Single Letter

GEO/ADD/3/83/17

Letter from Mary Hamilton to George, Prince of Wales

Diplomatic Text

[1]
17

17

17 Octbr
17[79]

My Friend
I can tell you nothing of Windsor
farther than the common reports
wch. agree wth. your intelligence. I
congratulate you on the prospect
of being more amused than you
have hitherto been -- I would
have you enjoy every satisfaction
neceʃsary to your happineʃs, for
I think you will seek for none
but those guided by a good heart
& your mind is too amiable to
desire derive any satisfaction
from what does not proceed
from its dictates -- I have
chosen a Color -- you desired me
to do so -- but I pretend not
to taste in Dreʃs -- I hope
the weather will prove favor-
able
for you on T—— I wish
you had proper Horses for
Hunting -- Adieu my Friend
      my Sentiments are still ye-
same wth- respect to you when
they vary I will honestly tell you
so Adieu -- I return you many



thanks for ye. Birds your
attention abt. my Birds
This was written by your
Brother William's gold pen
wch. he gave me in exchange
for my Seal of Sr. Isaac
Newton
s Head -- I always
carry it in my pocket

(hover over blue text or annotations for clarification;
red text is normalised and/or unformatted in other panel)


Notes


 1. On the order of letters from mid-October 1779, see GEO/ADD/3/83/16 p.1 n.1.

Normalised Text



17 October
1779

My Friend
I can tell you nothing of Windsor
farther than the common reports
which agree with your intelligence. I
congratulate you on the prospect
of being more amused than you
have hitherto been -- I would
have you enjoy every satisfaction
necessary to your happiness, for
I think you will seek for none
but those guided by a good heart
& your mind is too amiable to
derive any satisfaction
from what does not proceed
from its dictates -- I have
chosen a Colour -- you desired me
to do so -- but I pretend not
to taste in Dress -- I hope
the weather will prove favourable
for you on Tuesday I wish
you had proper Horses for
Hunting -- Adieu my Friend
      my Sentiments are still the
same with respect to you when
they vary I will honestly tell you
so Adieu -- I return you many



thanks for your
attention about my Birds
This was written by your
Brother William's gold pen
which he gave me in exchange
for my Seal of Sir Isaac
Newtons Head -- I always
carry it in my pocket

(consult diplomatic text or XML for annotations, deletions, clarifications, persons,
quotations,
spellings, uncorrected forms, split words, abbreviations, formatting)



 1. On the order of letters from mid-October 1779, see GEO/ADD/3/83/16 p.1 n.1.

Metadata

Library References

Repository: Windsor Castle, The Royal Archives

Archive: GEO/ADD/3 Additional papers of George IV, as Prince, Regent, and King

Item title: Letter from Mary Hamilton to George, Prince of Wales

Shelfmark: GEO/ADD/3/83/17

Correspondence Details

Sender: Mary Hamilton

Place sent: unknown

Addressee: George, Prince of Wales (later George IV)

Place received: unknown

Date sent: 17 October 1779

Letter Description

Summary: Letter from Mary Hamilton to George, Prince of Wales, on choosing a colour for him; reports regarding coming to Windsor; and on the Prince's happiness.
    Hamilton writes with Prince William's gold pen 'which he gave me in exchange for my seal of Sir Isaac Newton's Head'.
   

Length: 1 sheet, 183 words

Transliteration Information

Editorial declaration: First edited in the project 'Image to Text' (David Denison & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2013-2019), now incorporated in the project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers' (Hannah Barker, Sophie Coulombeau, David Denison, Tino Oudesluijs, Cassandra Ulph, Christine Wallis & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2019-2022).

All quotation marks are retained in the text and are represented by appropriate Unicode characters. Words split across two lines may have a hyphen on the first, the second or both fragments (reco-|ver, imperfect|-ly, satisfacti-|-on); or a double hyphen (pur=|port, dan|=ger, qua=|=litys); or none (respect|ing). Any point in abbreviations with superscripted letter(s) is placed last, regardless of relative left-right orientation in the original. Thus, Mrs. or Mrs may occur, but M.rs or Mr.s do not.

Acknowledgements: XML version: Transcription and Research Assistant funding in 2018/19 provided by the Student Experience Internship programme of the University of Manchester.

Research assistant: Emma Donington Kiey, undergraduate student, University of Manchester

Transliterator: Emma Donington Kiey (submitted August 2019)

Copyright: Transcriptions, notes and TEI/XML © the editors

Revision date: 10 December 2021

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