Single Letter

HAM/1/10/2/18

Letter from Frances Jackson to Mary Hamilton and Louisa Dickenson (later Anson)

Diplomatic Text



19

Uppm- Decr. 6th- 1805

My dear Mrs. Dickenson
                            
      I found your last letter on My
return from Newark where I had been
three weeks at Mrs. Godfrey's -- I shou'd have
Staid there much longer but was against
my inclination Obliged to return to Upping Ham
to Sign Some Deeds relative to the Estate wch. I fancy
is by this time paid for & the money placed in the
funds -- I cannot sufficiently thank you for the
trouble you are so kind as to take in offering to
find a Situation for us at Northampton -- Till Mr-
J
's return from London I cannot exactly say what our
annual income will be but I think I may venture
to say that we can afford to give £50 a year
each for board and lodging -- & certainly expect two
rooms entirely to our-Selves, I cou'd wish three but
two we cannot do without -- I think I shou'd wish
to go in about Feby- & soon after that I hope & trust
Mary will join me then, -- I have not been returned
from Newak quite a fortnight -- and Since then I
have been staying till till this eveg at the Revd. Mr.
Jones's
's at Grantham -- & As I have several other visits



to make before I leave this part of the Country I
think I can employ my time till feby- perhaps the
latter end -- I wish it may be possible to make a
bargain with whom we may board with to deduct
something whenever we are absent longer than a
certain time, as I know I shall be a good deal ab-
out
with Mrs. Tren in London -- & Mary will I dare
say be not leʃs frequently from home [1] -- and if the de-
duction
is only sufficient to defray our travelling
expences (tho I shou'd hope it will be considerably more)
it wou'd be worth speaking for -- You must know
so well the kind of family that wou'd Suit us that
I need not say a word on the Subject --
      While I was at Newark I met with
great encouragement to Settle there -- wch. I shod-
certainly have attempted (I mean to get a Situation)
had I not been agreably Surprised at My return
to Uppm- to find that You remembered Your kind
Promise of introducing us to some of Your friends
at Northampton -- & also endeavoring to find a
Situation for us -- I then gave up all thoughts
of Newark -- for As I had a decided preference
for Northampton, I shou'd have fixed at the for-
mer
place merely from Neceʃsity -- As I mean to
fill up the remainder of this Sheet of paper to
Louisa -- I will Conclude with many thanks ------
                             Yr- Obliged & affte.
                                                         Frances Jackson




My dear Louisa
      I have really nothing to say that
can at all entertain you but as your favor came
at last I cannot resist acknoledging it -- I have been
so much from home that I have not had an opportunity
of copying any patterns for you Yet, but you May de-
pend
upon it I will buy some send you a folio Sheet
with as many as you can desire You don't say par-
ticularly
what you want them for but I will send a
variety for a variety of uses -- As I was not quite so
much taken with Dr- Ingles as he pretended to be with
me you will I hope excuse My sending him any parti-
cular
kind Meʃsage -- and only hope you did not by my
absense from Leighton, experience a double portion of his
polite attentions -- Pray tell me when you write as I th[in]k
you said he was coming, whether he made any enq[uiry]
after the lady of the order of the Poppy -- or whether ------
was entirely forgotten -- . While I was at Newark I went to
one Public aʃsembly and one private ball -- at both I met
the beautiful but far more apparently far more pleasing
Mrs. Campbell -- Mr. Jon Hunter's Daughter. I mention this be-
cause
I think yr- Mama knows her -- I think I never Saw
a woman more admired than she was -- & I thought her
an uncommon pretty dame -- She came with a Mrs. Roger
Pocklington
-- her husbands Sister -- the private ball
was very pleasant, the aʃsembly I did not very much like
but I think lately I have been in great luck for dancing
as I was at an aʃsembly here only two evegs- before I went
to Newark & I believe we are to have another on friday in
honor of the victory -- a victory at wch. I think we shoud rather



lament than rejoice -- but I shall probably go if any family
is going that I can accompany -- during the theime I was
at Newark I had another invitation to a ball at Blather-
wick
hall -- a Mr. O'brien's -- wch. I of course cou'd not attend
I stopped at Oakham as I came thro' today to see my little New
Cousin George Ashby Barnard -- he is a very fine boy -- Mary Anne
is very well and is a very pretty and interesting little I wish
you cou'd see her -- the youngest child, grown plain -- Mr. W



is in town -- Mrs. Torkey still here but is likely to go as soon
as Mr. W returns, when his agreable Sister for a short time only
I am happy to say takes her place -- he intends while she is here
to look out for some clergimans widow or well educated woman to
Superintend his children and family -- the best plan I think he
can pursue as the children are too young to go to School --

[2]Perhaps you can tell me       whether there is any good
Scool at Northampton as Mr-       W seems very anxious if
we fix there to place his       children when they are
old enought there -- believe me dr. Louisa Ys affly
F Jackson
I was at Newark three or four days with Mr. & Mrs. Kinderley who
passed a week at Mr. Goldfreys in their way to London. Mr. K had been
confined near three weeks at Wooburn by a dangerous illness in wch. he was attended by Dr. Kerr -- [3]
best love to Mr. D. & Mrs. M. My hand is quite cramped
with writing so small a hand I hope my Dr- Louisa you
will be able to read, it -- Pray let me hear from you soon & let me
                             know what success Mrs. D: has had in her application to Northampton
                             love to the Grants[4]

[5]
Mrs. Dickenson
[6]       Leighton House
      Bedfordshire

(hover over blue text or annotations for clarification;
red text is normalised and/or unformatted in other panel)


Notes


 1. At this point in the text the author appears to change pens and the writing becomes noticeably clearer.
 2. This final paragraph is written vertically in the right-hand margin of the page.
 3. Moved this section of the postscript from the top right of p.2, just above Frances Jackson's letter to Louisa Dickenson, written upside down.
 4. Moved this postscript from the top of p.1 around the salutation, written upside down.
 5. Remains of a stamp, in red ink.
 6. Remains of a stamp, in black ink, reading 'PPINGH', i.e. UPPINGHAM.

Normalised Text




Uppingham December 6th- 1805

My dear Mrs. Dickenson
                            
      I found your last letter on My
return from Newark where I had been
three weeks at Mrs. Godfrey's -- I should have
stayed there much longer but was against
my inclination Obliged to return to Upping Ham
to Sign Some Deeds relative to the Estate which I fancy
is by this time paid for & the money placed in the
funds -- I cannot sufficiently thank you for the
trouble you are so kind as to take in offering to
find a Situation for us at Northampton -- Till Mr-
Jackson's return from London I cannot exactly say what our
annual income will be but I think I may venture
to say that we can afford to give £50 a year
each for board and lodging -- & certainly expect two
rooms entirely to our-Selves, I could wish three but
two we cannot do without -- I think I should wish
to go in about February & soon after that I hope & trust
Mary will join me then, -- I have not been returned
from Newak quite a fortnight -- and Since then I
have been staying till this evening at the Reverend Mr.
Jones's's at Grantham -- & As I have several other visits



to make before I leave this part of the Country I
think I can employ my time till february perhaps the
latter end -- I wish it may be possible to make a
bargain with whom we may board with to deduct
something whenever we are absent longer than a
certain time, as I know I shall be a good deal
with Mrs. Tren in London -- & Mary will I dare
say be not less frequently from home -- and if the deduction
is only sufficient to defray our travelling
expenses (though I should hope it will be considerably more)
it would be worth speaking for -- You must know
so well the kind of family that would Suit us that
I need not say a word on the Subject --
      While I was at Newark I met with
great encouragement to Settle there -- which I should
certainly have attempted (I mean to get a Situation)
had I not been agreeably Surprised at My return
to Uppingham to find that You remembered Your kind
Promise of introducing us to some of Your friends
at Northampton -- & also endeavouring to find a
Situation for us -- I then gave up all thoughts
of Newark -- for As I had a decided preference
for Northampton, I should have fixed at the former
place merely from Necessity -- As I mean to
fill up the remainder of this Sheet of paper to
Louisa -- I will Conclude with many thanks ------
                             Your Obliged & affectionate
                                                         Frances Jackson




My dear Louisa
      I have really nothing to say that
can at all entertain you but as your favour came
at last I cannot resist acknowledging it -- I have been
so much from home that I have not had an opportunity
of copying any patterns for you Yet, but you May depend
upon it I will buy some send you a folio Sheet
with as many as you can desire You don't say particularly
what you want them for but I will send a
variety for a variety of uses -- As I was not quite so
much taken with Dear Ingles as he pretended to be with
me you will I hope excuse My sending him any particular
kind Message -- and only hope you did not by my
absense from Leighton, experience a double portion of his
polite attentions -- Pray tell me when you write as I think
you said he was coming, whether he made any enquiry
after the lady of the order of the Poppy -- or whether ------
was entirely forgotten -- . While I was at Newark I went to
one Public assembly and one private ball -- at both I met
the beautiful but apparently far more pleasing
Mrs. Campbell -- Mr. Jon Hunter's Daughter. I mention this because
I think your Mama knows her -- I think I never Saw
a woman more admired than she was -- & I thought her
an uncommon pretty dame -- She came with a Mrs. Roger
Pocklington -- her husbands Sister -- the private ball
was very pleasant, the assembly I did not very much like
but I think lately I have been in great luck for dancing
as I was at an assembly here only two evenings before I went
to Newark & I believe we are to have another on friday in
honour of the victory -- a victory at which I think we should rather



lament than rejoice -- but I shall probably go if any family
is going that I can accompany -- during the time I was
at Newark I had another invitation to a ball at Blatherwick
hall -- a Mr. O'brien's -- which I of course could not attend
I stopped at Oakham as I came through today to see my little New
Cousin George Ashby Barnard -- he is a very fine boy -- Mary Anne
is very well and is a very pretty and interesting little I wish
you could see her -- the youngest child, grown plain -- Mr. Warren



is in town -- Mrs. Torkey still here but is likely to go as soon
as Mr. Warren returns, when his agreable Sister for a short time only
I am happy to say takes her place -- he intends while she is here
to look out for some clergyman's widow or well educated woman to
Superintend his children and family -- the best plan I think he
can pursue as the children are too young to go to School --

Perhaps you can tell me       whether there is any good
School at Northampton as Mr-       Warren seems very anxious if
we fix there to place his       children when they are
old enough there -- believe me dear Louisa Yours affectionately
Frances Jackson
I was at Newark three or four days with Mr. & Mrs. Kinderley who
passed a week at Mr. Goldfreys in their way to London. Mr. Kinderley had been
confined near three weeks at Wooburn by a dangerous illness in which he was attended by Dr. Kerr --
best love to Mr. Dickenson & Mrs. M. My hand is quite cramped
with writing so small a hand I hope my Dear Louisa you
will be able to read, it -- Pray let me hear from you soon & let me
                             know what success Mrs. Dickenson has had in her application to Northampton
                             love to the Grants


Mrs. Dickenson
      Leighton House
      Bedfordshire

(consult diplomatic text or XML for annotations, deletions, clarifications, persons,
quotations,
spellings, uncorrected forms, split words, abbreviations, formatting)



 1. At this point in the text the author appears to change pens and the writing becomes noticeably clearer.
 2. This final paragraph is written vertically in the right-hand margin of the page.
 3. Moved this section of the postscript from the top right of p.2, just above Frances Jackson's letter to Louisa Dickenson, written upside down.
 4. Moved this postscript from the top of p.1 around the salutation, written upside down.
 5. Remains of a stamp, in red ink.
 6. Remains of a stamp, in black ink, reading 'PPINGH', i.e. UPPINGHAM.

Metadata

Library References

Repository: John Rylands Research Institute and Library, University of Manchester

Archive: Mary Hamilton Papers

Item title: Letter from Frances Jackson to Mary Hamilton and Louisa Dickenson (later Anson)

Shelfmark: HAM/1/10/2/18

Correspondence Details

Sender: Frances Jackson

Place sent: Uppingham

Addressee: Mary Hamilton and Louisa Frances Mary (later Anson) Dickenson

Place received: Leighton Buzzard

Date sent: 6 December 1805

Letter Description

Summary: Letter from Fanny Jackson to Mary Hamilton, with a continuation addressed to Louisa Dickenson. She thanks Hamilton for offering to find a place for 'us' in Northampton. 'Till Mr J's return from London I cannot exactly say what our annual income will be but I think I may venture to say that we can afford to give £50 a year each for board and lodging'. The letter continues with details of what accommodation they would need and with general news.
    Dated at Uppingham.
    Original reference No. 19.
   

Length: 1 sheet, 1081 words

Transliteration Information

Editorial declaration: First edited in the project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers' (Hannah Barker, Sophie Coulombeau, David Denison, Tino Oudesluijs, Cassandra Ulph, Christine Wallis & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2019-2023).

All quotation marks are retained in the text and are represented by appropriate Unicode characters. Words split across two lines may have a hyphen on the first, the second or both fragments (reco-|ver, imperfect|-ly, satisfacti-|-on); or a double hyphen (pur=|port, dan|=ger, qua=|=litys); or none (respect|ing). Any point in abbreviations with superscripted letter(s) is placed last, regardless of relative left-right orientation in the original. Thus, Mrs. or Mrs may occur, but M.rs or Mr.s do not.

Acknowledgements: Transcription and XML version created as part of project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers', funded by the Arts & Humanities Research Council under grant AH/S007121/1.

Transliterator: Tino Oudesluijs, editorial team (completed 9 October 2020)

Cataloguer: Lisa Crawley, Archivist, The John Rylands Library

Cataloguer: John Hodgson, Head of Special Collections, John Rylands Research Institute and Library

Copyright: Transcriptions, notes and TEI/XML © the editors

Revision date: 2 November 2021

Document Image (pdf)