Single Letter

GEO/ADD/3/82/54

Letter from George, Prince of Wales, to Mary Hamilton

Diplomatic Text


54

Satry. Morng.
Octbr. 23d. 1779 --


My dearest, dearest, dearest Sister, Friend, Miranda

      I thank you very much for ye. Books you was
so good as to send me, I have not as yet been able to look into
ye. first you sent me, as I hadve still a little more to read in order
to finish another Book which my Brother was so good as to
lend me, & as my jaunts to W——r you know, are not famous
for leaving me much time upon my hands, I could not
read much while I was there, however I will now imme=
diately
set about reading ym.. & will read ym.. with great
attention, & mark ye. sparts according to yr. permiʃsion
that I like best.
      Oh my Friend since I wrote this Yesterday Evening
a Scene paʃsed upon my account, which gave me infinite pain



pains and drew tears from most of ye. Bystanders. Upon my
entering my Mother's Room last Night, who should I see there
to my great surprise but ye. poor Ducheʃs of A——r,[1] I
thought she looked very grave and particularly so when I made one bow to her but with an
Air of affection or rather of tenderneʃs yt. struck me very much.
She, as well as many other people have reckoned me ye very
image of her poor late Son to whom I was always singularly
attached, as I always looked upon him to be, a very honest, open
goodhearted young Man which he really was notwithstanding
all his wildneʃs. Well then soon after I had been in ye. Cham=
=ber
, & after some mutual expreʃsions of tenderneʃs had paʃsed
between my Mother & me, which recalled to her memory her
Son
's tenderneʃs towards her, which was always very remarka=
=ble
, ye. Poor Woman rose out of her place in an agony
of grief, & retired into another Apartment. There my
a-miable Mother soon followed her to sympathise with her in her
grief, every body immediately gueʃsed ye. occasion of
ye sudden emotion of ye. poor D——s when my Mother
returned & declared yt. to be ye. reason which I have men=



=tioned
above. I saw ye. tears trickle down my Mother's Cheeks
for I sawperceived she cd.. not help putting herself in ye. same si=
=tuation
to which her affection for me, (which I thank ye
Almighty, I may say is very great) prompted her.
My heart felt very much for ye. poor Woman, so that
it was painful to me to refrain from tears for some
time. I know what my Miranda wld.. have suffered had
she been present, not only from ye knowledge I have of her excellent
heart, but from what she felt upon a similar occasion. But
enough of this melancholy subject for ye. present I am
afraid of interesting yr. tender feelings My Miranda too
much for yr. Spirits, for I am always very much afraid,
& indeed avoid as much as is in my power mentioning
any such dismal subject, for fear it shd.. be detremen=
=tal
to yr. health, because I know how much you love
to brood over such melancholy topics.
      I am sorry my dearest friend & Sister yt. I am
not to have ye. happineʃs of yr. Company at W——r, you
know from what I have often told you yt. it is not



flattery when I tell you it is so to me, however tho' I haveʃhall ye
first Afternoon I am there seat myʃelf upon yr. Chair &
think how many happy moments I have paʃsed with my
Miranda in yt. spot & how many more I have yet to come
tho' I have you not in person with me, yet I have you always with me for yr. dear image
is so thoroughly imprinted in my heart yt. nothing
but Death itself can eface it. I am my dearest
dearest, dearest Miranda, my Sister, friend
      Yr. sincerely affectionate Brother
                             Palemon. toujours de même.
P.S. Pray excuse ye abrupt conclusion of this Letter
for I am hurried away by A——d. Pray let me have
a long Letter from you upon my return from W——
as you shall have from me. We have had good accounts
from my dear B—— W—— -- A. A. A.
                                                         toujours chére.

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Notes


 1. Mary Bertie, Duchess of Ancaster and Kesteven, Mistress of the Robes to the Queen. Her son, the 4th Duke, died on 8 July 1779 (Wikipedia), a year after her husband.

Normalised Text





My dearest, dearest, dearest Sister, Friend, Miranda

      I thank you very much for the Books you was
so good as to send me, I have not as yet been able to look into
the first you sent me, as I have still a little more to read in order
to finish another Book which my Brother was so good as to
lend me, & as my jaunts to Windsor you know, are not famous
for leaving me much time upon my hands, I could not
read much while I was there, however I will now immediately
set about reading them & will read them with great
attention, & mark the parts according to your permission
that I like best.
      Oh my Friend since I wrote this Yesterday Evening
a Scene passed upon my account, which gave me infinite



pain and drew tears from most of the Bystanders. Upon my
entering my Mother's Room last Night, who should I see there
to my great surprise but the poor Duchess of Ancaster, I
thought she looked very grave and particularly so when I made one bow to her but with an
Air of affection or rather of tenderness that struck me very much.
She, as well as many other people have reckoned me the very
image of her poor late Son to whom I was always singularly
attached, as I always looked upon him to be, a very honest, open
goodhearted young Man which he really was notwithstanding
all his wildness. Well then soon after I had been in the Chamber
, & after some mutual expressions of tenderness had passed
between my Mother & me, which recalled to her memory her
Son's tenderness towards her, which was always very remarkable
, the Poor Woman rose out of her place in an agony
of grief, & retired into another Apartment. There my
amiable Mother soon followed her to sympathise with her in her
grief, every body immediately guessed the occasion of
the sudden emotion of the poor Duchess when my Mother
returned & declared that to be the reason which I have mentioned



above. I saw the tears trickle down my Mother's Cheeks
for I perceived she could not help putting herself in the same situation
to which her affection for me, (which I thank the
Almighty, I may say is very great) prompted her.
My heart felt very much for the poor Woman, so that
it was painful to me to refrain from tears for some
time. I know what my Miranda would have suffered had
she been present, not only from the knowledge I have of her excellent
heart, but from what she felt upon a similar occasion. But
enough of this melancholy subject for the present I am
afraid of interesting your tender feelings My Miranda too
much for your Spirits, for I am always very much afraid,
& indeed avoid as much as is in my power mentioning
any such dismal subject, for fear it should be detrimental
to your health, because I know how much you love
to brood over such melancholy topics.
      I am sorry my dearest friend & Sister that I am
not to have the happiness of your Company at Windsor, you
know from what I have often told you that it is not



flattery when I tell you it is so to me, however I shall the
first Afternoon I am there sit myself upon your Chair &
think how many happy moments I have passed with my
Miranda in that spot & how many more I have yet to come
though I have you not in person with me, yet I have you always with me for your dear image
is so thoroughly imprinted in my heart that nothing
but Death itself can efface it. I am my dearest
dearest, dearest Miranda, my Sister, friend
      Your sincerely affectionate Brother
                             Palemon. toujours de même.
P.S. Pray excuse the abrupt conclusion of this Letter
for I am hurried away by Arnald. Pray let me have
a long Letter from you upon my return from Windsor
as you shall have from me. We have had good accounts
from my dear Brother William -- Adieu Adieu Adieu
                                                         toujours chére.

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 1. Mary Bertie, Duchess of Ancaster and Kesteven, Mistress of the Robes to the Queen. Her son, the 4th Duke, died on 8 July 1779 (Wikipedia), a year after her husband.

Metadata

Library References

Repository: Windsor Castle, The Royal Archives

Archive: GEO/ADD/3 Additional papers of George IV, as Prince, Regent, and King

Item title: Letter from George, Prince of Wales, to Mary Hamilton

Shelfmark: GEO/ADD/3/82/54

Correspondence Details

Sender: George, Prince of Wales (later George IV)

Place sent: unknown

Addressee: Mary Hamilton

Place received: unknown

Date sent: 23 October 1779
notBefore 23 October 1779 (precision: medium)
notAfter 23 October 1779 (precision: high)

Letter Description

Summary: Letter from George, Prince of Wales, to Mary Hamilton, on books; and the grief of Duchess A [?Mary Bertie, Duchess of Ancaster and Kesteven] following the death of her son [?Robert Bertie, 4th Duke of Ancaster and Kesteven].
    The Prince discusses Queen Charlotte's affection for him.
    Written Saturday morning.
    Signed 'Palemon'.
   

Length: 1 sheet, 700 words

Transliteration Information

Editorial declaration: First edited in the project 'Image to Text' (David Denison & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2013-2019), now incorporated in the project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers' (Hannah Barker, Sophie Coulombeau, David Denison, Tino Oudesluijs, Cassandra Ulph, Christine Wallis & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2019-2022).

All quotation marks are retained in the text and are represented by appropriate Unicode characters. Words split across two lines may have a hyphen on the first, the second or both fragments (reco-|ver, imperfect|-ly, satisfacti-|-on); or a double hyphen (pur=|port, dan|=ger, qua=|=litys); or none (respect|ing). Any point in abbreviations with superscripted letter(s) is placed last, regardless of relative left-right orientation in the original. Thus, Mrs. or Mrs may occur, but M.rs or Mr.s do not.

Acknowledgements: XML version: Transcription and Research Assistant funding in 2018/19 provided by the Student Experience Internship programme of the University of Manchester.

Research assistant: Emma Donington Kiey, undergraduate student, University of Manchester

Transliterator: Emma Donington Kiey (submitted July 2019)

Copyright: Transcriptions, notes and TEI/XML © the editors

Revision date: 2 November 2021

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