went down
to Breakfast with A Maria -- sat &
work'd below -- till 11. employ'd my
self in working till 12. took leave
of A Maria -- she was going to her
Sister Jacksons for a few day's.
Mr. Vesey & Mrs. Handcock were so
obliging to carry me to Portland
Place -- as I wish'd to go myself
to enquire after Lady Stormont.
As ye. Servt. told me Lord Stormonts
Daughter -- was come from Ken-
Wood
. I went in for a few
Minutes. Miʃs I found her in the



Library writing to Relation's to
acquaint them of Lady S——'s being
brought to bed -- She told me she
wrote ye. first letter to me yesterday to me --
but Lord S—— wd. not let her send
it as he had writingten himself. Miʃs
Murray
told me she had seen Lady
Stormont
this Morng. & that she &
ye. dear babe were charming well.
-- She promised to give my love to
Lord & Lady S——. she goes back to
Ken-Wood but is to come to Town
every Morng. Miʃs Murray is
Lord S:'s only Child by his first wife
who died when she was very Young
She is near a Year older than her
Mother in law -- abt. 26. or 7 --
She lives wth. Lord Mansfield &
was educated by the ye. late Lady
Mansfield
& two of Lord Stormonts
Sisters
who also reside wth. Lord
Mansfield
-- She is pleasing.
good humour'd -- well accomplished,
& conducts herself wth. that
propriety wch. ought to distin



guish
a Woman of fashion &
good education. -- Mr. V & Mrs:H:
then took me to Mrs. Boughtons
in Cavendish Square -- she was out
& I was saved a disagreeable Visit.
-- they then carried me to Mrs. Delanys
& promised to come for me again
in an hour. Mrs. D—— seem'd very
well -- A Mrs: Williams & her Niece
Miʃs Capper were wth. her they soon went
away there was something so prepoʃseʃsing
in Mrs: Williams countenance, manner,
& dreʃs -- that I desired Mrs.. Delany
to inform me who this lady was.
& she gave me ye. following account.
Mrs. Williams -- was suitably married
to a Gentleman of good fortune. it was
a match of inclination & they were
mutually happy, a few short years only
she enjoy'd the society of her amiable
Husband -- let ye. feeling heart judge
what she felt when one Morning
(without any previous illneʃs) she
found him lying dead by her side.
for 12 Years she shut herself up from
all society, only admitting ye. Visits
of her nearest Relations -- the last



12 Years she has ------ receivd some
of her old friends & now & then
pays them a visit -- but lives
in a retired manner -- abt. 10 Miles
from London -- her principal
amusement is the care of her
Garden & the study of Botany
She has a handsome independency
& lives in stile suitable to an
elegant mind -- without parade --
every thing about her is neat as
her dreʃs, & proper as her manner.
Never having been bleʃs'd with
Children -- she took a Brothers
Daughter to live wth. her -- the
Young Lady I saw -- who appears
as if she would do credit to her
Aunt. Miʃs Capper seems to be
abt. 16. not handsome, but looks
Modest & civil.
Mrs. Betty Granville a Cousin
of Mrs. Delanys succeeded Mrs. W.
She is ye only one left of that name.
-- A Maiden . of 70 I should think
she was Maid of Honor to Queen
Caroline
. Mrs. Delany was Niece



to ye. Minister Lord Granville.
Mrs. B:G: told us she had been
to congratulate her Nephew
Lord Weymouth on the approa-
ching
marriage of his daughter
Sophia wth. my Lord St. Asaph
-- the Veseys came for me &
I left the two Ladies agreeably
occupied in bestowing praises
on Lady Weymouths children
&c. -- we came home after
promising to dine wth. our
hospitable Neighbours -- I read
for an hour & half in Mrs: Carters Epictetus
at ½ past 4 Miʃs Clarke & I went
to the Veseys there was no other
Company -- we sat so long at
Desert that I took out my Work
Mrs: Vesey told us some anecdotes
of People in Ireland -- & of places
there. few people relate more
agreeably than Mrs. Vesey -- her
imagination is so luxuriant
that she always embellishes
-- not that she is guilty of telling



falsehoods -- but the sweetneʃs
of her own Nature always makes
her see things & people in the
most favourable point of view.
if there is sometimes an
unlucky shade in ye. Picture
she is blind to it -- of course
her descriptions are pleasing
to all those to like to contemplate
only ye. most beautiful objects
for she has ye. art of describ[ing]
so well that You see all the
objects of her sometimes poetic
Fancy. After having given me
an Account of Mr. Veseys fine
Place in Ireland -- she gave me the
following lines to read -- I read them
aloud & I was much pleased to see ye.
tear of sensibility steal down
Mr. Veseys cheek .. In Mr Veseys
beautiful Grounds at Lucan near
Dublin he had placed an Obelisk.
Mrs. Vesey walking with him
one day & looking on it, expreʃsed
a Wish that she might be



burried Under it & that when
he died he wd. be laid in the
- same grave. he immediately
took out his pencil & wrote
thise lines & giving them to her
said he wd. comply wth. her re-
quest
& that should be their
Epitaph
Near this fair sculpture sleeps a pair
In Church yard his'try wondrous rare,
Who liked the busy hum of Men,
Then joy'd to see their fields again,
Who dreʃs'd ye. Grove, or led ye. Rill,
To shine and bable down ye. Hill,
Who Nature felt, & void of art
Gave to ye. poor, & good, their heart,
Who lov'd when young, yet died old friends
A bleʃsing fate but seldom sends.
Mr: & Mrs: V: are Cousins -- they
were attach'd to each other from
their cradles -- Mr. V early
hoped to be united to ye. object



of his heart -- but Mrs. Vesey
was forced to ye. Altar at 15 by
the arbitary will of an arbitary
Father who obliged her to marry
a disagreeable old Man -- she
was beautiful -- & he in his 70th-
Year was too much captivated
to reject a forced consent --
the only excuse ye. father had
for sacrificing his daughter
was, that ye. Gentleman was
his friend & he had given
his honor to give him his
Child in marriage -- this
Man lived some Years during wch. time -- Mrs.
V.
behaved irreproachably --
when he had been dead a
Year -- Mr. Vesey's constancy
was rewarded by her.
I came home for a Quarter of an
hour to give some orders -- return'd
to tea -- at ½ past 7 Mrs. Delany
sent ye. Coach for me -- Mrs.
Vesey
& Miʃs Clarke accompanied



me -- I sat Miʃs C— down near
ye. Park -- she was going to take
her afternoon walk -- Mrs. V——
& I went to Mrs. Delany -- Mrs.
Sandford
& her Eldest Son who is
an agreeable genteel Young
Man -- a Young Lady & Lady Wallingford were
with -- I had my Work table
& we talk'd of Air Balloons
& weddings -- Miʃs Lucan --
Bingham
Lord Lucans 3d.
Daughter is going to be married
to Mr. Lindsay a Gentleman
of large fortune in Ireland
-- it is thought a great Match for her
&c &c &c Mrs. Veseys Coach
came soon after 9 -- I forced
her awar as I fear'd Mrs. D——
wd. be too much fatigued as she
had had Company all day. we
took Mr. V: up at ye. Coffee house
in St James Street. I would not
go hein wth. them but came
home -- instead of writing letters



letters, as I ought to have
done I endulged myself in
writing my extracts from
Mrs. Delanys letters. Miʃs
Clarke
sat with me till past
11 -- I went to my Room at
12.




Sunday 8th. August 1784
Breakfasted alone -- read, wrote, dreʃs'd for
ye. day -- paid a little Visit to Miʃs Clarke
went to May fair Chapel, it rain'd, Mrs.
Vesey
& Handcock were going & they took
me in their Coach -- Mr. Sheelds ye.
Curate gave us an excellent ------ Sermon
after Church I proceeded to Stanhope
Street to pay a Visit to Lady Mary
Hume
-- met a poor Young Woman who
had hardly clothes to cover her -- she
was very big with Child -- she seem'd
an object of real compaʃsion & her
Story was an artleʃs one. Mrs. Vesey
& Handcock drove after me to &
overtook me before I got to Stanhope
Street I yielded to their intreaties
willingly to accompany them for
they were going to Sr. J: Reynolds to
visit his Niece Miʃs Palmer whom
I wanted to see as I was have not been able
to call upon her since ye. Death of her
Sister. we call'd in Berkeley Square to
enquire if Mr. Walpole was expected as
Mrs.V—— wish'd to invite him for the
Eveg. -- but to our mortification the
Servt. said he was not to be in Town
-- we then drove to Leicester Square. found
Miʃs Palmer alone. She was much recove[re]d
in health but she was so low that she
burst into tears when we saluted her



we sat wth her near an hour & left her
in better spirits -- she goes into Devon-
shire
in a few days -- but promised
to come & sit with me for two hours on
Wednesday Morn.g. Mrs. Vesey. Handcock &
I took treated ourselves with one turn
in ye. Picture Gallery & Room adjoining
from Sr: Joshua Reynolds went to Mrs-
Delany
-- Mrs.. V. staid in ye. Coach for me
I was with Mrs. D: only a few Minutes
as it was near ye. time of her going
to Prayers & she expected ye. Clergyman
every moment. Richard brought me
a Note from Lady Dartrey to St. James's
Place -- to invite Mrs: Delany to go to
Chelsea tomorrow Morng wth. me -- this
she could not do as Mrs: Boscawen was
to make her a visit as I found Mrs. D
was to have Lady Bute & Lady Weymouth
in the Afternoon I told her not to
expect me. from Mrs. Delanys we went
to Sr. Robt. Herries -- left word there that
Mrs. Veseys desired ym. to come to her
in ye. Eveg. I then came home. wrote
an Answer to Lady Dartreys Note &
had two hours quietly to myself -- wch.
I hope I did not make an unprofitable
use of. ¼ past 4 Miʃs Clarke & I went
to ye. Veseys who had insited insisted
on our dining wth. them. there was no other



company. -- we sat at Desert till
½ past 6. Mrs. Vesey & I had a
long argument relative to the
education of Women -- Mr. Vesey &
Mrs. Handcock were on my side
Miʃs Clarke as usual was dumb
& what was more mortifying
she did not seem even to listen
to our debate. after amusing
ourselves for an hour & half, for
we were very friendly opponents
we left ye. dining Room -- as I did
not chuse Coffee & Mrs. V. has the
happy art of making her guests
feel under no constraint. I came home
to endulge myself in the luxury
of being quiet & alone for an
hour. I read one of Blairs Sermons
& wrote out a letter of Miʃs H.
More
's to Mrs: Vesey wch. she had
given me. Richard brought me a
good account of Lady Stormont & the
Child -- & I heard Mrs. Johnston was
pretty well again. at 8 o'Clock I
return'd to ye. Veseys -- Sr. Robt & Lady
Herries
came to Tea -- they staid
till 10 -- agreeable lively conversation



Air Balloons. -- Superstition --
ye. talk'd of marriages -- & how people
love to interfere judge of ye. conduct
of others -- however there was neither
scandal or illnatured remarks --
& we ended with Madneʃs & Bedlam
had I time it wd. be amusing
to write down ye. Dialogues of
this Eveg.s conversation. the Veseys
wd. not suffer me to leave them
so & as it was ye. last Eveg. I consented
Miʃs Clarke & I therefore staid supper
-- we talk'd of Dear Anna Maria &
Spoke of her as she well deserved.
As A M: made me consent to let
her acquaint ye. Veseys wth. my
engagement to Mr. D: upon promise
they wd. not mention it in general
Society. his health when there is no other company is always
drank. & Mrs: V—— generally torments
me for ½ an hour wth. an idea that
she has taken into her head that I
shall certainly never come to Town --
that my friends will lose me &c &c
& aʃsuring me it requires all her
charity not to hate my Dear friend
after chatting on indifferent subjects Miʃs C & I
came ½ past 11 Mr. Stanhope had call'd again beg'd to
see me before Tuesday next.



Monday 9th.. August 1784 --
Dreʃs'd at ½ past7 -- B. in my own Room
Mr. Saunders Ye. Painter came at
10 -- sat for an hour & half, I talk'd
to him as much as I could to prevent
his giving me ye. countenance of
a fool for I felt amazingly silly,
I design to have ye. picture ye.
size of a Ring.. Saunders was very
well pleased wth. me for I did not
torment him but desired him
to paint me as he thought best.
Lord Dartrey call'd -- he was not let
in -- he left word he would come
for me at two oClock -- recd. very
good accounts of Lady Stormont &
ye. Child -- sent to Mr. Stanhope to
say it was not in my power to
see him as I was going out of
Town. -- wrote a letter to Mr
Wiggins
to inform him I would
send to him on Wed. Morng -- Mr-
Planchée
came to enquire after
ye. Health of my Clock & Watches
I gave him one to repair &c &c
made Miʃs Clarke a Visit of
½ an hour.



My Uncle Frederick came at 1 o'Clock
he talk'd to me in a kind & affectionate
Manner. he was entirely persuaded
of that ye. good opinion I had of Mr
D
& his Father was well founded --
he told me that if they or I chose
to have ye. £1000 wch. is to be paid
to me (without deduction) of the
Estate wch. he inherited from my
father in Scotland -- he certainly
wd. raise ye. Money. but that as I
recd. 5 p:r. Cent & it was well secured
perhaps I might chuse to let
remain. that ye. £600 wch. he has on
bond & wch. on giving ½ a Years
Notice is to be paid in on ye.
13th. of May 1785, I should have
when I chose, for he said it
might be agreeable to me to have
the whole, or part of it before
that time, & if not, he would
keep it & give me ye. same inter-
est.... At 2 o'Clock Lord Dartreys
Coach came for me & my Uncle
took his leave. I went to Lord
D:
house in Stanhope Street where



he was -- we went together to his
Villa. he question'd me as to my
future plans, I aʃsured him
that they would be regulated
by what I found were agreeable
to Mr. D—— & I had not the
smallest doubt but that what-
ever
he proposed, wd. please &
satisfy all those kind friends
Who were interested about me.
Dear, charming, amiable Lady
Dartrey
flew wth. her sweet little
Julia to receive us -- if I could
be just what Lady Dartrey is
I think I should be certain yt.
My D—— never wd. repent his
choice. what a pattern is this
Woman for the whole Sex --
She is adored justly adored by
all who know her. but I must
not now indulge myself in
describing this best of Women.
Whilst Lady D. dreʃs'd before dinner
Julia took me to see her favourites



her chickens -- her Deer &c &c.
Mr. Antrobus Mr. Dawsons tutor,
an agreeable lively Young Man
join'd us -- he told me his senti-
ments
on a particular subject
wch. show'd ye. goodneʃs of his
heart & understanding. at 4 we
met to dinner -- there was only
Lord& Lady Dartrey Mr. Dawson
Mr. Antrobus & me -- when ye.
Servts. left us -- Lady D: gave
Mr. D——'s health -- & after, Lord
D:
gave his dear fathers.
The friendship of these excellent
Persons affect me always in
a manner wch. makes ye. tear
ready to start -- it goes in a
peculiar manner to my heart &
I feel somehow as if I was
not worthy of it -- & that they
were kinder to me than I
deserved. Julia join'd us at
Desert, we went into ye. Garden till
Coffee, amused ourselves & Miʃs



Dawson
by going in the Swing
& we made good fat Mrs. Palfrey
take her share in this exercise
Mrs. Palfrey lived wth. Lady as
Dartrey
as her own Maid before she married -- she
has been wth.. her 26 or 7 Years. -- she
is treated wth: that consideration
her affection to Lady D- merits
what happy beings are Lord. &
Lady Dartreys Servants!
Lord & Ldy. D & I had an hour &
½ quiet chat -- during wch. time
we were amused wth. two tolerable
French Horns, wch. two Men often
come & play before ye. Windows of
ye. Drawing Room wch. being close to
ye. Thames has a good effect --
Mr. Dawson & Antrobus join'd us
at tea -- it was so cold we had a
fire -- we saw a little Air Balloon
floating in ye. Air -- it was so
great a height that it seem'd a
very small black speck -- & was
soon out of sight -- Lady Dartrey



treated me with one sweet
song -- “To fair Fidelia” &c.
Julia sat up rather latter than
Usual that she might have
ye. pleasure of seeing two small
Suns & a little Wheel Play'd off
This little fire work she had
imagined to please & surprise
me. we play'd for an hour at
Pope Joan for pence to amuse
Mr.. Dawson -- & he was allow'd
to sit up to supper -- wch. was at
½. 9 o'Clock -- he left us as soon
as it was over. Lord & Lady
D.
Mr. Antrobus & I sat together
till ¼ before 11 -- cheerful in-
nocent
conversation fill'd the
time. Lady D. received an
invitation from ye. Queen this
Afternoon to spend next thursday
at Windsor being ye. P of W: Birth-day -- this was a little
Mal a propos as it was ye.
day fix'd to go to Tunbridge
however she sent word that she



wd. obey her Majesties command
& by saying she put of her
Journey till ye. next day evaded
ye. being ask'd to prolong ye. Visit
as she generally stays a Week or
ten days when invited to pay
her M: a visit at W -- ye. Q
sent word it was to be quite
a private party no other company -- & that she
was to bring only a Night Gown
this is ye. 2d. Prince of Wales's
Birth=day wch- has not been
Kept. I imagine he will not
pay his Compts. at W: &c &c
Mrs. Palfrey came to me after
I was in my Room -- I am so great
a favourite of hers that when she is
at liberty she never will suffer
Lady Dartreys Maid to come to me,
she staid chattering ¼ of an hour
begging me to go to Tunbridge wth
her Lord & Lady & reproaching
me with for not having made
them more frequent Visits this



Summer

Tuesady 10th. August 1784 --
I did not close my Eyes after 4 oClock
I found Thomsons Seasons -- with his
beautiful images -- with contemplation
of ye. Thames wch. I saw frm my Windows with my own wandering
Thoughts I paʃs'd my time till 8 oClock
when I dreʃs'd myself -- Mrs. Palfrey came
& aʃsisted me Lady Dartrey came to me &
would also insist upon being my fêmé
de Chambre. I accompanied her down
stairs.


Tuesday 10th. August 1784 continued
Lord & Lady Dartrey & I breakfasted together
(Mr Dr. & his Tutor alway's ------ only
accidentally make their appearance in
a Morning) -- it was so wet & cold that
we had a fire: dear little Julia made her
appearance before we rose from Breakfast
after wch. Lady D—— in a judicious pleasant
way taught her her french Verbs -- at
10 oClock Dr. Warren came to give advice
how they were all to take ye. Tunbridge
Waters &c &c &c. I left them to settle
this important affair & amused my-
self
with looking over Cowleys Geometri
cal
Plates -- the different Problems of
Euclid are drawn upon Pasteboard
Paper & cut so that You may lift them up & see
the Solid forms. &c &c I suppose a
profound scholar might despise
all this -- but I think it a pretty
Work for Ladys or young beginners.
When Dr. W—— went away Lord Dartrey
set out for London -- at 12 o'Clock
Lady Dartrey read Prayers to her Servts-
& Children -- this does not take up above
a ¼ of an hour & she always does it
unleʃs something particular prevents
her. it is also a good reading leʃson to
Julia -- who reads ye. Chapter wch. is
ye one for ye day in ye new Testament

Psalms -- Lady Dartrey only reads ye. Chapter
in ye. New testament for ye day in Doddridge with
his improvement.



I aʃsisted Lady Dartrey in sorting letters
till -- I read several of Lady Dowgr. Spencers
Lord Shelburnes -- Mrs. Veseys &c &c they
all did credit to ye.. writers of them -- but
Mrs. Veseys were ye. only ones I wish to be
poʃseʃsed of -- so much fine imagination --
yet so natural & so characteristic. so
entirely from ye: heart. &c &c --
My Dear friend & I were led to talk
over past events from ye. contents of
some of ye. letters -- painful were some of ye.
recollections! five or 6, -- indeed I
believe more, of our intimates who were of my
age were dead in ye. space of 9 Years
& very many of our mutual acquaintance, of Lady
Dartrey
s, -- & she is not above 46 --
“Hence fond remembrance prompts unbidden tears,
“And something sadly solemn mingles still,
“With every thought of time for ever gone,
“Distinct from past events of good or ill,
“Or View of life's swift changes hastening on:
“Blast ye. fair buds of hope, or snatch from sight
“The dear Companions of our social way
“Absorb'd at once in death's impervious night.
“The sadneʃs hence: but hence ye. sweetneʃs too
“For well spent time soft whispers to ye. Mind
“Hopes of a blest eternity behind.
“ -- -- -- -- -- when eternal day
“shall gladsome dawn, at once its glorious ray
“Shows ye. fair scenes of happineʃs complete:
“Then friends, Companions, Lovers joyful meet,
“Thence never more to part. &c &c



At 1 o'Clock I parted from my dear friend
-- I never shall lose ye. recollection of
ye. kind things she said to me at parting.
I had her Coach to convey me to Town
I took Mrs. Palfrey with me & made her
accompany me to Mr. Lawtons as I
did not like to pay him a visit alone.
he was very glad to see me -- I staid
abt. 20 Minutes & promised that Miʃs
Clarkes
& I would come & drink tea
with him -- he was so polite that he
wd. come out in ye. Rain to hand us
into ye. Coach -- his little Room was like
an Oven for he had a fire, I was glad
to get into ye: air again.[1] Mrs. Palfrey
Went on wth: me to Clarges Street -- she had
busineʃs therefore I did not detain her
to come in. I had ye. Pleasure of finding
Dr. AMaria return'd we work'd & chatted
together till dinner time Bell join'd us
Our good Neighbours ye. Veseys set off for
Margate to day -- I would not go & take
leave of them as it wd. have made us
all low & uncomfortable. they are so
far advanced in life that & are so infirm
that one always dreads one shall not
Meet again. din'd at home with Miʃs
Clarkes
-- we sat together till 6 -- A M——
play'd for ½ an hour. from ½ till past
¼ before 7 separated -- met then to
tea. Mrs. Delany came at 7 accompan[ied]
by Mrs. & Mr. Sandford -- they did not
come in, but took me with them to



Mrs. Delany's -- Mr. Sandford left us to
go to ye. Play. I spent my time wth. these
two amiable old Woman much more to
my satisfaction than If I had been in
ye. gayest & most brilliant entertainment.
Mrs. Delany inform'd me she had seen
Mrs. Walsingham & Miʃs Boyle yesterday
that she had told Mrs. W: all about me
for she thought she might have taken
it ill of me had I not done so.
Mrs. W: did me Ye. honor to speak
of me in a manner I can not
repeat -- for it was flattering &
far far from beyond my deserts.
I arranged Prints for Mrs. D—— & we
had reasonable sensible converse
till ½ past 9 o'Clock. I had ye. Dʃs
Coach. set Mrs. Sandford down At her house when
I came home joind Miʃs Clarkes
wrote a few lines to my D
& sent a portion of Diary. wch. I
sent by this post. [2]
A M. sat wth. me till ½ past 11 --
we then went to our Rooms


Recd. a good Acct. of Lady Stormont
& her little boy.



Wednesday 11th. August 1784
Dreʃs'd before 8 for ye. day. breakfasted
in my own Room. -- work'd notable
Work till 11 when Saunders came
A. M. was so good to sit with me
whilst he took my Picture he
staid an hour & ½. -- Wm. Benn
brought me ye. Money from Mr.
Wiggins
& ye. rect. of ye. Acct: &c
Recd. a Note from Miʃs Murray wth. very
pleasant intelligence of Lady Stormont
& ye. Child -- she said should come to me
on Friday Morng at 11 to pay me
a Visit. Miʃs Palmer came at
2 & sat with me till 4. she gave
me the whole Story of Mr. Bamfields
persecution. &c &c &c
She was just gone when Lord
Stormont
paid me a Visit, he
sat ½ an hour -- he told me
Lady Stormont wish'd to see me
& that he thought it would
be improper for me to go
tomorrow, that he would send
her Coach at 1 o'Clock. I had



ye. happineʃs of receiving a letter
frm. Derbyshire -- I also recd.
letters from Miʃs Gunning &
Mrs. Carter. sent to Mrs. Johnston
heard she was quite well again
din'd at home -- good old Mrs.
Russel
din'd with us. Miʃs Clarke
did not come in till we had almost
din'd -- she had been 5 hours
in a Coach to see the Air Balloon
at Chelsea -- & all she saw, was,
ye. top of it. the Mob were so
enraged that ye. Chevalier Moret
wd. not let it ascend on acct. of ye.
Rain that they set fire to it &
destroy'd what cost some hundred
of Pounds -- besides ye. labour
& anxiety of ye. poor Man.
I came to my Boudoir at
6 oClock to answer Mr. D's
letter




[3]


[4]


11th. August 1784continued.
Answered my D's letter wch. I sent
to ye. Post -- Mrs. Glover came at 8. &
Mr. Glover at 9 o'Clock -- they sup'd
& staid, with me till 11 -- Dear Mr. Glover ask'd me
many questions -- was much satisfied
with ye. answers I gave him & drank
Mr: D & his Sons health &c &c
Mr. & Mrs. G gave me said that Mr.
D
& I must make them a Visit
at Sunning Hill -- they promised
to spend every Eveg wth. us they staid
in Town wch. is till Saturday --
After they left us A. M. play'd a
leʃson to me -- & then we went to
our Rooms -- rec'd very good
accounts of Lady Stormont & ye. Child


12 August Thursday. dreʃs'd ½ past 7 for
ye. day -- B: in my own Room -- work'd
till 10 -- Saunders came -- A M sat
wth. me part of ye. time -- she went out
wth. her Sister & ye. Glovers -- Mr Saunders
kept me sitting for two hours -- when
he left me Lady Herries made me
an agreeable long Visit -- She told me
that she was at Chelsea Yesterday
to see ye. Chinese Air Balloon yt-



Most people thought Mr. Moret
must know that it could not
succeed -- it was an old one that had
faild in france -- he had got
Subscriptions they say to ye. Amount
of £2000. it was a Miracle he
escaped ye. fury of ye. Mob &c
at 1, o'Clock Lady Herries left me
& Lady Stormonts Coach came for
me -- went to Portland Place. I
was very happy to find my pretty
amiable Cousin as well as poʃsible
I sat by her bed side 3 hours -- I
was quite charm'd wth. ye. dear infant
& think him very pretty. Lady S——
is so fortunate to be able to nurse
him as well as ye. others, that is to
say William & Charles, for she was
not so happy as to Nurse George.
her Brother Coll. Cathcart came &
sat ½ an hour with us, Lord
Stormont
just look'd in before he
went to ye. house of Lords. little
George was allowed to come in for
a few minutes. Lady Stormont
told me that I must dine soon
at Lord Mansfields at Ken Wood
as Lord Stormonts Sister wish'd
to see me very much &c
we talk'd on various topics but



she true Mother like most of her
Children
. She told me that her
Brother (youngest Brother) Archibald
& Mr. Lindsay (a Cousin of Lord
Stormont
s) & our Aunt Dowgr.
Lady Warwick
were to be ye. Sponsors
for ye. Child who is to be named
Henry-Hamilton (Murray)
I had her Coach came home ½
past 4 din'd with Miʃs Clarkes.
------ after dinner had the
Man with the Stuffs Lady Wake
desired me to get for her -- chose
Mr. Wakes Coat & her Habit --
Wrote a letter to Lady Wake
wch. I had just finish'd when
Mrs. Delany with Mrs. Sandford
& her eldest Son came for me
we took an airing to Kensington
& at 7 got to St. James's Place
Lady Bute came to tea -- Air Balloons
ye. Marriages talk'd of particularly
Lord St. Asaphs & Miʃs S: Thynne
Lady Bute left Mrs. Delany at 8
o'Clock, & Mr. Sandford went to see



ye. illuminations in Honor of
ye. Prince of Wales's birth day wch-
were uncommonly beautiful &
Brilliant -- Mrs. D. Mrs- S & I, had
an hour to ourselves -- I told Mrs-
D
what my D—— had said of her
in his last letter that he had
seen Mr. Dewes -- she was very
Much pleased & expreʃs'd a kind
impatience to see my friend.
I read her ye. letter I had recd. from
Mrs.. Carter as she had mention'd
her ... at 9 oClock Mr- Sandford
return'd -- & the Ducheʃs's Coach
was ready for me. I set Mrs.
Sandford
down -- she insisted &
Mrs Delany desired that Mr.
Sandford
should accompany
me home as the People in
the Streets seem'd very riotous
& there were hundreds hallooing
& throwing Squibs & Crackers &c
I thought it wd. be ye. heigthht of
Prudery to object, & consented.
St. James's Street was so crowded
that the Coachman was obliged



to go a great Round -- what I
saw of ye. illuminations was very
pretty. there were such great
rejoicings that I think it must
have been a party affair, as
I never saw every thing equal
to it on any the Kings or Queens
Birth day. how apt are the
multitude to adore the rising
Sun!

Mr. Sandford took his
leave after politely handing me
out. -- I found our Dear Leonidas
& Mrs. Glover with Miʃs Clarkes -- we
sup̄'d at ½ past 9. & they staid with
us till ½ past 11. friendly converse
Mr. Glover was fatigued & his eyes
were bad -- we went to our Rooms
as soon as ye Glovers left us




13th. August 1784 Tues Friday
Breakfasted wth. Anna Maria -- at 10
oClock dreʃs'd for ye. day. at 11 Miʃs
Murray
came she sat an hour with
me -- brought me a very polite in-
vitation
from her Aunts to come
wth. Mrs. Delany to Ken Wood to
dine there. she pleased me very
much by telling me I was a great
favourite with of her fathers (Lord
Stormont
. Mr. Sandford came &
she left me. he read to me while I work'd the
debates in ye. House of Lords yester-
day
Lord Stormonts speeches &c &c.
A Maria join'd us. he ask'd me
to go & see ye. Air Balloon at the
Lyceum -- I agreed provided Miʃs
Clarke
wd. accompany us -- A. M.
was not well enough having a
pain in her face. Miʃs Clarke
Consented & we set out -- it was
not a pleasant walk as we were
obliged to walk through a part of
ye. Strand -- & ye. day very hot.
however it was worth our Walk
& gratified my curiosity as I
had not yet seen one of these
curious Vehicles -- the Balloon



is a perfect Sphere of abt. 33
feet in Diameter & 102 feet in
Circumference. it contains 18200
Cubic feet of inflammable Air
& composed entirely of Oil'd silk
the Colors are Green & Red in
parts thus
[5]
red, green, ye. silk join'd by stong stitching
ye. Oars are net works wth. flaps of oil silk
Oil silk cases or pipes through wch. ye. inflammable Oil is convey'd by large bellows at ye. end
Wings
Galler
2 Loose Oars wch. are held in hand
& are on each side & directed by ye. persons in ye. Gallery
ye. flapping of ye. Wings & Oars are of ye. Oild Silk [6]



The Gallery contains one pair of
Wings, wch. are raised high, & move
horizontally, for ye. purpose of in-
creasing
ye. Motion it receives from
ye. Wind: also one pair of Oars, wch. will
move vertically; & are meant to
raise or depreʃs ye. Balloon at ye.
pleasure of Aerial Travellers.
Mr. Lunardi & an English
Gentleman will ascend into ye
Atmosphere. I saw a Genteel
handsome looking Young Man who
they told me was ye. english Gentleman
who was to go up. the King & Queen
are to see this B: ascend. it is to
be conveyed to Chelsea Hospital Garden
from whence it is to ascend be
launched. Tickets are iʃsued at
ye Lyceum at 1 Guinea, ½ a
G: & a Crown. entitling ye. bearer
to an admiʃsion into ye. Gardens
at Chelsea Hospital on ye. day ye.
Balloon is to be launched, & also
to a sight of it before it leaves
ye. Lyceum -- we gave 1 shilling
a piece.



After having seen this curious Machin[e]
& been made very sick by the horrid
smell of it. I was rejoiced to breathe
even ye. Air of ye. Strand. in coming
home I went into two Shops bought
a Morng. Gown & Threads &c --
Met Mr. Jackson & Coll. Stephens
spoke to both (Coll. S: is one of ye.
Prince of Wales's Equerries) he seem'd
to stare at Mr. S -- & wonder who I was
flirting with -- we got home ¼ past
3 -- Mr. S—— took his leave. I
desired him to make my excuses
for not waiting on Mrs. Delany this
Morng., & also to tell her as she was
to have Company I wd. not come
to her in ye. Afternoon, for I felt
so exhausted with my walk that
I was sure I should not be able to
stir out. A: Maria & I sat together
till dinner time -- din'd comfortably
at home. A. M. play'd two or 3 leʃsons
after dinner -- we separated from 6
till 7. Miʃs C's & I join'd met
to tea -- amused ourselves with
writing -- &c. at 8 o'Clock Mr. Sandford
came with Mrs. Keenes Coach with full



powers from Dr. Mrs. Delany & his
Mother to carry me to Mrs. D's -- there
was no refusing, I went with him
Mrs. D: knowing how fond I was of
Music sent for me to hear Miʃs
Keene
play on ye. harpsicord -- there
was no other Company than Mrs
Sandford
Mrs. Keene & her daughter.
(Mrs. K. is Sister to Lord Dartmouth
& Lady Brudenal) Miʃs K: at
ye. age of between 6 & 7 began to play.
she is now between 9 & 10 Years old
a pretty unaffected child. her genius
for Music is astonishing -- she
does not practise much & though
she has been well taught has
learnt only from a Woman, a
Miʃs Reynolds of Oxford. She
play'd 2 very difficult leʃsons of
Schroters. & in such a manner
that ye. composer must have
been charm'd -- such wonderfull
execution & taste -- & her pretty
little hands so perfectly well
placed on ye. instrument. she did



not play by rote but read the
Notes. My Uncle William who
is one of ye. best & nicest judges of
Music we have, has said she
will be one of ye. finest players
in England. & he thought this
Child ye. only person worthy of
some Music he brought with
him (this last time) from
Italy. Mrs- Keene was so obliging
as to bring me home at 9 o'Clock.
Mr. & Mrs. Glover spent ye. Eveg.
with us -- took leave of us at
11. as they return to Sunning Hill tomorrow they in ye. most kind and
friendly manner insisted desired
me to aʃsure Mr. Dickenson
& his Son that they hoped
to have ye. pleasure of forming
a friendship with them & in the
most friendly manner charged
me to tell Mr. Dickenson that
their House in Albemarle Street



was entirely at his Service
for any length of time he chose
& that wd. leave order wth. the
Woman who keeps ye. House
to receive him, or his father
& the Servts. &c &c
we went to our Room as soon
as ye. Veseys left us.

Saturday August 14th. 1784
Dreʃs'd at ½ past 7 for ye. day --
Work'd notable work -- B in my
Own Room -- Recd. a letter from
Windsor -- written in three parts
one from Miʃs Goldsworthy one
from Mrs. Cheveley & Madlle-
Moula
-- Lady Dartrey had
I suppose mention'd my
engagement -- each of these
Ladyies expreʃs'd the warmest
Wishes for my future happineʃs
Miʃs Goldsworthy reproach me wth. not
having communicated it to her &c
Recd. a Note from Lady Dartrey
wch. I should have had yesterday
Call'd at Wirgman ye. Jeweller gave him ye.
Picture to set in a Ring to have
it on Tuesday[7]



She told me she expected me to
write long letters -- that she was
just setting out for Tunbridge it
was ten o'Clock & she arrived at
Chelsea from Windsor at 8 oClock
Mr. Saunders came at 11 -- I sat till
12 A Maria was so good to keep me
Company -- he finish'd my picture
& left it with me. I paid him
for it. I was very well satisfied
but Miʃs C -- & A: M: found
fault. Wm. Benn was call'd in
as he happen'd to come home, he
was not satisfied -- nor was
Mrs. Betty -- in short there was
a contrariety of opinions -- some
thought ye. Mouth too large.
ye. other said it was ye. only feature
resembling -- &c &c &c
At 1 o'Clock Mrs. Delany sent ye.
Ducheʃs Coach for me I went
to her -- she told me she had recd.
a letter from Mr. Dewes -- shew'd
it me -- we conversed upon ye.
Subject &c &c



at 2 oClock we call'd upon
Mrs. Sandford sat sometime wth.
her she was not well enough to
join our party -- but Mr. Sandford
went with Mrs. D & me to Doctr
Turton
s at North End where
he has a pretty very small
Villa call'd a Cottage. Mrs. T
& her pretty innocent Cousin Miʃs
Noseley
recd. us wth. much apparent
pleasure. Mr. S. Miʃs N & I walk'd
round ye. shoruberry[8] & Garden &c.
ye. whole of wch. is 3 quarters of an
Acre. Dr: Turton join'd us before
4 o'Clock. he dyed my Cheeks
by warm Congratulations &
wishes -- he had been at
Windsor yesterday & Miʃs
Goldsworthy
had told him wthht.
Lady Dartrey had said to Lady
L: Clayton
&c. Miʃs G. sent
me by him many kind reproa
ches
& wishes. for he had
mention'd yt. I was to dine
at ye. Cottage &c &c



-- we had a handsome dinner
& chearful conversation --
Dr. T—— gave us an description
of a fine House Adam is
going to build for him in
Kent. upon an Estate he
has lately purchased. Dr.
T——
is very Rich -- his Wife was
a great Heireʃs he had some
fortune, & has made a
great deal by his profeʃsion
of Physician. he has not
ye. happineʃs of having any
Children. Mrs. T. & him he are
one of ye. very happiest Couple
I know -- attentive to each other
to ye. greatest degree even in
ye. most triffling occasions &
their affection seems to spring
immediately from ye. heart.


they are kind & good friends
of mine & I really believe



love me most sincerely --
they both took an opportunity
of saying how happy I should
make them by introducing
Mr. D—— & that they hoped
when ye. House in Kent was
built we should often spend
a Month there. & that in
ye. mean time their Cottage
& house in Town wd. often
be visited by us.
Mrs. Sandford came in the
Coach for us & was well
enough to drink her Tea
with us under the Apricot
Tree. at 7 o'Clock we took
leave of our agreeable enter-
tainers
. in our way home we
talk'd of Dr: & Mrs: Turton & each
agree'd in saying how happy
they were in each other &c
I set Mrs. D & Mrs. Sandford down
in St. James Place. Mr. Sandford



insisted so strongly upon going
wth. me to Portland Place & ye.
Old Ladies approving yt. I was
obliged to yield. I got to Lady
Stormont
s at 8 -- my polite
Beau got out to hand me &
then took his leave. I found
Lady Stormont & ye. sweet babe
very well she was got into ye.
1st. drawing Room. we chatted
on Various Subjects till 10 oClock
-- Richard came for me wth. a
Chair -- as Ldy. S—— had inform'd
me her Horses were to go part
of ye. way to meet Lord Stormont
who went on Friday to Tunbridge
to see Lord Mansfield & was to
return to night or tomorrow
when I came home found A
M.
but indifferent wth. ye. pain
in her face. heard that Dr
Mr. Glover was not able to go
to Sunning Hill as he had
been siezed wth. ye. gout in his



Stomach -- that he was however
better. Miʃs C's & I sat together
till ¼ past 11 -- then went to
our Rooms -- ye. Dyer came to
settle abt. ye. sattins


Sunday 15th August -- 84
At 9 went down Breakfasted wth.
A. M. sat chatting wth. her till past
10 -- she was better. then dreʃs'd for
ye. day -- read some thing serious. walk'd
at 11 to Mrs. Delanys as I had promis'd
(she went to 8 oClock Chapel at St.
James's) I sent Richard to Church
was wth. Dr. Mrs. Delany till near
3 -- I found her pretty well after
her little excursion of yesterday.
we were alone till near 2. we
conversed abt. my D. &c &c
& we arranged things in one of
ye. Cabinets. she trusted me to
repair some fine delicate things
wch. her friend ye. Dʃs. had turn'd
for her some Years ago -- this was
------ small flowers in Ivory --
Vases &c. I wrote a letter for
her & myself to Lord Stormonts



Daughter to desire her to
acquaint her Aunts we would
dine wth. them at Ken Wood on
Tuesday next a Mrs [9]
came & sat near an hour -- I
went on with my Work & listen'd
to her & Mrs. Delanys sensible
conversation -- a ¼ before 3
My servt. came. I left my
beloved Mrs. D -- went to St.
James's -- Palace call'd on Mrs. Tracy
& Miʃs Tryon they were out I
left my Name, as I knew Mrs.
Boughton
was in waiting I also
call'd on her -- she was at her
apartment. she recd. me most
civily -- I sat ½ an hour -- she
invited me to dine at St. James's
whilst she was there. B. ye.
Month ye. Bedchamber Woman
is in waiting they dine at the
Maid of Honors table & have a
right to invite 1 Guest. &c



From St. James's came home.
read some Chapters &c. I could
not go to Chapel as it was after
3 o'Clock -- A. M. was gone to ye.
Glovers
-- Miʃs Clarke & I din'd
tête a tête -- we parted at ½ past
5 I begun a letter to Miʃs H. More
at ½ past 6 walk'd to Mr. Glovers
had ye. great pleasure of finding
him quite well again -- Miʃs
Clarke
came to us at 8. we spent
ye. Eveg. sociably -- at 10 took
leave of our good friends who
go to Sunning Hill tomorrow
had their Coach to bring us
home. we went to our Room
immediately -- My Uncle Fredk_
Mrs. & Miʃs Hamilton had call'd in ye. Morng.


Monday 16th. August 1784
At ½ past 8 went down to B——
with Dearest A. M. sat with her
till ½ past 9 -- then dreʃs'd for ye.
day -- work'd notable work -- had
Mrs. Scott who brought some things
home I had given her to do.
Mrs. Hawkins call'd but was not
let in.



abt. ½ past 11 walk'd to Mrs. Delany
a Mr. Fullwood was with her
looking over a Porte Fueille of
Prints -- this Gentleman invited
Mrs. D & I to come to his house
to see his Pictures &c. as it
was only ye. next door we went
he shew'd me (for Mrs. D: had seen
them before & went entirely to
please me) his -- House. took me
up even to ye. bed Chambers --
his Pictures -- his China -- his little
Cabinets. he has a few good
Pictures & many Copies -- wch. how-
ever
he pleases himself with
thinking originals. nothing could
exceed ye. neatneʃs of ye. whole
House & these were some
elegancies &c
After we had spent an hour
in pleasing Mr. Fullwood by
admiring his collection &c
Mrs: D. & I took our leaves --
As we return'd to Mrs. D's house



Mrs. Boscowan & her Daughter
(the Young Ducheʃs of Beaufort)
came. they staid near an hour.
Mrs: Boscawan took me aside &
said many very flattering things
to me -- after having made me
blush by her too great commen
dations
she touch'd my heart
very sensibly by the friendly
& maternal wishes she expreʃs'd
for my future happineʃs.
She desir'd I would contrive to
spend a day with her at her Villa.
After ye. Dʃs. & her Mother was
gone. I wrote a letter for Mrs-
Delany
to ye. Miʃs Murray's to
put off our going to Ken Wood
tomorrow as she was apprehen-
sive
of ye. great heat of ye. Weather.
I left her ¼ before three, came
home. recd. another letter from
Windsor -- it was from ye.
Princeʃs's English Teacher
Miʃs Planta -- it contain'd wishes
for my happineʃs &c &c



Recd. a very kind letter from
Miʃs Eliza Murray to inform
me how delighted her Aunts
were that I had accepted their
invitation -- that they had
long wish'd to be more acquaint
ed wth. me &c. I really think
I have some merit in not being
ye. vainest creature in the
World -- for people are so good
to me. I hope I shall continue
to derive benefit & not acquire
vanity -- by a steady persever
ance
in endeavouring to merit
ye. good opinion of those by
whom it is an honor to be
distinguished & liked. Coll. Cathcart call'd when I was out.
I employ'd myself till dinner
time in mending some China,
ye. Cover of Cup given me by my
dear deceased friend Lady Webb I
wd. not trust it out of my hands for
any other to do it & had ye. pleasure
of succeeding. din'd with Miʃs
Clarkes
. after dinner A. M. play'd



whilst I was busy in finishing my
Repairs. at 6 o'Clock Lady Stormonts
Coach came for me -- found her & ye
lovely infant quite well. we
chatted on various subjects -- she
told me that Lord Mansfield had
objected to ye. Childs having two Xtian
Names & yt. she was afraid she
must give up ye. one of Hamilton.
Lady S—— inform'd me that she
had recd. an Answer to a letter
wch. she had sent to her Sister
Mrs. Graham -- that a Page & ½
was fill'd wth: kind messages
to me & most afft. wishes &c
Lord Stormont join'd us at
8. he told me that he return'd
from Tunbridge Yesterday that
Lord Mansfield was quite recover'd
that he had seen Lord Dartrey &c.
Coll. Cathcart came in for ½ an
hour -- at 10 oClock I came
away had Lord S—— Chariot
-- his Servt. told me as I was
setting out that he had just



heard my Uncle William &
Cousin Chs. Greville were come
this Eveg. from Scotland --
I sat with Miʃs C's till ¼ before
12:
Mrs. D: made a very just observa-
tion
to day. She said that a
certain Woman of high rank
of our acquaintance dreʃs'd out
too much for a Woman of
Fashion & Quality -- I think
that as in breeding so in
dreʃs, People of real fashion
are distinguish'd by ease &
------ one generally ------ may
------ observe a much leʃs
ostentation of ornamental
decoration. a certain chasteneʃs
of dreʃs is wt. I admire.

Tuesday 17th August. At 8 o'Clock
Dreʃs'd for ye. day. went down at 9 to B.
with Dr. A. M. she was still suffering
with ye. pain in her face -- but she is
endow'd with so heavenly a disposition
that nothing alters for it her
temper. at 10 oClo I wrote a



Note to my Uncle William to
inform him I was in Town &
wish'd to see him -- hear he was
gone out early to Breakfast & therefor[e]
had no answer. at 10 oClock.
a Man brought me a lease leash of
[10] wch. came by the
Chester Coach from my D——son.
I immediately sent a brace in
a present to my Uncle Frederick
& kept one for our Table.
Mr. Wirgman ye. Jeweller brought
home my picture wch. I had
given him to set -- I paid him.
I pack'd it up & entrusted
it to ye. care of William Benn
to take it in to the City to send
by ye. Coach this Eveg. at 12
My Uncle Frederick came
to thank me for the Moorgame
he said he guess'd from whom
it came &c -- We talk'd
of ye. Stormonts I found
all ye. pains I had taken
had not gain'd all ye. ground



I wish'd. My Uncle was severe
in his censure of on ye. Queen
for her conduct towards me


[11]

I gave him ye. fine Prints of
Cook Voyages to look over
& sent for A Maria ------ I was
obliged to go at 1 oClock as
Lady Stormonts Coach came
for me (sent to Mrs. Delany
to excuse my not going to her
this Morng. recd. a kind Note
from her &c -- ) Lady Stormont
& ye. Child quite well -- we were very
much engaged wth. Mrs. Justi & Nurse
Hill
looking at ye. pretty things
ye Child was to wear at ye. Christening
when Lady Payne came & interrupted
us -- Lord Stormont & Sr. Raph
Payne
came to us for some time.
I made Lord S—— give me two
franks for Lady Dartrey & settled wth-
him abt our expedition to Ken
Wood next Sunday. Duke of Portland



came & Lord S left us -- some more
Matches were talk'd of -- Miʃs Woodley
to be marrided tomorrow to Mr. Banks
Admiral Digby Very soon to a ½ Sister
of Lady Cathcarts &c &c &c. heard of
all ye. fine things Miʃs Sophia Thynne is
to have for her Wedding Cloaths --
I staid wth. Lady Stormont till near 4
had her Coach went for her Hodgkinsons
to chuse some Muslins came home to
dinner -- din'd wth. Miʃs Clarkes -- A. M. not
much better -- she play'd two or 3 leʃsons
we parted at 6 -- met at 7 -- William Benn
came & told me he could not find out ye.
nearest stage to Taxal -- but went to try
in ye. City. I wrote 4 letters viz -- to Miʃs
Goldsworthy
. Miʃs Moula Mrs. Cheveley &
Miʃs Planta. at 8 Sir. Wm. Hamilton came
we had a tête a tête of 3 hours. he
seem'd very well satisfied wth. all I told him
abt. my D——son.[12] he gave me an account of
his journey through Wales, Scotland &c &c
of ye. state of his affairs -- we talkd of
Pictures -- Naples &c &c. he said that
I & Mr. D must come to Naples & that
if we staid a Year there it wd. answer
our expence of ye. Journey -- that he
should be happy to see us. he was most
Kind & Affectionate & I was made very
happy by his Visit. ye. moment he
left me I scribbled a hasty letter to inform
Mr. D. ye. picture was sent. I had just just
it to ye. bell man when Wm. Benn came &
told me it was not gone -- that he could not
venture to trust ye. box as he was not certain
wch. Coach went ye. nearest to Taxal -- Miʃs C's
were gone to bed. I sat up till 12 --
Mr. Stanhope came but was
[not] ------------ [Uncle] was with [me]
he left an imploring meʃsage to see me
before we went out of Town &c[13]

(hover over blue text or annotations for clarification;
red text is normalised and/or unformatted in other panel)


Notes


 1. The excessive warmth of Lawton's rooms in Northampton in August 1769 was considered noteworthy by John Dickenson's mother, Sarah (see HAM/1/3/1/1), just as in Chelsea in August 1784.
 2. Hamilton seems to have ended the entry here with a solid line, but then changed her mind and continued writing.
 3. This page is blank.
 4. This page is blank.
 5. Here Hamilton draws an annotated diagram of the Balloon. The text that follows has been transcribed from the diagram in its most logical reading order.
 6. This text appears arranged around and within the diagram of the balloon, in relation to the features it describes. See the image for the original text location.
 7. These three lines are written vertically along the right margin.
 8. In addition to the correction to the first syllable, Hamilton adds two unexplained strokes to give something like shrub/err/y.
 9. Hamilton seems to have left a gap here in order to fill in the name later.
 10. Either the red or the black grouse (OED s.v. moor n.1, Compounds C2, c. Accessed 20-09-2022).
 11. Hamilton draws three dotted lines here, suggesting a gap or something left unsaid (probably regarding Uncle Frederick's view of the Queen's conduct above).
 12. The three lines concerning Sir William's positive reaction are quoted in Anson & Anson (1925: 243).
 13. These last four lines are written vertically along the right margin.

Normalised Text


Tuesday 3d. August 1784 Clarges Street
Breakfasted in my own room -- paid Anna Maria
a short Visit -- her Cold much better. at
9 o'Clock set out to visit Mrs. Johnston
I found her more recovered than I expected
-- I sat an hour by her bed side
she seem much pleased with seeing me &c.
I was vastly glad to find her so comfortable
settled, & well situated for business,
I went into the Shop -- saw her husband
who did not appear very alert -- I
ordered home a loaf of Sugar. I asked
poor Johnston what she wished for
she said some Lavender Water & White
Wine which I sent her. from her went
to Bond Street to buy Lavender Water
& recollecting Mr. Saunders the Painter
lived in the Street went to him -- I settled
with him about a Miniature picture
for a Ring for Mr. Dickenson -- he promised
to begin it next Monday Morning at
10 o'Clock -- with some persuasion he
agreed to come to my house instead of
my going to his which as I have no
carriage would have been very inconvenient
as he lives a good way off
& I could not go in the day time
in Hackney Coach & Chair hire is
expensive. I then came home



passed Mr. Conway -- he bowed I did not
stop to speak to him -- answered Mr Dickensons
letter -- which I sent to the Post. I enclosed my
Diary -- Message from Lady Dartey to
beg me to dine & sleep at their Villa
I could not accept the agreeable invitation
being engaged to Lady Stormont.
AnnaMaria & I sat together for two
hours I decorated two small fine
screens for her with prints & Verses
Mrs. Vesey made us a little Visit as
did Miss Clarke -- I continued my
employment until ½ past 4 when
Lady Stormonts Coach came for me.
-- she was not quite so well to day --
Lord Stormont, Mr. Langlois & Colonel
Cathcart dined with us -- politics
the reigning topic -- after dinner Colonel
Cathcart -- look over 3 Papers to find which
had given Lord Stormonts speech
in the House of Lords yesterday most accurately
(for he was there). Woodfalls was
the best but he had, as well as the others
mis-stated -- mis-represented, &
mis-placed the order of words, as
well as added & omitted things.
heard that the Prince of Wales rode on
Horseback from Brighthelmstone



to day -- he set out at 4 in the
Morning -- attended only by Colonel Lake &
2 grooms he had relays of horses --
-- after he arrived in London he walked
8 miles -- & rode back to Brighton
in the Afternoon -- Brighton is above 60
miles from London. -- some people
say he came to meet Charles Fox
at Mrs. Armsteads, -- some, that
he came to purchase a fan for a
Lady -- & others that it was to
invite the D: de Chartres to Brighton
Lord Stormont & Colonel Cathcart left us at 8
Mr. Langlois sat on for sometime
with Lady Stormont & me -- he gave us an
Account of what alterations had
been made by Gobert at Chats
worth. how rapidly he was going
on (until the Duke of Devonshires Agent
remonstrated). to spoil the house,
he -- laid out 1500 in new
furnishing the Drawing Room
& all that he did was putting
new Chairs & sofas & a little
alteration to the Chimney piece



this Gobert was a Cook -- & is
now employed by the fine people
to decorated their houses instead
of their tables -- he has been the
principal person employed in
fitting up Carelton House. &c.
I came home about 10 -- sat with Miss
Clarkes until past 11. I wrote extracts
from Mrs: Delanys letters till ½
past 12


Wednesday 4 th. August. 84
Breakfasted with Anna Maria -- Isabella joined
us -- I sat chatting with them until
10 -- then dressed for the day -- worked &
at ½ past 11 walked to Mrs. Delany, she
was pretty well, but had had an indifferent
night. from 12 until 3 I was very busy
arranging some curious old China in
a Cabinet -- this dear Woman would not
trust any hands but mine to do it
-- I washed it, & she wiped
it -- Mr. Jerningham came in & found
us at our work -- he sat by us ½ an
hour. he brought Mrs. Delany one
of the prints of the great Air Ballon
which is to be let off next. tuesday, he



told us there were but 6 come out
& sent Mrs. Delany -- Servt. for one immediately
to send to my dearest friend. the eldest
Mrs. Sanford came in -- I left Mrs.
Delany at 3 o'Clock walked home, she
gave me three or 4 small specimens
of the Egg Shell China -- which I shall
ever value for the sake of the Donor
-- I enclosed the print in a frank &
sent it to the Post. Anna Maria sat with
me until 4 -- I was not quite well -- the
walking through a broiling Sun & having
fatigued myself in standing &c
at Mrs-. Delanys I believe was the
occasion -- Lady Stormont Coach came at
½ past 4 I went to Portland Place
Lord Stormont Colonel Greville & Cathcart
dined with us -- my Cousin Charles
promised his Sister to sit for his
Picture to Romney -- we consulted
together after dinner which would be the
best manner for him to be taken &c
he is a beautiful Young Man &
will make a charming interesting
Picture. we had the 2 dear Boys as
usual -- & Politics -- the Gentlemen
said that William Pitt had acted in an
unfair manner about the Navy Bills &



India affairs -- Lord Stormont & ColonelCathcart left us
at 8 -- I stayed until 9 -- left Colonel Greville
to keep Lady Stormont -- company -- I was
not quite well & came home -- had
Lady Stormont -- Coach as usual. sat with
the Miss Clarkes until ½ past 10 --
begun a letter to Mrs: Carter --
heard to day that Sir George Howards
Daughter Mrs. Vise died at Stoke
in Childbed -- I sincerely pity her
poor father -- she was his only
Child.
she has left 2 Children. I went to
bed before 11 o'clock
that good for nothing being Mr.
Coupland came again this Evening
he sent another letter a few days ago.
he is so wicked, that it would be
wrong to give him any thing as he
would make an improper use of any money
one could give him & he would accept of
no other relief . -- had a good account of
Mrs. Johnston, that one of my old Chairman who looked dying &c &c.


Thursday5th. August 1784 -- I breakfasted
in my own Room. Anna Maria made me
a Visit -- I was quite well again. at 11
o'Clock Lady Dartrey came -- she did not stay
long as I promised to follow her to
Stanhope Street & sit with her whilst



she dressed for the Drawing Room as
she was going there to take leave
before she went to Tunbridge where
she & Lord Dartrey go in a short time
for 6 Weeks. Mr- Jackson came to
see Miss Clarkes & me. -- he walked wth.
me as far as Lord Dartreys -- I saw the Prince
of Wales who passed by to go to Mrs. Arm
steads -- fortunately he did not see me.
this is another flying excursion
from Brighthelmstone -- I had the
happiness of spending an hour & half
with my most engaging & most amiable
Friend -- she was very solicitous to
know if I really felt happy in the
prospect of being united to my
Dickenson -- & was satisfied with my
assurances in the affirmative -- she desired
I would allow her (some time hence)
to write to Lady Charlotte Finch & her Sister Lady
Louisa Clayton to inform them of my engagement
-- she wished all those friends
who were at a distance should know that
what I intended doing with the
warmest approbation of all those who
were already acquainted with it & who were
interested in my happiness. How
shall I ever repay the goodness of so many
kind friends as I am blessed with?
I think myself the most fortunate
of human beings -- those to whom I



give the Title of dear Friends are people of
the most excellent characters & best
principles -- I am by their example
encouraged to persevere in Virtue &
guard myself from folly & vice. &c.
I possess the heart of an amiable Man
whom I love, & whom I have ever preferred
to every other -- I not only ought
to be but I can truly say I am most
grateful to Providence.
these beautiful lines of Addison better
express my gratitude than any thing I
can say --
Thy bounteous hand wth. worldly bliss
      Has made my Cup run over
And in a kind & faithful friend
      Had doubled all my store
Ten thousand thousand precious gifts
      My daily thanks employ;
Nor is the least, a cheerful heart,
      That tastes those gifts with joy.
Through every period of my life
      Thy goodness I'll pursue
And after death in distant Worlds
      The glorious theme renew.

the rest of this beautiful ode is
(I believe) in Number 453 of the Spectator.



I saw dear Lord Dartrey for a few Minutes
I promised to spend one day at Chelsea
before they went to Tunbridge. I went
in the Coach with my good friends as far as
St. James's Place where I took leave of them
& went to Mrs. Delany -- I found her
charming well & in high spirits for
Lady Weymouth had been to communicate
to her that her 3d. Daughter Miss Sophia Thynne had
received proposals from Lord St. Asaph
-- that Miss Sophia -- & herself & Lord Weymouth
approved very much &c. Lord St. Asaph
is a Young Man of very good character
it is a suitable match in every Respect.
Lord Ashburnham his father is
pleased with his choice. I sat an hour
with Mrs. Delany -- walked home through the
Park -- met Mr. Houghman & spoke to him.
The Man brought home Mr. Glovers
Picture -- it is not a pleasing likeness
but I ought not to find fault as he
would not have sat for any body but me
& he was ill when the picture was taken.
I had not time to walk so far as Mrs.
Johnston I sent & had very good
accounts of her -- finished a long letter
to dear Mrs. Carter which I sent by to days post.
Received a letter from Lady Wake. she
kindly regrets my not being able to
Visit them this Summer &c&c&c



sat ½ an hour wth. Anna Maria -- ¼ before
5 Lady Stormont Coach came for me -- only
Lord & Lady Stormont & me -- Lord Stormont joined
very soon after we went into the Drawing
Room after dinner -- general topics --
heard that Lady Charlotte Bertie was to
marry Mr. Lenox (the Duke of Richmonds
Nephew & heir) -- Lady Sutherland
Lord Strathaven (Lord Aboynes Son)
Mr. North (Lord Norths eldest Son) it is
said is to marry one of the Miss Hobarts
(one of the Twins) this is not thought likely to take place, as
she has not sixpence & he is ruined
& it is not likely his Grandfather
Lord Guilford will part with any Money.
whilst he lives. Lord Euston has
made proposals & is accepted by Lady
Maria Waldgrave -- but his father
the Duke of Grafton will not give consent
which is thought very cruel & unreasonable
&c &c. Lord Stormont left us at
8 he promised me to make Mrs. Delany
a Visit -- Lady Stormont & I had a tête á tête
we talked of the necessity of economy in
every situation. I was pleased to
hear a Young Woman in so brilliant
a style of life -- married to a Man of
large fortune & very great expectations
as all Lord Mansfeilds fortune
will be his -- speak so sensibly



on a subject which I hardly imagined
she had thought on -- Lord Stormonts
household establishment is a very
large one -- 4 men out of livery
4 footmen -- Under Butler -- Porter.
2 Coachmen under Coachman -- 2 Postilion, 3 or 4 Grooms
&c. &c. Lord Stormont is so good a Manager
that he has always kept the same number
of Servants as when he was in
Office -- no other Minister can say the
same -- & he has not a Shilling debt
      I came home about 10 -- left Lady Stormont
much better than last Night -- she was
not so fatigued -- the Veseys sent
for me to join Miss Clarkes -- I went
we supped with our kind Neighbours --
-- the Conversation turned on Ireland --
lost Ireland! -- the Veseys have
again put off their Journey to Margate
came home ½ past 11 -- went immediately
to our Rooms


Friday6th: August 1784 At ½ past 8. went
down to breakfast with Anna Maria -- sat with her
an hour -- then dressed for the day -- sent to
enquire after Mrs. Johnstone -- she was
getting well very fast -- received a Note
from my cousin Stormont -- she told
me I should not come to her to day
but that she was in very good Spirits
&c. &c. I wrote an Answer



-- walked at 11 to Mrs. Delany stayed with her
until 1 o'Clock arranged a Glass Cabinet
of fossils Spars & Minerals for her, she
gave me a few specimens -- I saw some
from Cornwall which I had not seen before
there were some fine ones from
Derbyshire & Lancashire. the dear
old Woman dressed herself & left me to
pay her compliments of congratulations to
Lord & Lady Weymouth -- I desired
her to present mine which would save me
a Visit & fine speeches. When I
came home found a Present from good
Mrs: Handcock of some valuable small tea
cups & Saucers of Egg shell China which she bought
in Holland many years ago & knowing I was
beginning a collection. she kindly sent me. I went over
immediately to thank her. She was in
her own Room -- I sat with her ½ an
hour -- when I came away she insisted
upon my acceptance of a little Silver lamp
which she had in a Cabinet -- I was obliged to
accept it -- She showed me some fine
Old Chinas & her darling Pigeons &c.
I could not stay to see ye. Veseys. employed
myself until dinner time in hanging
up Mr. Glovers Picture & other jobs of the
same kind -- Miss C's & I dined together
sat & chatted until 6 -- separated until 7 --
met in ye. Drawing Room -- read & wrote
& worked & were together ye. whole Evening



at 9 recieved a letter from Lord Stormont
to inform me Lady Stormont was
safely brought to bed at a little after
6 o'Clock this Afternoon of a Son
that though she wished much to have a
Daughter yet she bore her disappoint
perfectly well, & was quite comforted
at the sight of her fine boy. -- This is
her 6th. Son -- she never had a Girl --
she has now 4 boys.
The Veseys sent for us but we
excused ourselves.
Went to our Rooms soon after 11 --


Saturday 7th: August 1784
Dressed at 7 for the day at 8 went down
to Breakfast with Anna Maria -- sat &
worked below -- until 11. employed my
self in working until 12. took leave
of Anna Maria -- she was going to her
Sister Jacksons for a few day's.
Mr. Vesey & Mrs. Handcock were so
obliging to carry me to Portland
Place -- as I wished to go myself
to enquire after Lady Stormont.
As the Servant told me Lord Stormonts
Daughter -- was come from KenWood
. I went in for a few
Minutes. I found her in the



Library writing to Relation's to
acquaint them of Lady Stormont's being
brought to bed -- She told me she
wrote the first letter to me --
but Lord Stormont would not let her send
it as he had written himself. Miss
Murray told me she had seen Lady
Stormont this Morning & that she &
the dear babe were charming well.
-- She promised to give my love to
Lord & Lady Stormont she goes back to
Ken-Wood but is to come to Town
every Morning Miss Murray is
Lord Stormont's only Child by his first wife
who died when she was very Young
She is near a Year older than her
Mother in law -- about 26. or 7 --
She lives with Lord Mansfield &
was educated by the late Lady
Mansfield & two of Lord Stormonts
Sisters who also reside with Lord
Mansfield -- She is pleasing.
good humoured -- well accomplished,
& conducts herself with that
propriety which ought to distinguish



a Woman of fashion &
good education. -- Mr. Vesey & Mrs:Hancock
then took me to Mrs. Boughtons
in Cavendish Square -- she was out
& I was saved a disagreeable Visit.
-- they then carried me to Mrs. Delanys
& promised to come for me again
in an hour. Mrs. Delany seemed very
well -- A Mrs: Williams & her Niece
Miss Capper were with her they soon went
away there was something so prepossessing
in Mrs: Williams countenance, manner,
& dress -- that I desired Mrs.. Delany
to inform me who this lady was.
& she gave me the following account.
Mrs. Williams -- was suitably married
to a Gentleman of good fortune. it was
a match of inclination & they were
mutually happy, a few short years only
she enjoyed the society of her amiable
Husband -- let the feeling heart judge
what she felt when one Morning
(without any previous illness) she
found him lying dead by her side.
for 12 Years she shut herself up from
all society, only admitting the Visits
of her nearest Relations -- the last



12 Years she has received some
of her old friends & now & then
pays them a visit -- but lives
in a retired manner -- about 10 Miles
from London -- her principal
amusement is the care of her
Garden & the study of Botany
She has a handsome independency
& lives in style suitable to an
elegant mind -- without parade --
every thing about her is neat as
her dress, & proper as her manner.
Never having been blessed with
Children -- she took a Brothers
Daughter to live with her -- the
Young Lady I saw -- who appears
as if she would do credit to her
Aunt. Miss Capper seems to be
about 16. not handsome, but looks
Modest & civil.
Mrs. Betty Granville a Cousin
of Mrs. Delanys succeeded Mrs. Williams
She is the only one left of that name.
-- A Maiden . of 70 I should think
she was Maid of Honour to Queen
Caroline. Mrs. Delany was Niece



to ye. Minister Lord Granville.
Mrs. Betty:Granville told us she had been
to congratulate her Nephew
Lord Weymouth on the approaching
marriage of his daughter
Sophia wth. my Lord St. Asaph
-- the Veseys came for me &
I left the two Ladies agreeably
occupied in bestowing praises
on Lady Weymouths children
&c. -- we came home after
promising to dine with our
hospitable Neighbours -- I read
for an hour & half in Mrs: Carters Epictetus
at ½ past 4 Miss Clarke & I went
to the Veseys there was no other
Company -- we sat so long at
Dessert that I took out my Work
Mrs: Vesey told us some anecdotes
of People in Ireland -- & of places
there. few people relate more
agreeably than Mrs. Vesey -- her
imagination is so luxuriant
that she always embellishes
-- not that she is guilty of telling



falsehoods -- but the sweetness
of her own Nature always makes
her see things & people in the
most favourable point of view.
if there is sometimes an
unlucky shade in ythe Picture
she is blind to it -- of course
her descriptions are pleasing
to all those to like to contemplate
only the most beautiful objects
for she has the art of describing
so well that You see all the
objects of her sometimes poetic
Fancy. After having given me
an Account of Mr. Veseys fine
Place in Ireland -- she gave me the
following lines to read -- I read them
aloud & I was much pleased to see the
tear of sensibility steal down
Mr. Veseys cheek .. In Mr Veseys
beautiful Grounds at Lucan near
Dublin he had placed an Obelisk.
Mrs. Vesey walking with him
one day & looking on it, expressed
a Wish that she might be



buried Under it & that when
he died he would be laid in the
same grave. he immediately
took out his pencil & wrote
these lines & giving them to her
said he would comply with her request
& that should be their
Epitaph
Near this fair sculpture sleeps a pair
In Church yard his'try wondrous rare,
Who liked the busy hum of Men,
Then joyed to see their fields again,
Who dressed the Grove, or led the Rill,
To shine and babble down the Hill,
Who Nature felt, & void of art
Gave to the poor, & good, their heart,
Who loved when young, yet died old friends
A blessing fate but seldom sends.
Mr: & Mrs: Vesey are Cousins -- they
were attached to each other from
their cradles -- Mr. Vesey early
hoped to be united to the object



of his heart -- but Mrs. Vesey
was forced to the Altar at 15 by
the arbitrary will of an arbitrary
Father who obliged her to marry
a disagreeable old Man -- she
was beautiful -- & he in his 70th-
Year was too much captivated
to reject a forced consent --
the only excuse the father had
for sacrificing his daughter
was, that the Gentleman was
his friend & he had given
his honour to give him his
Child in marriage -- this
Man lived some Years during which time -- Mrs.
Vesey behaved irreproachably --
when he had been dead a
Year -- Mr. Vesey's constancy
was rewarded by her.
I came home for a Quarter of an
hour to give some orders -- returned
to tea -- at ½ past 7 Mrs. Delany
sent the Coach for me -- Mrs.
Vesey & Miss Clarke accompanied



me -- I sat Miss Clarke down near
the Park -- she was going to take
her afternoon walk -- Mrs. Vesey
& I went to Mrs. Delany -- Mrs.
Sandford & her Eldest Son who is
an agreeable genteel Young
Man -- a Young Lady & Lady Wallingford were
with -- I had my Work table
& we talked of Air Balloons
& weddings -- Miss --
Bingham Lord Lucans 3d.
Daughter is going to be married
to Mr. Lindsay a Gentleman
of large fortune in Ireland
-- it is thought a great Match for her
&c &c &c Mrs. Veseys Coach
came soon after 9 -- I forced
her awar as I feared Mrs. Delany
would be too much fatigued as she
had had Company all day. we
took Mr. Vesey up at the Coffee house
in St James Street. I would not
go in with them but came
home -- instead of writing letters



, as I ought to have
done I indulged myself in
writing my extracts from
Mrs. Delanys letters. Miss
Clarke sat with me until past
11 -- I went to my Room at
12.




Sunday 8th. August 1784
Breakfasted alone -- read, wrote, dressed for
the day -- paid a little Visit to Miss Clarke
went to May fair Chapel, it rained, Mrs.
Vesey & Handcock were going & they took
me in their Coach -- Mr. Sheelds the
Curate gave us an excellent Sermon
after Church I proceeded to Stanhope
Street to pay a Visit to Lady Mary
Hume -- met a poor Young Woman who
had hardly clothes to cover her -- she
was very big with Child -- she seemed
an object of real compassion & her
Story was an artless one. Mrs. Vesey
& Handcock drove after me &
overtook me before I got to Stanhope
Street I yielded to their entreaties
willingly to accompany them for
they were going to Sir Joshua Reynolds to
visit his Niece Miss Palmer whom
I wanted to see as I have not been able
to call upon her since ye. Death of her
Sister. we called in Berkeley Square to
enquire if Mr. Walpole was expected as
Mrs.Vesey wished to invite him for the
Evening -- but to our mortification the
Servant said he was not to be in Town
-- we then drove to Leicester Square. found
Miss Palmer alone. She was much recovered
in health but she was so low that she
burst into tears when we saluted her



we sat with her near an hour & left her
in better spirits -- she goes into Devonshire
in a few days -- but promised
to come & sit with me for two hours on
Wednesday Morning Mrs. Vesey. Handcock &
I treated ourselves with one turn
in the Picture Gallery & Room adjoining
from Sir Joshua Reynolds went to Mrs-
Delany -- Mrs.. Vesey stayed in the Coach for me
I was with Mrs. Delany only a few Minutes
as it was near the time of her going
to Prayers & she expected the Clergyman
every moment. Richard brought me
a Note from Lady Dartrey to St. James's
Place -- to invite Mrs: Delany to go to
Chelsea tomorrow Morning with me -- this
she could not do as Mrs: Boscawen was
to make her a visit as I found Mrs. Delany
was to have Lady Bute & Lady Weymouth
in the Afternoon I told her not to
expect me. from Mrs. Delanys we went
to Sir Robert Herries -- left word there that
Mrs. Vesey desired them to come to her
in the Evening I then came home. wrote
an Answer to Lady Dartreys Note &
had two hours quietly to myself -- which
I hope I did not make an unprofitable
use of. ¼ past 4 Miss Clarke & I went
to the Veseys who had insisted
on our dining with them. there was no other



company. -- we sat at Dessert until
½ past 6. Mrs. Vesey & I had a
long argument relative to the
education of Women -- Mr. Vesey &
Mrs. Handcock were on my side
Miss Clarke as usual was dumb
& what was more mortifying
she did not seem even to listen
to our debate. after amusing
ourselves for an hour & half, for
we were very friendly opponents
we left the dining Room -- as I did
not choose Coffee & Mrs. Vesey has the
happy art of making her guests
feel under no constraint. I came home
to indulge myself in the luxury
of being quiet & alone for an
hour. I read one of Blairs Sermons
& wrote out a letter of Miss Hannah
More's to Mrs: Vesey which she had
given me. Richard brought me a
good account of Lady Stormont & the
Child -- & I heard Mrs. Johnston was
pretty well again. at 8 o'Clock I
returned to the Veseys -- Sir Robert & Lady
Herries came to Tea -- they stayed
until 10 -- agreeable lively conversation



Air Balloons. -- Superstition --
the talked of marriages -- & how people
love to judge of the conduct
of others -- however there was neither
scandal or ill-natured remarks --
& we ended with Madness & Bedlam
had I time it would be amusing
to write down the Dialogues of
this Evenings conversation. the Veseys
would not suffer me to leave them
& as it was the last Evening I consented
Miss Clarke & I therefore stayed supper
-- we talked of Dear Anna Maria &
Spoke of her as she well deserved.
As Anna Maria made me consent to let
her acquaint the Veseys with my
engagement to Mr. Dickenson upon promise
they would not mention it in general
Society. his health when there is no other company is always
drank. & Mrs: Vesey generally torments
me for ½ an hour with an idea that
she has taken into her head that I
shall certainly never come to Town --
that my friends will lose me &c &c
& assuring me it requires all her
charity not to hate my Dear friend
after chatting on indifferent subjects Miss Clarke & I
came ½ past 11 Mr. Stanhope had called again begged to
see me before Tuesday next.



Monday 9th.. August 1784 --
Dressed at ½ past7 -- Breakfasted in my own Room
Mr. Saunders Ye. Painter came at
10 -- sat for an hour & half, I talked
to him as much as I could to prevent
his giving me the countenance of
a fool for I felt amazingly silly,
I design to have the picture the
size of a Ring.. Saunders was very
well pleased with me for I did not
torment him but desired him
to paint me as he thought best.
Lord Dartrey called -- he was not let
in -- he left word he would come
for me at two o'Clock -- received very
good accounts of Lady Stormont &
the Child -- sent to Mr. Stanhope to
say it was not in my power to
see him as I was going out of
Town. -- wrote a letter to Mr
Wiggins to inform him I would
send to him on Wednesday Morning -- Mr-
Planchée came to enquire after
the Health of my Clock & Watches
I gave him one to repair &c &c
made Miss Clarke a Visit of
½ an hour.



My Uncle Frederick came at 1 o'Clock
he talked to me in a kind & affectionate
Manner. he was entirely persuaded
that the good opinion I had of Mr
Dickenson & his Father was well founded --
he told me that if they or I chose
to have the £1000 which is to be paid
to me (without deduction) of the
Estate which he inherited from my
father in Scotland -- he certainly
would raise the Money. but that as I
received 5 Per Cent & it was well secured
perhaps I might choose to let
remain. that the £600 which he has on
bond & which on giving ½ a Years
Notice is to be paid in on the
13th. of May 1785, I should have
when I chose, for he said it
might be agreeable to me to have
the whole, or part of it before
that time, & if not, he would
keep it & give me the same inter-
est.... At 2 o'Clock Lord Dartreys
Coach came for me & my Uncle
took his leave. I went to Lord
Dartrey house in Stanhope Street where



he was -- we went together to his
Villa. he questioned me as to my
future plans, I assured him
that they would be regulated
by what I found were agreeable
to Mr. Dickenson & I had not the
smallest doubt but that whatever
he proposed, would please &
satisfy all those kind friends
Who were interested about me.
Dear, charming, amiable Lady
Dartrey flew with her sweet little
Julia to receive us -- if I could
be just what Lady Dartrey is
I think I should be certain that
My Dickenson never would repent his
choice. what a pattern is this
Woman for the whole Sex --
She is adored justly adored by
all who know her. but I must
not now indulge myself in
describing this best of Women.
Whilst Lady Dartrey dressed before dinner
Julia took me to see her favourites



her chickens -- her Deer &c &c.
Mr. Antrobus Mr. Dawsons tutor,
an agreeable lively Young Man
joined us -- he told me his sentiments
on a particular subject
which showed the goodness of his
heart & understanding. at 4 we
met to dinner -- there was only
Lord& Lady Dartrey Mr. Dawson
Mr. Antrobus & me -- when ye.
Servants left us -- Lady Dartrey gave
Mr. Dickenson's health -- & after, Lord
Dartrey gave his dear fathers.
The friendship of these excellent
Persons affect me always in
a manner which makes the tear
ready to start -- it goes in a
peculiar manner to my heart &
I feel somehow as if I was
not worthy of it -- & that they
were kinder to me than I
deserved. Julia joined us at
Dessert, we went into the Garden until
Coffee, amused ourselves & Miss



Dawson by going in the Swing
& we made good fat Mrs. Palfrey
take her share in this exercise
Mrs. Palfrey lived with Lady
Dartrey as her own Maid before she married -- she
has been with her 26 or 7 Years. -- she
is treated with that consideration
her affection to Lady Dartrey- merits
what happy beings are Lord. &
Lady Dartreys Servants!
Lord & Lady Dartrey & I had an hour &
½ quiet chat -- during which time
we were amused with two tolerable
French Horns, two Men often
come & play before the Windows of
the Drawing Room which being close to
the Thames has a good effect --
Mr. Dawson & Antrobus joined us
at tea -- it was so cold we had a
fire -- we saw a little Air Balloon
floating in the Air -- it was so
great a height that it seemed a
very small black speck -- & was
soon out of sight -- Lady Dartrey



treated me with one sweet
song -- “To fair Fidelia” &c.
Julia sat up rather later than
Usual that she might have
the pleasure of seeing two small
Suns & a little Wheel Played off
This little fire work she had
imagined to please & surprise
me. we played for an hour at
Pope Joan for pence to amuse
Mr.. Dawson -- & he was allowed
to sit up to supper -- which was at
½. 9 o'Clock -- he left us as soon
as it was over. Lord & Lady
Dartrey Mr. Antrobus & I sat together
until ¼ before 11 -- cheerful innocent
conversation filled the
time. Lady Dartrey received an
invitation from the Queen this
Afternoon to spend next thursday
at Windsor being the Prince of Wales Birthday -- this was a little
Mal a propos as it was the
day fixed to go to Tunbridge
however she sent word that she



would obey her Majesties command
& by saying she put off her
Journey until the next day evaded
the being asked to prolong the Visit
as she generally stays a Week or
ten days when invited to pay
her Majesty a visit at Windsor -- the Queen
sent word it was to be quite
a private party no other company -- & that she
was to bring only a Night Gown
this is the 2d. Prince of Wales's
Birth=day which has not been
Kept. I imagine he will not
pay his Compliments at Windsor &c &c
Mrs. Palfrey came to me after
I was in my Room -- I am so great
a favourite of hers that when she is
at liberty she never will suffer
Lady Dartreys Maid to come to me,
she stayed chattering ¼ of an hour
begging me to go to Tunbridge with
her Lord & Lady & reproaching
me for not having made
them more frequent Visits this



Summer

Tuesday 10th. August 1784 --
I did not close my Eyes after 4 o'Clock
I found Thomsons Seasons -- with his
beautiful images -- with contemplation
of the Thames which I saw from my Windows with my own wandering
Thoughts I passed my time until 8 o'Clock
when I dressed myself -- Mrs. Palfrey came
& assisted me Lady Dartrey came to me &
would also insist upon being my fêmé
de Chambre. I accompanied her down
stairs.


Tuesday 10th. August 1784 continued
Lord & Lady Dartrey & I breakfasted together
(Mr Dawson & his Tutor only
accidentally make their appearance in
a Morning) -- it was so wet & cold that
we had a fire: dear little Julia made her
appearance before we rose from Breakfast
after which Lady Dartrey in a judicious pleasant
way taught her her french Verbs -- at
10 o'Clock Dr. Warren came to give advice
how they were all to take the Tunbridge
Waters &c &c &c. I left them to settle
this important affair & amused myself
with looking over Cowleys Geometrical
Plates -- the different Problems of
Euclid are drawn upon Pasteboard
Paper & cut so that You may lift them up & see
the Solid forms. &c &c I suppose a
profound scholar might despise
all this -- but I think it a pretty
Work for Ladies or young beginners.
When Dr. Warren went away Lord Dartrey
set out for London -- at 12 o'Clock
Lady Dartrey read Prayers to her Servants
& Children -- this does not take up above
a ¼ of an hour & she always does it
unless something particular prevents
her. it is also a good reading lesson to
Julia -- who reads the
Psalms -- Lady Dartrey only reads the Chapter
in the New testament for the day in Doddridge with
his improvement.



I assisted Lady Dartrey in sorting letters
-- I read several of Lady Dowager Spencers
Lord Shelburnes -- Mrs. Veseys &c &c they
all did credit to the writers of them -- but
Mrs. Veseys were the only ones I wish to be
possessed of -- so much fine imagination --
yet so natural & so characteristic. so
entirely from the heart. &c &c --
My Dear friend & I were led to talk
over past events from the contents of
some of the letters -- painful were some of the
recollections! five or 6, -- indeed I
believe more, of our intimates who were of my
age were dead in the space of 9 Years
& very many of our mutual acquaintance, of Lady
Dartreys, -- & she is not above 46 --
“Hence fond remembrance prompts unbidden tears,
“And something sadly solemn mingles still,
“With every thought of time for ever gone,
“Distinct from past events of good or ill,
“Or View of life's swift changes hastening on:
“Blast ye. fair buds of hope, or snatch from sight
“The dear Companions of our social way
“Absorb'd at once in death's impervious night.
“The sadness hence: but hence ye. sweetness too
“For well spent time soft whispers to ye. Mind
“Hopes of a blest eternity behind.
“ -- -- -- -- -- when eternal day
“shall gladsome dawn, at once its glorious ray
“Shows ye. fair scenes of happiness complete:
“Then friends, Companions, Lovers joyful meet,
“Thence never more to part. &c &c



At 1 o'Clock I parted from my dear friend
-- I never shall lose the recollection of
the kind things she said to me at parting.
I had her Coach to convey me to Town
I took Mrs. Palfrey with me & made her
accompany me to Mr. Lawtons as I
did not like to pay him a visit alone.
he was very glad to see me -- I stayed
about 20 Minutes & promised that Miss
Clarkes & I would come & drink tea
with him -- he was so polite that he
would come out in the Rain to hand us
into ye. Coach -- his little Room was like
an Oven for he had a fire, I was glad
to get into the air again. Mrs. Palfrey
Went on with me to Clarges Street -- she had
business therefore I did not detain her
to come in. I had the Pleasure of finding
Dear AnnaMaria returned we worked & chatted
together until dinner time Bell joined us
Our good Neighbours the Veseys set off for
Margate to day -- I would not go & take
leave of them as it would have made us
all low & uncomfortable. they are so
far advanced in life & are so infirm
that one always dreads one shall not
Meet again. dined at home with Miss
Clarkes -- we sat together until 6 -- Anna Maria
played for ½ an hour. from ½ until
¼ before 7 separated -- met then to
tea. Mrs. Delany came at 7 accompanied
by Mrs. & Mr. Sandford -- they did not
come in, but took me with them to



Mrs. Delany's -- Mr. Sandford left us to
go to the Play. I spent my time with these
two amiable old Women much more to
my satisfaction than If I had been in
the gayest & most brilliant entertainment.
Mrs. Delany informed me she had seen
Mrs. Walsingham & Miss Boyle yesterday
that she had told Mrs. Walsingham all about me
for she thought she might have taken
it ill of me had I not done so.
Mrs. Walsingham did me the honour to speak
of me in a manner I can not
repeat -- for it was flattering &
far far beyond my deserts.
I arranged Prints for Mrs. Delany & we
had reasonable sensible converse
until ½ past 9 o'Clock. I had the Duchess
Coach. set Mrs. Sandford down At her house when
I came home joined Miss Clarkes
wrote a few lines to my Dickenson
& sent a portion of Diary. which I
sent by this post.
Anna Maria sat with me until ½ past 11 --
we then went to our Rooms


Received a good Account of Lady Stormont
& her little boy.



Wednesday 11th. August 1784
Dressed before 8 for the day. breakfasted
in my own Room. -- worked notable
Work until 11 when Saunders came
Anna Maria was so good to sit with me
whilst he took my Picture he
stayed an hour & ½. -- William Benn
brought me the Money from Mr.
Wiggins & the receipt of the Account &c
Received a Note from Miss Murray with very
pleasant intelligence of Lady Stormont
& the Child -- she said should come to me
on Friday Morning at 11 to pay me
a Visit. Miss Palmer came at
2 & sat with me until 4. she gave
me the whole Story of Mr. Bamfields
persecution. &c &c &c
She was just gone when Lord
Stormont paid me a Visit, he
sat ½ an hour -- he told me
Lady Stormont wished to see me
& that he thought it would
be improper for me to go
tomorrow, that he would send
her Coach at 1 o'Clock. I had



the happiness of receiving a letter
from Derbyshire -- I also received
letters from Miss Gunning &
Mrs. Carter. sent to Mrs. Johnston
heard she was quite well again
dined at home -- good old Mrs.
Russel dined with us. Miss Clarke
did not come in until we had almost
dined -- she had been 5 hours
in a Coach to see the Air Balloon
at Chelsea -- & all she saw, was,
the top of it. the Mob were so
enraged that the Chevalier Moret
would not let it ascend on account of the
Rain that they set fire to it &
destroyed what cost some hundred
of Pounds -- besides the labour
& anxiety of the poor Man.
I came to my Boudoir at
6 o'Clock to answer Mr. Dickenson's
letter










11th. August 1784continued.
Answered my Dickenson's letter which I sent
to the Post -- Mrs. Glover came at 8. &
Mr. Glover at 9 o'Clock -- they supped
& stayed, with me till 11 -- Dear Mr. Glover asked me
many questions -- was much satisfied
with the answers I gave him & drank
Mr: Dickenson & his Sons health &c &c
Mr. & Mrs. Glover said that Mr.
Dickenson & I must make them a Visit
at Sunning Hill -- they promised
to spend every Evening with us they stayed
in Town which is until Saturday --
After they left us Anna Maria played a
lesson to me -- & then we went to
our Rooms -- received very good
accounts of Lady Stormont & the Child


12 August Thursday. dressed ½ past 7 for
the day -- Breakfasted in my own Room -- worked
until 10 -- Saunders came -- Anna Maria sat
with me part of the time -- she went out
with her Sister & the Glovers -- Mr Saunders
kept me sitting for two hours -- when
he left me Lady Herries made me
an agreeable long Visit -- She told me
that she was at Chelsea Yesterday
to see the Chinese Air Balloon that



Most people thought Mr. Moret
must know that it could not
succeed -- it was an old one that had
failed in france -- he had got
Subscriptions they say to the Amount
of £2000. it was a Miracle he
escaped the fury of the Mob &c
at 1, o'Clock Lady Herries left me
& Lady Stormonts Coach came for
me -- went to Portland Place. I
was very happy to find my pretty
amiable Cousin as well as possible
I sat by her bed side 3 hours -- I
was quite charmed with the dear infant
& think him very pretty. Lady Stormont
is so fortunate to be able to nurse
him as well as the others, that is to
say William & Charles, for she was
not so happy as to Nurse George.
her Brother Colonel Cathcart came &
sat ½ an hour with us, Lord
Stormont just looked in before he
went to the house of Lords. little
George was allowed to come in for
a few minutes. Lady Stormont
told me that I must dine soon
at Lord Mansfields at Ken Wood
as Lord Stormonts Sister wished
to see me very much &c
we talked on various topics but



she true Mother like most of her
Children. She told me that her
Brother (youngest Brother) Archibald
& Mr. Lindsay (a Cousin of Lord
Stormonts) & our Aunt Dowager
Lady Warwick were to be the Sponsors
for the Child who is to be named
Henry-Hamilton ()
I had her Coach came home ½
past 4 dined with Miss Clarkes.
after dinner had the
Man with the Stuffs Lady Wake
desired me to get for her -- chose
Mr. Wakes Coat & her Habit --
Wrote a letter to Lady Wake
which I had just finished when
Mrs. Delany with Mrs. Sandford
& her eldest Son came for me
we took an airing to Kensington
& at 7 got to St. James's Place
Lady Bute came to tea -- Air Balloons
the Marriages talked of particularly
Lord St. Asaphs & Miss S: Thynne
Lady Bute left Mrs. Delany at 8
o'Clock, & Mr. Sandford went to see



the illuminations in Honour of
the Prince of Wales's birth day which
were uncommonly beautiful &
Brilliant -- Mrs. Delany Mrs- Sandford & I, had
an hour to ourselves -- I told Mrs-
Delany what my Dickenson had said of her
in his last letter that he had
seen Mr. Dewes -- she was very
Much pleased & expressed a kind
impatience to see my friend.
I read her the letter I had received from
Mrs.. Carter as she had mentioned
her ... at 9 o'Clock Mr- Sandford
returned -- & the Duchess's Coach
was ready for me. I set Mrs.
Sandford down -- she insisted &
Mrs Delany desired that Mr.
Sandford should accompany
me home as the People in
the Streets seemed very riotous
& there were hundreds hallooing
& throwing Squibs & Crackers &c
I thought it would be the height of
Prudery to object, & consented.
St. James's Street was so crowded
that the Coachman was obliged



to go a great Round -- what I
saw of the illuminations was very
pretty. there were such great
rejoicings that I think it must
have been a party affair, as
I never saw every thing equal
to it on the Kings or Queens
Birth day. how apt are the
multitude to adore the rising
Sun!

Mr. Sandford took his
leave after politely handing me
out. -- I found our Dear Leonidas
& Mrs. Glover with Miss Clarkes -- we
supped at ½ past 9. & they stayed with
us until ½ past 11. friendly converse
Mr. Glover was fatigued & his eyes
were bad -- we went to our Rooms
as soon as the Glovers left us




13th. August 1784 Friday
Breakfasted with Anna Maria -- at 10
o'Clock dressed for the day. at 11 Miss
Murray came she sat an hour with
me -- brought me a very polite invitation
from her Aunts to come
with Mrs. Delany to Ken Wood to
dine there. she pleased me very
much by telling me I was a great
favourite of her fathers (Lord
Stormont. Mr. Sandford came &
she left me. he read to me while I worked the
debates in the House of Lords yesterday
Lord Stormonts speeches &c &c.
Anna Maria joined us. he asked me
to go & see the Air Balloon at the
Lyceum -- I agreed provided Miss
Clarke would accompany us -- Anna Maria
was not well enough having a
pain in her face. Miss Clarke
Consented & we set out -- it was
not a pleasant walk as we were
obliged to walk through a part of
the Strand -- & the day very hot.
however it was worth our Walk
& gratified my curiosity as I
had not yet seen one of these
curious Vehicles -- the Balloon



is a perfect Sphere of about 33
feet in Diameter & 102 feet in
Circumference. it contains 18200
Cubic feet of inflammable Air
& composed entirely of Oiled silk
the Colours are Green & Red in
parts thus

red, green, the silk joined by stong stitching
the Oars are net works with flaps of oil silk
Oil silk cases or pipes through which the inflammable Oil is conveyed by large bellows at the end
Wings
Galler
2 Loose Oars which are held in hand
& are on each side & directed by the persons in the Gallery
the flapping of the Wings & Oars are of the Oiled Silk



The Gallery contains one pair of
Wings, which are raised high, & move
horizontally, for the purpose of increasing
the Motion it receives from
the Wind: also one pair of Oars, which will
move vertically; & are meant to
raise or depress the Balloon at the
pleasure of Aerial Travellers.
Mr. Lunardi & an English
Gentleman will ascend into the
Atmosphere. I saw a Genteel
handsome looking Young Man who
they told me was the english Gentleman
who was to go up. the King & Queen
are to see this Balloon ascend. it is to
be conveyed to Chelsea Hospital Garden
from whence it is to be
launched. Tickets are issued at
the Lyceum at 1 Guinea, ½ a
Guinea & a Crown. entitling the bearer
to an admission into the Gardens
at Chelsea Hospital on the day the
Balloon is to be launched, & also
to a sight of it before it leaves
the Lyceum -- we gave 1 shilling
a piece.



After having seen this curious Machine
& been made very sick by the horrid
smell of it. I was rejoiced to breathe
even the Air of the Strand. in coming
home I went into two Shops bought
a Morning Gown & Threads &c --
Met Mr. Jackson & Colonel Stephens
spoke to both (Colonel Stephens is one of the
Prince of Wales's Equerries) he seemed
to stare at Mr. Sandford -- & wonder who I was
flirting with -- we got home ¼ past
3 -- Mr. Sandford took his leave. I
desired him to make my excuses
for not waiting on Mrs. Delany this
Morning, & also to tell her as she was
to have Company I would not come
to her in the Afternoon, for I felt
so exhausted with my walk that
I was sure I should not be able to
stir out. Anna Maria & I sat together
until dinner time -- dined comfortably
at home. Anna Maria played two or 3 lessons
after dinner -- we separated from 6
until 7. Miss Clarke's & I met
to tea -- amused ourselves with
writing -- &c. at 8 o'Clock Mr. Sandford
came with Mrs. Keenes Coach with full



powers from Dear Mrs. Delany & his
Mother to carry me to Mrs. Delany's -- there
was no refusing, I went with him
Mrs. Delany knowing how fond I was of
Music sent for me to hear Miss
Keene play on the harpsichord -- there
was no other Company than Mrs
Sandford Mrs. Keene & her daughter.
(Mrs. Keene is Sister to Lord Dartmouth
& Lady Brudenal) Miss Keene at
the age of between 6 & 7 began to play.
she is now between 9 & 10 Years old
a pretty unaffected child. her genius
for Music is astonishing -- she
does not practise much & though
she has been well taught has
learnt only from a Woman, a
Miss Reynolds of Oxford. She
played 2 very difficult lessons of
Schroters. & in such a manner
that the composer must have
been charmed -- such wonderful
execution & taste -- & her pretty
little hands so perfectly well
placed on the instrument. she did



not play by rote but read the
Notes. My Uncle William who
is one of the best & nicest judges of
Music we have, has said she
will be one of the finest players
in England. & he thought this
Child the only person worthy of
some Music he brought with
him (this last time) from
Italy. Mrs- Keene was so obliging
as to bring me home at 9 o'Clock.
Mr. & Mrs. Glover spent the Evening
with us -- took leave of us at
11. as they return to Sunning Hill tomorrow they in the most kind and
friendly manner desired
me to assure Mr. Dickenson
& his Son that they hoped
to have the pleasure of forming
a friendship with them & in the
most friendly manner charged
me to tell Mr. Dickenson that
their House in Albemarle Street



was entirely at his Service
for any length of time he chose
& that would leave order with the
Woman who keeps the House
to receive him, or his father
& the Servants &c &c
we went to our Room as soon
as the Veseys left us.

Saturday August 14th. 1784
Dressed at ½ past 7 for the day --
Worked notable work -- Breakfasted in my
Own Room -- Received a letter from
Windsor -- written in three parts
one from Miss Goldsworthy one
from Mrs. Cheveley & Mademoiselle
Moula -- Lady Dartrey had
I suppose mentioned my
engagement -- each of these
Ladies expressed the warmest
Wishes for my future happiness
Miss Goldsworthy reproach me with not
having communicated it to her &c
Received a Note from Lady Dartrey
which I should have had yesterday
Called at Wirgman the Jeweller gave him the
Picture to set in a Ring to have
it on Tuesday



She told me she expected me to
write long letters -- that she was
just setting out for Tunbridge it
was ten o'Clock & she arrived at
Chelsea from Windsor at 8 o'Clock
Mr. Saunders came at 11 -- I sat until
12 Anna Maria was so good to keep me
Company -- he finished my picture
& left it with me. I paid him
for it. I was very well satisfied
but Miss Clarke -- & Anna Maria found
fault. William Benn was called in
as he happened to come home, he
was not satisfied -- nor was
Mrs. Betty -- in short there was
a contrariety of opinions --
thought the Mouth too large.
the other said it was the only feature
resembling -- &c &c &c
At 1 o'Clock Mrs. Delany sent the
Duchess Coach for me I went
to her -- she told me she had received
a letter from Mr. Dewes -- showed
it me -- we conversed upon the
Subject &c &c



at 2 o'Clock we called upon
Mrs. Sandford sat sometime with
her she was not well enough to
join our party -- but Mr. Sandford
went with Mrs. Delany & me to Doctor
Turtons at North End where
he has a pretty very small
Villa called a Cottage. Mrs. Turton
& her pretty innocent Cousin Miss
Noseley received us with much apparent
pleasure. Mr. Sandford Miss Noseley & I walked
round ye. shruberry & Garden &c.
the whole of which is 3 quarters of an
Acre. Dr: Turton joined us before
4 o'Clock. he dyed my Cheeks
by warm Congratulations &
wishes -- he had been at
Windsor yesterday & Miss
Goldsworthy had told him what
Lady Dartrey had said to Lady
Louisa Clayton &c. Miss Goldsworthy sent
me by him many kind reproaches
& wishes. for he had
mentioned that I was to dine
at the. Cottage &c &c



-- we had a handsome dinner
& cheerful conversation --
Dr. Turton gave us a description
of a fine House Adam is
going to build for him in
Kent. upon an Estate he
has lately purchased. Dr.
Turton is very Rich -- his Wife was
a great Heiress he had some
fortune, & has made a
great deal by his profession
of Physician. he has not
the happiness of having any
Children. Mrs. Turton & he are
one of the very happiest Couple
I know -- attentive to each other
to the greatest degree even in
the most trifling occasions &
their affection seems to spring
immediately from the heart.


they are kind & good friends
of mine & I really believe



love me most sincerely --
they both took an opportunity
of saying how happy I should
make them by introducing
Mr. Dickenson & that they hoped
when the House in Kent was
built we should often spend
a Month there. & that in
the mean time their Cottage
& house in Town would often
be visited by us.
Mrs. Sandford came in the
Coach for us & was well
enough to drink her Tea
with us under the Apricot
Tree. at 7 o'Clock we took
leave of our agreeable entertainers
. in our way home we
talked of Dr: & Mrs: Turton & each
agreed in saying how happy
they were in each other &c
I set Mrs. Delany & Mrs. Sandford down
in St. James Place. Mr. Sandford



insisted so strongly upon going
with me to Portland Place & the
Old Ladies approving that I was
obliged to yield. I got to Lady
Stormonts at 8 -- my polite
Beau got out to hand me &
then took his leave. I found
Lady Stormont & the sweet babe
very well she was got into the
1st. drawing Room. we chatted
on Various Subjects until 10 o'Clock
-- Richard came for me with a
Chair -- as Lady Stormont had informed
me her Horses were to go part
of the way to meet Lord Stormont
who went on Friday to Tunbridge
to see Lord Mansfield & was to
return to night or tomorrow
when I came home found Anna
Maria but indifferent with the pain
in her face. heard that Dear
Mr. Glover was not able to go
to Sunning Hill as he had
been seized with the gout in his



Stomach -- that he was however
better. Miss Clarke's & I sat together
until ¼ past 11 -- then went to
our Rooms -- the Dyer came to
settle about the satins


Sunday 15th August -- 84
At 9 went down Breakfasted with
Anna Maria sat chatting with her until past
10 -- she was better. then dressed for
the day -- read some thing serious. walked
at 11 to Mrs. Delanys as I had promised
(she went to 8 o'Clock Chapel at St.
James's) I sent Richard to Church
was with Dear Mrs. Delany until near
3 -- I found her pretty well after
her little excursion of yesterday.
we were alone until near 2. we
conversed about my Dickenson &c &c
& we arranged things in one of
the Cabinets. she trusted me to
repair some fine delicate things
which her friend the Duchess had turned
for her some Years ago --
small flowers in Ivory --
Vases &c. I wrote a letter for
her & myself to Lord Stormonts



Daughter to desire her to
acquaint her Aunts we would
dine with them at Ken Wood on
Tuesday next a Mrs
came & sat near an hour -- I
went on with my Work & listened
to her & Mrs. Delanys sensible
conversation -- a ¼ before 3
My servant came. I left my
beloved Mrs. Delany -- went to St.
James's -- Palace called on Mrs. Tracy
& Miss Tryon they were out I
left my Name, as I knew Mrs.
Boughton was in waiting I also
called on her -- she was at her
apartment. she received me most
civilly -- I sat ½ an hour -- she
invited me to dine at St. James's
whilst she was there. B. the
Month the Bedchamber Woman
is in waiting they dine at the
Maid of Honour's table & have a
right to invite 1 Guest. &c



From St. James's came home.
read some Chapters &c. I could
not go to Chapel as it was after
3 o'Clock -- Anna Maria was gone to ye.
Glovers -- Miss Clarke & I dined
tête a tête -- we parted at ½ past
5 I began a letter to Miss Hannah More
at ½ past 6 walked to Mr. Glovers
had the great pleasure of finding
him quite well again -- Miss
Clarke came to us at 8. we spent
the Evening sociably -- at 10 took
leave of our good friends who
go to Sunning Hill tomorrow
had their Coach to bring us
home. we went to our Room
immediately -- My Uncle Frederick
Mrs. & Miss Hamilton had called in the Morning


Monday 16th. August 1784
At ½ past 8 went down to Breakfast
with Dearest Anna Maria sat with her
until ½ past 9 -- then dressed for the
day -- worked notable work -- had
Mrs. Scott who brought some things
home I had given her to do.
Mrs. Hawkins called but was not
let in.



about ½ past 11 walked to Mrs. Delany
a Mr. Fullwood was with her
looking over a Porte Fueille of
Prints -- this Gentleman invited
Mrs. Delany & I to come to his house
to see his Pictures &c. as it
was only the next door we went
he showed me (for Mrs. Delany had seen
them before & went entirely to
please me) his -- House. took me
up even to the bed Chambers --
his Pictures -- his China -- his little
Cabinets. he has a few good
Pictures & many Copies -- which however
he pleases himself with
thinking originals. nothing could
exceed the neatness of the whole
House & these were some
elegancies &c
After we had spent an hour
in pleasing Mr. Fullwood by
admiring his collection &c
Mrs: Delany & I took our leaves --
As we returned to Mrs. Delany's house



Mrs. Boscowan & her Daughter
(the Young Duchess of Beaufort)
came. they stayed near an hour.
Mrs: Boscawan took me aside &
said many very flattering things
to me -- after having made me
blush by her too great commendations
she touched my heart
very sensibly by the friendly
& maternal wishes she expressed
for my future happiness.
She desired I would contrive to
spend a day with her at her Villa.
After the Duchess & her Mother was
gone. I wrote a letter for Mrs-
Delany to the Miss Murray's to
put off our going to Ken Wood
tomorrow as she was apprehensive
of the great heat of the Weather.
I left her ¼ before three, came
home. received another letter from
Windsor -- it was from the
Princess's English Teacher
Miss Planta -- it contained wishes
for my happiness &c &c



Received a very kind letter from
Miss Eliza Murray to inform
me how delighted her Aunts
were that I had accepted their
invitation -- that they had
long wished to be more acquaint
ed with me &c. I really think
I have some merit in not being
the vainest creature in the
World -- for people are so good
to me. I hope I shall continue
to derive benefit & not acquire
vanity -- by a steady perseverance
in endeavouring to merit
the good opinion of those by
whom it is an honour to be
distinguished & liked. Colonel Cathcart called when I was out.
I employed myself until dinner
time in mending some China,
the Cover of Cup given me by my
dear deceased friend Lady Webb I
would. not trust it out of my hands for
any other to do it & had the pleasure
of succeeding. dined with Miss
Clarkes. after dinner Anna Maria played



whilst I was busy in finishing my
Repairs. at 6 o'Clock Lady Stormonts
Coach came for me -- found her & ye
lovely infant quite well. we
chatted on various subjects -- she
told me that Lord Mansfield had
objected to the Childs having two Christian
Names & that she was afraid she
must give up the one of Hamilton.
Lady Stormont informed me that she
had received an Answer to a letter
which she had sent to her Sister
Mrs. Graham -- that a Page & ½
was filled with kind messages
to me & most affectionate wishes &c
Lord Stormont joined us at
8. he told me that he returned
from Tunbridge Yesterday that
Lord Mansfield was quite recovered
that he had seen Lord Dartrey &c.
Colonel Cathcart came in for ½ an
hour -- at 10 o'Clock I came
away had Lord Stormont Chariot
-- his Servant told me as I was
setting out that he had



heard my Uncle William &
Cousin Charles Greville were come
this Evening from Scotland --
I sat with Miss Clarke's till ¼ before
12:
Mrs. Delany made a very just observation
to day. She said that a
certain Woman of high rank
of our acquaintance dressed out
too much for a Woman of
Fashion & Quality -- I think
that as in breeding so in
dress, People of real fashion
are distinguished by ease &
one generally may
observe a much less
ostentation of ornamental
decoration. a certain chasteness
of dress is what I admire.

Tuesday 17th August. At 8 o'Clock
Dressed for the day. went down at 9 to Breakfast
with Dear Anna Maria she was still suffering
with the pain in her face -- but she is
endowed with so heavenly a disposition
that nothing alters her
temper. I wrote a



Note to my Uncle William to
inform him I was in Town &
wished to see him -- hear he was
gone out early to Breakfast & therefore
had no answer. at 10 o'Clock.
a Man brought me a leash of
which came by the
Chester Coach from my Dickenson.
I immediately sent a brace in
a present to my Uncle Frederick
& kept one for our Table.
Mr. Wirgman the Jeweller brought
home my picture which I had
given him to set -- I paid him.
I packed it up & entrusted
it to the care of William Benn
to take it in to the City to send
by the Coach this Evening at 12
My Uncle Frederick came
to thank me for the Moorgame
he said he guessed from whom
it came &c -- We talked
of the Stormonts I found
all the pains I had taken
had not gained all the ground



I wished. My Uncle was severe
in his censure on the Queen
for her conduct towards me




I gave him the fine Prints of
Cook Voyages to look over
& sent for Anna Maria I was
obliged to go at 1 o'Clock as
Lady Stormonts Coach came
for me (sent to Mrs. Delany
to excuse my not going to her
this Morning received a kind Note
from her &c -- ) Lady Stormont
& the Child quite well -- we were very
much engaged wth. Mrs. Justi & Nurse
Hill looking at the pretty things
the Child was to wear at the Christening
when Lady Payne came & interrupted
us -- Lord Stormont & Sr. Raph
Payne came to us for some time.
I made Lord Stormont give me two
franks for Lady Dartrey & settled with
him about our expedition to Ken
Wood next Sunday. Duke of Portland



came & Lord Stormont left us -- some more
Matches were talked of -- Miss Woodley
to be married tomorrow to Mr. Banks
Admiral Digby Very soon to a ½ Sister
of Lady Cathcarts &c &c &c. heard of
all the. fine things Miss Sophia Thynne is
to have for her Wedding Clothes --
I stayed with Lady Stormont until near 4
had her Coach went for her Hodgkinsons
to choose some Muslins came home to
dinner -- dined with Miss Clarkes -- Anna Maria not
much better -- she played two or 3 lessons
we parted at 6 -- met at 7 -- William Benn
came & told me he could not find out the
nearest stage to Taxal -- but went to try
in the City. I wrote 4 letters viz -- to Miss
Goldsworthy. Miss Moula Mrs. Cheveley &
Miss Planta. at 8 Sir. William Hamilton came
we had a tête a tête of 3 hours. he
seemed very well satisfied with all I told him
about my Dickenson. he gave me an account of
his journey through Wales, Scotland &c &c
of the state of his affairs -- we talked of
Pictures -- Naples &c &c. he said that
I & Mr. Dickenson must come to Naples & that
if we stayed a Year there it would answer
our expense of the Journey -- that he
should be happy to see us. he was most
Kind & Affectionate & I was made very
happy by his Visit. the moment he
left me I scribbled a hasty letter to inform
Mr. Dickenson the picture was sent. I had just
it to the bell man when William Benn came &
told me it was not gone -- that he could not
venture to trust the box as he was not certain
which Coach went the nearest to Taxal -- Miss Clarke's
were gone to bed. I sat up until 12 --
Mr. Stanhope came but was
not ------------ Uncle was with me
he left an imploring message to see me
before we went out of Town &c

(consult diplomatic text or XML for annotations, deletions, clarifications, persons,
quotations,
spellings, uncorrected forms, split words, abbreviations, formatting)



 1. The excessive warmth of Lawton's rooms in Northampton in August 1769 was considered noteworthy by John Dickenson's mother, Sarah (see HAM/1/3/1/1), just as in Chelsea in August 1784.
 2. Hamilton seems to have ended the entry here with a solid line, but then changed her mind and continued writing.
 3. This page is blank.
 4. This page is blank.
 5. Here Hamilton draws an annotated diagram of the Balloon. The text that follows has been transcribed from the diagram in its most logical reading order.
 6. This text appears arranged around and within the diagram of the balloon, in relation to the features it describes. See the image for the original text location.
 7. These three lines are written vertically along the right margin.
 8. In addition to the correction to the first syllable, Hamilton adds two unexplained strokes to give something like shrub/err/y.
 9. Hamilton seems to have left a gap here in order to fill in the name later.
 10. Either the red or the black grouse (OED s.v. moor n.1, Compounds C2, c. Accessed 20-09-2022).
 11. Hamilton draws three dotted lines here, suggesting a gap or something left unsaid (probably regarding Uncle Frederick's view of the Queen's conduct above).
 12. The three lines concerning Sir William's positive reaction are quoted in Anson & Anson (1925: 243).
 13. These last four lines are written vertically along the right margin.

Metadata

Library References

Repository: John Rylands Research Institute and Library, University of Manchester

Archive: Mary Hamilton Papers

Item title: Diary of Mary Hamilton (3 August 1784 - 17 August 1784)

Shelfmark: HAM/2/13

Document Details

Author: Mary Hamilton

Date: from 3 August to 17 August 1784

Summary: The diary covers the period from 3 to 17 August 1784 and includes details of Mary Hamilton’s first view of a hot-air balloon. She also records the poetry and literature that she has read, the Bas Bleu evenings she attends at Elizabeth Vesey’s, visits to and from her many prominent friends, and her numerous other engagements.
    Hamilton describes visiting Mary Delany at Bulstrode. While there she helped Delany to arrange and clean ‘some curious old china in a cabinet’, a task that Delany would not trust anyone else to do for her. She arranged Delany’s cabinet of fossils and minerals and was given some specimens from it. Hamilton spent time looking at prints with Delany, including one of the air balloon that was to be let off the following week. Hamilton details some of the conversations she had with Delany including one about a woman of ‘high rank’ whom Delany thought ‘dress[e]d out too much for a woman of fashion & quality’. It was Hamilton’s belief ‘that as in breeding so in dress, People of real fashion are distinguish[e]d by ease & [word crossed out] observe less ostentation’ in dress.
    Hamilton also writes about her family including Lady Stormont and Charles Greville, who has agreed to sit for his portrait for George Romney. Hamilton discusses the best way he should position himself for his portrait and comments that he will make a ‘charming interesting picture’. Hamilton writes approvingly of Lady Stormont’s sensible views on the importance of economy: although married to a man of great fortune she nevertheless views ‘economy in every situation’ as a necessity. It is likely that her fortune will increase in future as it is expected that Lord Mansfield will leave his wealth to Lord Stormont. Hamilton lists the household establishment of Lady Stormont and the number of servants she has. She also writes about Lady Stormont’s daughter-in-law, a Miss Murray, who is about 26 years old (a year older than Lady Stormont) who is staying with Lady Stormont while she is confined. Miss Murray was the only child of Lord Stormont’s first wife who died whilst Miss Murray was very young. Hamilton describes her as a woman of fashion and good education who lives with Lord Mansfield and two of Lord Stormont’s sisters.
    Hamilton records that a man brought the portrait of Richard Glover that she had commissioned from the artist John Opie. She comments that ‘it is not a pleasing likeness, but I ought not to find fault as he [Glover] would not have sat for any body but me & he was ill when the picture was taken’ (see HAM/2/10). Hamilton also records her meetings with the Prince Regent and of her many evenings spent with Bas Blue friends. At one such evening Mrs Vesey told Hamilton many anecdotes about Ireland; Hamilton comments that ‘few people relate more equally than Mrs Vesey – her magnetism is so luxuriant that she always embellishes – not that she is guilty of telling falsehoods – but the sweetness of her own nature always makes her see things & people in the most favourable point of view’. Hamilton describes having a ‘long argument’ with Mrs Vesey on the subject of the education of women; Mr Vesey and Mrs Handcock were on her side, while Miss Clarke ‘as usual was dumb & what was more mortifying she did not seem even to listen to our debate’. They later had an ‘agreeable lively conversation’ on air balloons, superstition, marriages, and how people love to judge the conduct of others, and they ended their conversation on the subject of madness and Bedlam. Hamilton comments that if she had time it would be amusing to write down the dialogue of this conversation.
    Hamilton also records that Elizabeth Vesey talked of an obelisk in Mr Vesey’s grounds in Ireland, under which she would like to be buried when she died. Vesey noted that she mentioned this once to her husband and he immediately wrote down some lines, which he gave to her saying that he ‘would comply with her request and that this should be their epitaph’. Hamilton continues on Mrs Vesey and on her first marriage to a ‘disagreeable old man in his 70th year’ [William Handcock], and that her father [Sir Thomas Vesey, Bishop of Ossory] had ‘sacrific[ed]’ her to this man because he was his friend. Hamilton also writes of a visit with Elizabeth to Sir Joshua Reynolds and his niece, Miss Palmer. They had not seen Miss Palmer since the death of her sister and Hamilton records that Miss Palmer burst into tears when they entered. They stayed with her for a hour and treated themselves to a tour in Reynold’s picture gallery.
    Hamilton discusses her engagement to John Dickenson and her friends’ support for her marriage. She notes that she ‘possess[es] the heart of an amiable man whom I love, & whom I have ever prefer’d to every other’. She notes that her uncle, Sir William Hamilton, has written inviting her and John Dickenson to visit him in Naples and to stay there for a year after their marriage. Hamilton also writes about a meeting she had with one of her other uncles, Frederick Hamilton, and her discussions with him on the subject of her marriage and of business relating to her finances and of the estate which her uncle had inherited from Hamilton’s father in Scotland.
    The diary is also full of gossip of the possible marriages and engagements in society, including Mr North the son of Lord North, who is said to marry soon, a fact that Hamilton takes no pleasure in as the woman in question ‘has not sixpence & he is ruined and it is not likely his grandfather Lord Guildford(?) will part with any money whilst he lives’. She continues that Lord Causton had proposed marriage to Lady Maria Waldergrave but his ‘father Lord Grafton will not give his consent which is thought cruel and unacceptable’.
    Hamilton writes with news of her friends and acquaintances. For instance, she details the refurbishments at that have been carried out at Chatsworth House [home of the Duke and Duchess of Devonshire]; it was reported that £1500 was spent on refurbishing the drawing room and all that was purchased were new chairs and sofas and there was also a small alteration to the chimney-piece. The man employed for the work was named Gobert and it was said that he was also involved in the ‘fitting up’ of Carleton House and that he was once a cook ‘and is now employed by fine people to decorate their houses instead of their tables’. Hamilton had begun a collection of china and she notes that on returning home on the 6 August 1784, her friend, Mrs Handcock, knowing her interest had sent her a valuable gift of tea cups and saucers made from egg-shell china. Hamilton also describes sitting for her portrait by the painter Sanderson and feeling uncomfortable in doing so; she ‘talked to him as much as I could to prevent his giving me the continence of a fool for I felt annoyingly silly’. Hamilton was pleased with the finished portrait but the two Miss Clarkes found fault with it. Some of her friends thought that the mouth was painted too large whilst others ‘thought it was the only resemblance’.
    Politics were frequently discussed at the social events Hamilton attended and she comments on the significant Parliamentary bills and events of the day. She records the various charitable endeavours to which she and her friends contributed. She also writes of a man whom she deemed unworthy of her charity: ‘[t]hat good for nothing Mr Coupland came again this Even[ing]. He sent another letter a few days ago. He is so wicked, that it would be wrong to give him any thing as he w[oul]d make an improper use of any money one could give him & he w[oul]d accept of no other relief’. She writes of meeting a poor, heavily pregnant woman who had hardly any clothes to cover her. This woman was an ‘object of real compassion and her story was an artless one’.
    The subject of hot-air balloons features prominently in the diary. Whilst at her friend’s Lady Dartrey (whom Hamilton describes as a ‘pattern [...] for the whole sex’) they see a small air balloon floating in the sky at such a great height that is seemed only to be a small black speck. Her friend Miss Clarke spent five hours in a coach just to see the air balloon at Chelsea and all she managed to see was the top of it. Hamilton records that ‘the Mob were so enraged that the Chevalier Moret w[oul]d not let it ascend on acc[oun]t of the Rain that they set fire to it & destroy’d what cost some hundred of Pounds – besides the labour & anxiety of the poor man’ that made it. She notes that Lady Herries had been to Chelsea the previous day to see the Chinese air balloon and did not believe that it would succeed in ascending as it was an old one that had previously failed in France. The owner ‘had got Subscriptions they say to the amount of £2000. It was a Miracle he escaped the fury of the Mob’.
    On Friday 13 August Hamilton set off herself to see ‘one of these curious vehicles’. The balloon was being shown by Lunardi at the Lyceum and was to be the first ever hot-air balloon to take off in London. Hamilton describes the construction of the balloon in great detail and also includes a drawing of the balloon in the diary. Hamilton notes that Lunardi and an Englishman were to ascend in it and that the King and Queen were to watch. Tickets to view the balloon at the Lyceum on the day of its launch were priced up to one guinea. Hamilton continues on the subject of the balloon and on the excitement it caused in great detail.
   

Length: 1 volume, 70 images, 33 folios (33 + i) , 11522 words

Transliteration Information

Editorial declaration: First edited in the project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers' (Hannah Barker, Sophie Coulombeau, David Denison, Tino Oudesluijs, Cassandra Ulph, Christine Wallis & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2019-2023).

All quotation marks are retained in the text and are represented by appropriate Unicode characters. Words split across two lines may have a hyphen on the first, the second or both fragments (reco-|ver, imperfect|-ly, satisfacti-|-on); or a double hyphen (pur=|port, dan|=ger, qua=|=litys); or none (respect|ing). Any point in abbreviations with superscripted letter(s) is placed last, regardless of relative left-right orientation in the original. Thus, Mrs. or Mrs may occur, but M.rs or Mr.s do not.

Acknowledgements: Transcription and XML version created as part of project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers', funded by the Arts & Humanities Research Council under grant AH/S007121/1.

Research assistant: Katie Crowther, Doctoral Candidate, University of York

Transliterator: Katie Crowther (submitted 6 April 2020)

Cataloguer: Lisa Crawley, Archivist, The John Rylands Library

Cataloguer: John Hodgson, Head of Special Collections, John Rylands Research Institute and Library

Copyright: Transcriptions, notes and TEI/XML © the editors

Revision date: 5 January 2022

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